Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  March 10, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

6:00 pm
tonight at six — a serving police officer has been arrested on suspicion of murder after the disappearance of a woman in london. 33—year—old sarah everard went missing a week ago after leaving a friend's house in clapham. two sites in kent are being searched after the police officer — in his 40s — was held yesterday. this is a serious and significant development in our search for sarah and the fact the man has been arrested is a serving metropolitan police officer is both shocking and deeply disturbing. also on the programme tonight: the prime minister defends england's test and trace system — as mps heavily criticise its unimaginable spending. piers morgan says he stands
6:01 pm
by his criticism of the duchess of sussex after dramatically leaving itv�*s breakfast show — and putting stammering in the spotlight — the actor sir michael palin, whose father stammered, on why this disability should be talked about more. everyone needs to be heard. everyone has a voice and the idea, the old idea, that stammerers somehow have little to say or aren't as bright as everybody else — that is so utterly, ridiculously wrong. and coming up on bbc news: can the champions league breathe life back into liverpool? jurgen klopp�*s side have won just two games in their last eight, as they get set to face rb leipzig. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. a serving metropolitan police
6:02 pm
officer has been arrested on suspicion of murder after a woman disappeared in london last week. 33—year—old sarah everard has not been heard from since she left a friend's house in clapham last wednesday night. the officer — who's in his 40s — was detained last night in kent — along with a woman in her thirties, who was arrested on suspicion of assisting an offender. today, officers have been searching a house in deal and woodland near ashford. lucy manning is in kent. a week ago tonight, sarah everard walked from a friends house, like many women do, many women walking alone, and police said she vanished from sight. today the disturbing news that a serving police officer had been arrested on suspicion of murder, leaving the hopes of her family and herfriends murder, leaving the hopes of her family and her friends looking very
6:03 pm
bleak. off the beaten track, surrounded by woodland, many miles from where sarah everard was last seen in south london. police meticulously search an old golf course in ashford in kent, as one of their own colleagues sits in police custody, suspected of her kidnap and murder. it seems hopes of finding the 33—year—old alive are fading. sarah everard was last seen a week ago walking from a friend's house to her home. family and friends desperate for news. this morning, a shocking update. yesterday evening, officers arrested a serving metropolitan police officer at an address in kent in connection with the disappearance of sarah everard. this is a serious and significant development in our search for sarah, and the fact that the man who's been arrested is a serving metropolitan police officer is both shocking and deeply disturbing.
6:04 pm
i recognise the significant concern this will cause. the police officer is in his 405, his house in deal in kent the focus of searches all day, police removing cars. he was part of the parliamentary and diplomatic protection command, but instead of protecting embassies he's facing questions about a possible murder. a woman was also arrested on suspicion of assisting an offender. about four o'clock in the morning, i heard car doors banging. i just assumed it was, like, night workers. you know, people going to bed, going to work, and then i just saw some activity with police down there. a week ago, sarah, a marketing executive, had been visiting a friend's house on leathwaite road, close to clapham common in south london. she left there at around 9pm in the evening to return to her home in brixton an hour away. police believe she made her way
6:05 pm
across clapham common. this footage from a doorbell camera showed sarah on poynders road at around 9:30pm. it's the last time she was seen. for the past week, the search has been in south london, now in kent, very firmly focused on these fields. all day, there has been a stream of police vans, officers and equipment arriving here. the policeman arrested was, scotland yard said, off duty at the time of her disappearance, and it's not known if he was or wasn't connected in any way to the missing woman. amazing, lovely, fantastic — just a few ways her family describe sarah everard. and she still hasn't been found. this search will continue into the evening. large lights have been brought in to help that. it is a
6:06 pm
fast—paced police investigation, a large one. initially the arrest was on suspicion of kidnap, perhaps some hope, but that arrest is now on suspicion of murder, which makes it so much more difficult for sarah everard's family.— the prime minister has been defending the test and trace system in england after fierce criticism from a group of mps. the commons public accounts committee says the £37 billion system didn't have a clear impact on infection levels — but borisjohnson said the scheme has been a success. with more, here's our health editor hugh pym. a testing site today now part of everyday life, but it has cost a lot of money to get where we are and a highly critical report by mps has fuelled a new debate on what test and trace has achieved. it was raised at prime minister's questions. the government is throwing a staggering 37 billion at a test and trace system that we know has made barely any difference. the prime minister
