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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  March 16, 2021 7:00pm-8:00pm GMT

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robert buckland authoritarianism. robert buckland said he did not see what the fuss is all about. voting is the scene and we will keep you up—to—date on that. but next up here and bbc news is outside source. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. more european countries suspend their roll out of the oxford astrazeneca covid jab. but as vaccination centres lie idle across the eu its medical regulator says there's no evidence the jab is unsafe. the benefits of the astrazeneca vaccine in preventing covid—19 with its associated risks of hospitalisation and death outweigh the risks of these side—effects. aid workers in mozambique say children as young as eleven
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are being executed in the north of the country. in clinical trials, both the vaccinated people and the people who received the placebo had shown small numbers of blood clots developments.
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the number of thromboembolism events overall in vaccinated people seems not to be higher than that seen in the general population. the european medical agency _ the general population. the european medical agency investigation - the general population. the european medical agency investigation is - medical agency investigation is ongoing, we are expected to hear the outcome on thursday. but let's be clear, both the uk present medicines were regular and the world health organization have stressed there is no evidence of any connection between these vaccines and blood clots. on monday, the eu because i picks memphis, germany, france and italyjoined several other countries in suspending the astrazeneca jab. sweden, latvia, portugal, and slovenia have now followed. other countries — including austria — have halted the use of certain batches. and the uk, belgium, poland, the czech republic and ukraine are continuing to use it. the countries which have suspended it said it is precautionary and are to norway.
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last week it suspended the jab after reporting four rare cases of bleeding, blood clots and a low count of blood plate—lets. here's sara watle a senior physician at the norwegian institute of public health on her concerns. it's too difficult for us to conclude regarding if there is a link or not, but this has been a very difficult decision. we are, as you pointed out, in the midst of a pandemic and vaccines will be very important to stop the spread of the virus. and there are also a lot of people that will get blood clots from having covid—i9 disease. and we still have confidence in the vaccine, and it will be efficacious in preventing severe covid—i9, but at the same time the clusters of patients that we are talking about are not the more common clots like deep vein thrombosis. these are very rare and severe cases with critical outcome in a very young population, where this is not commonly seen, so we do not know if there is a relationship with the vaccination yet, but we are working as fast as we can to get clarity around this. another thing i would like to point out is also that looking at statistics is not enough to assess this issue
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alone because if you look at the numbers the rates are very low because there are few cases, so you won't find these in the big numbers, but that doesn't mean there is not a link between the vaccination and the symptoms, so we need to look further into that. we should put this into perspective. astrazeneca says 17 million people in the eu and the uk have received its vaccine. of that number — 15 have suffered a blood clot in a vein — known as deep—vein thrombosis or dvt. 22 have suffered a blood clot in the lungs — known as a pulmonary embolism. so in total there are 37 reports of blood clots — which is lower than what would be found in a normal population sample. here's the bbc medical editor fergus walsh. it really is baffling, is the only word i can use to describe it. i can't find any expert in the uk
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nor amongst those at astrazeneca or oxford who understands exactly what the decisions and why they're being made. sure, prudence and caution are very wise things to do and we should look a potential side effects. every country has a system for monitoring vaccine safety but it does look like the incidence of clots and serious clots is no higher among those who receive the vaccine and may indeed be significantly lower than among the general population. in the past hour france and italy have said comments by the eu medicines agency are �*positive' — and that both nations would restart innoculating with astrazeneca �*quickly�* — a if it's given the go—ahead by the ema on thursday. however — some people's concerns aren't going to go away quickly. next — this is dr veronique trillet—lenoir who's a french member
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of european parliament and an oncologist. i agree that the clinical trials did not show any significant difference on the secondary effects between the vaccinated people and the people who received the placebo but we are concerned during this temporary authorisation on some specific cases arising in relatively young people and even if there are a few of these cases, i think it is reasonable to cautiously review the individual data and make sure that we will not find a specific population or specific situation where maybe astrazeneca should not be the best way to vaccinate. that's the view from france. next germany.
