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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  March 12, 2021 6:00pm-6:30pm GMT

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police confirm a body found hidden in woodland in kent is that of sarah everard. the 33—year—old went missing while walking home in south london last week. the body has now been recovered and a formal identification procedure has been undertaken. i can now confirm that it is the body of sarah everard. forensics officers have been searching a home in deal in kent. the police watchdog is investigating how scotland yard responded to two allegations of indecent exposure involving the officer suspected of sarah everard's murder. also on the programme: the former british cycling and team sky chief doctor richard freeman has been found guilty of ordering banned testosterone for a rider. easing of lockdown rules in wales will soon mean people can visit hairdressers and meet friends
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in a garden. i think it's fascinating to see the pictures of mars. and the queen zooms to celebrate british scientific success. and coming up on bbc news, it's a winning start for england in their first twenty20 against india, dawid malan helping eoin morgan's side to an eight—wicket win in ahmedabad. good evening. the metropolitan police has confirmed that a body found in woodland on wednesday is that of sarah everard. she disappeared while walking home from a friend's house in clapham in south london last week. detectives have been given more time to question a serving police officer on suspicion of the kidnap and murder of the 33 year—old
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marketing executive. the police watchdog is investigating a number of issues including how the metropolitan police responded to two allegations of indecent exposure involving the suspect three days before miss everard went missing. our special correspondent lucy manning reports. in this isolated countryside, the person who murdered sarah everard dumped her body in the woods that surround here. that devastating news confirmed this to her family and then by police this afternoon. fin then by police this afternoon. q�*i wednesday evening, detectives investigating the disappearance of sarah everard discovered a body and a formal identification procedure has been undertaken. i can now confirm that it is the body of sarah everard, and ijust want to pause for a moment and say that my thoughts and prayers and those of the entire organisation remain with her. the entire organisation remain with her, ,,., ., ., ,
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the entire organisation remain with her. ., .,, ., . . ., ., her. sarah was, according to her famil , her. sarah was, according to her family. bright — her. sarah was, according to her family, bright and _ her. sarah was, according to her family, bright and beautiful, - her. sarah was, according to her. family, bright and beautiful, strong and principled, and she brought so muchjoy to their lives. and principled, and she brought so much joy to their lives. she was just walking home. there was heavy police activity with forensic teams in the area behind the suspect because my house in >> tell—macro: today. officers investigating a fellow officer on suspicion of sarah's murder. his home is 30 miles from where her body was found. endeavour, they focused on the garage where the suspect worked and his family owned —— in dover. there is a network of old military channels on the cliffs behind him. but questions for the metropolitan police. sarah everard disappeared last wednesday in south london. three days before she was last seen, the suspect, a police officer himself, was reported for allegedly exposing himself twice in allegedly exposing himself twice in a fast—food restaurant also in south london. now two of his police colleagues are being investigated by
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the police watchdog for how they dealt with this. the metropolitan police is facing another four investigations by the police watchdog. two are connected to the arrest of its own officer on suspicion of murder and indecent exposure. one is about how the force responded when the first reports came in of sarah everard's disappearance, and the final one — how the suspect got a head injury that required hospital treatment when he was in a police cell on his own. forwomen when he was in a police cell on his own. for women everywhere, the disappearance of a woman just walking home has galvanised the demand for safer streets and despite covid, they want the right to hold a public vigil in memory and in anger. we have come together as a group of women who feel afraid of some of our public spaces, but also houthi are angry that we ought to be afraid of those places —— we feel angry. it is awful that it's taken such a tragic,
