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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  March 4, 2021 1:00pm-1:30pm GMT

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the duke of edinburgh has undergone a procedure for a pre—existing heart condition. buckingham palace says the operation was successful — prince philip is likely to stay in hospitalfor a number more days. it comes as the duchess of sussex tells american television she feels she has to speak out about how the palace treated her and prince harry. i don't know how they could expect that after all of this time we would still be just silent if there is an active role that the firm is playing in perpetuating falsehoods about us. we'll have the latest from our royal correspondent. also this lunchtime: more tax rises may be needed, says the institute for fiscal studies, as it warns the chancellor's spending plans don't look deliverable.
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the number of coronavirus infections in england continues to fall, say researchers, but the rate of decrease may have slowed. and leave your money at home — amazon opens its first supermarket in the uk, and it doesn't have any tills. and coming up on bbc news... liverpool managerjurgen klopp says he won't automatically release players for international duty if they have to quarantine on their return to the uk. klopp said fifa backed him. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the duke of edinburgh has undergone a procedure for a pre—existing heart condition. buckingham palace says
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the procedure was successful, and was carried out yesterday. the duke, who is 99, is expected to stay in hospital for a number of days. the news comes as the royal family is being accused by the duchess of sussex of perpetuating falsehoods about her and and her husband. the dramatic comments are in a newly released excerpt from meghan and prince harry's interview with oprah winfrey for american television. here's our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. it was on monday of this week that the duke was transferred from the king edward vii hospital, where he had spent 13 nights to st bartholomew's hospital, one of britain's premier centres for cardiac care. he will have been assessed on tuesday and then a surgical procedure yesterday. according to buckingham palace...
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it's thought the pre—existing heart condition may refer to the episode ten years ago, when he was admitted by helicopter to papworth hospital. he had suffered a blocked coronary artery. a stent was inserted. the queen and other members of the family visited him in hospital, a sign that this had been a moment of real anxiety. this time, the queen is remaining at windsor, where, with her officials, she will doubtless be pondering the latest twists and turns in the sussex saga. last night, the us broadcaster cbs issued another clip from the duchess of sussex�*s upcoming interview with oprah winfrey. it is not comfortable viewing for the palace. how do you feel about the palace hearing you speak your truth today? i don't know how they could expect that after all of this time we would still be just silent if there is an active role that the firm is playing
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in perpetuating falsehoods about us. and if that comes with risk of losing things, i mean, there's a lot that has been lost already. as the duchess accuses the palace of perpetuating unspecified falsehoods against her, the palace is preparing to investigate claims from former members of her staff that she bullied them, allegations which the duchess's spokesman has denied. normally, of course, the queen would have her husband at her side to support her at moments such as this. but not just now. but notjust now. but from the palace today on social media, on this world book day, a reminder of less turbulent times. the queen and the duke together at bell moral in 1976. and nicholas is here with me... let's talk about the duke. the
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procedure, we understand? yes. let's talk about the duke. the procedure, we understand? yes, if it is something — procedure, we understand? yes, if it is something to _ procedure, we understand? yes, if it is something to do _ procedure, we understand? yes, if it is something to do with _ procedure, we understand? yes, if it is something to do with the - is something to do with the insertion of the stent in 2011, this would be something called angioplasties. this is not major heart surgery. it would be carried out under local anaesthetic which clearly is important in the case of someone who is nearly 100 years old. it could be narrowing of the artery around the old stent, or another stent required. we don't know and i don't think the palace will say. we don't think the palace will say. we do know that his recuperation is expected to take a number of further days. expected to take a number of further da s. �* , , . days. and very difficult timing, we are a matter _ days. and very difficult timing, we are a matter of _ days. and very difficult timing, we are a matter of days _ days. and very difficult timing, we are a matter of days away - days. and very difficult timing, we are a matter of days away from . days. and very difficult timing, we | are a matter of days away from the full broadcast of the interview in the us. , ., ., ., full broadcast of the interview in theus. , ., ., ., ., the us. yes, not great for someone with a heart — the us. yes, not great for someone with a heart condition. _ the us. yes, not great for someone with a heart condition. it _ the us. yes, not great for someone with a heart condition. it is - the us. yes, not great for someone with a heart condition. it is fair- with a heart condition. it is fair to say the palace must be feeling baffled and frankly bemused by all of this. what are the falsehoods that meghan alleges the firm has been perpetuating? hopefully, oprah