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it's published new data which says that of 1.6 million vaccinations — there have been7 cases of cerebral thrombosis — a clot to the brain — including three deaths. here'sjenny hill in berlin. experts here concluded that within a population of 1.6 million people you would ordinarily expect to see one case, maybe just over one case. statistically here you have seven cases and that is why the government acted on the advice of the experts and suspended the vaccine. a lot of people here saying it is a very heavy—handed decision, why notjust investigate while you keep rolling out the programme. to that the health ministry said the cases are so severe it would not be responsible to keep vaccinating until they have re—evaluated. it is a decision which could cause a lot of concern and anger — in germany everyday around 200 people are dying from covid.
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vaccination programme is very slow, just 8% of the population have received a first dose so far, so a lot of anger. the government telling us, health ministry in particular creation saying that this is about trust and they have an obligation if they're going to ask people to be vaccinated, they are obliged to make sure they react to reports like this and keep re—evaluating the vaccine. it is all about making sure the public interest in the vaccine. a lot of people would say they are having the reverse effect by bringing in this decision, they are undermining the trust not only in the astrazeneca vaccine here in germany but further afield and also in the government itself. italy has a different calculation. the head of the medicine's authority said the decision was �*political�*. in this interview with daily newspaper la republica — nicola magrina said the vaccine was safe and that the benefit to risk ratio of the jab was �*widely positive'. to help understand that — we also
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have this assessement from politico. "don't underestimate the european public sphere." france, for example, decided to suspend the astrazeneca jab in part because germany did, "because we would have three days of stress after the german decision," a french minister told politico" and here's the view of natasha loder — the health policy editor for the economist. if they had concern for the health of their citizens they should support the vaccines because as we have heard, we don't know any link between vaccination and blood clots. there doesn't seem to be won. in the absence of that kind of evidence if you were being precautionary, you would continue to vaccinate. as i am sure everyone is aware, the side—effects of not having a vaccine are mild—to—moderate covid, hospitalisation and potentially death. we have to vaccinate, thousands of people are dying across europe and suspending vaccination is
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not a good idea and also makes people worry about vaccines. let's not forget the timing. there are already concerns over the pace of europe's vaccine programme — which has been affected by shortages and slow take up. but the situation is urgent. according to afp — the number of deaths across europe has now passed 900,000 — that's the highest toll in any global region. and european countries are once again tightening restrictions. one of them is italy is back in lockdown. here's mark lowen in milan. this is the milan science museum and it was being used yesterday as an astrazeneca vaccine site until 413 the afternoon when italy suspended the afternoon when italy suspended the vaccine and closed all the extra sites across the country, hundreds of thousands of appointments cancelled. this is the exact same day that italy started using
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museums, schools and theatres and mass national vaccine mobilisation to try and triple daily doses by the middle of april. hours later they then suspended them. i spent the morning at pfizer vaccination site which is still progressing at full speed ahead. i spoke to the over 80s being vaccinated and they expressed in the vaccine and many said they would be happy to have an astrazeneca job. they said they felt people were trying to draw a link between medical problems where there were none. one lady said it added to her sense of nervousness and it was right to suspend the astrazeneca vaccine while the full medical investigation was under way. this throws italy's vaccination roll—out into disarray. italy was hoping to vaccinate 80% of the population by mid—september. that target might be
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missed. in the uk — rollout of astrazeneca continues. here's the foreign minister on why people should take it. to the uk now and the prime minister borisjohnson has outlining britain's foreign and defence policy priorities after brexit. it follows a year long review which sees the uk shifting its focus towards the indo pacific region. the uk also plans to increase its stockpile of nuclear weapons, reversing a previous policy. our diplomatic correspondent james landale has this report — which contains some flash photography. for years britain's place in the world was defined by its relationship with the european union and the united states. but brexit changed that. now the government's promising a new approach to foreign affairs. one the prime minister said would keep people safe at home. for us there are no far away countries of which we know little. global britain is not a reflection of old obligations, still less a vainglorious gesture but a necessity for the safety and prosperity of the british people in the decades ahead. one new idea is for britain to focus more on the indo pacific, boosting ties with growing economies like india, where borisjohnson