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tragic week to remind us that this is not acceptable. it tragic week to remind us that this is not acceptable.— tragic week to remind us that this is not acceptable. it has become not 'ust a is not acceptable. it has become not just a police — is not acceptable. it has become not just a police issue, _ is not acceptable. it has become not just a police issue, but _ is not acceptable. it has become not just a police issue, but a _ is not acceptable. it has become not just a police issue, but a political. just a police issue, but a political one. i just a police issue, but a political one. ., . y just a police issue, but a political one. ., ., , , ., , , one. i totally understand why this has triggered _ one. i totally understand why this has triggered such _ one. i totally understand why this has triggered such a _ one. i totally understand why this has triggered such a wave - one. i totally understand why this has triggered such a wave of - one. i totally understand why this i has triggered such a wave of feeling on this issue, on the issue of safety of women and safety of the streets. fix. safety of women and safety of the streets. �* . j , ., , safety of women and safety of the streets. �* . . , , safety of women and safety of the streets. �* . ., , , ., streets. a family's tragedy, but one felt by women _ streets. a family's tragedy, but one felt by women everywhere. - this is clapham common, where it's thought sarah everard walked through on her way home. she obviously didn't make it. it is also where they want to hold the vigil tomorrow. the high court is still about to rule on that as to whether they can, but what can't be stopped other voices of women speaking out about their own experiences, the harassment, the fear they feel when walking the streets and what can't be stopped other demands that this has to change and something has to be done. lucy manning, live in
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clapham in south london. the former chief doctor for british cycling and team sky has been found guilty of ordering a banned performance—enhancing drug, "knowing or believing" it would be used to dope a rider. the charges against richard freeman date back to 2011, a year before the london olympics. the british cycling team enjoyed huge success during his time as the sport's top medic. he admitted 18 out of 22 charges at a medical tribunal. our sports editor, dan roan, reports. for the past decade british cycling has enjoyed and success, dominating on both the road and track. for much of that time, richard freeman was the sports's top doctor, but two years after his medical tribunal began, today came the verdict that cycling had dreaded. the panel said he had ordered testosterone, the sportdoping drug of choice, his conduct incapable of innocent explanation. and on it was clear that dr freeman placed the order, he knew or believed it was to be
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administered to an athlete to improve the athletic performance. the question is, which rider was it ordered for? it seriously damaging. i'm not sure how she cycling in the sport can recover. the reputation of the sport in terms of management and governance is in tatters. the the sport in terms of management and governance is in tatters.— governance is in tatters. the saga be . an in governance is in tatters. the saga began in 2011 _ governance is in tatters. the saga began in 2011 when _ governance is in tatters. the saga began in 2011 when freeman - governance is in tatters. the saga i began in 2011 when freeman ordered tester gel from a local supplier to the sport at�*s ho. six years later having already left team sky, the medic resigned from british cycling. in 2019, he admitted to 18 gmc judges including initially lying to uk anti—doping and last month he was charged by the agency with two anti—doping rule violations. freeman told the tribunal he ordered the drug to treat the erectile dysfunction of this man, former british cycling technical director shane sutton, who denied the claim. today sutton said the decision had cut a huge shadow of a team sky and british cycling, denying any knowledge of the testosterone order. in 2018, freeman told me he would
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clear his name. i in 2018, freeman told me he would clear his name.— clear his name. i can clear everything _ clear his name. i can clear everything un _ clear his name. i can clear everything up but - clear his name. i can clear everything up but at - clear his name. i can clear everything up but at the i clear his name. i can clear- everything up but at the moment, i am under investigation by the general medical council. therefore, i am not at liberty at the present time, due to respect for them, not to talk about it. 50 time, due to respect for them, not to talk about it.— time, due to respect for them, not to talk about it. so no wrongdoing? no wrongdoing- _ to talk about it. so no wrongdoing? no wrongdoing. but _ to talk about it. so no wrongdoing? no wrongdoing. but today, - to talk about it. so no wrongdoing? no wrongdoing. but today, a - to talk about it. so no wrongdoing? no wrongdoing. but today, a man | to talk about it. so no wrongdoing? i no wrongdoing. but today, a man who for ears no wrongdoing. but today, a man who for years worked _ no wrongdoing. but today, a man who for years worked with _ no wrongdoing. but today, a man who for years worked with some _ no wrongdoing. but today, a man who for years worked with some of - no wrongdoing. but today, a man who for years worked with some of the - for years worked with some of the most well—known names in the sport, bradley wiggins among them, was told his explanation was implausible. british cycling said today's seismic verdict was extremely disturbing, but insisted that they had reformed since the days when freeman worked here. but this is the gravest blow to date to the reputation of one of the country's most successful and best funded olympic sports, and it leaves a series of unanswered questions. which rider was involved, and who else is new? today brailsford's team ineos, which replaced team sky two years ago, said it didn't believe any athlete ever used or sought to use the