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winfrey has pushed back and challenged her in the interview to say, what are you talking about? what is the chapter and verse of these falsehoods you say? and then if she does spell it out we will be in a position to judge the credibility and the substance of what it is she is alleging. nicholas witchell, for _ what it is she is alleging. nicholas witchell, for now, _ what it is she is alleging. nicholas witchell, for now, thank- nicholas witchell, you very much. a leading economic research group says the chancellor's spending plans outlined in yesterday's budget do not look deliverable. the institute for fiscal studies is warning further tax rises may be needed. let's speak to our economics correspondent andy verity. bring us right up to speed with what the afs is laying out here, and e. this is the traditional assessment we get after every fiscal event and i have followed a lot of these over the years, and i have rarely seen an assessment is critical of a budget assessment is critical of a budget as this one. of course the ifs
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welcomes the spending that will support the economy, some £65 billion additional spending rishi sunak is doing. he says it is generous, progressive, helping the country through the emergency, and the ifs welcomes that. it is just the ifs welcomes that. it is just the rest of their assessment that won't be pleasant listening for the chancellor. for example, they are saying the credibility of the plan is to get back into surplus after that big initial spend to get us out of this hole, well, there is not much credibility to them is what the ifs is saying. jogged in is a £17 billion cut public spending, relative to the plans rishi sunak had before the pandemic. paul johnson, the ifs director, asked how likely he thinks it is rishi sunak would be able to pull that off, had this assessment. frankly, that doesn't strike me as being terribly plausible. the idea that we'll need to be spending less on education
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and health and social care and local government and all those things after the pandemic than we thought we were going to beforehand just doesn't look in the least bit likely, given that we know, even for the minimum things like vaccination and test and trace and ppe and so on, let alone catching up with the huge backlog of operations and the need to catch up children who have lost so much school and the need to help local authorities and so on, these numbers don't look like they're going to hold. the ifs has also repeatedly focused on what it regards as a double standard. on the one hand the chancellor is withdrawing the temporary boost to universal credit for 6 million of the country's poorest families in october. he has done it now for 18 months, but the ifs has pointed out that that is being done in october while on the other hand hisjudgment is being done in october while on the other hand his judgment is that you cannot raise taxes on corporations
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for another three years. they are joining the criticism that some other ngos have made of the effect that will have on those particular families. rishi sunak has said this morning he acted generously by extending it to that level rather than phasing it out before, and has pointed to other measures like kick—start, like help paying with rent, but the ifs is saying there no policies he had to deal with the inequalities that have worsened over the pandemic. between the young and old, the rich and poor, and also the better and less well educated. shindig better and less well educated. andy veri , better and less well educated. andy verity. thank _ better and less well educated. andy verity, thank you. _ better and less well educated. andy verity, thank you. let's _ better and less well educated. andy verity, thank you. let's talk about the politics of it all is well with chris mason at westminster. how is the government responding to the criticisms, particularly around the whole area of inequality?- criticisms, particularly around the whole area of inequality? there's a fascinatin: whole area of inequality? there's a fascinating day _ whole area of inequality? there's a fascinating day to _ whole area of inequality? there's a fascinating day to microanalysis - fascinating day to microanalysis going on as we pour through the detail of the budget yesterday, in particular questions around this phrase levelling up. you will have
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heard it used a lot, sprinkled around like political seasoning on the rhetoric of particularly conservative politicians. what on earth does it mean? there is a row this lunchtime about money allocated in the budget yesterday to a series of towns, a good number of which are now conservative held with labour saying this is pork barrel politics, a reference to a 19th american term of shovelling money in the direction of shovelling money in the direction of people you hope will continue voting for you. the government argues that if you have a sizeable majority, then lots of areas you do help with funding are likely to be areas that are held by the current government. danjarvis, the mayor of south yorkshire, labour mp in barnsley also asking why the chancellor seat in relatively affluent north yorkshire is allocated as a priority one region for levelling up spending whereas barnsley and sheffield in south yorkshire are only in priority two.