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will travel next month. new partnerships with regional groups of south—east asian countries and membership of a trans—pacific free trade agreement and the new aircraft carrier hms elizabeth visiting the region later this year. to hold joint operations with allies, and show britain can project force overseas. but will it be enough? there will be some questions, i think, about the details. what will this actually mean for uk presence on the ground, for the resources it is willing to deploy in the region and to some extent, how much it is willing to listen to demand signals from the region as well? but what will this mean for britain's relationship with china? the report says the uk should pursue a positive relationship with beijing on trade and climate change but still says it presents a systemic challenge to britain. china represents the generational threat and the reason for that is that the idea that china will become more like us as it got
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richer or as its economy matured is clearly for the birds. the question for any new foreign policy is not what people at the foreign office think, but whether it changes people's lives. will this new focus on asia make people safer and more prosperous or will it neglect britain's interests closer to home? the report insists britain's commitment to euro atlantic security is unequivocal with nato at its heart but there is little about cooperation with europe on regional threats. like russia, which after the salisbury poison attack the report says remains the most acute threat to britain's security. the review rightly identifies russia as the number one threat that we face, both at home and abroad, but there was no strategy to work with our european partners to try to deal with that challenge, there was no strategy to repair our defences at home. to help tackle new threats there will be a white house—style situation room near downing street, and a new counter—terrorism
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operation centre and the cap on britain's stockpile of nuclear warheads will be lifted because of what the report says is the evolving security environment. an old school weapon for what is supposed to be a new strategy. james landale, bbc news. stay with us on outside source — still to come... we will hear the former first lady, michelle obama, sharing her thoughts on the meghan and harry interview with oprah winfrey. on the meghan and harry interview with oprah winfrey. the police officer accused of the kidnap and murder of a woman walking home in london, has appeared at the old bailey via video link. wayne couzens, who is 48, was remanded in custody. the case of sarah everard's death almost two weeks ago led to protests by women concerned about their safety on britain's streets. here's lucy manning. he sat through most of it with his head bowed, he was rocking backwards
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and forwards as well. the court heard there had been a wide and extensive police investigation since sarah went missing, her body was found last week in whitland and kent. it was found in a builders bag and she had to be identified through dental records. when cousins was on duty in the morning when she went missing at nine pn duty in the morning when she went missing at nine pm in the evening when walking home from clapham. the court was told that the judge was setting a trial date of the 25th of october the trial is due to last four weeks. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is? the benefits of the astrazeneca vaccine outweigh the risk but more european countries have suspended its use.
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to mozambique. more grim details of violence are emerging. before i continue — i should warn you, this story is distressing. there are claims that children are being killed — some as young as 11 are being beheaded. it's happening in mozambique's northern most province of cabo delgado. the province has seen an armed insurgency since 2017 which has triggered a humanitarian crisis. and since 2017, more than two and a half thousand people have been killed in the violence. and almost three quarters of a million people have been displaced. the aid agency save the children has been speaking to displaced families who reported horrifying scenes of violence. here's its mozambique country manager, chance briggs. we have as you said 700,000 people displaced and that's about one third of the province of the population. they're being chased from their homes and villages. the insurgents come in and burn everything. they are very violent.