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testosterone. but the sport's attempt to move on from this scandal just got harder. dan roan, bbc news. exports to the eu of british goods like seafood and dairy products fell byjust over 40% injanuary, after the brexit transition period came to an end. imports also fell by nearly 30%. the office for national statistics says temporary factors, like producers stockpiling goods before the end of the year, were to blame. at the same time, the british economy shrank by 2.9%, largely because of covid restrictions. our economics correspondent, andy verity, has the details. this manchester exporter on branded clothing, much of it for corporate events that haven't been happening, has gone through what it describes as a nightmare yearjust staying in business and keeping staff safe. but now its boss told me, far from the prized fictional straight, it's become very difficult to export to europe. transporters and careers are charging big extra fees to cover much more complex paperwork and taxes, pushing costs up so high, that it has had to stop exporting to
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european consumers. me that it has had to stop exporting to european consumers.— that it has had to stop exporting to european consumers. we had one order which was a £15 — european consumers. we had one order which was a £15 order. _ european consumers. we had one order which was a £15 order. the _ european consumers. we had one order which was a £15 order. the customer . which was a £15 order. the customer contacted us because they were contacted us because they were contacted by the post office to say that they were 38 euros of admin charges to pay in order to collect that order. we have tried to deal with it by paying on behalf of the customer. we have taken on the complexity of that, but the cost and the time in the admin just means it's not viable to ship those orders into europe any more.— into europe any more. overall, exorts into europe any more. overall, exoorts of _ into europe any more. overall, exports of goods _ into europe any more. overall, exports of goods to _ into europe any more. overall, exports of goods to the - into europe any more. overall, exports of goods to the eu - into europe any more. overall, - exports of goods to the eu dropped ijy exports of goods to the eu dropped by 40.7%, the biggest fall on record. by far the hardest hit were exporters of food and live animals, dairy down by 50%, meat exports down 59% and fish and shellfish exports down by 83%. we 5996 and fish and shellfish exports down by 8396-— 59% and fish and shellfish exports downb 83%. ~ ., ., ~ . , down by 83%. we are working closely with the eu- — down by 83%. we are working closely with the eu. it's — down by 83%. we are working closely with the eu. it's in _ down by 83%. we are working closely with the eu. it's in everybody's - with the eu. it's in everybody's interest that trade is as smooth as possible. we were always clear there would be extra processes that would need to be undertaken, and i'm confident that we continue to build
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exports to the eu as well as exports to the rest of the world.— to the rest of the world. while the economy is _ to the rest of the world. while the economy is forecast _ to the rest of the world. while the economy is forecast to _ to the rest of the world. while the economy is forecast to roar - to the rest of the world. while the economy is forecast to roar into i economy is forecast to roar into action next year, growing by 7%, businesses like goodwood �*s still have months to get through with very little money coming in. {lit have months to get through with very little money coming in.— little money coming in. of the next few years. — little money coming in. of the next few years. we _ little money coming in. of the next few years, we have _ little money coming in. of the next few years, we have got _ little money coming in. of the next few years, we have got to - little money coming in. of the next few years, we have got to get - little money coming in. of the next few years, we have got to get back| few years, we have got to get back to where we were two years ago. but thatis to where we were two years ago. but that is going to take another couple of years. that is going to take another couple of ears. �* .., ., , that is going to take another couple of ears. �* ., , of years. after the economy was brou . ht of years. after the economy was brought screeching _ of years. after the economy was brought screeching to _ of years. after the economy was brought screeching to a - of years. after the economy was brought screeching to a halt - of years. after the economy was brought screeching to a halt by i of years. after the economy was i brought screeching to a halt by the lockdown last spring, it picked up speedin lockdown last spring, it picked up speed in the summer and autumn, only to have the government slammed the brakes on again after christmas, leading to a 2.9% drop in activity injanuary. while the office for national statistics said much of the hit to trade with will be temporary as businesses adjust to the new regime, just weeks after the break to the new regime, just weeks after the brexit transition ended, it's still too soon to tell how much of that economic damage might be more lasting. andy verity, bbc news. an inquest has found neglect contributed to the death of leon briggs, who died in november 2013 after being restrained by police in luton. the jury said a number of serious
