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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 11, 2020 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the eu says a no—deal brexit is now more likely than not — but australia's former prime minister has warned against the australian—style option of the uk not having a free trade deal with the eu. be careful what you wish for. i mean, australia... australia's relationship with the eu is not one, from a trade point of view that britain, i think, would want. dame barbara windsor — best known for her roles in eastenders and the carry on films — has died at the age of 83. the hong kong media tycoon and democracy campaignerjimmy lai has been charged under the territory's controversial new national security law.
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mass coronavirus testing is to be rolled out to secondary schools in parts of london, kent and essex in an attempt to curb rising infections. scotland and northern ireland ease coronavirus restrictions — with non—essential retail able to re—open for the first time in weeks. medical experts advising the us food and drug administration recommend emergency approval for the pfizer—biontech coronavirus vaccine, meaning it could be cleared for use within days. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world — and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. prime minister borisjohnson has urged the british public
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and business to get ready for trade talks with the european union to end in a no—deal. an eu official has said that the european commission chief, ursula von der leyen, has told member states that no deal is more likely than a deal. yesterday, long queues of lorries snaked into the port of dover — put down to the brexit stockpiling, pre—christmas build—up and transport of medical supplies for covid—19 care. freight traffic at ports is expected to worsen after the brexit transition period ends on the january 1st. well, let's go live to brussels to the european council, post—council meeting talks, so charles michel, president of the council, and alongside him ursula von der leyen, the european commission president, and german chancellor angela merkel. they have been talking about climate change. translation: together, in a
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calm and confident fashion, dated how we want to ensure the eu can get on track again. we are talking about difficult issues, sensitive issues. this requires a great deal of effort. i would like to think the heads of government and their teams for all the work they had done and all of our support from the european commission. they had set into our work and help the german presidency in their leadership role over the past six months, i had very much enjoyed working, practically on a daily basis, certainly weekly, with angela merkel, and centimetre by centimetre we have been able to take things forward in the decisions that need to be taken. translation: well, i would like to start off by thanking charles michel, with i have been working very, very intensively, very regularly, and ursula von der
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leyen. i think we have very regularly, and ursula von der leyen. ithink we have been very regularly, and ursula von der leyen. i think we have been a good team to overcome the challenges which were on the agenda during the german presidency. i would also like to think our teams, the secretariat general, the secretariat general of the commission as well. and i would also like to thank the ambassadors. this is perhaps not customary, but the ambassadors, our german ambassadors i think are the only oi'ies ambassadors i think are the only ones apart from the council presidents and commission members still physically in brussels, most of the other work having had to be john by teleconference. we saved up a lot of work for this last council and it is a great willie that thanks to thisjoint effort and it is a great willie that thanks to this joint effort we have managed to this joint effort we have managed to pass the budget on, pass it back to pass the budget on, pass it back to the parliament, including the
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recovery fund and the conditionality message as well —— and it is a great relief. it has been a huge task. the second wave of the virus, we are in the second data the moment and we needed to cooperate. there was a long history to theirs, there was a franco german proposal, there were many discussions. in july we had franco german proposal, there were many discussions. injuly we had one of the longest councils in the history of european councils. 46 years ago, by the way, the european council was invented by a great european, as charles michel pointed out yesterday. so we now have to work on the resources decisions and get them transposed in national parliaments so that the financing can be made operational as soon as
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possible. we will need money, we will need to invest in the future, so it was fitting that the second biggest issue today with our obligations in the climate area, because the green deal is a core project. we do notjust want to produce an economic programme but we need something that will take us safely into the future, and the commission has told us that we will soon have to present our national programmes and we should be able to give a commitment of 55% reduction by2030, give a commitment of 55% reduction by 2030, we have managed to come up with that commitment the day before the united nations meeting, i don't know what would have happened if we had been unable to reach such a result. now, we wanted as part of the german presidency to make
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relations with turkey more constructive, unfortunately a number of developments have taken place in the south—eastern mediterranean where unfortunately we had to say that we have to do more listings due to what we consider to be the illegal drilling going on. nonetheless, we are still reaching out to turkey, we want a constructive agenda with turkey but from the perspective of the german presidency that has been rather disappointing, we had intended to achieve more, i can be quite open about that. we have left a bit of unfinished business for our portuguese successor, i wish antonio all the best with that. i must say, i rather enjoyed the council presidency even though we were unable to do a lot of what we had intended... studio: just to recap what is being talked about at the
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post european council meeting in brussels were charles michel, angela merkel and ursula von der leyen, we just heard angela merkel talking about your‘s green deal, the agreement by the eu 27 to cut gas emissions by at least 55% by 2030. ursula von der leyen has been chatting about that in the lucky minutes, saying it is a landmark moment for the eu and our planet. and there has been a deal on the very important issue of the eu budget. we are also waiting to see if there is any mention of brexit, but very clearly the climate, the budget and the coronavirus pandemic has been right at the top of the agenda, so let's listen in again. translation: thanking. first double, dear angela, what a presidency you had. we are all rather exhausted
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after the night we had spent negotiating, but i think we are quite entitled to be pleased with the results. we have the budget, the eu next generation and the climate is quite an impressive triple macro, dated a good day for europe. i am very grateful to the german presidency and angela merkel for the effo rts presidency and angela merkel for the efforts undertaken, from the commission's proposal on the budget of the next generation of the eu to the agreement injuly in council and the agreement injuly in council and the finalisation of the next days. untranslated: this has highlighted the european capacity to act in the face of the worst crisis eu has appetite. it would not have been possible with the steady leadership of the chancellor, the rotating presidency, and we are very grateful for that. the agreement will help us
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to provide a strong economic response to the crisis while preserving the rule of law. citizens in the eu economy need our support more than ever, and they need it now. we need to finalise the adoption of the package with the help of the european parliament has, and member states need to ensure swift ratification. this is essential for us to power our economy as soon as possible. of course, the launch of next—generation eu is also a key component of climate ambition. now that we have secured the funding, we have the means for our actions, which is why i am delighted that together with the german presidency we we re together with the german presidency we were able today to reach an agreement on the proposal for a new eu climate targets, we will reduce emissions by at least 55% by 2030.
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and today's agreement puts us on a cleopatra board climate neutrality in 2050, it gives certainty to investors, businesses, public authorities and citizens. it future proofed our union. or eu company should benefit from the transition with economic growth, a cleaner environment and healthier citizens -- all eu environment and healthier citizens —— all eu companies. the european deal will be our growth strategy. on the coronavirus pandemic, right now the coronavirus pandemic, right now the european union is working. to renew the safety of vaccines that make them available. we aim to authorise the biontech pfizer vaccine by the end of the year, subject to ema's opinion. ema's opinion on the moderna vaccine should come in the new year, and the
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roll—out of the astrazeneca and oxford vaccines are ongoing. but it is vaccination, not vaccines, that says lights. i called on member states to finalise the preparations for the start of vaccination, we stand ready to support. we also care for our neighbourhood. the european union will coordinate the donation of vaccines by member states, in particular to protect the health ca re particular to protect the health care workers in the western balkans and in our neighbourhood. and finally we should start working now on avoiding future crises. i asked leaders for their support to advance rapidly on getting the european health union of the ground, and thank you very much, angela, for your words concerning that. finally i briefed the leaders on the negotiations with the united kingdom. positions remain a on
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fundamental issues. on the level playing field, we have repeatedly made clear to our uk partners that the principal of said competition is a precondition to privileged access to the eu market —— the principle of fair competition. it is the largest single market in the world and it is only fair competitors to our own enterprises face the same conditions on our own market. at this is not to say that we would require the uk to follow us every time we decide to raise our level of ambition, for example in the environmental field. they would remain free, sovereign, if you wish, to decide what they wa nt to if you wish, to decide what they want to do. we would simply adapt the conditions for access to our markets according to the decision of the united kingdom, and this would apply vice versa. on fisheries, we
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continue to have a cap, we have not yet found the solution is to bridge our differences. we understand the uk aspires to control its waters. the uk must on the other hand understand the legitimate expectations of eu fishing fleets built on decades and sometimes centuries of access. uneven points, our negotiators are working. we will decide on sunday whether we have the conditions for an agreement or not. in the meantime, the commission has proposed four targeted contingency measures today. they provide a short—term fix to ensure basic connectivity in air and road transport. sounds we are also proposing to the uk to ensure the typical access to each other‘s access point here —— and routes
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transport, for the next six months. one way or another, it will be new beginning for old friends. thank you. thank you, madam president, we will now take a couple of questions. may i kindly ask you to switch on your cameras. in the meantime, on the council website we have published all conclusions on every different topic. we will start with thomas? yes, thank you and good morning to you all. my questions are on turkey. the first question will be to president michel. you have addedin be to president michel. you have added in the conclusions a sentence saying you intend to cooperate on the response of the management of migration flows towards all member states. that sounds almost like an
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a cce pta nce states. that sounds almost like an acce pta nce of states. that sounds almost like an acceptance of hungary and poland to ta ke acceptance of hungary and poland to take in migrants, which they have refused so far. can you please clarify what this really means? translation: ante question to the chancellor. studio: so while the speakers take that question, let me just some of those final remarks from the president of the european commission, ursula von der leyen, on the negotiations with ceu to try to reach a trade deal. she said that positions remain apart on fundamental issues and she picked up on two of those issues, the level playing field and fisheries. the level playing field, fair competition, she said this is a precondition to free access to the eu market for the uk, she said we have repeatedly said that the uk.
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then interestingly she added that this is not to say we would expect the to follow every teacher change, they would remain free, then she pointedly used the word sovereign, if you like, was what she said, in some of that decision—making. and i am wondering is that a little bit of movement? we will get an analysis from our political correspondence but i wonder whether in that statement there is perhaps some sign of movement from the eu, because the uk has been very concerned about whether in the future it would remain bound by any future changes from the eu in the areas of competition. on fisheries, she said we understand the uk's desire to control access to its waters but the uk needs to understand the legitimate expectations, that was the phrase she used, of eu fishing
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fleets around access to those waters built, she said, on decades, sometimes centuries of access. so she finished that thought with the fa ct she finished that thought with the fact that sunday remains a deadline to decide whether the talks can progress all whether there will not bea progress all whether there will not be a trade deal between the eu and the uk. very, very interesting. we will get more analysis about what was said at that european council meeting and bring that to you very soon, i hope. moving to the uk, now. in the uk, secondary school pupils in parts of london, essex and kent will be offered mass testing in an effort to control the spread of coronavirus. it comes as secondary school students in wales prepare to take their classes online from the end of today, after a significant rise in infections there. anna o'neill has the story. out of an actual real gcse question... secondary school pupils in the classroom in wales, but not for long. from monday until the new year, they will be doing their
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learning at home, online. the public health situation there is deteriorating, putting the nhs under pressure. one of the largest teaching unions in wales welcomed the news to keep students at home for now. a few days ago, there was a report by the technical advisory group, which effectively, when you boiled it down, was telling parents that if they wanted a christmas that was without self—isolation, they should take their children out of school. we have found from our members telling us that large numbers of parents were beginning to do that. cases among young people in the south—east of england are also on the rise. at last night's news conference, the health minister said he was particularly concerned about london, where rates are up in 31 out of 32 boroughs. we know from experience that a sharp rise in cases in younger people can lead to a rise amongst more vulnerable age groups later. we have seen that happen before. so we need to do everything we can to stop the spread amongst school—aged children
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in london right now. in havering, there are 379 cases per 100,000 people. in waltham forest, it's 317. and 311 per 100,000 people in barking and dagenham. and so, last night, the government announced an immediate plan for testing all secondary school—aged children in the seven worst affected boroughs in london, as well as parts of essex that border it and parts of kent. the leader of barking and dagenham welcomed the news. we are looking forward to being able to use the additional resources we need to make sure we keep our young people as safe as possible. at the same time, we are also making sure that every teacher gets tested before they leave the term, which is good, and they will go home with a home test, which will allow them to test before they have to come back at the start of the new term. there are concerns that unless the rates in london start
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to fall, the capital is heading for a move from tier two into tier three next week, just before the christmas relaxation of restrictions — something london's leaders are keen to avoid. anna o'neill, bbc news. two serial rapists will have their sentences increased in survey minimum of 40 years in prison, the high court has ruled. joseph mccann was jailed last year at the old bailey for a series of sexual attacks, including 37 offences on 11 women and children. i think we can show you mccann on the left of your screen, on the right, 37—year—old reynhard sinaga who was jailed at the beginning of this year at manchester crown court for a total of 159 offences, including 136 because of rape committed against 48
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men. following their convictions they both received life sentences with minimum terms of 30 years but the attorney general‘s of the subsequently referred them to the court of appeal as unduly lenient and they should have received whole life orders, so today the high court has ruled that these two serial rapists will have their sentences increased and served a minimum of 40 yea rs increased and served a minimum of 40 years in prison. a new study says this year has seen the biggest annual drop in co2 emissions since the second world war, largely because of the restrictions imposed due to the coronavirus pandemic. the research from the global carbon project indicates that globally, emissions have fallen by around 7% this year, with the biggest drops in the uk and france. and this morning, european union leaders have set a more ambitious target for cutting greenhouse gases. their goal is that over the next decade they'll be slashed
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by 55 percent compared with 1990 levels. the commission president ursula von der leyen said the eu was now on a clear path to climate neutrality by mid—century. with me now is professor dave reay, climate change scientist and professor of carbon management at the university of edinburgh. good to have you with us, professor reay. let talk about this annual report on the global carbon project and we have reflected over the course of the gear that the restrictions, the limitations brought about due to the pandemic we re brought about due to the pandemic were having a positive effect on terms of dealing with carbon emissions and one of the countries that was singled out, i suppose, for a feature in this report was france, there has been a great drop in emissions in france. why? basically because obviously france has been really badly hit by covid and had very stringent restrictions, but also lots of emissions in france
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come from transport. their energy system is quite low carbon per transport is a big hitter, and with the restrictions it has meant emissions have dropped more than anywhere else. a very direct and obvious link in many ways, but i think since the first ended there has been slow but gradual increase in carbon emissions again? yes, it is really interesting, looking at the data for china. obviously in april there are nations, march and april, went down really rapidly —— in april, their emissions. they have been rising again and by the end of this year they might end up at normal levels or even higher because they are producing allotted steel, burning a lot of coal. it is not an even picture around the world and i think all of the economies, as they get back on their feet as we can out of covid, the risk is that emissions
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return to where they were before or higher. politicians around the world have been talking about green deals, we just heard it at the european council meeting in brussels, but do you really see government committing to changing things rather than this rush to return to business as usual with the omissions that come with it? it is a next bad, the message after the financial crisis and the recovery from that is that we cannot afford to recover in that same high carbon way. i think lots of governments this time have identified the benefits of a green recovery in terms of investment in renewable energy, energy efficiency in homes, because of thejob suspect. we are facing huge risk in terms of unemployment and if that investment goes into a green recovery edge creates more jobs that it is focused on tackling climate change. so i think germany, france,
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the uk and the eu overall kind of catholics, but that is not the picture across the world and that is certainly where we need to see a global effort in terms of green recovery. i think riding will really change the dynamic of this. water signs are we seeing a nature? you mentioned —— you mentioned that they may be greater than before the lockdown, that is a rapid rebound. what signs are that that they are taking on the idea of a new green deal to drive down carbon emissions into that part of the world? china has committed to get to net zero
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emissions by 2060, they are looking to pique emissions before 2030. they are now changing away from coal. i think 2020, as we recover from covid, they will go up, so the long—term trend, the next five years or more, they will see a lot of economies delivering that recovery, 18 to be the financing for that, the government to the brave. the tailwind for climate action are stronger than ever. that is a really positive assessment, goodness knows, there has not been much positive, but it is really interesting to hear you strike that positive tone, it is
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about the money and the political will that you are optimistic? locale data has been such a dark year, in terms of climate change -- eight has been such a dark year, intensive climate change uk has a targeted 68% reduction by 2030, a 55% commitment from the eu, it is light at the end of the channel on climate change which is very welcome. professor dave reay, thank you very much, really interesting to talk to you. dame barbara windsor — one of the uk's best—loved actresses — has died at the age of 83. her husband, scott mitchell, said she passed away peacefully from alzheimer's at a care home in london last night. he spent the last seven days by her side. he said, "myself, her family and friends years of her love, fun, friendship and brightness she brought to all our lives and the entertainment she gave to so many thousands of others during her career."