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in some cases, they are going to youths and even older children and saying, you mustjoin us. with girls sometimes they're asking the girls to come and the girls cook for them and in some cases there is also forced marriage. so it's a very very challenging situation. people are chased from their homes. they leave with nothing but the shirt on their back. the attacks are often at night and as we have reported in some cases, family members are killed. in fact some family members, including children are killed in front of the people who they love. let's take a closer look at the insurgency — and who the militants are. they're linked to the islamic state group and are known locally as al—shabab — although they have no known links to the somali islamist group of the same name. the group has rarely given information about its motive, leadership or demands. though it's known there's local resentment that more money from the region's vast natural resources doesn't reach local communities. well last week, the bbc�*s andrew harding made it to a town called palma
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in the region. he's the first international journalist to make it there. and this is part of the report he made there. it looks a lowering but below was northern mozambique is now a place of terror. we are flying into parma, small—town under siege, all roads cut and the outskirts unnerving empty. in town we find traumatised families. these children havejust fled their village on foot seeking refuge here. their uncle holds up an id card, his brother's beheaded with six others the weekend. here is al—shabaab, a home—grown insurgency now link to the islamic state group with a taste for abductions and butchery. his fighters have swept
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through the region with bewildering speed, a savage scorched earth offensive. against these militants, the government forces are struggling to put it politely. they have hired private foreign security companies to help out but both are been accused of human rights abuses. for more on how to respond to this threat, here is bbc�*s africa correspondent injohannesburg. the correspondent in johannesburg. tue: government correspondent injohannesburg. tte: government in correspondent injohannesburg. t'te: government in mozambique correspondent injohannesburg. tte: government in mozambique has been overwhelmed. it has even been trying to bring together private security companies in this fight against the insurgency. it has appealed to the african union and to the international community. there has been a time when the zimbabwean government said they were offering their help to take its own troops to mozambique capital to try and fight the insurgency but there has not been a lot of movement as such in
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terms of countries within the region who will go in to try and assist them. ~ f who will go in to try and assist them. ~ j , ., who will go in to try and assist them. ~ j ~' who will go in to try and assist them. ~ j ~ , them. why'd you think there has been that lack of movement, _ them. why'd you think there has been that lack of movement, is _ them. why'd you think there has been that lack of movement, is it _ them. why'd you think there has been that lack of movement, is it because i that lack of movement, is it because there is not a knock on security or humanitarian situation beyond mozambique's borders? fist humanitarian situation beyond mozambique's borders? at this moment, mozambique's borders? at this moment. it _ mozambique's borders? at this moment, it looks _ mozambique's borders? at this moment, it looks like - mozambique's borders? at this moment, it looks like that - mozambique's borders? at this moment, it looks like that is i mozambique's borders? at this | moment, it looks like that is the situation but this conflict is bound to spill over into neighbouring countries if it is not controlled as soon as possible. just in the cabo delgado province more than 700,000 people have been displaced. 2500 killed and of those that are displaced, 40% of those are children and now those militant groups are going as far as beheading children as young as 11 years old so this insurgency is also intensifying in its brutality and there are calls
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from eight organisations and also the world to —— to find solutions in making sure this conflict is put to an end. ., . ~' making sure this conflict is put to an end. ., ., ~ ., ., , ., an end. you talk about thousands of --eole an end. you talk about thousands of peeple being _ an end. you talk about thousands of people being displaced _ an end. you talk about thousands of people being displaced from - an end. you talk about thousands of people being displaced from that. people being displaced from that region of mozambique, so where have they gone? region of mozambique, so where have the one? , ., ., ., they gone? they have gone to neighbouring _ they gone? they have gone to neighbouring villages - they gone? they have gone to neighbouring villages which i they gone? they have gone to . neighbouring villages which these militant groups have not reached but in some cases unfortunately people have fled on foot, others have fled by boat and unfortunately those ports have been capsizing leading to more deaths. ports have been capsizing leading to more deathe— to the uk now and prince phillip is back at windsor castle, after being discharged from hospital earlier on tuesday. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell reports. shielded by a screen, a patient, evidently in a wheelchair, was brought out from the king edward vii hospital to a waiting vehicle. moments later, the vehicle left with the duke of edinburgh safely aboard. as the car drove away, photographers caught sight of him sitting in the rear of the vehicle.