6:07 pm
defended its performance. it is thanks to nhs test and trace that we are able to send kids back to school and begin cautiously and irreversibly to reopen our economy and restart our lives. the £37 billion budget is over two years. the report criticises the use of consultants. 2,500 were still on the books early last month, with one paid more than £6,000 a day. lots of money was being thrown at lots of projects and, you know, in many cases there are big questions about how that money has been allocated, how it is being spent and the overall oversight. remember that parliament doesn't get a good look at some of these issues because of the coronavirus act. it is worth remembering that early on in the first wave there was nothing like this. the test and trace network had to be created from scratch. the key issue is, has it been as effective as it should have been? there were long waits at testing centres and for results when infections rose rapidly in september and october,
6:08 pm
and the system failed to keep up, with people sometimes ask to drive 100 miles or more to get a test. it is an absolute joke. i have had to bring my three kids out of school. i willjust have to go back home and try again, i guess. the performance figures have improved since those problems last year. nearly 83% of test results came back in 2a hours in the last reported week in february, compared with only around 33.5% one week in october. the proportion of close contacts reached was more than 93% in late february, compared with about 60% back in october. the number of daily tests carried out has more than doubled since the new year to over a million yesterday, but this includes those done in schools, which have reopened. yes, we do have very large number of tests. we successfully reached a very large number of people to ask them to self—isolate. that is what test and trace was set up to do, so this report accuses us of delivering what we said
6:09 pm
we were going to do, to build the service that the country needed in this extraordinary crisis that we are all facing. some argue that local council officials knocking on doors rather than a national call centre system is the best way to reach contacts of those who test positive. health leaders in england say both approaches are required. hugh pym, bbc news. the latest figures on coronavirus show 5,926 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period — which means that on average the number of new cases reported per day in the last week is 5,734. across the uk, the latest data shows the number of patients in hospital with coronavirus is 9,435. 190 deaths were reported — that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—i9 test. on average, 172 people have died every day in the last week from coronavirus — the lowest it's been since 21st october.
6:10 pm
the total number of deaths so far across the uk is 124,987. as for vaccinations, more than 217,000 people have had their first dose of a covid vaccine in the latest 24 hour period. it means more than 22.8 million people had theirfirstjab and over 1.25 million people have had both doses of the vaccine. women have borne a bigger burden of childcare, home—schooling and housework than men over the course of the pandemic — according to new analysis of data from office for national statistics. it also suggests women have experienced significantly poorer levels of personal wellbeing and are more likely to have been furloughed. our health correspondent, catherine burns, has been hearing from some women about the effect the pandemic has had on them. it's an experience that really allows feelings of anxiety, loneliness, to fester. we
6:11 pm
allows feelings of anxiety, loneliness, to fester. ~ . , loneliness, to fester. we have been havin: to loneliness, to fester. we have been having to juggle _ loneliness, to fester. we have been having to juggle home _ loneliness, to fester. we have been having to juggle home schooling, i having tojuggle home schooling, fifield, _ having tojuggle home schooling, fifield, looking after an 18 month year old~ — fifield, looking after an 18 month ear old. ., , , ., .,, fifield, looking after an 18 month year old-_ it - fifield, looking after an 18 month year old-_ it is- year old. not sustainable. it is stressful for _ year old. not sustainable. it is stressful for all _ year old. not sustainable. it is stressful for all of _ year old. not sustainable. it is stressful for all of us - year old. not sustainable. it is stressful for all of us but - year old. not sustainable. it is stressful for all of us but we . year old. not sustainable. it is l stressful for all of us but we just have to work through this. physically we know covid is more of a risk for men. between march last yearin a risk for men. between march last year injanuary a risk for men. between march last year in january this a risk for men. between march last year injanuary this year a risk for men. between march last year in january this year they 0ffice year in january this year they office for national statistics registered almost 64,000 deaths of men involving covid. 