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failings had been made by both police officers and ambulance workers. before the inquest began, paramedics had already admitted their failure to check mr briggs�* vital signs, or take him to hospital for treatment. jon ironmonger has more. leon briggs, a father of two, was gentle and generous, according to those who knew him. it's taken seven years to find out how he suddenly died. cctv released at the inquest captured him skipping down a high street, high on amphetamines, suffering a mental health crisis. he's brought to the ground by armed response officers and pinned for 13 minutes, just out of sight of the only camera recording. police said they didn't hold him in a dangerous prone position. but among a string of eyewitnesses, there was general agreement that leon was face down on his front for most, if not all of his restraint. leon was taken to luton police station, where again, he was restrained on the floor
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of a cell. custody sergeant grant waterman tries to get his attention. mr briggs? there's no response. the inquest found that he and others fail to notice that leon was a medical emergency, and leon dies around an hour later in hospital after officers finally raise the alarm. thejurors' conclusions were highly critical and said officers had used inappropriate force. but leon's family had been hoping for an outcome of unlawful killing. i have been shocked by the utter i disregard for his life as he lay l dying on the police cell floor. why did the police choose to treat my son, who was mixed—race, as if his life had no value? they took away his human rights. today, bedfordshire police admitted they were truly sorry, but leon's mother said it was an insult and that their long campaign forjustice would continue. jon ironmonger, bbc news. borisjohnson has visited northern ireland for the first time since the post—brexit trade arrangements were introduced at the beginning of the year. the first minister, arlene foster, raised concerns about the new trade
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border in the irish sea, which has led to tensions. our ireland correspondent emma vardy is in belfast. emma, how did the prime minister's visit go down?— visit go down? well, it was never auoin to visit go down? well, it was never going to be _ visit go down? well, it was never going to be an — visit go down? well, it was never going to be an easy _ visit go down? well, it was never going to be an easy visit - visit go down? well, it was never going to be an easy visit for - visit go down? well, it was never going to be an easy visit for him l going to be an easy visit for him because on the one hand, many unionists feel betrayed by boris johnson having agreed to those brexit trading arrangements, which now treats northern ireland differently from the rest of the uk. so today, the first minister of northern ireland, arlene foster, reiterated the dup's opposition, calling those arrangements intolerable. on the other hand, sinn fein michelle o'neill, refused to meet with boris johnson altogether, saying that sinn fein meet with borisjohnson altogether, saying that sinn fein had been long asking for a meeting to discuss brexit and other matters and that the party felt they still hadn't had that opportunity yet. boris johnson's visit here today was to focus on meeting the medical teams that have been helping in the fight back against covid and to launch the
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programme of events to mark northern ireland's centenary, 100 years since the formation of this place. but while there is all this uncertainty and division over the irish sea border, relationships with the two biggest parties here will continue to be difficult and rebuilding trust with eunice is going to be heard. emma vardy in belfast. —— trust with unionists is going to be hard. the government has ordered a public inquiry, into plans for a deep coal mine on the cumbrian coast. previously, the government said it wouldn't intervene in the planning process, but has come under pressure from environmental campaigners ahead of britain hosting the un's climate change summit in glasgow later this year. our environment correspondent, victoria gill, has more from cumbria. the plan to build a new coal mine on this former industrial site was first given the go—ahead last march. the government has now decided to intervene because this place has become the setting of an international climate controversy about the future of coal.