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little has been said by the palace about the reasons for his hospital stay other than he had been suffering from an infection and an unspecified pre—existing heart condition. but the treatment, evidently having been successful, he was on his way to be reunited with the queen at windsor. for the royalfamily, it was welcome news. the prince of wales was visiting a vaccination clinic at finsbury park mosque in north london when the news about his father was confirmed. very good news. i am thrilled. and had he had a chance to speak to his father? yes, i've spoken to him, several times. the queen has continued with her official programme throughout her husband's stay in hospital, marking commonwealth day among other things, as well as coping with the fallout from the us television interview given by the sussexes. gayle, you spoke with the couple over the weekend. let's break some news. what did they say? on that, the aftermath of the sussex interview,
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one of meghan's friends, a us breakfast tv presenter has been sharing with her viewers what the couple told her at the weekend. i did actually call them to see how they were feeling, and it is true that harry has talked to his brother and his father too. the word i was given was that those conversations were not productive, but they are glad that they have at least started the conversation. fanfare. here the family's focus is firmly on the duke of edinburgh. in less than 90 days it will be his 100th birthday, and it will be a matter of reassurance to his family that his four weeks in hospital are now over and that doctors have decided he is well enough to return home. nicholas witchell, bbc news. in other royal news, the former first lady michelle obama has shared her thoughts on the harry and meghan oprah interview with nbc nightly news.
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when you watched meghan markle speak out, what went through your mind? public service is a bright, sharp hot spotlight and most people don't understand it, nor should they. the thing i always keep in mind is that none of this is about us in public service. it's about the people we serve. i always tried to push the light back out and focus it on the folks that we are actually here to serve. but what about when she talked about the fact she experienced racism? i feel that was heartbreaking to hear that she felt like she was in her own family, her own family thought differently of her. race isn't a new construct in this world for people of colour so it wasn't a complete surprise to hear her feelings and to have them articulated, i think.
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the thing that i hope for and i think about is that this first and foremost is a family and i pray forforgiveness and healing for them so that they can use this as a teachable moment for us all. that ends this half hour. hello again it's been a glorious afternoon. what a beautiful day has been in the highlands of scotland. take a look at this beautiful picture. it was the warmest day of the year so far for scotland. it wasn't the warm spotin for scotland. it wasn't the warm spot in the uk. number of sports got to 17 degrees, among some cardiff making it wales's warm state of the year as well. overnight tonight will start off clear skies, temperatures drop away quickly. there may be some cloud wafting in across the north of scotland, showers in shetland but for the most we will keep the clear skies. a colder night than last
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night, temperatures between three and six celsius but cold enough for frost. in our coldest rural areas. high—pressure to the west but this move south across north sea and a warm front will move into the west of scotland, thinking cloud and bringing the prospect of rain and drizzle. showers could be anywhere across to east england as we go through wednesday. best of the sunshine towards the south—west but with the winds coming from the north, they are coming from the north sea were temperatures are only 6 degrees at the moment. a subtle change in the wind directions it will be a cooler day across central and eastern england and across parts of northern and eastern areas of scotland as well. temperatures around 11 degrees but still very mild in southern wales and south—west england. thursday, some rain for eastern england but otherwise a lot dry weather. breaks in the cloud, especially in the
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west. dumfries and galloway might see a few spots, as well as county down. wales and south england probably seeing some sunshine as well. i then have the weaker high remains but we will drag on cold winds from the near continent. not a bitter arctic blast but there will be a sharp drop—off in temperatures especially crossed east anglia and coastal regions of south—east england, margate six or seven celsius. strong winds around as well making a few chilly. elsewhere quite cloudy but temperatures remain in double figures.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. more european countries suspend their roll out of the oxford/astrazeneca covid jab. but as vaccination centres lie idle across the eu its medical regulator says there's no evidence the jab is unsafe. the benefits of the astrazeneca vaccine in preventing covid—19 with its associated risk of hospitalisation and death outweigh the risk of these side effects. a crisis is unfolding on the us—mexico border as thousands of migrants congregate and children are being held in inhumane conditions. and, the duke of edinburgh is released home after his four—week hospital stay.