0ver registered almost 64,000 deaths of men involving covid. over the same timejust over 53,000 men involving covid. over the same time just over 53,000 women died, men involving covid. over the same timejust over 53,000 women died, a difference of almost 18%. but the ons difference of almost 18%. but the 0ns says men are less likely to worry about the impact of the pandemic on their life. lockdown seems to have hit women harder. they are more likely to say they feel lonely and have consistently reported high levels of anxiety and depression than men. sophie graduated university last summer. she loves her firstjob graduated university last summer. she loves herfirstjob but graduated university last summer. she loves her firstjob but has never met her team and faints
6:12 pm
working from home hard on her mental health. it working from home hard on her mental health. , , ., , ., g , health. it is 'ust horrible and july awake at health. it isjust horrible and july awake at night _ health. it isjust horrible and july awake at night thinking - health. it isjust horrible and july awake at night thinking is - health. it isjust horrible and july awake at night thinking is my - health. it isjust horrible and july awake at night thinking is my job awake at night thinking is myjob secure? awake at night thinking is my “ob secure? ,, , . ~ ., awake at night thinking is my “ob secure? ,, , ., ,. secure? sue is back on the school run this week _ secure? sue is back on the school run this week but _ secure? sue is back on the school run this week but before - secure? sue is back on the school run this week but before there's l run this week but before there's like seven in ten women and five and ten men she has spent this term home—schooling and she did it while running a company with her husband at the same time. i am running a company with her husband at the same time.— at the same time. i am the one who tends to step _ at the same time. i am the one who tends to step back _ at the same time. i am the one who tends to step back from _ at the same time. i am the one who tends to step back from the - at the same time. i am the one who| tends to step back from the business because my husband is more of the business headed one and i will be doing most of the home—schooling with our little one. this doing most of the home-schooling with our little one.— with our little one. this women is also trying _ with our little one. this women is also trying to _ with our little one. this women is also trying to keep _ with our little one. this women is also trying to keep the _ with our little one. this women is also trying to keep the business | also trying to keep the business running and look after her three—year—old. the 0ns found women have done more unpaid childcare and housework than men across the pandemic and the gap has widened as time has gone by. i find pandemic and the gap has widened as time has gone i’ll-— time has gone by. i find myself in this constant _ time has gone by. i find myself in this constant struggle _ time has gone by. i find myself in this constant struggle between i time has gone by. i find myself in. this constant struggle between the desire to pursue my own dreams, to pursue this business, my own ambitions, and also the
6:13 pm
unwillingness to put my child in second place, and the result was that i often worked through the night. that i often worked through the niuht. ~ ., ., , ., that i often worked through the ni. ht, . ., ., , ., 4' , night. women have been more likely to be picked — night. women have been more likely to be picked on _ night. women have been more likely to be picked on furlough. _ night. women have been more likely to be picked on furlough. it - night. women have been more likely to be picked on furlough. it has - to be picked on furlough. it has happened tojenny twice. i to be picked on furlough. it has happened to jenny twice. i have had to sort of do — happened to jenny twice. i have had to sort of do more _ happened to jenny twice. i have had to sort of do more in _ happened to jenny twice. i have had to sort of do more in the _ happened to jenny twice. i have had to sort of do more in the house - happened to jenny twice. i have had to sort of do more in the house and | to sort of do more in the house and quite rightly so, my husband and my son have been put under massive pressure being key workers. these fiuures pressure being key workers. these figures reflect _ pressure being key workers. these figures reflect the _ pressure being key workers. these figures reflect the first _ pressure being key workers. these figures reflect the first year - pressure being key workers. these figures reflect the first year of - figures reflect the first year of coronavirus. the question is if things will be more balanced when we finally get through the pandemic. it's understood that the duchess of sussex formally complained to itv about piers morgan's comments and the effect they could have on the issue of mental health generally and those attempting to deal with their own problems. piers morgan dramatically left itv�*s good morning britain yesterday — after saying he didn't believe a word of what meghan said in her interview with oprah winfrey. 0ur media editor amol rajan has been looking at how morgan's style