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she was best known for her work in eastenders and carry on films. david sillito looks back at her life. barbara giggles. that'll do, that'll do. all right, girls, get in the coach, and you get on with the loading. barbara windsor — a 4ft 10in national treasure. we were told to bring the minimum of clothing. now really let's see those chests come out! a testa m e nt a testament to a career going back 70 years. matron, take them away! among them, her eastenders co—stars. patsy palmer, i can hear that laugh now. danniella westbrook, my heart is broken. barbara ann deeks began acting as a teenager. born in shoreditch, in london, the daughter of a barrow boy, it was joan littlewood at a theatre workshop who saw her star quality. she won a bafta nomination for the film sparrows can't sing.
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movies and cabaret introduced her to glamour and some shady friends. at one point, she dated the gangster reggie kray. but it was the carry on films that made her a star. hi. have you got a large one? i've had no complaints, so far. he cackles. especially if sid james was around — a relationship that carried on off—camera. quick, before somebody comes in. you 'aven't got any soap on that bit. # up to the west end!# but after those nine carry on films, there were some lean years. until she found peggy. grant! mum. i heard you were back, i was going to give you a call. then why didn't you, you useless great lump? peggy mitchell in eastenders, the new landlady of the queen vic, was a role made for her. you're unfit to be a father! don't you dare turn your back on me! 22 years on albert square...
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get outta my pub! ..which ended with barbara becoming dame barbara. dame babs sounds nice, doesn't it? my mum would have liked it to be dame barbara — she was a bit of a cockney snob, my mum. so she would be, "dame barbara." god, what would she be thinking now? what would she be thinking? however, her farewell to walford was also her farewell to acting. she had been diagnosed with alzheimer's. oh, my dear friend. you'll never leave me, will you? dame barbara windsor, talent, warmth... no, sweetheart. thank you. ..and a lifetime of cheeky fun. actor larry lamb starred in eastenders with barbara windsor, playing her on—screen husband in 2008 — he spoke a little earlier
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about the first time they met in real life well, the thing is, we had friends in common but we'd never actually met. i was sort of ushered into the presence to go and meet her, you know? because, really, the reason i was there was because she decided she wanted a new man in her life in the show, and i was the one, i was the one that got chosen. and shejust... she looked at me, because she was such a tiny thing, i hadn't realised and she said, "oh, you are big, and you are tall. never mind, darling, we're all the same height lying down." she was just really... she was a tiny little thing. i mean, i remember doing scenes with her where i had to do this kind of groucho marx walk along and they'd get me on the road on the square, and she'd be on the pavement, we'd go along side by side and it sort of balanced it out. but she was tiny, a tiny little thing. she knew how to keep everybody together and make it a team, you know? she was... she was really special.
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medical experts advising the us food and drug administration have recommended emergency approval for the pfizer—biontech coronavirus vaccine. the decision comes after a 23—member panel met to determine whether the drug's benefits outweigh the risks. the pfizer vaccine has already been approved for the public in four other countries including the uk and canada. nomia iqbal reports from washington. fda and the sponsor, we agreed... a day—long, live—streamed meeting involving health experts may not make for exciting viewing, but this group of researchers and physicians are the key to america's path back to normality. one question i have is, why... they are part of an independent committee voting on whether the pfizer—biontech vaccine should be given to all americans. pfizer has applied for emergency authorisation. the group has been analysing the effectiveness of the vaccine and any potential side effects, including the allergic reactions experienced by two british health workers who received the pfizer
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jab this week. the vote came down to a single question, whether or not the benefits of the vaccine outweigh its risks for use in individuals 16 years of age and older. so, if we could please close the vote and broadcast the results. in the end, 17 said yes, four said no. the next step is now for the united states food and drug administration to sign off the vaccine. this would then clear the way for the logistically—complicated task of distributing it across all 50 states of america. but this is happening during a controversial transitional period. the incoming president says he wants to get 100 million people vaccinated in his first 100 days in office, whilst the outgoing president is more focused on overturning the election result, as well as criticising the fda for not bringing out a vaccine earlier, but his administration insists, once that green light comes for the jabs,
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they are ready to roll them out. thanks to president trump's and vice president pence's leadership and operation warp speed and the historic mobilisation that has happened there, we expect to see 100 million vaccinations total by the end of february. however, health experts say it could take until spring next year for enough americans to receive a vaccination to end the surging pandemic. in a sense, it's the beginning of the end, but the end is going to last a really long time. every single day, we're shattering records for the number of new cases, hospitalisations and deaths. many parts of the us are getting ready, though, and shipping in covid—19 vaccine kits, including syringes and personal protective equipment. all they need now is a vaccine. nomia iqbal, bbc news, washington.
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more now on that vaccine, our health correspondent james gallagher is here. mass vaccination for coronavirus is underway and eventually millions of us will be offered a jab. so what do we know about its safety? i want you to hold this number in your mind. one in a thousand of the entire uk population have already died after being infected during the pandemic and this figure is rising daily. this is the known threat any side—effects have to be balanced against. so, what are they? more than one in ten people can expect fatigue, fever or muscle pains as their body responds to the jab. but these tend to be mild and can be handled with pa racetemol. around 20,000 people have been given the pfizer vaccine in trials, two have developed adverse events classified as severe.
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one patient had a shoulder injury after being given the vaccine, another developed swollen lymph glands. it is possible that there are rarer problems that affect, say, less than one in 100,000 people, that have not been picked up in trials. but that is true every time a vaccine is approved. around one in 900,000 people have a severe allergic reaction to even current vaccines, but we are now in the territory of extremely rare events. however, scare stories and fake news are all too predictable in the months to come. here's the problem. if we just look at stroke... each of these icons represents 10 strokes. in total there are more than 2,000 of them in an average week in the uk. but when large numbers of people are immunised, it is likely that someone could be vaccinated one day and then have an unrelated health problem a few days later. there is a real danger of people falsely assuming events that happen by coincidence are caused by the vaccine. this is why we all need
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to keep our wits about us and why the regulator will continue to closely monitor the data as vaccines are rolled out. in the last few minutes, europen commission preisdent ursula von der leyen has said that the positions of the eu and uk "remain apart on fundamental issues", when speaking at the eu summit. let's listen again to what she said. on fisheries, here also, we continue to have a gap. we have not yet found the solution is to bridge our differences. we understand that the uk wants to control its waters. the uk wants to control its waters. the uk must on the other hand understand the legitimate expectations of eu fishing fleets, built on decades and sometimes centuries of access. on these and other points, our negotiators are working. we will
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decide on sunday weather we have the conditions for an agreement or not. in the meantime, the commission has proposed four targeted contingency measures today. they provide a short—term fix to ensure basic connectivity in air and road transport for six months, and we are also proposing to the uk to ensure reciprocal access to each other‘s waters for next year. one way or the other, in less than three weeks, it will be new beginnings for old friends. let's get right up-to-date without brussels correspondent nick beake, who was listening to all of that. hello to you. just before ursula von der leyen spoke about fisheries, she also talked about the level playing field, fair competition, and she said that the eu has repeatedly said to the uk that fair competition is a precondition to free access to eu markets and that it was quite
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interesting, but this is not to say, she went on, that we would require the uk to follow us every time we decide to raise our level of ambition, for example in the environmental field, ambition, for example in the environmentalfield, they ambition, for example in the environmental field, they would remain free, sovereign, if you wish, to decide what they want to do. is that a bit of movement on the eu side? annita, i think you could definitely interpret that as the eu saying that it has got the door open, it is giving borisjohnson and his government and opportunity to walk back in and sees an opportunity to ta ke walk back in and sees an opportunity to take a deal that is in everyone's interests. i thought it was really interesting that she used that word sovereign, that is the essence of what the british argument has been, saying that britain, post—brexit, is sovereign, it is an independent coastal nation, it is someone who will be making its own rules and that there is no way it will be taking rules and regulations from the eu, that much is clear. so we will have to see what the response from london is to that. but certainly the fact that she addressed the issue of sovereignty
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is, you could say, an acknowledgement that they are listening to what london has made very clear to be read lines. and let's just look at what the french president, emmanuel macron, has been saying. in fact i think we can show our view is that mr macron is speaking now at that summit. if we can go to the live pictures... he has been saying, we can't say that we are in a no deal situation, since there was a withdrawal agreement, saying, europeans have not chosen brexit but respect the british. the eu priority on a future relationship with britain, he says, is to remain united. he says wasn't... doesn't wa nt to united. he says wasn't... doesn't want to have his cake and eat it, but simply to have his cake. very interesting comments from vista macron, who has been pretty tough in the last few weeks on what he has been saying on fishing, but also sounding like he is opening the door, saying to the british at least that the door is still open? yes, i think it is worth reminding ourselves that despite all the
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gloomy language and the private assessments, for example, ursula von der leyen was supposed to be more pessimistic in private earlier today, telling eu leaders that she thought it was more likely that there would be no deal, being more frank on that, the kind of language which echoes what borisjohnson was saying last night, that there was a significant chance that there would be no deal and that people should be preparing for that, now was the time for businesses and consumers and all of us to think about that. but yet in brussels today, the negotiations continue. michel barnier, for the eu, david frost for the uk side, we'll be talking once again. they will be talking tomorrow and they will be talking tomorrow and they will be talking on sunday. it is a bit of a running joke that brexit deadlines come and go, but they are saying on sunday, a decision needs to be made. both sides agree on that one. is that a real hard deadline? the talking is continuing and as we have been hearing this morning, if not softer language, may be an opportunity at this 11th hour for the two sides to come together and
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reach some sort of compromise. but it is by no means certain that that will be the case. it would be a brave correspondent who would say that sunday actually was the ultimate deadline. nick beake, thank you very much, in brussels. in the uk, the government has announced more details in the last few moments of massive testing for schools. we had been hearing that the government was planning to ramp up this testing in schools in london and essex and kent. in london we are hearing that an additional 44,000 home test kits will be made available for school staff including teachers to test before returning to school in january. an additional 15 mobile testing units will be deployed in or near schools for staff, students and families to be tested. the government says this will provide approximate lease 75,000 additional tests over and above existing test
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sites in london. and the london boroughs receiving this additional testing are a parking in dagenham, hackney and the city, haven, newham, redbridge, tower hamlets and waltham forest. then, in essex, an additional ten mobile testing units will be deployed tomorrow and over the weekend. the essex burros receiving additional testing are southend, basildon, ca nvey receiving additional testing are southend, basildon, canvey island, harlow, brentwood, southend, i have already mentioned, i think there is some repetition in this list... harlow, brentwood. .. some repetition in this list... harlow, brentwood... and then in kent, an additional two mobile testing units deployed tomorrow, with a further ten arriving at the weekend. so, certainlya with a further ten arriving at the weekend. so, certainly a sense of a ramping up of the response in those three areas. london, essex and kent. to try to deal with the rise in transmissions, particularly for schools and teaching staff. we will
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bring you more on that detail as we get it. non—essential shops across much of western scotland including glasgow are reopening for the first time in three weeks. retailers in the 11 council areas that had been been under the country's toughest lockdown rules were also able to welcome customers this morning. but pubs and restaurants will have to remain closed until saturday. and in northern ireland, non—essential retail and some parts of the hospitality sector are now able to reopen. a two—week limited lockdown which was imposed on 27th november ended last night. earlier i spoke to our correspondent chris page in belfast and andrew black in glasgow. christmas shopping is returning this morning to the streets of belfast, just two weeks before christmas day. the shutters are going up in the shops around now, there hasn't been a rush back, but the crowds are very gradually building, there are queues outside some shops. as regards the situation
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for retailers, many of them have said it has been a very tough time for them to close, they have lost two of what is usually their four busiest weeks of the year, the four weeks before christmas. also the hospitality industry has been hit very hard with pubs, restaurants and hotels shut since the middle of october, but as of today, pubs and restaurants that serve food can reopen to customers again today, but bars that serve drinks only will have to stay shut. close contact services like hairdressers and beauticians are reopening, and services can resume in places of worship and gyms are reopening as well. but all that is being tempered by health experts and members of the devolved government saying that the two week circuit breaker lockdown has not had as good an impact on the rate of infection as had been hoped. the number of cases per day is still
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numbering between 400 and 500 a day, and for a place with the population the size of northern ireland that is a high rate. so, the warning is to take extra care if you are going out and about today, obey all the public health guidelines. people are encouraged to go out and support local businesses at this key time but also to bear in mind that the infection rate is high and really northern ireland could be looking at further restrictions, perhaps even before the new year, certainly into january, if the infection rate rises significantly. here in the centre of glasgow, shops have started to reopen this morning. some quite good news, shoppers have returned to the high street, the nonessential outlets have been closed in glasgow and in a number of other local authority areas in the west of scotland for the last three weeks. those additional measures have been
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put in place to deal with a spike in coronavirus cases. but this morning shops in the centre of glasgow started opening from around seven o'clock, there have been plenty of queues, the debenhamsjust behind me opened just after nine o'clock and lots of bargain hunters were waiting to get in. speaking to some of the shoppers, they are quite up for coming back to the high street to do their christmas shopping, they are happy that they will be safe. there has been money spent to put safety procedures in, the scottish government has been careful to issue advice to people going out shopping to state socially distant, to stay socially distant, to wash their hands and to wear face coverings in shops. there is a bit of trepidation in glasgow because even though nonessential retailers have been allowed to reopen, there are still travel restrictions in place for the areas in level 3 restrictions, which
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glasgow is now in. given that glasgow high street is such a famous place, shoppers come from all across scotland to do christmas shopping, they think that might impact things. also, hospitality businesses are not due to open again until tomorrow, and even so, in the level 3 area, they cannot serve alcohol and they have to close at 6pm. so, all those factors are giving a bit of concern to retailers, and the message seems to be that even though they have been allowed to reopen and shoppers are happy to come back to the shops, to come back to the shops today, retailers don't think that in the next couple of weeks they will be able to make up the shortfall they would otherwise have made if shopping had been allowed to happen normally. andrew black in glasgow and chris page in belfast, thank you.