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and scientists believe they have solved one of the great mysteries of mars. where did all of its water go? let's turn to the us now — there is a humanitarian crisis unfolding at the border with mexico. thousands of migrants from central america have been arriving at the border in recent weeks. a pandemic health order means that most adults are being turned away — but the biden administration is allowing children under the age of 18 to enter — separating them from their parents in the process. —— allowing unaccompanied children to enter. critics say these children are then held in cramped and inhumane conditions. here's cbs correspondent naomi ruchim. there was one temporary
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site, a tented site that opened up about 500 miles south of dallas, so very close to the border, they were holding children there as young as four years old and were told that they had to take turns sleeping on the floor, that's how bad it was. they're just overcrowded, there isn't enough room for them, and more of them continued to cross. that being said, the biden administration has now contracted a deal with the city of dallas. the convention centre there will soon open up to 3000 teenage boys so that they have somewhere to stay and also, they are allowing volunteers to come and volunteer time and to drop off any necessities. so the hope is that will improve conditions. let's take a look at the scale of the problem. as of march the 14th, us customs and border patrol agents were housing 4,200 children in detention centres. that's a 31% jump from a week earlier. in that time, the number of children being kept over the three—day limit more than doubled. bear in mind that after 72 hours, children should be taken to refugee shelters, which are better equipped, with play areas, classrooms and counselling services. and the situation isn't improving.
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according to cbs news, 565 unaccompanied children are now entering us custody every day. here's the white house press secretaryjen psaki speaking on monday. we have a lot of critics but many of them are not putting forward a lot of solutions. the options here are send the kids back on theirjourney, send them to unvetted homes, or work to expedite moving them into shelters where they can get health treatment by medical doctors, educational resources, legal counselling, mental health counselling. that's exactly what we're focused on doing. so a difficult situation for the biden administration to solve and a difficult poltical situation for the president. that's because throughout his presidential election campaign he criticised donald trump's immigration policies. now republicans say that the influx of people at the border is a direct result ofjoe biden's decision to reverse donald decision to reverse donald
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trump's ha rd—line policies. here's the senior republican kevin mccarthy speaking at the border on monday. i came down here because i heard of the crisis. it's more than a crisis. this is a human heartbreak. the sad part about all of this — it didn't have to happen. this crisis was created by the presidential policies of this new administration. there's no other way to claim it than a biden border crisis. now this current situation is being compared with the situation in 2018 when these disturbing pictures emerged of children cramped into caged areas in detention centres. thousands of children were separated from their parents under the trump administration's "zero tolerance" border scheme. and hundreds of those separated families still haven't been reunited. so far we've not seen any pictures from inside the facilities recently — that's because journalists, attorneys and rights groups have so far been barred from access.
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here'sjen psaki again on that. we continue to support transparency from here in the white house. dhs oversees some of the facilities, hhs oversees some of the facilities. i know that they are working through how to provide access in a way that abides by covid protocols and also protects the privacy of people who are being — who are staying in those facilities. juliegrace brufke is the capitol hill reporter for the hill. thank you for your time. first of all help me understand the circumstances in which these children are coming across the border unaccompanied. republicans have said to — border unaccompanied. republicans have said to the _ border unaccompanied. republicans have said to the biden _ have said to the biden administration, we have seen more than 4000 children children, fema has been called in, so you can expect republicans to seize on this