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the coal that is coming out of this mine is exclusively for the production of steel. you know, the united kingdom in reducing the reliance on coal for electricity, again, that will be eradicated completely by 202a. but the need to make steel continues and we will be importing this coal, so it's better to mine it here in the united kingdom in an environmentally friendly mine. this very windswept corner of west cumbria is causing such a rift because the people here who support this is a local issue, a source ofjobs and a supply of coal for the uk steel industry, but for critics and climate scientists it's a global example that's being set by this project, a plan to dig up the dirtiest of fossil fuels in a country that's committed to a target of net zero carbon emissions. this is what the west cumbria mining company wants to build, but pressure on the government is mounting to stop it, not least because this year it's trying to set the ultimate global example by hosting
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the un climate summit in glasgow in november. the problem with the mine is it's a false solution, it's a false solution on climate grounds, but crucially it's also a false solution because it won't provide secure long—term jobs because coal is a declining market, it won't help our steel industry either, actually what government could be doing and should be doing and what conservative mps should be asking government to be doing is bringing forward the investment in clean steel. in the nearby town of whitehaven, opinions seem almost as divided as they do internationally. this was a big mining community, and from what i've heard, it's some of the top coal out there, and if we don't take it out somebody else will take it out somewhere else in the world. i suppose it bringsjobs in, but the other side l is the climate as well, so... if they are trying to get rid of using coal anyway, what's the point building something that's going to be there? what are they going to use it for after? the public inquiry will allow critics and supporters to put forward their case, and the government will hope it could
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prevent a patch of land on the northwest coast ruining its climate credentials. victoria gill, bbc news. our top story this evening: police confirm the body found hidden in woodland in kent is that of sarah everard. and how have pupils and teachers managed after the first week back at school in england? coming up on sportsday on bbc news: growing tensions behind the scenes at sheffield united — with chris wilder set to leave hisjob as manager withjust ten games of the premier league season remaining. some coronavirus restrictions are being lifted in wales from tomorrow, allowing limited mixing of households and certain outdoor sports. from midnight the "stay at home" rule will be replaced by "stay local" ahead of the further easing of travel rules for easter. in addition, four people from two households can meet outdoors, including in private gardens.
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and from monday, hairdressing appointments can resume, but most non—essential retail will remain closed until april the 12th. our wales correspondent, hywel griffith, is in crickowl, in powys, for us this evening. after 12 weeks of shutdown, 12 weeks of staying at home, wales is at the beginning of the end of its longest lockdown. i look forward to seeing you. thank you, alun. yay! i haven't spoke to him for three months. i've missed my clients. it's the newsjess and her customers have been waiting for. on monday, her barbershop can open again — next week is already fully booked. absolutely ecstatic. i've missed crickowl, i've missed my clients, i've missed the banter, i've missed the other shop traders in town. yeah, i'm ecstatic. i can't wait to get back in. not that many of those other traders can open. you can have a haircut here next week, but the book shop and clothes shop will be closed for a month.