6:14 pm
of personality—led tv news is changing the media landscape. what? and you are not going to tell me who had the conversation? i think that would be — me who had the conversation? i think that would be very _ me who had the conversation? i think that would be very damaging - me who had the conversation? i think that would be very damaging to - me who had the conversation? i think that would be very damaging to them. an era _ that would be very damaging to them. an era of— that would be very damaging to them. an era of culture wars fuelled by the attention economy. every element of the story is catching up for the frenzy and theory of social media. sometimes it boils over. broadcaster piers morgan left itv yesterday, and willing to apologise for saying he did not believe meghan�*s claims. morgan was bullish this morning. i believe in freedom of speech, the right to have an opinion. if people want to believe meghan markle it is their right. want to believe meghan markle it is their riuht. �* . , ., ., their right. britain is about to launch an _ their right. britain is about to launch an experiment - their right. britain is about to launch an experiment partly. their right. britain is about to - launch an experiment partly inspired by america. in the us cable news is
6:15 pm
no longer regulated. it prioritises personality and opinion in prime—time slots from nbc to fox knows. britain still has a broadcast regulator, 0fcom, but is moving in the same direction. more than 40 years after being chairman of sky, andrew neil is playing the same role for gb news, a soon to launch centre—right antidote to the established broadcasters. here he is earlier in the week. will we be different from the existing networks? yes. what is the point in doing the same thing. will we give voices to people outside the metropolitan consensus? yes. do we have any interest in fox news? no. this information? no.— this information? no. conspiracy theories? no. _ this information? no. conspiracy theories? no. gb— this information? no. conspiracy
6:16 pm
theories? no. gb news- this information? no. conspiracy theories? no. gb news will- this information? no. conspiracy theories? no. gb news will havej this information? no. conspiracy- theories? no. gb news will have the distinction of a balance across the network like lbc have navigated. in an age of abundant information, attention becomes the most precious resource and it is for those who can best grab that attention. generating noise is easy, generating news is hard and expensive. gb news will galvanise british broadcasting but it will do so by accelerating trends we are seeing online and in america, towards big personalities.— towards big personalities. america not rid of towards big personalities. america got rid of its _ towards big personalities. america got rid of its requirement - towards big personalities. america got rid of its requirement that - got rid of its requirement that journalists in broadcasting represent all views fairly. and we see what has happened there as a result. peoplejust see what has happened there as a result. people just watch the television channel which agrees with their views and prejudices. {lime their views and pre'udices. once u on a their views and pre'udices. once upon a time. _ their views and pre'udices. once upon a time, the _ their views and prejudices. once upon a time, the news - their views and prejudices. once upon a time, the news was - their views and prejudices. once upon a time, the news was the i their views and prejudices. once upon a time, the news was the star. in the new world, it is the stars that will be the news.
6:17 pm
our top story this evening: a serving police officer has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of sarah everard in london. coming up — the former welsh rugby international, markjones, on how his stammer drove him to violence behaviour on the pitch. and coming up on sportsday bbc news. 20 times grand slam winner, roger federer, returns to the court for the first time in more than a year. we'll have news on how britain's dan evans fared against him at the qatar open. there's been so much pressure on intensive care units during the pandemic, that senior consultants and surgeons have been drafted in from other parts of hospitals to help support the intensive care nurses. at kings college hospital in london, they set up a family unit, a team who were tasked with keeping patients in touch with their relatives. now the unit is being wound down. reeta chakrabarti has been talking
6:18 pm
to some of the team before they go back to their normaljobs. it's been a year where all staff at king's college hospital have had to dig deep. for orthopaedic surgeon, sarah phillips, this is her last day working on the specially created team liaising with families of those in critical care. relieved that we're no longer needed, because obviously the numbers have come down. but in some respects i'll miss it, i learnt an awful lot. it's a very slow process... when relatives were barred from visiting their loved ones in hospital, sarah's team was a human lifeline, giving updates and support by phone and video calls. she is breathing for herself, so that's progression. for six long weeks, this lady couldn't visit a husband, jamal. thank you. that's all right. she couldn't hold his hand and she was told his case was hopeless.