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until the biden administration doesn't take a harder line on immigration. t5 doesn't take a harder line on immigration.— doesn't take a harder line on immigration. is kevin mccarthy riaht, are immigration. is kevin mccarthy right. are the _ immigration. is kevin mccarthy right, are the republicans - immigration. is kevin mccarthyj right, are the republicans right that the number of arrivals and unaccompanied children coming across the border has gone up since the start of the biden presidency? the numbers start of the biden presidency? tte: numbers have gone start of the biden presidency? tt9 numbers have gone up. migrants going across the board have gone up by 28% but democrats point to the numbers have been rising since last fall. they pointed to the failed policies by the trump administration. so there's a lot of finger pointing and it is an emotional issue where it will be difficult for lawmakers to hash out a plan that will satisfy both sides. hash out a plan that will satisfy both sides-_ hash out a plan that will satisfy both sides. : ., both sides. and when we look at the hundreds of — both sides. and when we look at the hundreds of children _ both sides. and when we look at the hundreds of children involved - both sides. and when we look at the hundreds of children involved in - hundreds of children involved in this. are there families on the other side of the border are they not making the journey with them? t not making the journey with them? i think it is a mixture of that. i have talked to lawmakers who have said they've paid to have the children come up here for a better
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wife and a lot of republican lawmakers are accusing the biden demonstration of same families won't be separated at the border and they will not be able to successfully enter this country has led to this influx. : :, enter this country has led to this influx. : ., g enter this country has led to this influx. : . g ,., ~ influx. and we heard jen psaki there 'usti wh influx. and we heard jen psaki there justify why access — influx. and we heard jen psaki there justify why access has _ influx. and we heard jen psaki there justify why access has not _ influx. and we heard jen psaki there justify why access has not been - justify why access has not been given to the detention centres wasn't does that add up to you as a journalist who is one of many organisations trying to cover this story? t organisations trying to cover this sto ? ~ :, organisations trying to cover this sto ? ~ ., :, :, ., story? i think a lot of fixture -- a lot of from _ story? i think a lot of fixture -- a lot of from us _ story? i think a lot of fixture -- a lot of from us would _ story? i think a lot of fixture -- a lot of from us would like - story? i think a lot of fixture -- a lot of from us would like to - story? i think a lot of fixture -- a lot of from us would like to see l story? i think a lot of fixture -- a l lot of from us would like to see the circumstances. i think this would be helpful for any accurate depiction of any story. hopefully access opens up of any story. hopefully access opens up sooner rather than later. in terms of political pressure, i can see there is some but because this is so early in the biden presidency... it is so early in the biden presidency... is so early in the biden residen :, , �* presidency... it doesn't tell in the wa it presidency... it doesn't tell in the way it might _ presidency... it doesn't tell in the way it might do — presidency... it doesn't tell in the way it might do several _ presidency... it doesn't tell in the way it might do several years - presidency... it doesn't tell in the way it might do several years in. l presidency... it doesn't tell in the way it might do several years in. i think republicans during the last two election cycles have pointed to a crime committed by those who
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illegally cross the border and made that huge talking point which they have seen some successfully so i think it will be continue to be used as a talking point they're moving forward into the next election cycle. forward into the next election cle. ~ forward into the next election cle.~ forward into the next election clef :, forward into the next election cle. ., , cycle. we appreciate you 'oining us. thank ou cycle. we appreciate you 'oining us. thank you very * cycle. we appreciate you 'oining us. thank you very much _ cycle. we appreciate you joining us. thank you very much indeed - cycle. we appreciate you joining us. thank you very much indeed for - cycle. we appreciate you joining us. | thank you very much indeed for your time and reporting, you can read on the hill website. some theatres have been forced to be close. but those who can reopen that has been set in may. here is this report from the west and in london. theatres as they're meant to be. but for a year now, uk theatres like this one — the apollo in london — and others up and down the country have been deserted,
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suddenly told to close on the 16th of march 2020. it was the night the show did not go on — leaving empty chairs and empty stages, and empty order books at the firms that supply them. the week before the theatres closed we'd just opened phantom of the opera and we'd just opened the back to the future musical in manchester. we'd just got back to london and we had this crazy, busy time planned. and itjust all stopped. i mean, everything stopped. we told our guys that we would stop for two weeks and see what happened. then it was seven months before we came back here. during lockdown, the national theatre streamed 16 shows online, watched by millions around the world. they streamed millions of shows online. .. they streamed millions of shows online... they committed £1.5 billion for arts venues like this one but some effects on the long shutdown has hurt many freelance