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richard is annoyed that supermarkets will be allowed to sell non—essential goods in the meantime. it doesn't feel fair in the slightest for all the little independents, including ourselves, missing that opportunity to sell, especially over easter, so we've missed another chunk of key trading time. the welsh government doesn't have a road map out of lockdown or a long list of dates — instead, every three weeks, it suggests the areas — like nonessential retail — it wants to prioritize. that had led a lot of shops across wales to expect today would be the day they'd get the green light to reopen. the first minister insists there hasn't been a u—turn. i completely understand that if you're running such a business you want to reopen, of course you do. you want to be trading, you want to be with your customers. and i understand, you know, the huge frustration there must be. there are very few guarantees... pubs, restaurants and cafes like emma's are also anxious for more information. today, she learned that she may be able to trade
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outdoors from late april. but there's no more detail, or a date. it's really frustrating, it's annoying. we need a road map, you know? we know that things may have to be moved because situations change. that's inevitable, that's life. but we need these dates in place. one day people can now celebrate is mother's day this sunday. as long as it's outdoors and at a distance. hopefully, more of us will be able to see our mums, which has been really difficult. it's difficult to try and keep distance still, but at least it's something. oh, well done! wales was the first of uk nations to enter this lockdown. now it's the first to move this far easing restrictions, however uncertain that journey may be. hywel griffith, bbc news, crickowl. scotland's coronavirus rules have been eased today. outdoor non—contact sports for adults in groups of up to 15 can take place, and up to four adults from two different households can meet in any outdoor space.
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up to four people aged from 12 to 17 can also meet up, even if they're from different households. the latest coronavirus figures show 6,609 new infections were recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means that on average the number of new cases reported per day in the last week is 5,855. across the uk, the number of patients in hospital with coronavirus is 8,404. there were 175 deaths reported — that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average, 155 people have died every day in the last week from coronavirus, taking the total across the uk to 125,343. over 260,000 people have had their first dose of a covid vaccine in the latest 24—hour period, which means 23.3 million people have had theirfirstjab, and now nearly 1.5 million have had both doses of the vaccine.
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there are new details from the office of national statistics showing how coronavirus cases are spread across different parts of the uk. our health correspondent cath burns is here. what cath burns is here. have we learned? ,, . something what have we learned? starting with something that _ what have we learned? starting with something that shows _ what have we learned? starting with something that shows us _ what have we learned? starting with something that shows us how - what have we learned? starting with something that shows us how much l something that shows us how much things have changed since the beginning of the year. these figures are a snapshot of virus figures at any point in time and if you look at the start ofjanuary any point in time and if you look at the start of january at that point they thought there was maybe one and a quarter million people across the uk who would have tested positive for coronavirus. the most recent data they think that has dropped by about 1 data they think that has dropped by about1 million. the data they think that has dropped by about1 million.— about1 million. the picture does vary depending _ about1 million. the picture does vary depending on _ about1 million. the picture does vary depending on the _ about1 million. the picture does vary depending on the home - about1 million. the picture does i vary depending on the home nation you look at. it is vary depending on the home nation you look at— you look at. it is the first time since january _ you look at. it is the first time since january the _ you look at. it is the first time since january the figures - you look at. it is the first time i since january the figures haven't shown a reduction across all four nations. england and wales, the ons thinks things are going in the right direction with the fall and infections in both countries. in
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scotland and northern ireland it is not quite so clear so the ons is calling it levelling off and if you look at the estimates of the number of cases they think could be out there it looks like a very small increase potentially, maybe 200 extra cases a week in northern ireland and possibly 1000 in scotland. i am seeing possibly and maybe because if you look at the trend of the amount of people taking the survey across and got the numbers are really small so the trend is quite uncertain. catherine, thank you- — reopening schools to all pupils this week was the first step on the road to lifting the coronavirus lockdown in england, with restrictions and rules in place in classrooms, to try to curb infections. our correspondent danny savage has spent the last few days at a primary school near skegness, an area of relatively high infection rates, to see how pupils and teachers have been getting on. good morning. a colourful, celebratory return to school. a warm welcome after a cold winter, designed to take