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so this a real focus today, as the analysis of this budget in the detail really gets going. chris mason, thank _ detail really gets going. chris mason, thank you. _ scientists tracking the spread of coronavirus say infections in england have continued to fall, although the rate of decrease may have slowed. the findings from imperial college london are based on swab samples last month. and as the government announces extra funding to try to tackle obesity in england, a new report shows that 90% of covid deaths worldwide have happened in countries where more than half the population is overweight — that includes the uk. here's our health correspondent catherine burns. the health secretary today checking in on the latest in the race between us and coronavirus. last year it was all about scientists creating vaccines, now the race continues, tweaking those vaccines to make sure they keep pace with the virus as it
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mutates. , , ., ., ,., ., ~ mutates. this is all about making sure that if _ mutates. this is all about making sure that if we _ mutates. this is all about making sure that if we need _ mutates. this is all about making sure that if we need an _ mutates. this is all about making sure that if we need an updated | sure that if we need an updated vaccine to work against these new variants, we can get it approved and into people's arms as soon as is safely possible. the into people's arms as soon as is safely possible.— into people's arms as soon as is safely possible. the vaccines we have not safely possible. the vaccines we have got new — safely possible. the vaccines we have got now were _ safely possible. the vaccines we have got now were designed - safely possible. the vaccines we have got now were designed to l safely possible. the vaccines we - have got now were designed to fight the original version of coronavirus. they still work against new variants but maybe not quite as well. scientists are already working to update them, and now the regulator, the mhra, says when they are ready they can be fast tracked through the approval system. the government has also announced more money to deal with obesity, £100 million to encourage people to get to and stay at a healthy weight. this comes as a report from the world obesity forum says 90% of covid deaths around the world have happened in countries with high obesity levels. the reverse is true too, countries like vietnam with low numbers of overweight people have not been as
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badly affected. vietnam has one of the lowest rates in the world, 0.04 per 100,000 people have died of covid and 18% of its population is overweight. in comparison, the uk has one of the worst death tolls with 182 people dying out of every 100,000. 64% of people here are overweight. we 100,000. 64% of people here are overweight-— 100,000. 64% of people here are overweight. we are still struggling to understand _ overweight. we are still struggling to understand exactly _ overweight. we are still struggling to understand exactly the - overweight. we are still struggling - to understand exactly the mechanisms but it is something we have seen with h one and people tend to die more with influenza as well so it's not exactly news to ours. the problem is we haven't done anything about obesity until now. {lin problem is we haven't done anything about obesity until now.— about obesity until now. on monday schoolchildren _ about obesity until now. on monday schoolchildren across _ about obesity until now. on monday schoolchildren across england - about obesity until now. on monday schoolchildren across england will. schoolchildren across england will head back to classrooms, the first step in lifting this lockdown. today though, researchers are warning the fall in infections in england could be slowing down. we fall in infections in england could be slowing down.— be slowing down. we are seeing ockets be slowing down. we are seeing pockets where _ be slowing down. we are seeing pockets where there _ be slowing down. we are seeing pockets where there seems - be slowing down. we are seeing pockets where there seems to l be slowing down. we are seeing l pockets where there seems to be be slowing down. we are seeing - pockets where there seems to be the suggestion of increasing rates, so
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we have a mixed picture of quite large falls and then the possibility that things are rising in certain areas. .,, that things are rising in certain areas, ., ., , . that things are rising in certain areas. ., . ., ., areas. those areas include london, the south-east _ areas. those areas include london, the south-east and _ areas. those areas include london, the south-east and the _ areas. those areas include london, the south-east and the midlands. l areas. those areas include london, | the south-east and the midlands. it the south—east and the midlands. it is based on just the south—east and the midlands. it is based onjust a the south—east and the midlands. it is based on just a few days' data, but worth keeping an eye on, especially as it looks like this is happening before we come out of lockdown. catherine burns, bbc news. there have been heated exchanges at holyrood, with opposition msps continuing to press nicola sturgeon at first minister's questions about the scottish government's handling of harassment complaints against her predecessor alex salmond. our political correspondent nick eardley is at holyrood. bring is up—to—date, nick. bring is up-to-date, nick. yes, that mammoth session _ bring is up-to-date, nick. yes, that mammoth session nicola _ bring is up-to-date, nick. yes, that mammoth session nicola sturgeon l bring is up-to-date, nick. yes, that i mammoth session nicola sturgeon had in parliament yesterday, her team seem to be pretty happy. they don't think there was a knockout blow, a moment that could have been extremely damaging for the first