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a federal prison in the united states has carried out the execution of the convicted killer brandon bernard. the african—american man was part of a gang who abducted, robbed and murdered two white youth ministers in 1999. he's the ninth federal inmate to have been put to death sincejuly. more federal prisoners have been executed in the us this year than than in the previous 56 years combined. lebo diseko has this report. brandon bernard had been on death row for the last 20 years, and on thursday he became the first federal inmate to be executed during a presidential transition. donald trump will have seen the deaths of 13 federal inmates since july this year, more than any president in over a century. the federal death penalty was reinstated in 1988 but executions were rare. just three have taken place since then and none since 2003.
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but in thejuly the trump administration resumed the practice after a 17—year hiatus. brandon bernard's case attracted the support of celebrities like kym kardashian west. the reality star and prison reform activist had called on her followers to tweet donald trump to save brandon bernard. tomorrow, another federal execution is scheduled at the same penitentiary in indiana. these executions come just weeks beforejoe biden takes office, and he has said that he will seek to end the death penalty. the incumbent president would usually defer to his successor and let the president—elect set the course, but donald trump's attorney general says he is just following the law. he says he owes it to the victims and their families to carry forward this sentence. travellers returning to the uk from spain's canary islands from saturday morning must self—isolate for two weeks after the government removed the area from the safe travel corridor list. it's another blow to holiday firms
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after a year of difficulties. our correspondent ben thompson has been to london's stansted airport. it is pretty grey here this morning so people might have been thinking to go somewhere for a bit of winter sun, it is hugely popular at this time of yearand sun, it is hugely popular at this time of year and it was one of the few places you could actually get to without having to quarantine on the way back. but from 4am tomorrow, it changes, you will need to quarantine for 14 days if you are returning from the ca nary for 14 days if you are returning from the canary islands. a big change, and we know that the big travel giant tui has said it may cancel all of its christmas schedule because of that. there is so much confusion and uncertainty, especially given that the foreign office hasn't actually changed its advice, so, the advice is still at the moment, you can go. they are not advising against all but essential travel, so it means your flight may 90, travel, so it means your flight may go, your hotel may stay open, so you are not entitled to an automatic refund. the one saving grace might be the idea of test and released.
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from next week, from tuesday, in england, you will be able to sign up to test and release, which means that you will be able to take a test which could cut the quarantine from 14 days down to about five days. you ta ke 14 days down to about five days. you take your test on the fifth day and get your results within a couple of days, so maybe seven days of quarantine rather than 14. but you will have to pay for it privately and it will cost about £100 but it might be worth it if you want to get out of the 40 to bit sooner. but all sorts of uncertainty right now regarding travel, and the man to a nswer regarding travel, and the man to answer some of our questions is a simon calder, a familiarface. simon, hello to you. let's talk about first of all the travel corridor to the canaries, that has changed, but at this time of year, hugely popular? yes, and it is an absolutely bleak midwinter notjust for the hundreds of thousands of people who seven weeks ago when the canaries suddenly opened up thought, great, we want to book a winter holiday, but of course for the travel industry, which had pinned so
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many of its hopes on the idea that we would be able to go to tenerife, la nza rote, g ra n we would be able to go to tenerife, la nza rote, gran ca naria, we would be able to go to tenerife, lanzarote, gran canaria, and have our traditional winter holidays. as you say, the foreign office still hasn't changed its advice, and that is having some really odd effects. normally the foreign office says at the same time as the department of transport says you have got to quarantine, the foreign office says, it is too dangerous, we advise against travel, all holiday companies cancel their trips. but tui, the biggest holiday company, has told me this morning, their trips are going ahead, the foreign of his has not changed its advice. if you don't want to go because you can't quarantine we will let you rebook an alternative holiday but at moment, you are not going to be able to get a cash refund. i am still trying to find out whatjeptoo is doing but it is a right old model. trying to find out whatjeptoo is doing but it is a right old modellj know doing but it is a right old model.” know you are going to stay on that for us, simon. talking about the end of the year, the end of the transition period, brings some other challenges, what do we need to know?
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well, we don't know quite a lot at the moment! but it seems very likely that your european health insurance card, mine says it expires in 2024, will not be going much longer than three weeks. serious implications for passport holders, you have got to have at least six months remaining on your passport but your passport also must not have been issued more than nine years, six months ago. and if you're driving it looks very likely you will need an international driving permit and if you are going to france as well as spain will need two different international permits for driving, £5 50 from your post office. of all the people to be prepared, simon, i knew it would be you. thank you forecasting a bit of light on all of that. simon is all sorted but many of us will not be. worth bearing in mind some of that advice if you intend to travel. and big questions about the covid safe rules. we know we can travel at the but there is a succession suggestion that after the end of the transition period we will not be welcome because we are
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classed as a high infection country and therefore may not be able to travel to other countries in the european union. many questions and very few european union. many questions and very few answers european union. many questions and very few answers right now. now it is time for a look at the weather, with matt taylor. hello, a bit of sunshine for some of you today but for most people this weekend, the rain will never be too far away. this morning we had this weather front lingering over eastern england, and it is still there in the north—east of scotland. that will continue to bring rain across aberdeenshire, angus and caithness. lighter winds elsewhere. the showers that we have got, in plentiful supply in the west, will keep going. some of them will be on the heavy side. some heavy showers in the english channel. in between, some of you will stay dry with some sunshine. this evening and overnight, with the
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wind is light on the ground down, there will be some mist and fog around and there will still be some further rain in scotland and england and wales. further west, further rain in scotland and england and wales. furtherwest, era further rain in scotland and england and wales. further west, era skies into tomorrow morning and this is where there could possibly be a touch of frost tomorrow morning. not particularly potent, so the rain is fairly showery. but a lot of cloud and mist. looking further west, we will see sunnier conditions develop, the best day of the weekend, saturday, for those of you in the western half of the country. temperatures may be down a little bit. in the eastern areas could we will start brightest on sunday, however, further west, low pressure coming in, and strengthening winds. those winds will bring slightly milderair
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those winds will bring slightly milder air but with will bring much more rain across the country, with some snow across the very more rain across the country, with some snow across the very tops of the scottish hills. the rain is set to be heavy at times, working northwards and eastwards. probably a good day for the sofa and a christmas movie. strong winds, touching gale force in places. probably the driest weather throughout the day will be the north—east of scotland. moving into next week, fairly changeable, there will be some drier moments, rain at times and some strong winds.
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this is bbc news. i'm geeta guru—murthy. the headlines at 11am... the eu says a no—deal brexit is now more likely than not but says it could still be possible to strike a trade deal without the uk being forced to follow eu rules. they would remain free, sovereign, if you was, to decide what they want to we would simply add adapter conditions for access to our market according to the decision of the united kingdom, and that's what our plight and vice versa. borisjohnson has told his cabinet to prepare for an australian—style relationship with the eu. australia's former prime minister has a warning about that. be careful what you wish for. i mean, australia... australia's relationship with the eu is not one, from a trade point of view,
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that britain, i think, would want. dame barbara windsor, best known for her roles in eastenders and the carry on films, has died at the age of 83. mass coronavirus testing is to be rolled out to secondary schools in parts of london, kent and essex in an attempt to curb rising infections. scotland and northern ireland ease coronavirus restrictions, with non—essential retail able to re—open for the first time in weeks. european leaders have been told that a brexit deal is unlikely to be made by this sunday's deadline. meanwhile, borisjohnson has urged businesses to get ready for a no—deal scenario when the transition period ends on december 31st. yesterday, long queues of lorries
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snaked into the port of dover — put down to brexit stockpiling, pre—christmas build—up and transport of medical supplies for covid—19 care. freight traffic at ports is expected to worsen from the end of the year. in the past hour, the european commisison chief, ursula von der leyen, said that while the positions of the eu and uk "remain apart on fundamental issues" it could still be possible to strike a trade deal without the uk being forced to follow eu rules. on fisheries, here also, we continue to have a gap. we have not yet found the solution is to bridge our differences. we understand that the uk aspires to control its waters. the year kate moss, on the other hand, legitimate expectations of the eu fishing fleets, built on decades and sometimes centuries of access.