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the worry out of the day. bye, see you later! bobby is just four years old. for reception children like him, teachers say it's like starting all over again. i was a bit emotional, but he was fine. glad to be back. what are you feeling? happy, really happy that we're getting a bit of normality back. most of the families at this school have been scattered across this area in isolation for months. now they have their focal point back. when we go in, just a little squirt of sanitiser. lesson one in year three on monday was simply getting used to each other again. what's made you feel happy? big voice, abigail. i get to see my friends. we've missed each other, haven't we? it's like going back to the beginning of the year again. we've got those who say, "we've had new baby sisters being born, new pets". they have had sad news as well and they want to tell
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a friend about that. some of them have moved house or they were going to move house and they haven't been able to do that. please don't talk over me. the priority is to get familiar with school. that's a sad face. it's been tricky, hasn't it? you're the only little girl in your house and now we've got to get along with lots of other boys and girls again. catching up is for the long haul. it'll take a long time educationally to get them back to where they need to be. we're talking about maybe a year, 18 months. we can only do that if the children are socially and emotionally ready to learn. first break, and it's going well. but behind the scenes, the effects of coronavirus are still present, even on day one. one of the local secondary schools had a bubble go down already this morning. we'll have to look up associated children and make sure there's nobody that we need to pick up on tonight. thanks, see you later. yesterday saw the school belatedly
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mark world book day, another fun way to get back into the routine. that doesn't mean there aren't anxieties. lincolnshire has a grammar school system. they sit the 11 plus. some of the older children are a bit worried. there's been a massive impact on year six especially and on year five because next year they've got to do their 11 plus and this year our sats have been cancelled. so it's been a massive impact on learning. for the parents of younger children, back to school is a weight off their minds. three days after we talked at the school gates, we caught up with bobby's mum. what difference has it made to you not having to home—school? massive difference. just little things like getting my housework done. we've got the business as well and a baby, sojuggling all that was quite difficult. but he's really excited that he's back at school, getting back into that routine. every day, he's come home and said he's had a fantastic day with his friends.
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so how has the week gone? it's been 0k. i think that's the best analysis we can do. there may be an issue with phonics. some of the key sounds that the children knew back at christmas, we've maybe gone back two or three steps and we have to pick that up. is that a tiger? there is a long way to go in this story, but at least they're back together. danny savage, bbc news, lincolnshire. the queen's made an appearance at a viritual event to mark british science week, just days after the duke and duchess of sussex's controversial interview in america. speaking via zoom, she joined scientists and schoolchildren to view the latest pictures from nasa's mission to mars, and the recent meteorite that fell to earth in gloucestershire. our royal correspondent nick witchell reports. her husband remains in hospital, herfamily is in turmoil over the sussexes, but two days ago the queen was on a video call talking about other worlds — space travel, to be precise — all part of british science week.
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so, it is a true honour to be speaking with you just now. they started with yuri gagarin — the first person into space way back in 1961. had the queen come across him? well, what do you think? very interesting to meet him. what was he like? russian. he didn't speak english. he didn't speak english? no, he was fascinating. they talked about things raining down on you, apt in a week such as this — though theirfocus was the meteorite, chunks of which landed in gloucestershire. because it looks very mixed rock. then they were off to mars and the pictures of the four—billion—year—old martian landscape sent back to earth from the mars perseverance probe. it is pretty rock strewn, isn't it? i think it's fascinating to see the pictures of mars. unbelievable, really, to think one can actually see its surface. school children demonstrated their idea of a rocket blasting. very successful.
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for a few moments, a monarch with much to think about was able to escape. bye! nicholas witchell, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's louise lear. we had rain, hailand even we had rain, hail and even some snow raining down on us today but we have also had some beautiful rainbow pictures as well, so a little bit of everything in the forecast today and plenty of that to come unfortunately as we go through the weekend with more significant rain through the night tonight with these weather fronts crossing. plenty of isobars on the charts, that nagging north—westerly wind is going to be here through the night and into tomorrow, slowly easing down by sunday. we could see further snow falling at low levels across scotland and perhaps through the peaks and pennines so we start off tomorrow with sunny spells and scattered showers but the trend is
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for most of those showers to be

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