6:19 pm
in this desperate time, the family team where essential to her. it does help, it really does help. just to have that contact with somebody and to know that, you know, there's someone you can ask questions which will be relayed back. it was very comforting. they said it's like medicine to him. on one occasion after i left they said his blood pressure actually went down, which was really good to know. i know what it's like for a loved one not to be able to be seen or not to be able to be hugged. it's one of my lasting memories of something my mother said to me when my father died when i was very young, was that she wasn't able to hug him. helen tippett, like sarah, is a highly skilled consultant — in her case, orthodontics and she too has devoted months to family liaison. it was difficult sometimes, having that conversation with a relative when the patient's not doing so well. but i've had some life experiences
6:20 pm
that equip me better. just going to take that blood sample, 0k? that's it, well done, well done. just going to suction you now as well. 0n the overnight shift, intensive care nurse, grace, struggles to hide her emotion when asked how hard this illness has been on the relatives. patients not had their families come in, it's very difficult and it's quite emotionally tough and sometimes you feel like you take on their struggles because they're not able to be the bedside. this merciless disease has taken its toll on so many staff. malachi started as a nurse exactly a year ago. in the peak he cared for four patients at once. he was meant to care forjust one. i mean, there were three deaths in the last 24 hours here, on this ward, yeah. and that's a lot. and then you turn around and there's still 12 other patients. it'sjust not feasible, you can't carry on like this for a long time. it's so difficult to get time
6:21 pm
to even go and answer the phones, let alone be able to give an update. with case numbers now falling, the nhs is turning its attention to its next mammoth task — dealing with the backlog of operations that have been delayed by the pandemic. there's a whole group of patients who have been waiting to be seen in clinic and then go on a waiting list. so the backlog will be, will be huge. the nhs is starting cautiously to look beyond the upheaval inflicted by covid. but this could be a brief moment of calm, a short pause before nhs staff face their next daunting challenge. reeta chakrabarti, bbc news. the brother of ghislaine maxwell, ian maxwell, has described her treatment in jail in new york as "degrading", and says it "amounts to torture". 59—year—old ms maxwell is seeking
6:22 pm
bail, ahead of her trial on charges she helped the convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein groom young girls — a charge she denies. this report from our new york correspondent nada tawfik. jeffrey epstein and ghislaine maxwell shared an intimate relationship. to epstein�*s alleged victims, the pair were a dangerous combination. ghislaine, they say, was the chief enabler of the convicted sex offender. and now herfamily is finally speaking out. ian maxwell defended his sister in an interview with the bbc. he said she was being treated in a fashion that amounted to torture. physically, a 59—year—old woman and we understand that she's losing her hair, that she's also having trouble with her eyesight and her ability to concentrate because this is a tremendous pressure to be under. his comments come as his sister
6:23 pm
is seeking bailfor a third time, desperate to leave the federal prison here in brooklyn and to wait out the trial under home confinement. thejudge has previously ruled that she is a flight risk. ghislaine maxwell says she's innocent. ghislaine is not a suicide risk. she has never been a suicide risk. there are daily mental evaluations of her. she has shown no indication that that is her intention. she's been completely overmanaged. and why is that? because jeffrey epstein, who was under federal custody at the time of his death, died in federal custody, and so this is a grotesque overreaction. for her alleged victims, though, it's not. women that i represent, 20 victims, many of them have suffered through so many years.