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on these and other points, our negotiators are working. we will decide on sunday whether we have the conditions for an agreement or not. in the meantime, the commission has proposed for targeted contingency measures today. they provide a short—term fix to ensure basic connectivity in air, and road transport for six months, and we are also proposing to the uk to ensure reciprocal access to each other‘s waters for next year. one way or the other, and less on the three weeks, it will be a new beginnings for old friends. joining me now is our brussels correpsondent nick beake. ss is dating of the position as we knew it or anything different? because the eu said the uk will not be forced to follow rules set by the eu, but of course, if they want to
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access, there has to be some sort of parity, some sort of link, which we have always known. there was a lot of restating of the language, we have heard a lot of in the past week orso, have heard a lot of in the past week or so, talking about the eu priorities, the fact that if the uk wa nts to priorities, the fact that if the uk wants to get access to its single market it has to agree to some rules and regulations in the future. but i think what ursula von der leyen was attempting to do there was appear very reasonable, to say there is a deal on offer which accepts british sovereignty, and she used the word sovereign, that was very clear. she pointedly dwelt on that words, and i think what they were hoping to do was that they want to british, certainly may be the british public, to see that the eu have come to the wicket, to use the analogy is that borisjohnson likes to come other than cricket, with a proposal that they believe is fair. i think we look to london though to see whether this is enough, whether they can
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break the stalemate that hasn't been able to happen over the past few weeks or so. and crucially, what i think she was getting down to is that the eu as far as it was sweet as it is not trying to tidy uk in the future, and if eu standards on some sectors, environment or workers' rights, they are not necessarily sing the uk has to follow, has to raise the standards to the same level, but there will be some sort of consequence to that. and we know privately in the talks, the british are taking exception to that, some sort of lighting reaction that, some sort of lighting reaction that there may be tariffs on british goods as a consequence for any sort of future digressions. i think that is what the eu was trying to do this morning. in reality, is it likely that the uk and the eu we diverged very much on it sorts of measures going forward? that is something a lot of people in the uk have been sent. look at our standards, they
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are world leading when it comes to agriculture, environment and workers' rights, looking after people in their places of work. this is things that we have done for yea rs is things that we have done for years and years, ironically, you may say, when the uk was part of the european union. i look at stated, government subsidies, that was an element of policy the british were instrumental in. so some trade experts are suggesting, is a really much between the two sides? interestingly, emmanuel macron has also been speaking this morning. he said that this is all about remaining harmonious friends in the future. he had knowledge there is lots of rumour and speculation swirling around, and he said it was important if a deal is to be done, it would affect relationships between the two sides for years and yea rs between the two sides for years and years to come. interestingly, he was asked about this contingency plan that the eu put forward yesterday on things like aviation under hauliers, which for six months would keep things going the same way to
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minimise disruption, and on fishing too, the eu proposal is that if there is no deal, fishing access would stay the same for 12 months. and the french president was asked, are you trying to have your cake and eatit? are you trying to have your cake and eat it? and of course that is a reference to something borisjohnson said, and the french president said to this, i am not trying to have my ca ke to this, i am not trying to have my cake and eat it, i am asking for the ca ke to cake and eat it, i am asking for the cake to be well put together, but i would be giving my part away either. so, an indication of the eu, i think, trying to suggest they are being reasonable, but also reiterating their red lines. our political correpsondent jessica parker is here. just repeat what ursula von der leyen has said just now in the last few minutes. she said britain would remain free, sovereign, to decide what they want to do. i don't know if there has been any response as yet from the uk and what we know about the state of talks. no response yet from the uk side, but i
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thought ursula von der leyen's comments were very thought ursula von der leyen's comments were very interesting. if you think back to wednesday, when borisjohnson was in the house of commons taking questions, he addresses to specific issues as well, that he had come to understand the different perspectives from the uk and eu sides that night has been reflecting on. borisjohnson said on wednesday that if the eu wanted an automatic right to punish the uk if it diverts from a standards in the future, and on fishing as well, he said that the eu wanted to be —— wa nted said that the eu wanted to be —— wanted britain to be the only country in the world not to have sovereign control of its water. it seems as though the level playing field and fishing rights remain at the turkey sticking points. the talks are going on in private, so it is difficult to know what is going on in the room. the government is saying, if it has to be a no—deal scenario, so be it. of course, the terminology the uk government uses
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isa terminology the uk government uses is a so—called australia style deal. that is essentially treading on wto tariffs, as shelley actually has a few side arrangements with the european union, for example, to help australian wine. interestingly, yesterday the former prime minister of australia malcolm turnbull was asked how favourable an australia soil agreement would be for the uk. there are really some very large barriers to australian trade with europe, which we're seeking to address, as we negotiate a free—trade agreement with europe. but australians would not regard our trade relationship with europe as being a satisfactory one. i mean, we do have, it is our third biggest trading partner, i guess, collectively, because it is such a big economy. but there are very big barriers to australian exports of agricultural products in particular. there's a lot of friction in the system, in terms of services. so, there's a lot to aim for.
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and when i was prime minister, we started formal negotiations of a european—australia free—trade agreement, but that will take some time. so, be careful what you wish for. i mean, australia's relationship with the eu is not one, from a trade point of view, that britain i think would want. and also, of course, was pointing out as people will be well aware, australia is slightly further away from the european union than in the uk, and it has free trade agreements with its nearest traders partner. from the government because my perspective, we had only issue saying that borisjohnson wants to leave no stone unturned in trying to seek out some sort of agreement with the european union in a very little time left. and we have this new deadline of sunday, that's ursula von der leyen referred to this morning as well, where they will assess whether these talks are going
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anywhere. i'm just in terms of us getting ready for what is coming in three weeks' time, we know michael gove has been preparing for the exit strategy, they no—deal scenario. we remember matt hancock's fridge is about a year ago now. there has been parliamentary scrutiny on how prepared the government is for no—deal. prepared the government is for no-deal. yeah, there has been a warning from an eu subcommittee in the house of lords, raising their concerns about the extent to which the uk is prepared on a technological, physical basis, in terms of arrangements for the border. and it is not really the first time we have heard warnings along those lines. we also heard previously from the national audit office saying that they are concerned that many businesses will not be ready for the end of this year, and it is worth pointing out again that changes are coming regardless as to whether there is going to be a free—trade agreement with the european union or not. there will, for example, be enhanced
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checks, and that is why the government has said it is planning a lot of money in to improve infrastructure arrangements, increase the number of custom staff as well to try and smooth things out at the border, at some level of disruption because of these changes is expected in the new year. but the extent to which that happens will hinge on there is a free trade agreement. so, ithink hinge on there is a free trade agreement. so, i think change is coming whatever happens, onjanuary the 1st. and again warning today that there is insufficient readiness for that come the new year. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here with me now, to talk about what a no—deal brexit would actually entail. it is important to state that no deal has been flagged up by remainers and the past as being something that is a huge change, lots of questions about whether we are ready for it. some on the brexit side is saying they see it as an opportunity. in practical terms, what does it mean? in practical terms, it means all the rules and
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regulations that have slowly gathered pace over 40 years to disappear overnight. so, it will be an incredibly abrupt change to a very, very complex political and economic relationship. it is really on the economics of the focus is going to be for businesses and for travellers and so forth. it is worth emphasising that even if there is a deal, quite a lot will change anyway at the borders, for traders and travellers crossing borders, there will be new bureaucracy, new checks and forms to fill in. but without a deal, don't forget we are notjust talking about should we are talking about right across the board to being a tariffs on imports, going in both directions, but also other things that might make trading easier, eat agreements that mean you have to do slightly fewer checks on things like product standard. all that would go by the way. we would be literally treading with no agreements itself. it is notjust about trade, it is also about things like security. internal security and policing. we have heard a lot of
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senior police officer seeing in this country they are very worried if we are suddenly, abruptly, cut off from all the eu data bases are suddenly, abruptly, cut off from all the eu databases on things like fingerprints, criminal records, wa nted fingerprints, criminal records, wanted up with nothing appropriate to replace. so, we are focused on trade, but it is a whole range of other things as well, which will very a bru ptly other things as well, which will very abruptly come to an end. boris johnson keeps referring to this as a australia style deal. is a whole range of other things as well, which will very abruptly come to an end. borisjohnson keeps referring to this as a australia style deal. as at the same as a no—deal exit? australia, it is the same as it no—deal in the sense that australia trades with the eu on wto chant, but actually it is a better deal with the eu done the no—deal exit the uk could be facing in three weeks, because it does have a series of agreements which ease trade, it is not a free trade agreement, but they make things easier. and if we suddenly leave after negotiations have broken down, none of that will be in place for the eu — uk relationship. and there is also a
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really important fact of geography. australia is on the other side of the world. the eu is not as important for australian trade as it is for uk trade. we had president macron singh this morning the geography is stubborn, and we will concern it is because we continue to live side by side even after brexit. on the fact is, things like the just—in—time supply chain, really important for indices like vehicle's pharmaceuticals, food, eu— uk trade when it relies on those, and there we re when it relies on those, and there were some quite abruptly with no deal. with australia, if there are border delays and checks, it because it is so far away, it is a different relationship. it matters much less. we are already seeing some build—up around in kent in the last two or three days. do we know how much preparedness it is for no—deal planning? and we know about the lorry park being planned, but obviously medicines and food. those are the things people will be really
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worried about. yeah, i mean, if you ta ke worried about. yeah, i mean, if you take that, supermarkets have been doing a certain amount of stock primer where they can. it is one of the reasons why the big container ports like felixstowe have been having problems getting things through, it is partly about massive amounts of ppe arriving because of covid—19, but also because has been some bricks are stockpiling. but obviously first read, you cannot stop product, and a lot of it comes particular in the time of year, january and february, when the uk because if you are fruit and vegeta bles because if you are fruit and vegetables than any other time of the year, so we are quite dependent on that stage for lettuces, tomatoes, salad stuff coming from southern europe. if laura's suddenly couldn't cross the channel, the delays, supermarkets could try fly things in from other countries, but when used start to fly things and thatis when used start to fly things and that is more expensive, and who pays for that? the answer is, if the supply chain gets more expensive,
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the wholesalers probably pay a bit, the wholesalers probably pay a bit, the retailer probably pay a bit, and consumers pay a bit. if there is more cost in the supply chain from farm to fork if you like, everyone will pay a bit more. so, there are preparations going on, but to be honest, i don't think anyone really knows what quantity is going to be like. think a lot of businesses will say they are not going to try to trade across the border in the first few weeks of january. —— i trade across the border in the first few weeks ofjanuary. —— i have spoken to a lot of businesses who say that. i think people are hoping that the will settle down. some breaking news, and it has been reported that penn pupils have been assaulted outside a secondary school in rochdale this morning. in 19—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of assault. police say there is no suggestion it has been treated as terror —related. they are expected to release more details later. officers are seeing working
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closely to ensure those who are infected are supported. there is a statement on the academy's websites m, statement on the academy's websites in, we experience an incident which will require the support of the police. the incident has be dealt with and there will be an extended police presence in the area... if anyone has any information that may support the police please contact us directly. just to repeat the news that ten pupils, we believe, have been assaulted outside and academy school in rochdale. and it has also been reported that a 40 new —— 14—year—old boy has been taken to hospital. enquiries are still continuing. dame barbara windsor, one of the uk's best—loved actresses,
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has died at the age of 83. her husband, scott mitchell, said she passed away peacefully from alzheimer's at a care home in london last night. he spent the last seven days by her side. he said... she was best known for her work in eastenders and carry on films. david sillito looks back at her life. barbara giggles. that'll do, that'll do. all right, girls, get in the coach, and you get on with the loading. barbara windsor — a 4ft 10in national treasure. we were told to bring the minimum of clothing. now really let's see those chests come out! funny, cheeky, slightly naughty. but there was a lot more to her than just carry on camping. matron, take them away! barbara ann deeks began acting as a teenager. born in shoreditch, in london, the daughter of a barrow boy, it was joan littlewood at a theatre workshop who saw her star quality. she won a bafta nomination
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for the film sparrows can't sing. and a tony for oh, what a lovely war! movies and cabaret introduced her to glamour and some shady friends. at one point, she dated the gangster reggie kray. but it was the carry on films that made her a star. hi. her entrance always an excuse for something slightly saucy. sorry. have you got a large one? i've had no complaints, so far. he cackles. especially if sid james was around — a relationship that carried on off—camera. quick, before somebody comes in. you 'aven't got any soap on that bit. # up to the west end!#. but after those nine carry on films, there were some lean years. until she found peggy. grant! mum. i heard you were back, i was going to give you a call. then why didn't you, you useless great lump? peggy mitchell in eastenders, the new landlady of the queen vic, was a role made for her.
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you're unfit to be a father! don't you dare turn your back on me! 22 years on albert square... get outta my pub! ..which ended with barbara becoming dame barbara. dame babs sounds nice, doesn't it? my mum would have liked it to be dame barbara — she was a bit of a cockney snob, my mum. so she would be, "dame barbara." god, what would she be thinking now? what would she be thinking? however, her farewell to walford was also her farewell to acting. she had been diagnosed with alzheimer's. oh, my dear friend. you'll never leave me, will you? dame barbara windsor, talent, warmth... no, sweetheart. thank you. ..and a lifetime of cheeky fun. let's take a look at some of the tributes to barbara windsor... actress danniella westbrook, who played dame barbara's on—screen daughter sam mitchell
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on eastenders, tweeted... matt lucas, in his tweet, said... and patsy palmer, who played bianca jackson on eastenders, shared a moving tribute on instagram. the headlines on bbc news... the eu says a no—deal brexit is now more likely than the uk securing a trade deal with the bloc. dame barbara windsor — best known for her roles in eastenders and the carry on films — has died at the age of 83. mass coronavirus testing is to be rolled out to secondary schools in parts of london, kent and essex in an attempt to curb rising infections.
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in the uk, secondary school pupils in parts of london, essex and kent will be offered mass—testing in an effort to control the spread of coronavirus. it comes as secondary school students in wales prepare to take their classes online from the end of today, after a significant rise in infections there. anna o'neill has the story. out of an actual real gcse question... secondary school pupils in the classroom in wales, but not for long. from monday until the new year, they will be doing their learning at home, online. the public health situation there is deteriorating, putting the nhs under pressure. one of the largest teaching unions in wales welcomed the news to keep students at home for now. a few days ago, there was a report by the technical advisory group, which effectively, when you boiled it down, was telling parents that if they wanted a christmas that was without self—isolation, they should take their
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children out of school. we have found from our members telling us that large numbers of parents were beginning to do that. cases among young people in the south—east of england are also on the rise. at last night's news conference, the health minister said he was particularly concerned about london, where rates are up in 31 out of 32 boroughs. we know from experience that a sharp rise in cases in younger people can lead to a rise amongst more vulnerable age groups later. we have seen that happen before. so we need to do everything we can to stop the spread amongst school—aged children in london right now. in havering, there are 379 cases per 100,000 people. in waltham forest, it's 317. and 311 per 100,000 people in barking and dagenham. and so, last night, the government announced an immediate plan for testing all secondary school—aged children in the seven
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worst affected boroughs in london, as well as parts of essex that border it and parts of kent. the leader of barking and dagenham welcomed the news. we are looking forward to being able to use the additional resources we need to make sure we keep our young people as safe as possible. at the same time, we are also making sure that every teacher gets tested before they leave the term, which is good, and they will go home with a home test, which will allow them to test before they have to come back at the start of the new term. there are concerns that unless the rates in london start to fall, the capital is heading for a move from tier two into tier three next week, just before the christmas relaxation of restrictions — something london's leaders are keen to avoid. anna o'neill, bbc news. we are hearing that in north—east
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london, an additional 44,000 home test kits will be made available to school staff. this is according to the government's announcement. and in airsits, they the government's announcement. and in air sits, they will be an extra mobile testing units deployed over the weekend, and parents will be able to apply for test using the on line testing ports of —— and essex. we know that covid—19 spreads in secondary schools in order to sinners —— amongst older teenagers just as it does with adults. in northern ireland, shops, gyms and some hospitality businesses are reopening after a two—week lockdown. restaurants, cafes and other venues serving food can resume trading, but pubs that don't serve food must remain shut. hairdressers, barbers and beauty salons can reopen but visits to them are by appointment only. in scotland, millions of people have come out of tier 4 lockdown rules today.