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minister. that said, i don't think questions are going to stop being asked,in questions are going to stop being asked, in particular over whether she has potentially broken the rules ministers have to follow, the ministerial code. within the last half hour here at holyrood at first ministers questions, there have been some heated exchanges about the government of�*s legal advice and civil action that was brought by alex salmond, and whether nicola sturgeon should have paused or scrapped the government's case a lot earlier. have a listen to this exchange with the scottish tory leader ruth davidson. what exchange with the scottish tory leader ruth davidson.— exchange with the scottish tory leader ruth davidson. what we have already seen — leader ruth davidson. what we have already seen shows _ leader ruth davidson. what we have already seen shows there _ leader ruth davidson. what we have already seen shows there is - leader ruth davidson. what we have already seen shows there is no - already seen shows there is no argument _ already seen shows there is no argument if this government ignored le-al argument if this government ignored legal advice they did, the argument is if it— legal advice they did, the argument is if it did _ legal advice they did, the argument is if it did so for more than three weeks _ is if it did so for more than three weeks or— is if it did so for more than three weeks or three months. there is no argument _ weeks or three months. there is no argument if— weeks or three months. there is no argument if the first minister was at fault _ argument if the first minister was at fault for— argument if the first minister was at fault for losing taxpayers' money, _ at fault for losing taxpayers' money, the argument is only how much she is— money, the argument is only how much she is to _ money, the argument is only how much she is to blame for. and there is no argument _ she is to blame for. and there is no argument if— she is to blame for. and there is no argument if she broke the ministerial code, the only argument is about— ministerial code, the only argument is about how badly she broke it. we
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believe _ is about how badly she broke it. we believe the — is about how badly she broke it. we believe the sanction is to go, why doesn't _ believe the sanction is to go, why doesn't she? first minister. i think ruth davidson hasjust shown her true colours and the conservative true colours all over again, because of course she stands up here and says scrutiny and democracy and due process is really important, but just as on tuesday night the conservatives prejudged my evidence to the parliamentary enquiry, she'sjust prejudged the outcome of the independent enquiry into the ministerial code. this isjust about desperate political games for the conservatives. so that was first ministers questions. there could be more to come on this, today we are expecting to see more legal documents published this afternoon. they will continue to be questions over other parts of nicola sturgeon's evidence. but there are two things to watch out for now, one is when the committee reports on what it has been hearing over the last few
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weeks. that is likely to be in about two or three weeks' time. another report has been done by the first minister's independent adviser on the ministerial code, that could be crucial. nicola sturgeon has committed today to that being published in full on the day that it is received by the government, so nicola sturgeon and the evidence yesterday i think really steadied the ship after the crisis we have seen engulfing the scottish government over the last few days. that doesn't mean it is all plain sailing from now on. hick that doesn't mean it is all plain sailing from now on. nick eardley at hol rood, sailing from now on. nick eardley at holyrood, thank— sailing from now on. nick eardley at holyrood, thank you. _ the time is 1.17. our top story this lunchtime. buckingham palace says the duke of edinburgh has undergone a procedure for a pre—existing heart condition. and coming up — a disappointing start for england's cricketers on the first day of the final test against india in ahmedabad. coming up on bbc news... wales scrum half kieran hardy has been ruled out of the six nations with a hamstring injury. he scored a try against england
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in wales' victory at the weekend. hardy will return to his club scarlets to undergo rehab. demonstrators have returned to the streets of myanmar to continue their protest against the military coup, despite the increasing use of deadly force by the police. the united nations says 38 people were killed in the country yesterday. the un human rights chief has called on the military to "stop murdering and jailing protesters". our south east asia correspondent jonathan head reports. this was an astonishing display of courage and defiance by a protest movement that's seen dozens gunned down in the past 24 hours. they're fortifying their own neighbourhoods, knowing that they too could be shot, forcing the police to retake them street by street.
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it's a war now for control of myanmar, but a war in which only one side is armed. this is okkalapa township in yangon, the shrines marking out where seven protesters were killed in a deadly confrontation with the security forces. caught on this terrifying video, as people tried to avoid the volleys of gunfire while calling out to get help for those they see being hit. gun fire. translation: soldiers fired live rounds from the bridge. - they shot at us and i think they used machine guns. many people were hit on their head, face, hands and bodies. i saw some people's fingers were in pieces.