6:24 pm
they have, some of them, engaged in self—blaming, feel ashamed. they are understanding now that it's not their fault, but this has been a long, long process. ian maxwell says that he met epstein once fleetingly and that he only saw him and his sister together once. there are numerous photos, including this infamous one with prince andrew which he was asked about in his bbc interview. i don't know anything about the photograph, other than that i've seen its been published. do you recognise the setting of that? was it taken in ghislaine's house in london? i do recognise that setting. he believes his sister still considers prince andrew a friend. the prince, meanwhile, has stepped back from real duties to reduce his public profile. with the trial drawing near, the world may finally get to uncover the truth about epstein, his associates and what's been called the most notorious sex trafficking
6:25 pm
ring in us history. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. around 1.5 million adults in the uk have a stammer. for some, it is obvious when they speak. for many others, it's something they manage to hide — sometimes from even those closest to them. felicity baker is a producer here in the bbc newsroom. until recently she had never spoken openly about her stammer. but after a chance conversation i had with her a few months ago, she has decided to step out in front of the camera to put stammering in the spotlight. markjames played rugby for wales. he has stammered since he was a child but has never spoken about it until now. the embarrassment you feel... ..well, it's a, it's a constant fight. the self—loathing, i hated myself. i hated myself because i wasn't
6:26 pm
like other people. it's a head—butt, it's a real bad one. he was known for his violent outbursts on the pitch, but now says that was driven by his stammer. it alters your behaviour. i've hit a couple of people who have done this and that, but it was... ..none of it was ever targeted, it was just that release. hello, i'm calling from the bbc. like mark, i hadn't spoken about my stammer before. i worked with you last year for pretty much a full year doing documentaries. i never knew. i'm very good at hiding it and i've been hiding it, honestly, for as long as i can remember, for as long as i can speak. i think i learnt very quickly, i think a lot of people do. and, you know, i want to appear fluent and i've spent so long kind of trying to appear fluent that ijust avoid words and situations. what i do still struggle with is my name. and i've discovered i'm not alone.
6:27 pm
i will eitherjust say hey, hey, m—m—my name's grace, just like that, just to make sure that i don't have to have that, like, moment of them being, like, what's your name and me just not being able to say it. plenty of time... sir michael palin played the stammering ken pile in a fish called wanda. oh, come on! his own father stammered, but like so many, it was never talked about. 0ne felt there was nothing you could do, so how would we talk about it? and at what stage do you suddenly say, is there anything we can do to stop your stammer? or, how did you first get a stammer? i would love to have asked all these questions but we just didn't because it would feel like rubbing in, you know, rubbing it all in. stammering is still a very hidden disability. i now hope we can give others a chance to be heard and understood at last.
6:28 pm
felicity baker, bbc news. 0ur documentary, i can't say my name — stammering in the spotlight — is on bbc one tonight at 7:30. time for a look at the weather here's susan powell. a very good evening. windy weather on the way for the uk through the next few days but potentially with a peak overnight. widespread gales and more rain getting swept our way and some sub domi sees, particularly the irish sea. this deepening area of low pressure will continue to intensify their winds through this evening and overnight. probably reaching their maximum somewhere in the small hours and towards the end of the night. some more rain as you can see for northern ireland, northern england and scotland. showery further south. no lower than seven to 9 degrees, so no major concerns. the wind is our big talking point through thursday as
6:29 pm
well. the centre of the area of low pressure will pull off into the north sea. thursday is a brighter day for many others. drier, too, but a fair number of showers will be driven into the west by the wind and carried eastwards. some will be heavy, squally with hail and thunder. a little bit cooler than today but the difference might be that it today but the difference might be thatitis today but the difference might be that it is going to be windier. the low centre is pulling away but we will still have strong, westerly winds and the gusts are the primary concern, because they do the damage and because the disruption. friday, still low pressure running the show. the isobars open up a tiny bit. it will still be windy and another blustery day. plenty of showers first thing for england and wales and brighter later. something more wintry in the way of showers, crowding into scotland and northern ireland for the second part of the day. temperatures down a little, sliding into single figures. still, very blustery and that is the key element and still blustery on
6:30 pm
saturday. it takes until sunday and into next week before we see things properly calming down. that's all from the bbc news at six. so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are.

36 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on