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non—essential shops in 11 local authorities across much of western scotland can reopen for the first time in three weeks. these areas have been facing the toughest lockdown rules and will now move to level 3. pu bs, restau ra nts a nd cafes are able to reopen but still face some restrictions. joining me now is neil douglas, who owns of four restaurants across glasgow and edinburgh. i think you are in one of your restau ra nt. i think you are in one of your restaurant. just tell us how you are going to manage with your reopening? what measures have you put in place to make it as secure as possible? the measures we have in place we have had in place since the summer. we did out risk assessments very early on, peter one—way systems in place. the restaurant has always been safe and secure, we have just not always been allowed to trade. the big difference this time is alcohol free draught lager and points that we are selling for the fa ct points that we are selling for the fact that we can't trade normally. you are not allowed to sell any
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alcohol? nothing at all, and our customers have to be out by 6pm. so, are you hoping people will still come in numbers? bookings are picking up now. the crackers and be delivered, the turkeys are being prepared, so we hope to be as busy as we possibly can be, but we accept that the restrictions that are still in place make trading very difficult. and how tough is it being to be closed ? difficult. and how tough is it being to be closed? it has been deeply frustrating. the broad brush approach to hospitality has been damaging to consumer confidence and really damaging to the industry generally. it is a secure environment, it has been tested, and there has not really been an opportunity for us to prove that.” eve ryo ne opportunity for us to prove that.” everyone understands all the difficulties, you have put screens up, but given that the virus spread through aerosols in the air, can it ever really be a safer place for people who are worried, or people
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who are vulnerable? well, we have invested heavily in air conditioning as well, and the air as as it can be. the doors are open as much as possible. it can never be perfect, nothing can be, but be certainly feel we have done as much as we can to make this environment safe. and the air conditioning system, you are sure that that operates in a way... does it refer to the particles? there has been a lot of discussion upon the systems work? it is more technically advanced and i am capable of expending, but i certainly feel that the system has been a store that was sufficient for the requirements on a risk assessment. and your restaurants across glasgow and edinburgh. have it all been affected in the same or have you had different opening and closing times? edinburgh remains in tier 3, so it was open, but again with no alcohol allowed to be sold, and closed up 5pm. what was a reaction from customers? do you think that has changed the dynamic
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and interesting out? it has come up but having an alcohol free lager on d raft, but having an alcohol free lager on draft, and still being able to have a pint stopped it has been different, people have reacted well to it. similar to that no alcohol cover and the no alcohol wines we have in stock. it has been a different environment, but not unpleasant either for customers and staff to be in. how has it been different? we are working with no music at all until today as well, for the last five months in scotland, so it has been a much quieter, much more sedate environment. but we still think we have created a space where people can come relax and enjoy himself. and the reason for no alcohol is it so that people buy us behaviour is an adversely affected, i guess. of course, but as a licensee orjob and responsibility has always been to make sure that customers behave in a certain way, and that result alcohol responsibly, so we would rather have the opportunity to show that we
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continue to do that. very interesting. good luck in the run—up to christmas, and i hope everyone stays safe. thank you. lots of showers across the west. some could be heavy and persistent. and between them, glimmers of sunshine. there could be some thunder. temperatures a little bit apt on it yesterday. overnight turning misty and murky for scotland and england. turning cleared out towards the west later. these are the temperatures to expect as we start saturday. clearer conditions.
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sunny weather will push across western areas. sunday, winds will pick up. heavy rain will sweep across pick up. heavy rain will sweep a cross m ost pick up. heavy rain will sweep across most parts of the country. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. the eu says a no—deal brexit is now more likely than not — but says it could still be possible to strike a trade deal without the uk being forced to follow eu rules. they would remain free, sovereign and if you wish, to decide what they want. we would add that the conditions for access to our market accordingly to the decision of the united kingdom. borisjohnson has told his cabinet to prepare for an australian—style relationship with the eu. australia's former prime minister has
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a warning about that. be careful what you wish for. australia's relationship with the eu is not one from a trade point of view that britain would want. dame barbara windsor — best known for her roles in eastenders and the carry on films — has died at the age of 83. mass coronavirus testing is to be rolled out to secondary schools in parts of london, kent and essex in an attempt to curb rising infections. scotland and northern ireland ease coronavirus restrictions — with non—essential retail able to re—open for the first time in weeks. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's sarah. lewis hamilton could only manage fifth place in first practice for the abu dhabi grand prix. red bull's max verstappen was quickest, just ahead of valtteri bottas, whose team—mate hamilton is back in his mercedes
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seat after missing last week's race in bahrain. you can't read too much into this session though, because it takes place in the heat of the day, whereas qualifying and the race itself are held at sunset, when track temperatures drop. motor rallying's most successful driver, sebastian loeb, will race for lewis hamilton's team in the new extreme e off—road electric series. loeb was world champion nine times in a row in a career including 79 rally wins up until 2012. he's 46 now, and said he was really impressed by what hamilton was doing. the first race is in saudi arabia next march. the series aims to raise awareness of climate change and will visit affected areas, including the arctic and the amazon and the environmental focus prompted hamilton to set up his team, which will also feature cristina gutierrez, an up—and—coming spanish driver. paris saint germain are set to make another bid for dele alli in next month's transfer window.
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they want to sign him on loan from tottenham. alli is becoming increasingly frustrated at spurs — he's only started one premier league game this season and hasn't played at all in the league for over two months. he was clearly unhappy at being left on the bench for last night's europa league win over royal antwerp. psg tried to sign him in the summer but couldn't agree a deal. english golfer matt fitzpatrick is one shot of the clubhouse lead at the season—ending world tour championship — he's picked up five shots so far in his second round, to move to nine—under through 13 holes. american patrick reed, who's aiming to win the race to dubai finished his round on ten under, that the target there. and it's fellow american amy olsen who has the first—round lead at the final major of the year, the delayed us women's open in houston, thanks in no small part to this. a hole in one at the 16th. she's four under par,
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a shot clear of the field, with britain's charley hull two off the pace. the bobsleigh world cup event in austria this weekend will feature a british team for the first time this season. problems with injury and funding have meant they've missed the first two events. the team have removed all commercial sponsor branding from their sled for the year and they're paying tribute to the nhs frontline staff, for their work during the coronavirus pandemic, as well as displaying the logos of charities which are close to the hearts of the athletes. i have chosen pancreatic cancer uk. my dad passed away from the disease about six years ago, just before i became a pilot in bobsleigh. he was a big inspiration for me in sport, so i'd like to give something back to them. we have also chosen our separate charity and included team charity, which is the nhs, as well, to support, to try and raise money and awareness and try to spread a bit of positivity through this year, as well. that's all the sport for now.
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you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. including an update from newcastle united manager steve bruce who says he will be without a large number of players following coronavirus cases. more now on sunday's brexit deal deadline. the prime minister has urged businesses to get ready for a no—deal scenario when the transition period ends on december 31st. so, how does a government prepare itself for no deal, what would the implications be on trade and travel and when we hear talk of an australia style deal, what does it really mean? i'm joined now byjoe marshall, a senior researcher at the institute for government who can hopefully help explain some of that.
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just to repeat, the difference between no deal and an australia style deal. the government i guess wa nts style deal. the government i guess wants it to sound positive. is there any difference between australia and wto rules? they are used interchangeably, australia means no deal, it means relying on mostly wto turns in the trade relationship. however, australia does not trade with the eu on purely wto times. it has smaller arrangements regarding trading wine, and things like nuclear cooperation and scientific cooperation. lots of different areas where australia has smaller relationships and deals with the eu. i would also say, the kind of trade that australia does with the eu is different from the kind of trade that the uk does with the eu and
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actually australia has got a free trade relationships and agreements with its closest neighbours where it does a lot of its trade. it is called for no deal but i do not think it is necessarily a helpful analogy. the argument for those who say we would rather have no deal, it is an opportunity for britain to be free and sovereign, versus those who see it as and sovereign, versus those who see itasa and sovereign, versus those who see it as a terrible cliff edge with real risks, how we assess the truth of those two arguments? some of it comes down to fundamental disagreements about what brexit means. about what sovereignty means. and the extent to which you are willing to tie yourself up with others which might tie your hands to get a ccess others which might tie your hands to get access to others' markets. all international agreements, free trade agreements, involve a degree of trade—off, it is where you draw the line. it is important to note that the kind of brexit deal that the government is pursuing, a canada style free trade agreement, it means
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that many of the changes that are going to come at the end of the year at the same, deal or no deal. there are going to be customs and wrigley three checks on the border and potentially cues and traffic disruption as those checks come in a people get used to them. it is going to be new red tape for businesses trading with the eu which will apply, deal or no deal. there will be an immigration system relating to people. many of the big ticket items are the same deal or no deal. no deal poses the risk of additional disruption, and only less red tape, ta riffs disruption, and only less red tape, tariffs and taxes at the border which could affect certain sectors like car manufacturer, agriculture, where there are complex supply chains, potential increases in prices for consumers, and makes and businesses assess whether or not they can adapt to those supply chains or operate as they do now. no deal does have big consequences. but big ticket picture is big changes
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come in, deal or no deal. it is a matter of degree not of type. if there is a no deal exit which it is potentially looking like at the moment, how will we feel? will we notice it in not being able to get food, medicine, things we would really worry about? some of these issues apply, deal or no deal. no deal situation, greater disruption. the risk of shortages of products, this comes from the fact there will be checks introduced at the border, that could cause delays, could cause disruption. in a reasonable worst—case scenario the government expects there could be 7000 lorries queueing over 2d periods, but it probably will not be as bad as that. there is risk that disruption leads to some sort of short—term problems in getting access, particulate to fresh products that may be missing from the shelves. it is likely to be
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not overall reduction of availability of food but there might be particular things that are missing. the government has put in a lot of preparations to try to prevent this disruption and mitigate it. it has got plans in place to manage the traffic play, —— traffic flow. alternative routes to get priority goods including medicines. ina priority goods including medicines. in a note deal scenario there are tariff costs at the border, the most intensive that will add to costs, that will add to cost of doing business with the eu. at some point businesses, particularly those which have struggled with the coronavirus crisis, might have to pass those prices on to consumers. the head of tesco had seen there could be a 5% increase in the cost of food on the shelves. there will be costly. deal or no deal, there will be changes if
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you are travelling, working or studying in europe. red tape, paperwork, more restrictions. it will be harder to do most things and it is at the moment. the uk, boris johnson it is at the moment. the uk, borisjohnson has said the government does not want to be forced to keep up with changes imposed by the eu. he likened it to being forced to buy an expensive handbag. ursula von der leyen has said on the contrary britain would remain free, sovereign if you wish, to decide what to do, simply adapt to decide what to do, simply adapt to conditions. this what she is seeing new or is it a different interpretation? this issue of that level playing field, what standards to be agreed to abide by, unfair competition, has been a key sticking point for negotiations, a technology over the last few months. what it comes down to is the extent to which agreeing a
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set of rules or principles that will govern your competition and make sure that no business is getting an unfair advantage, the uk is concerned it might feel it is tied up concerned it might feel it is tied up to having to follow eu standards or eu levels of protection in perpetuity and that might not want to, and that prevents the ability to diverge. what is interesting, what a lot of trade experts have said, this isa lot of trade experts have said, this is a choice between do you accept the need to potentially have to change your standards in future, if you don't change a standard in future, there will be tariffs and restrictions on trade? or, you sign up, or do you decide to do that now and go for no deal now or you will have tallis and things straightaway but you'll have that freedom to diverge straightaway. trade deals a lwa ys diverge straightaway. trade deals always involve give and take, they a lwa ys always involve give and take, they always involve give and take, they always involve a bit of balance between sovereignty and access to
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markets. it is where the government's appetite is in that. some of the discussions from ursula von der leyen today might ease some of the concerns in recent discussions but ultimately it is a political choice for the government to make. immigration, freedom of movement across the eu, that. in terms of how the uk is involved. that was a key critical factor in how people voted in brexit. it is fascinating to see that the immigration concerns have gone down, haven't they, already?m is interesting. particularly at the moment, the number of people moving around has reduced. it is thought to yea rs around has reduced. it is thought to years since that referendum, things have changed significantly since then. there are going to be a new district is on immigration. the uk is reducing an emigration system, eu citizens will have to apply for
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visas. in most cases they will need a work sponsor or complete a sponsor of them, there will be a salary threshold, english language requirements, all of us think they have not had to do before. it will be harderfor eu citizens to have not had to do before. it will be harder for eu citizens to come and move to the uk after the end of the year. likewise, the same applies for uk citizens wanting to go to the eu. now they will have to deal with the rules and requirements of 27 member states immigration systems and it will be much harder, more expensive, more costly on both sides for that movement of people to take place. yes, the government is delivering on concerns about freedom of movement but it does apply both ways. many thanks for that. very interesting. the public spending watchdog has strongly criticised the coronavirus test and trace service in england, which has a budget of 22 billion pounds. the national audit office