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in the city of mandalay supporters of the protest movement filed past the body of 19—year—old kyal sin, who was shot dead while taking part in a rally. her image has now become a symbol of their determination to resist the military and of the sacrifices that must entail. there is plenty of international outrage over what the myanmar military is doing. so far though, not much international action. the people of myanmar are on their own, resisting a regime which shows no concern over the human cost of its heavy—handed repression. jonathan head, bbc news. the bbcjournalist martin bashir won't face a criminal investigation over documents related to his interview with princess diana in 1995.
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our home affairs correspondent tom symonds can gave us more details. what have the police been saying, tom? ~ ~ ., ., what have the police been saying, tom? ~ ., ., . tom? well, the metropolitan police haven't said — tom? well, the metropolitan police haven't said who _ tom? well, the metropolitan police haven't said who complained - tom? well, the metropolitan police haven't said who complained to - tom? well, the metropolitan police haven't said who complained to it i haven't said who complained to it about martin bashir, but we do know that earl spencer, the brother of princess diana, has accused mr bashir of sheer dishonesty in the way that he secured an exclusive interview with princess diana in 1995. now, the claim was that mr bashir arranged for the forgery of some bank statements which might have suggested that two officials within the royal household were being paid by the security services for information about diana, and earl spencer wrote in the daily mail if it hadn't been for seeing these statements he would not have introduced mr bashir to princess diana. the met has said this morning that it received allegations of unlawful activity,
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that it received allegations of unlawfulactivity, it that it received allegations of unlawful activity, it hasn't said what the potential offences might have been. it said it had taken legal advice from police lawyers, a barrister and the crown prosecution service, and we have determined that it is not appropriate to begin a criminal investigation into these allegations. no further action will be taken. having said that, the bbc has announced its own enquiry and the director—general tim davie, the director—general of the bbc, has said the bbc is determined to get to the truth. ., ., , ., ,, ,., amazon has opened its first shop in the uk — and it doesn't have any tills. the supermarket, in west london, uses smartphone technology to allow customers to choose their items, and then walk out. the company wants to open dozens of similar stores across the country, but privacy campaigners say they have big concerns. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. so here it is, amazon's first physical store outside the us. it's a grocery convenience score. you can probably see there's
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an awful lot of interest in this. now, to use it all you need is one of these and the amazon app, that's because when you go in you've got a lot of expensive technology. it's full of cameras and sensors tracking everything that you take off the shelves and put in your bag and then once you are done you simply have to walk out. there is no checkout. so is this a glimpse into the future of shopping? we arejoined by duncan brewer, retail consultant. what do you think, duncan? supermarkets are always looking for ways to make shopping easier for their customers and this is an experience unlike anything else in the uk. i think they're going to be looking with great interest to see if they need to evolve similar technology, similar experiences out into their stores. why is amazon moving onto the high street? i think it's a great time to be moving into the high street. property prices, rental prices are cheap and there's lots of sites available and it's important
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to remember even the online players need a bricks and mortar presence. a bricks and mortar store can offer things, whether its brand experience or ultra convenience, that can't be done through a purely online offer. are its rivals, the big supermarkets, going to be worried about this? i'm sure the supermarkets will be watching this closely to see the rate of expansion and see what happens, but the reality is supermarket retail is always changing and everyone is looking out for the next innovation, to make it betterfor customers, whether it's freshness of product or ease of shopping, and this may be the future. who knows, duncan, thanks very much, and amazon is planning a few more of these in the coming weeks and months. emma simpson. about 200,000 women who were underpaid the state pension are to receive cash top—ups. the department for work and pensions is reviewing cases where women should have been given an automatic increase. the total bill could be nearly £3 billion. let's get more details from our personal finance
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correspondent, kevin peachey. what happened and how is it going to be remedied? it what happened and how is it going to be remedied?— be remedied? it was already clear that some women _ be remedied? it was already clear that some women were _ be remedied? it was already clear that some women were underpaid be remedied? it was already clear - that some women were underpaid their state pension but the true scale of this has been revealed in documents revealed with the budget yesterday and it shows early estimates that there are 200,000 women who were underpaid their state pension. they were primarily married women were widows, the over 80s, and they often had a poor pension in their own right and they should have had automatic increases which were linked to their husbands pension or death. now, the bill to repay them is going to be, as you say, a staggering £2.7 billion. now, some of that is going to go to their families if they've died in the interim, but that's an astonishing
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amount of money and it could mean 6—figure sums for some individuals. now, this all came from a clerical error and it's a huge amount of paperwork to go through to understand exactly who needs to be paid back. there are some people who will need to make a claim if their husband has reached pension age before 2008. for those after that point, well, they should be contacted by the department for work and pensions but that could take up to five years. that's a long time to wait for someone who hasn't received their full pension entitlement for many years in the past.— many years in the past. kevin peachey. _ many years in the past. kevin peachey, thank _ many years in the past. kevin peachey, thank you. - it's been another disappointing day for england's cricketers in india, as the final test began in ahmedabad. england, needing victory in this match to square the series, won the toss but could only score 205. india were 24—1 at the close in reply. joe wilson was watching the action.