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said in the early stages of the programme, some contact tracers were busy for only one per cent of their paid hours. the government said more recent performance figures had improved, this report covers the time up to the start of november, as england entered a second wave of the pandemic. on testing, it says plans were not in place to deal with a spike in cases as schools and universities reopened. at a drive—in site like this, the aim was to return results in 24 hours. but, by early november, just 38% of tests met that target. then there was a second key task — to trace anyone an infected person had been in contact with and tell them to self—isolate. here, again, the report is critical, saying too few people were called by tracers and it took too long to find those who were. test and trace had a target for in—person tests in the community to get all of them
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back within 24 hours. in the period we looked out from may to october, it only managed to get 41% back within that timeframe, so it needs to look at the speed of what it's doing. more recent figures do appear to show the system is improving, but there have been changes in the way some data are recorded, making comparisons difficult. the government says it now plans to work more closely with local council teams to stop clusters of cases growing into outbreaks. the budget for test and trace this year is £22 billion, or £950 for each household. the watchdog says it must do more to justify that at a time when cases are rising across the country. medical experts advising the us food and drug administration have recommended emergency approval for the pfizer—biontech coronavirus vaccine. the decision comes after a 23—member panel met to determine whether the drug's benefits outweigh the risks. the pfizer vaccine has already been approved for the public in four
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other countries including the uk and canada. nomia iqbal reports from washington. fda and the sponsor, we agreed... a day long, live streamed meeting involving health experts may not make for exciting viewing, but this group of researchers and physicians are the key to america's path back to normality. one question i have is, why... they are part of an independent committee voting on whether the pfizer—biontech vaccine should be given to all americans. pfizer has applied for emergency authorisation. the group has been analyzing the effectiveness of the vaccine and any potential side effects, including the allergic reactions experienced by two british health workers who received the pfizer jab this week. the vote came down to a single question — whether or not the benefits of the vaccine outweigh its risks for use in individuals 16 years of age and older. so if we could please close the vote and broadcast the results. in the end, 17 said
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yes, four said no. the next step is now for the united states food and drug administration to sign off the vaccine, this would then clear the way for the logistically complicated task of distributing it across all 50 states of america. but this is happening during a controversial transitional period. the incoming president says he wants to get 100 million people vaccinated in his first 100 days in office. whilst the outgoing president is more focused on overturning the election result, as well as criticizing the fda for not bringing out a vaccine earlier, but his administration insists, once that green light comes for the jabs, they are ready to roll them out. thanks to president trump's and vice president pence's leadership and operation warp speed and the historic mobilisation that has happened there, we expect to see 100 million vaccinations total by
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the end of february. however, health experts say it could take until spring next year for enough americans to receive a vaccination to end the surging pandemic. in a sense, it's the beginning of the end, but the end is going to last a really long time. every single day, we're shattering records for the number of new cases, hospitalisations and deaths. many parts of the us are getting ready, though, and shipping in covid—19 vaccine kits, including syringes and personal protective equipment. all they need now is a vaccine. let's get more now on the news that dame barbara windsor — one of the uk's best—loved actresses — has died at the age of 83. her husband, scott mitchell, said she passed away peacefully from alzheimer's at a care home in london last night. he spent the last seven days by her side. she was best known for her work
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in eastenders and carry on films. thank you forjoining us. a sad day to hear this news. it isa to hear this news. it is a sad day but everybody smiles because as soon as you think of barbara, that is all you can do. a sad day. a massive loss to the country, the industry, herfamily. but if you remember that smile and that giggle or you can do is smile. it is shocking. it was a lot to wake up it is shocking. it was a lot to wake up to. tell as what she was like to work with? was she as she appeared on screen, off camera also? yes, she was full of energy. always had time
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for young actors. i would remember her being on set. we would have fans waiting outside the gates of bbc. every time she would stop, even if she saw them in the morning, the same day, she would still stop and say hello. if she was on location, every time there was a cat, she would go and speak to those waiting on the sidelines. that was a lesson i took. there is one story that makes me warm inside. there was one scene where we had the scene, a lot of time in my first year and a half i was very quiet. my character is very loud. there is a lot of slang. but myself, i was quiet in the corner. when i was needed, i would
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come on, then i would get out. the end of the scene. i was standing quite. she looked at me. she might have said, i don't know, i was nervous, intimidated, idon't have said, i don't know, i was nervous, intimidated, i don't know what, but she looked at me, grabbed the side of my face and said, aren't you gorgeous? she made you warm inside. it was such a special moment. and lovely to do the scene after it. and it went fantastic. barbara was special. i am so proud at having been able to meet her and work with our and to have memories of her on this sad day. that is a lovely story. and that laugh, it was incredibly infectious. absolutely. i grew up with barbara. everybody loved carry on. then i
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went to theatre royal, stratford east. that is a place where barbara was well known. she had done all, what a lovely war. she had done many epic pieces. we always grew up with the legend of barbara around and how special she was. carrie on, the theatre royal, to see the legend that she was. -- carry on. where are you intimidated? she had incredible comic timing. huge personality on screen. that must have been daunting? absolutely. it was. you'd knew that if you were
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ina it was. you'd knew that if you were in a scene with barbara you had to make sure you knew your lines backwards, that you are on the ball. do not mess anything up. i do not wa nt to do not mess anything up. i do not want to mess at her scene. it was a little bit of intimidation, but that was self intimidation. she never put that out. her order, she was warm, approachable, smiling, engaging. if you asked her a question she would answer. she would give you the time. it is unfortunate i did not get too long to work with her but i'm thankfulfor long to work with her but i'm thankful for the long to work with her but i'm thankfulfor the time long to work with her but i'm thankful for the time that i did get. thank you for sharing your thoughts and memories of working with dame barbara windsor.
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this front is still there. continues to push rain across aberdeenshire, angus. lighter winds elsewhere. to push rain across aberdeenshire, angus. lighterwinds elsewhere. some heavy thundery showers through the english channel. some will stay dry with some sunshine. this evening, mist and fog, particularly over the hills. further rain in scotland, england, north and east wales. further west, clearer skies are due tomorrow morning. the bigger picture for the weekend, low pressure still with us. the rain is
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showery. lots of cloud. a misty and murky start for scotland, northern england, the midlands, eastern england. further west, a conditions develop. sunshine more widely into the afternoon. temperatures may be down a little bit. staying cloudy and damp in eastern parts of scotland. brightest on sunday. for the west, strengthening winds, winds coming in from the south to south—west. more on the way of rain across the country. there might be snow over the tops of the scottish hills, quickly turning back to rain. strong winds touching gale force in places. the driest weather will be in the north east of scotland. into
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next week, a changeable picture. drier moment, rain at times, and some strong winds.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the eu says a no—deal brexit is now more likely than not, but says it could still be possible to strike a trade deal without the uk being forced to follow eu rules. they would remain free, sovereign, if you wish, to decide what they want to. we would simply adapt the conditions for access to our market according to the decision of the united kingdom, and this would apply vice versa. borisjohnson has told his cabinet to prepare for an australian—style relationship with the eu — australia's former prime minister has a warning about that. be careful what you wish for. i mean, australia... australia's relationship with the eu is not one, from a trade point of view, that britain, i think, would want.
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the self—isolation period for those who come into contact with a positive covid case will be cut from 14 days to 10 — the same will apply to those returning from countries which are not on the travel corridor list. dame barbara windsor, best known for her roles in eastenders and the carry on films, has died at the age of 83. mass coronavirus testing is to be rolled out to secondary schools in parts of london, kent and essex in an attempt to curb rising infections. scotland and northern ireland ease coronavirus restrictions, with nonessential retail able to re—open for the first time in weeks. borisjohnson has urged businesses
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to get ready for a no—deal brexit when the transition period ends on december 31st, as european leaders have been told that an agreement is unlikely to be made by this sunday's deadline. but the eu summit, european commisison president ursula von der leyen said that while the positions of the eu and uk "remain apart on fundamental issues", it could still be possible to strike a trade deal without the uk being forced to follow eu rules. on fisheries, here also we continue to have a graph. we have not yet found the solution to bridge our differences. we understand the uk aspires to control its waters. the uk must come on the other hand, understand legitimate expectations of the eu fishing fleets, built on decades and sometimes centuries of access. on these and other plants,
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our negotiators are working. we will decide on sunday for that we have the conditions for an agreement or not. in the meantime, the commission has proposed for targeted contingency measures today. they provide a short—term fix to ensure basic connectivity in air and road transport for six months, and we are also proposing to the uk to ensure reciprocal access to each other‘s waters for next year. one way or the other, in less than three weeks, it will be a new beginnings for all fans. —— for old friends. president emmanuel macron, who has been vocal in his defence of french fishing rights, said he wasn't asking to have his cake and eat it —insisting he just wanted a fair slice of the cake. translation: geography is a stubborn, and we will keep living next to each other even after brexit, so we need to be able to live with each other in the most
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harmonious way possible. i am not asking to have my cake and eat it, no. all i'm asking for is a cake thatis no. all i'm asking for is a cake that is worth its weight. and i won't give up my share of it either. ur brussels correpsondent nick beake has this update. there was a lot of restating language, talking about eu priorities, the fact that if the uk wa nts a ccess priorities, the fact that if the uk wants access to its market it has to agree to some rules and regulations in the future. but i think what ursula von der leyen was attempting to do that was appear very reasonable, to say that it is a deal on offer here which accepts british sovereignty. once a year the word soften, that was very clear. she pointedly dwelt on the word sovereign. and i think what they we re sovereign. and i think what they were hoping to do was to want the british, certainly the british public to see that the eu have come to the wicket, if we had to use the
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analogy is that borisjohnson likes to use a van cricket, that they have come with a proposal they believe is fair. we look to london though to see whether this is enough, to see whether it can break the stalemate that hasn't been able to happen over the past few weeks or so. and crucially what i think she was getting down to is that the eu, as far as it would say, is that it is not trying to tie the uk in the future, and it may be eu standards on some sectors, and environmental workers would go up, they are not necessarily saying the uk has to raise the standard to the same level, but that there will be some sort of consequence to the outcome could be no private ended talks, which of course a behind closed doors, the british are taking exception to exemption to that. the factor may be tariffs on british goods as a consequence of any future digression. i think that is what you we re digression. i think that is what you were trying to do this morning. in reality, is it likely the uk and eu would divert very much on these
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sorts of measures going forward? that is something that a lot of people in the uk have been sane. look at our standard. they are broadly doing when it comes to agriculture, environment, workers tried, looking after people in the places of work. these are things we have done for years and years, ironically when the uk was part of the european union. and if you look at state aid and government subsidies, that is an element of policy that the british were instrumental in. and so some trade experts are saying, is a really, really that much between the two sides? interestingly, emmanuel macron has also been speaking this morning. he said that this is all about remaining harmonious frenzy in the future. you acknowledge there is lots of rumour and speculation swirling around, and he said it was important that if a deal is to be done, it will affect relationships for yea rs done, it will affect relationships for years and years to come. interestingly, he was asked about
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this contingency plan the eu put forward yesterday on things like aviation and hauliers, which for six months would keep things going the same way, to minimise disruption, i don't fishing too. the eu proposal is that if there is no till, fishing access will stay the same for 12 months. and the french president was asked, are you trying to have your ca ke asked, are you trying to have your cake and eat it. and of course that isa cake and eat it. and of course that is a reference to something boris johnson has said previously, that he was a pro having his cake and eating it, and the prensa president said, i am not trying to have my cake and eat it, i'm asking for the cake to be well put together, but i won't be put because my mask are of the other. so an indication that the eu are trying to suggest they are being reasonable, but also reiterating their red lines. in the last few minutes there has been an important change announced to self—isolation rules across the uk. the period you have to stay at home if you have been in contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus is being cut
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from 14 days to 10. our health reporter, jim reed is with me. tell us more about what has been a nun. this is a self isolation period. if someone you have been in contact with test positives for the virus. there are two main ways you find out about that at the moment, through a notification on your mobile phone order contacted by a test and trace team and told you need to stay at home for 14 days. it isa14 need to stay at home for 14 days. it is a 14 day period that from monday is a 14 day period that from monday is being cut to turn days instead. that is already the case in wales, they announced that change earlier this week. it is being rolled out across the whole uk, so england, scotla nd across the whole uk, so england, scotland and northern ireland from monday next week. it is also going to apply to anyone coming to the uk from abroad from a country not in what is called the travel corridor area. if you're coming from one of those countries, at the moment you need to self—isolate for 14 did.
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from monday, that is going down ten days. that means that the signs suggest that you are not infectious after data in? exactly. that is what scientists are saying. why they are doing this i guess it's a key question. speculation they have been trying to do this for a power, torque from the summer onwards. scientists are saying, looking at the data now, you are most infectious for coronavirus pretty soon after being in contact with someone, and then that fades away. so by day ten, it is still possible you can infect someone, but that risk is so much law, and that is why they are saying it is notjustified to hold people in this quarantine period for those last four days. it is also worth pointing out, it's mostly confusing anomaly here with the nhs up. that tells you, it can tell you when your isolation period is over. they are not going to be able to update that until thursday next week, so there is going to be this period between monday and thursday but if you are being told to self—isolate by the app, that
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information could in theory be wrong until this optic can be rolled out later in the week, on thursday. this ta kes later in the week, on thursday. this takes effect from monday next week. in terms of if you are travelling from abroad, can you be tested at five days now? what are the rules on that? there are different rules depending if you are in the travel corridor. if you are in a travel corridor. if you are in a travel corridor country you can come straight in, no self isolation. if you're coming from abroad but if you are coming from a country where you have to currently quarantine for 14 days, for example, france, that is now reduced to ten from monday. but slightly confusingly, from the 15th, that can be cut again to five if you show a negative test done by a private company after that time is up. there will be big changes coming in next week depending on where you are coming from and impinging on if you are going to take a private terrace. and it isjust one test at
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day five? yes. and i think three private companies have said, these are the ones that you can use, and if you show that test on a day six, then you can cut your quarantine period back to just those days. then that suggest that again, after day five, the risk is presumably less? yes, indeed, for people coming from abroad. there is a difference between the first trip are so fascinating because have been in contact with someone who has tested positive on the group coming from abroad that might not have had contact with someone with the virus. there are two slightly different issues. yes. we have all the rules online. hard to keep, but important to try to keep up with all the details. we have just to try to keep up with all the details. we havejust had to try to keep up with all the details. we have just had the latest ons figures on the number of covid infection from the server. the estimate 481,500 people in private households in england had covid—19
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between november the 19th and december the 5th. that is the equivalent of around 0.18% of the population. it represents a drop from 521,300 who were estimated to have covid—19 in the period earlier. and these figures just amount you, they are private households and they don't include care homes or institutional setting. those numbers just in it now. dame barbara windsor, one of the uk's best—loved actresses, has died at the age of 83. her husband, scott mitchell, said she passed away peacefully from alzheimer's at a care home in london last night. he spent the last seven days by her side. he said... she was best known for her work
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in eastenders and carry on films. david sillito looks back at her life. barbara giggles. that'll do, that'll do. all right, girls, get in the coach, and you get on with the loading. barbara windsor — a 4ft 10in national treasure. we were told to bring the minimum of clothing. now really let's see those chests come out! matron, take them away! barbara ann deeks began acting as a teenager. born in shoreditch, in london, the daughter of a barrow boy, it was joan littlewood at a theatre workshop who saw her star quality. she won a bafta nomination for the film sparrows can't sing. movies and cabaret introduced her to glamour and some shady friends. at one point, she dated the gangster reggie kray. but it was the carry on films that made her a star. hi.
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have you got a large one? i've had no complaints, so far. he cackles. especially if sid james was around — a relationship that carried on off—camera. quick, before somebody comes in. you 'aven't got any soap on that bit. # up to the west end!#. but after those nine carry on films, there were some lean years. until she found peggy. grant! mum. i heard you were back, i was going to give you a call. then why didn't you, you useless great lump? peggy mitchell in eastenders, the new landlady of the queen vic, was a role made for her. you're unfit to be a father! don't you dare turn your back on me! 22 years on albert square... get outta my pub! ..which ended with barbara becoming dame barbara. dame babs sounds nice, doesn't it? my mum would have liked it to be dame barbara — she was a bit of a cockney
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snob, my mum. so she would be, "dame barbara." god, what would she be thinking now? what would she be thinking? however, her farewell to walford was also her farewell to acting. she had been diagnosed with alzheimer's. oh, my dear friend. you'll never leave me, will you? dame barbara windsor, talent, warmth... no, sweetheart. thank you. ..and a lifetime of cheeky fun. in the uk, secondary school pupils in parts of london, essex and kent will be offered mass—testing in an effort to control the spread of coronavirus. it comes as secondary school students in wales prepare to take their classes online from the end of today, after a significant rise in infections there. anna o'neill has the story. out of an actual real
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gcse question... secondary school pupils in the classroom in wales, but not for long. from monday until the new year, they will be doing their learning at home, online. the public health situation there is deteriorating, putting the nhs under pressure. one of the largest teaching unions in wales welcomed the news to keep students at home for now. a few days ago, there was a report by the technical advisory group, which effectively, when you boiled it down, was telling parents that if they wanted a christmas that was without self—isolation, they should take their children out of school. we have found from our members telling us that large numbers of parents were beginning to do that. cases among young people in the south—east of england are also on the rise. at last night's news conference, the health minister said he was particularly concerned about london, where rates are up in 31 out of 32 boroughs. we know from experience that a sharp rise in cases in younger people can lead to a rise amongst more
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vulnerable age groups later. we have seen that happen before. so we need to do everything we can to stop the spread amongst school—aged children in london right now. in havering, there are 379 cases per 100,000 people. in waltham forest, it's 317. and 311 per 100,000 people in barking and dagenham. and so, last night, the government announced an immediate plan for testing all secondary school—aged children in the seven worst affected boroughs in london, as well as parts of essex that border it and parts of kent. the leader of barking and dagenham welcomed the news. we are looking forward to being able to use the additional resources we need to make sure we keep our young people as safe as possible. at the same time, we are also making sure that every teacher gets tested before they leave the term, which is good, and they will go home with a home test,
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which will allow them to test before they have to come back at the start of the new term. there are concerns that unless the rates in london start to fall, the capital is heading for a move from tier 2 into tier 3 next week, just before the christmas relaxation of restrictions — something london's leaders are keen to avoid. anna o'neill, bbc news. let's take you straight to cardiff, where the first minister of wales, mark drakeford, is holding a briefing on the coronavirus. he assigned the virus is spreading than predicted. the events are now incredibly high. these very high levels of coronavirus are translating inevitably into significant and sustained pressure on our nhs. this week the number of coronavirus related patients in hospital past 1900 for the very
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first time, and continues to rise. if this increase continues at this rate, we could see 2500 people with coronavirus in hospital by christmas day. a very large number of people who catch coronavirus go on to have a serious illness afterwards. they needed a careful and expert care of our health service, because many will be in hospitalfor weeks. our nhs staff are doing an incredible job, under very difficult circumstances, and i thank them all for everything they have done throughout the pandemic, and continue to do so. but there is only so much we can ask of them. there is only so much we can ask of her
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national health service. put quite simply, the nhs will not be able to cope as it is today if we continue to see this level of coronavirus —related emissions in the coming weeks. on top of normal winter pressures . weeks. on top of normal winter pressures. yesterday, the health minister agreed that health boards can postpone some appointments and procedures world that has become necessary. yesterday, the education minister announced all secondary schools and colleges will move to online learning from monday as part ofa online learning from monday as part of a national effort to bring coronavirus under control. we will require all local authorities which have had to close primary schools next week because, for example, they have a shortage of teaching staff, to open harbour provision for
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vulnerable children and the children of essential workers until the end of essential workers until the end of term. and i know that there is clarity will be welcomed by local authority leaders. —— to open a provision. and today, a local government minister will announce the closure of outdoor attractions across wales. the seriousness we face demands no less. i know there have been rumours about fake news circulating about action that could be taken here in wales. let me confirm today, there will not be a night—time curfew and there is no ban on all alcohol sales. you will a lwa ys ban on all alcohol sales. you will always hear about the changes to the measures we are putting in place in wales directly from myself or from my ministerial colleagues. we will
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a lwa ys my ministerial colleagues. we will always explain to you why we need to make any changes. and the authoritative news you need to come so you don't from the welsh government. and to help with that, next week we will publish an updated coronavirus control plan to help you, businesses and public services plan in today's rapidly changing circumstances. we originally published at traffic lights plan in may, in the first wave of the pandemic, as we were moving out of lockdown. this was before we had a trusted trace and protect, before the new generation of rapid resort test became available, and before we had a vaccine. that traffic light plan focus on a cautious and gradual unlocking of restrictions as cases
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we re unlocking of restrictions as cases were falling. today, the situation is very different. we have revised the plan using what we have learnt over the course of the pandemic about how the virus is rapidly spreading, and the latest information from our scientific and medical advisers. and we have drawn an experience elsewhere across the united kingdom. the revised plan sets out for alert levels. today in wales, we are at alert level three. the traffic light is red. the level of risk is very high. now, i must be clear with everybody this afternoon. if the strengthened measures of last week and the extra actions of this week, together with the efforts each and every one of us need to make, if
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those measures do not succeed in turning the tide of the virus, then it is inevitable that we will have to consider a move to alert level for immediately after christmas. now, that move is not a foregone conclusion. the future remains in our hands. every act together and all reduced to people we see and mix with, we can change the course of this terrible virus. we have done it before when we work together to protect the nhs and save lives, and we needs to do the same thing again now. in the last seven days, there have been more than 12,000 new cases of coronavirus. that's the size of a
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town like carmarthen here in wales. the virus is here, it is widespread throughout the uk and wales. the best present anyone of us can give ourfamilies this best present anyone of us can give our families this year is to have a coronavirus free christmas. and for that to happen, we all need to reduce the number of people we see and mix with. the chief medical officers message to people in wales this week has been simple — don't mix with people outside your own household. if we all do that, we can keep ourfamilies household. if we all do that, we can keep our families safe and keep wales safe too. as usual now, i will ta ke
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wales safe too. as usual now, i will take some questions, and all the a nswe rs take some questions, and all the answers will be broadcast live on it welsh government's social media channels. and today, i am going first to james volumes at bbc wales. cani first to james volumes at bbc wales. can i start with some practical question. when are you going to announce the new plan? also, with regards to the level three we are at moment, does not mean this kind of restrictions that we have at the moment? and to qualify does little marks of —— does the level four look like what we had a couple of weeks ago? probably it across all wales come and bother me any time limits on? we plan to publish the document on? we plan to publish the document on monday. i would hope to have it debated on the floor of the senate
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on tuesday. we are indeed at level three, so you are right that the sort of restrictions we have in place now are consistent with a level three, a red traffic light level. when we moved to level four, it is inevitable that there will be a greater level of restriction. we will set out that in the document next week. we will also set out how, if it were to be the case that parts of wales establish themselves in a reliable and predictable and sustainable way as having a different level of the virus to other parts of wales, it would be possible to have more than one level in wales. that is not the position we are and in wales today. the virus is rising everywhere in wales, but the plan will set out the criteria we produce, the judgments
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the plan will set out the criteria we produce, thejudgments that the plan will set out the criteria we produce, the judgments that would be needed, if that pattern were to change in the future. just to confirm, we are looking at another lockdown if you get to level four? cani lockdown if you get to level four? can ijust asked you about schools? at the start of the route, you said you were sticking by the joint statement by the welsh government and the welsh local government association that the schools would stay open until the end of term. you change the course yesterday. why? level four restrictions are a step above what we have now, and they are pretty restrictive now, so i think it would be self evident to people that at level four, there would be even more restrictions to the freedoms we are able to offer people. if the numbers cannot be brought to a position where they are falling away from where they are today. the position on schools altered because of the break the
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numbers are rising. they have been rising even faster this week than they were over the last two weeks. by they were over the last two weeks. by yesterday, the advice of the chief medical officer to myself and to the education minister was unequivocal. it was his advice that secondary school student should be taught at home next week. this is not bringing the holidays forward by a week. those young people will remain in school. they will be receiving their education online and at home, but they will still be receiving an education, and it was a chief medical officer's to advise that, in the face of the rising numbers we aren't seeing, and the impact that is having on our health service, we had to take even further measures than the ones we announced last week, and that is why we made the decision that we did. over to
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james at itv tier. could you just explain what constitutes an outdoor attraction? does that include christmas lights? it will include things like winter wonderland attractions and fun fairs and other things that are simply there for entertainment. is waiting till after christmas to do anything to bring in a lockdown, is that waiting too late? based on your own graph it seemed to indicate lockdown should be brought in now, thatis lockdown should be brought in now, that is what many doctors in a smack for, but it seems that is not going to happen.
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i took this press conference twice last week and both press conferences i was asked repeatedly whether or not we were doing too much, whether the restrictions you are introducing in relation to hospitality and indoor attractions was going too far, in advance of the facts, where was the evidence. this week the question is whether we are going far enough. thatjust demonstrates that this is constantly a balancing act, co nsta ntly this is constantly a balancing act, constantly trying to find the right set of measures to address the issues that we are facing. i believe that with the restrictions that we announced last week, with the changes we're making this week, in the health service, education, in relation to outdoor attractions, that we have a package of measures provided, this is the most important point, provided in our own lives we
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all do those things that have the biggest effect of all, that we have to allow that package to have an impact. if it doesn't have, if we do not manage to do that, then i am signalling clearly to people today that more will have to follow. in welsh. in welsh.
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sorry to our welsh speakers, but in the meantime i'm going to summarise what we have heard from mark dra keford what we have heard from mark drakeford who what we have heard from mark dra keford who has what we have heard from mark drakeford who has said that if things continue we could see 2500 cases in hospital by christmas per day. they are very worried about the rising number of infections. they have stressed that they are postponing some normal hospital procedures. schools will go online from monday for the final part of the school term. and they are also currently on alert level three, with their traffic light system, being very high on red, and it could go to level four immediately after christmas, if the numbers continue to rise. mark drakeford seeing that is not inevitable and it does depend on everyone's behaviour. stressing the message that regardless of what
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is allowed, people should still be very careful about mixing, including over the christmas period. also stress that any announcement on wales in terms of procedures and restrictions will only come from the government. he mentioned reports of a night—time curfew and ban on alcohol sales are not true and that any changes can directly from the welsh government. with a plea again for people to heed restrictions and not necessarily to see people if they do not need to, despite what they do not need to, despite what the rules are. just want to also bring you up—to—date on the latest on the ons survey figures which we have had in. that gives as an idea as to how many people have got the virus now in the uk. our head of statistics is a saying that what it is showing is that in england, there are one and 115 cases, but level still falling,
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in scotland and wales, 120, scotland is stable, wales are seeing rising numbers, in northern ireland the numbers, in northern ireland the numbers are one and 235. there are regional variations, in england over the most recent week, percentage of people testing positive has increased in london, early signs that rates may be increasing in the east of england. percentage of people testing positive has decreased in all other regions, that is figures up to the 5th of december. those are some of the latest statistics coming in from the ons. the estimated about 480,000 had coronavirus and weekending 5th of december, lockdown ending on 2nd of december. there was suggestions that london could be put into tier 3, potentially with an announcement next week, but nothing confirmed. it
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is currently in tier 2. in the last hour we have also had an important change and outs to self isolation rules, the period that you have to stay at home if you have been in contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus. it has now been cut from 14 days to ten days. the change comes into place from monday. deputy chief medical officer for england gave as this update. the announcement is to see that following continuous review of the evidence as it has accumulated, we are now saying that for individuals who are self isolating or coming back from non—exempt travel destinations, they can reduce the period of isolation from 14 days to ten days. that science is based on a continuous accumulation of evidence through the pandemic. siege has looked at this as have a number of academic institutions. —— sage has
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looked at this. all of these show that the tail end of infection are an individual is least likely to transmit infection, therefore allowing people out of isolation a short time earlier than that is a reasonable balance between managing risk but allowing as not to intrude on their lives. and to clarify, those changes, those measures already apply in wales, those changes come into effect in england, scotland, northern ireland, from monday. medical —— experts advising the us food and drug administration have recommended emergency approval for the pfizer—biontech coronavirus vaccine. the decision comes after a 23—member panel met to determine whether the drug's benefits outweigh the risks. the pfizer vaccine has already been approved for the public in four other countries including the uk and canada. nomia iqbal reports from washington.