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yes, it's the cricket again and yes, it's this again. q acts are patel. exit dom sibley. now zac, attack. crawley mis—hit directly into those waiting hands and england were two down. rememberwhenjoe waiting hands and england were two down. remember whenjoe root eustace gore 200s? out for five, down. remember whenjoe root eustace gore 200s? out forfive, lbw. here's an exchange between muhammad surridge and ben stokes, soon india's captain virat kohli stepped in, two blokes showing they care is how stokes described it, certainly no ground griffin in world cricket's biggest stadium. stokes provided 50 with the promise of more. that’s with the promise of more. that's cominu , with the promise of more. that's coming. it's _ with the promise of more. that's coming, it's been _ with the promise of more. that's coming, it's been given. - with the promise of more. that's coming, it's been given. he - with the promise of more. that's coming, it's been given. he was| with the promise of more. that's i coming, it's been given. he was out for 55. coming, it's been given. he was out for 55- england _ coming, it's been given. he was out for 55. england have _ coming, it's been given. he was out for 55. england have picked - coming, it's been given. he was out for 55. england have picked an - coming, it's been given. he was outj for 55. england have picked an extra batsman, dan lawrence, and scoring
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was feasible. it wasn't easy. india saw to that. seven spun out. lawrence was expanding and in all seriousness considered the umpire, it's a dangerous business. that was a well executed myth. this wasn't. oh, that's gone. a well executed myth. this wasn't. oh. that's gone-— a well executed myth. this wasn't. oh, that's gone. lawrence stranded and stumped _ oh, that's gone. lawrence stranded and stumped for— oh, that's gone. lawrence stranded and stumped for 46. _ oh, that's gone. lawrence stranded and stumped for 46. england - oh, that's gone. lawrence stranded and stumped for 46. england soonl oh, that's gone. lawrence stranded i and stumped for 46. england soon all out for 205. if you bat badly you must bowled brilliantly, hold on. anderson struck, one wicket late thursday, may be morally on friday? yeah, that's a big maybe. joe wilson, bbc news. it's time of year — when children across the uk dress up to mark world book day. events are largely taking place online because of the pandemic. campaigners are using the day to urge families, schools and nurseries to have books with more characters from black, asian and minority ethnic backgrounds. our community affairs correspondent
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adina campbell reports. dressing up as their favourite book characters. i'm dressed up as my favourite character — fantastic mr fox. world book day is one of the biggest events in the school calendar, but bradford born children's author trish cook says representation hasn't changed that much since she started writing 30 years ago. it's not something that's unusual. in everyday life, we take on main roles, we're notjust a friend or the supporting role in a piece. the stories that i'm telling are universal stories, they're stories that happen to everyone, but i'm writing them from the point of view of a black writer to make sure these characters get out there because they haven't been out there enough.
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despite a third of uk children being from an ethnic minority background, just 5% of books feature characters from these backgrounds. more diversity is needed to reflect the uk today. we're raising the next generation, the next change makers, the next business owners. in order for in 20 years time for us to not be having this conversation, we need to start now, it starts with books. and for those reading a bedtime story tonight... what's a gruffalo? adina campbell, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's stav da naos.

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