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fda and the sponsor, we agreed... a day long, live streamed meeting involving health experts may not make for exciting viewing, but this group of researchers and physicians are the key to america's path back to normality. one question i have is, why... they are part of an independent committee voting on whether the pfizer—biontech vaccine should be given to all americans. pfizer has applied for emergency authorisation. the group has been analyzing the effectiveness of the vaccine and any potential side effects, including the allergic reactions experienced by two british health workers who received the pfizer jab this week. the vote came down to a single question — whether or not the benefits of the vaccine outweigh its risks for use in individuals 16 years of age and older. so if we could please close the vote and broadcast the results. in the end, 17 said yes, four said no. the next step is now for the united states food and drug administration to sign off the vaccine, this would then clear
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the way for the logistically complicated task of distributing it across all 50 states of america. but this is happening during a controversial transitional period. the incoming president says he wants to get 100 million people vaccinated in his first 100 days in office. whilst the outgoing president is more focused on overturning the election result, as well as criticizing the fda for not bringing out a vaccine earlier, but his administration insists, once that green light comes for the jabs, they are ready to roll them out. thanks to president trump's and vice president pence's leadership and operation warp speed and the historic mobilisation that has happened there, we expect to see 100 million vaccinations total by the end of february. however, health experts say it could take until spring next year for enough americans to receive a vaccination to end
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the surging pandemic. in a sense, it's the beginning of the end, but the end is going to last a really long time. every single day, we're shattering records for the number of new cases, hospitalisations and deaths. many parts of the us are getting ready, though, and shipping in covid—19 vaccine kits, including syringes and personal protective equipment. all they need now is a vaccine. let's get more on brexit — the prime minister has been speaking in the past few minutes. a critical few days now with sandy being the latest deadline. we are always hopeful. negotiations are continuing. our teams are still out there in brussels. it was a big offer, a big change and what they are saying. i have yet to see id. at
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the moment, there are two key things where we just cannot seem to make progress. this is the kind of ratchet clause that they have to keep the uk locked into whatever they want to do in terms of legislation which office he does not work, then that is the issue of fish, we have got to be able to take back control of our waters. there is a way to go. we are hopeful that progress can be made. but i have got to tell you, from where i stand now, it is looking very likely that we will have to go for a solution that i think will be wonderful for the uk, we will be able to do what we wa nt uk, we will be able to do what we want from january the 1st, it will be different to what we set out to achieve, but i have no doubt that this country can do that. world trade terms. boris johnson, speaking
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a short time ago, on what he says is the strong prospect of a no—deal brexit. non—essential shops across much of western scotland — including glasgow — are reopening for the first time in three weeks. retailers in the 11 council areas that had been been under the country's toughest lockdown rules were also able to welcome customers this morning. but pubs and restaurants will have to remain closed until saturday. and in northern ireland non—essential retail and some parts of the hospitality sector are now able to reopen. a two—week limited lockdown, which was imposed on 27 november ended last night. our correspondent chris page is in belfast and andrew black is in glasgow. christmas shopping is returning in belfast two weeks before christmas day.
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the crowds are gradually starting to gather. there are eight few queues outside some shops. as regards the situation for retailers a lot of them have been seeing it as a tough time for them. they have lost two of what is usually there are four busiest weeks of the year. also, the hospitality industry has been hit very hard. pubs, restaurants and hotels have been shut since the middle of october but that is changing today. pubs and restaurants that serve food can reopen to customers again. bars that serve drinks only, they will have to stay shut. also close contact services like hairdressers, beauticians, they are opening again, and regular services can't in places of worship. it isa services can't in places of worship. it is a big tree opening day but all of that is tempered by warnings from senior medics, health officials, leaders of a devolved government in belfast, that these last two weeks,
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the circuits break out lockdown has not had as good an impact on the rate of infection as had been hoped. that number of cases per day is still rising between 400 and 500. that is a high infection rate for a country the size of northern ireland. the warning is if you are going out and about to take extra care, make sure you are being all the public health guidelines, and while people are encouraged to support local businesses, people are also being urged to bear in mind that the infection rate is high and that the infection rate is high and that northern ireland could be looking at further restrictions, perhaps even before the new year, certainly into january, if that infection rates rises significantly. here in glasgow, in the centre of glasgow, shops have started reopening this morning. some quite good news. shoppers have returned to the high street. the nonessential outlets have been closed in glasgow
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and an eight number of other local authority areas in west of scotland for the last three weeks. these additional measures have been put in place to deal with a spike in coronavirus cases. this morning for shops in central glasgow started opening from around seven o'clock. there have been plenty of queues in shops. debenhams, just behind me, opened at nine o'clock. lots of bargain hunters waiting to get in. speaking to shoppers this morning, they are quite apt for coming back to high streets to do their christmas shopping. they are quite happy that they will be safe. there has been a lot of money spent by scottish retailers to put as many safety procedures in shops as possible. the scottish government has been quite careful to issue plenty of advice to people who are going shopping to its the social existence, wash their hands, and we are face coverings in stores as well. there is still a bit of
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trepidation, especially in glasgow, because even though nonessential retailers have been allowed to reopen, there are still travel restrictions in place for the areas in that level three area of restrictions, of which glasgow now is. given that glasgow high street is. given that glasgow high street is such a famous place, shoppers can from across scotland to do christmas shopping, especially here, also hospitality businesses are not set to open again until tomorrow. even so, in the level three area they cannot sell alcohol, they have to close at 6pm as well. all of those factors a re close at 6pm as well. all of those factors are giving concern to retailers here. the message seems to be that even though they have been allowed to reopen, and shoppers are quite happy to come back to the shops today, retailers do not think that the next couple of weeks they will be able to make up the shortfall that they would otherwise have made if shopping had been
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allowed to happen normally. and from the scotland daily briefing, the first minister announcing 31 deaths from coronavirus in scotland the last 24 hours from people who had tested positive for coronavirus in the previous 28 days. new number of cases registered, has taken the total in the country to 1306. nicola sturgeon admitted the amount of new cases was the highest in the number of days and reminded us that the virus is still out there. 999 people currently in hospital in scotland, 15 more than yesterday, 53 are in intensive care, that is one more. total number of deaths from coronavirus in scotland is 4070. that has just come from the scottish daily briefing.
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let's get more now on the news that dame barbara windsor — one of the uk's best—loved actresses — has died at the age of 83. her husband, scott mitchell, said she passed away peacefully from alzheimer's at a care home in london last night. she was best known for her work in eastenders and carry on films. earlier i spoke to former eastenders actor ricky norwood, who worked alongside barbara windsor for five years from 2010. it isa it is a very sad day but it is a sad day in which everybody smiles. as soon as you think of barbara, all you can do is smile. a really sad day, a massive loss to the country, to the industry, add to herfamily. but if you remember that smile, that giggle, all you can do is smile. it was crazy to be capped to that news. shocking. it was a lot to wake up to. tell as about what she was like to
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work with. was she as she appeared on screen, was she like that off camera also? yes. she was full of energy. she always had time for young actors and the fans. i would remember her being on set. we would have fa ns remember her being on set. we would have fans wait outside the gates of the bbc. every time, she would stop. evenif the bbc. every time, she would stop. even if she saw them in the morning, the same day she was still stop and say hello. if she was on location map she would go and speak to the people that were waiting on the sidelines. she would spend more time with the fans than with the executives are the bigwigs in the bbc. that was a lesson that i took. one story that makes me warm inside. one story that makes me warm inside. one scene, a lot of the time in my
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first year and a half i was very quiet. my character was very loud. there was a lot of slang. but myself, i was very quiet in the corner. when i was needed, i would do what i had to do and then get out. we had this scene. i was standing quite. she looked at me, she might have sensed i was nervous or intimidated, i don't know what. she looked at me, and she grabbed the side of my face and said, aren't you gorgeous. she made me warm inside. it was such a special moment. it was lovely to do the scene after mass. it went fantastic. barbara was special. i am so honoured to have worked with her as an artist and to have memories of her on this sad day.
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that laugh was infectious. that is what we all here. absolutely. i grew up what we all here. absolutely. i grew up with barbara everybody love to we would all be watching carry on. and the theatre royal stratford east is a place where barbara was well known. she had done all, what a lovely war. and there is one picture where she is pulling an expression but looking through a pair of women's legs, that was always in the bar. we grew up at the legend of barbara and how special she was. to see her in pictures, and the legend she was, and to know her and worked with her for the short time that i did is very special. i am thankful for that.
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where are you intimidated? it must have been difficult. she had this incredible comic timing. huge personality. on screen at least. incredible comic timing. huge personality. on screen at leastm must‘ve been quite daunting. it was. if you knew that you were any scene with barbara, you had to make sure that you knew you lines backwards, that you knew you lines backwards, that you knew you lines backwards, that you were on the ball. do not mess anything up. i do not want to mess anything up. i do not want to mess up her scene. but that was like self intimidation. she never put that out. her aura, when she was around, she was warm and approachable. she was smiling and engaging. if you ask a question she would answer, she would give you the time. if he needs any advice she would always give you the time. it is unfortunate i did not get too long to work with her but i am thankfulfor long to work with her but i am thankful for the long to work with her but i am thankfulfor the time long to work with her but i am thankful for the time that i did
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get. the prime minister did request a call with angela merkel, that was rejected, a senior eu official has confirmed, because the talks were being conducted on behalf of the commission. we have also heard from ursula von der leyen earlier this morning saying the uk is three to remain solvent, to decide whether they want to go on a level playing field, they are still holding that out on sunday. oscar—winning director steve mcqueen secured his place in cinematic history with the academy award—winning best
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picture 12 years a slave. but until now, there wasn't an equivalent epic portraying black people's history in britain. his series small axe features five standalone movies exploring the lives of people in london's west indian community. the final episode airs this sunday. mcqueen spoke earlier to bbc breakfast. many of us have yet to catch up with small axe. the thinking behind it was, this is a period of time, why was that this particular period of time, late 70s and early 80s? why was it that particular period of time that you thought there were stories there that we didn't know enough about? firstly i wanted to make small axe for my mother, where she could turn on the telly and have it accessible to her. that period of time, from the late 60s to the early 80s, was a time when things were being contested. and stories which were being swept beneath the carpet needed to be spoken about. what for me was interesting about it was the evolution from that
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period of time, from 68 with enoch powell, the rivers of blood speech, at the same time frank crichlow opening the mangrove, all the way to leroy logan in '84. when he gets to a situation of institutional racism in the metropolitan police. tell as a little bit more about leroy logan. that is the last part we saw. we just played a couple of clips. tell us more about that story particularly. this is a black man who joins the police force and it is the story of dynamic within the police force and the problems he faced from within. yes, leroy logan was a research scientist and he decided to join the met in the early 80s, 83. at the time, just after he decided to join the met, his father was brutally beaten up by two policemen. and he had to make a decision. to join the met or not.
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again, i don't want to spoil it for anyone who hasn't seen it, but there is a map in the story there between the father and the son. the rights and wrongs of joining the establishment in order to change it. that's what that story was about. it's just a generational story too. between the second generation and the person who was in the windrush generation. there is a generational debate, discussion really. some wet weather in the forecast. there has been some wet weather today. this band of rain moved away from eastern england during the morning. it's persisted across parts of eastern scotland. south—easterly winds of the north sea bringing this rain relentlessly into parts of
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aberdeenshire and up to caithness as well. these same areas will be seeing rain through the rest of today. and the ground is wet, there is the risk of localised disruption and flooding. showery rain elsewhere as we end the day. a bit heavier in the west for a time overnight. the far west, particularly northern ireland, wales and the south—west, clearer skies moving in will allow temperatures to drop later. clear skies, courtesy of a temporary ridge of high pressure. this high temporarily exerting its influence and giving a slice of the drier and brighter weather. eastern areas will hold on to cloud and showery rain. more in the way of sunshine elsewhere. temperatures a little
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down on today. through saturday evening, this slice of the sky will be pushed further eastwards. as that passes overhead it will allow temperatures to drop. there could be a touch of frost temporarily and fog. out west it turns milder through the night. winds will be strengthening. for sunday we will see brisk winds and heavy bursts of rain. just about all of as seeing wet weather. some windy weather also. exposed coasts could see gusts of 50 mph or more.
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dame barbara windsor — whose acting career spanned more than six decades — has died at the age of 83. laughter. she found fame in the carry on films — and later was the landlady of the queen vic. eastenders co—stars have paid tribute. we were so very close and she was actually a mentor to me, and a good friend to me, throughout everything in my life. she was just great fun. after being diagnosed with dementia six years ago, dame barbara campaigned for greater awareness and help for the condition. we'll hear many tributes to dame barbara. also this lunchtime: the self—isolation period is being reduced from 14 days to ten

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