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workers. . ., , shutdown has hurt many freelance workers. ., , , workers. the impact has been most harshly felt — workers. the impact has been most harshly felt by _ workers. the impact has been most harshly felt by the _ workers. the impact has been most harshly felt by the freelancers - workers. the impact has been most harshly felt by the freelancers who l harshly felt by the freelancers who we work _ harshly felt by the freelancers who we work with us at the vast majority 70% of _ we work with us at the vast majority 70% of the — we work with us at the vast majority 70% of the feeder industry are freelancers and i think almost 40% of them _ freelancers and i think almost 40% of them have not been eligible for any government supports and as you can imagine, there has been no help in all— can imagine, there has been no help in all on _ can imagine, there has been no help inall on their— can imagine, there has been no help in all on their lives, at the impact has been — in all on their lives, at the impact has been chronic. at in all on their lives, at the impact has been chronic.— in all on their lives, at the impact has been chronic. at the time i was livin: with has been chronic. at the time i was living with some _ has been chronic. at the time i was living with some technicians - has been chronic. at the time i was living with some technicians that i has been chronic. at the time i was| living with some technicians that we have the texts one after the other saying that they had lost their work. :, ~ :, , :, saying that they had lost their work. . , ., , ., work. harri marshall is a freelancer. _ work. harri marshall is a freelancer. she - work. harri marshall is a freelancer. she had - work. harri marshall is a freelancer. she had to i work. harri marshall is a i freelancer. she had to find work. harri marshall is a - freelancer. she had to find work. i am a ward clerk at the nhs. sol am a ward clerk at the nhs. so i work on the labour ward which is really busy at the minute as you can imagine. it is so nice to see a lot of people having families but there are so many. i would love to resume being a freelancer again picking up where i kind of left off almost
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exactly a year ago. i would love to continue narrating out with the lights in the play grandma, i love to keep making work with young people and vulnerable adults. —— nerding out. i like directing my own show but we will have to wait and see. :, , show but we will have to wait and see. . , . :, show but we will have to wait and see. . , , ., ., fith 1?th of may albeit reopen from the 17th of may albeit with social distancing and limited audience numbers. it won't be scenes like this one right away but it is certainly something to sing about. let's hope those theatres are open sooner rather than later stay with me here in outside source was up in a few minutes we will have the latest from mars as scientists believe they have solved one of the greatest mysteries of the planet. the first minister of scotland has laid out her plans to ease
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you may remember there is a big row between facebook and the austrian government over a controversial law aimed at making tech platforms pay for news content that is being shared on their platform. —— the australian government. facebook blocked all news being shared in australia and then after talks facebook agreed to lift that ban and the government agreed to make changes to the new thoughtful since then facebook has now reached a three year deal with the biggest news company in australia, rupert murdoch's news corp. australia and this involves facebook giving news corp. money. this this involves facebook giving news corp- money-— corp. money. this is a big dealfor a number of— corp. money. this is a big dealfor a number of reasons. _ corp. money. this is a big dealfor a number of reasons. the - corp. money. this is a big dealfor a number of reasons. the fact - corp. money. this is a big dealfor| a number of reasons. the fact that these are two empires basically signing off on a deal where news corp who controls a huge chunk of the media market in australia has come to an agreement with facebook, it is quite significant. we don't know the number but we can hazard a guess that it will be a significant
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amount. they control about 70% of the newspaper circulation here, they own sky news australia, they own new stock conduct a you. and if they are getting paid for that on facebook, it is significant because of the context of it. the ongoing follow—up thatis context of it. the ongoing follow—up that is happening ever since austria said it was proposing this legislation, facebook and google have spoken out against it a number of times and then we had that big fall out and pick dispute when facebook watch news here in australia and we all woke up and thought our phones were broken because all the news feed had gone away and made a big u—turn on that. —— news.com.au. they made some negotiations with the australian government and sat down with me outlets to negotiate payments and now that is what we are seeing. whether or not the smaller companies, the smaller outlets get similar negotiations and deals that
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is the big question i think. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... europe's medical regulator is insane the benefits of the astrazeneca vaccine outweigh any risks but more european countries had suspended its use. —— medical regulator's vaccine. to the uk now and mps in the house of commons have been voting on the government's police, crime, sentencing and courts bill. ata at a second reading it passed by a majority of nearly 100 votes. the legislation would — among other things — give police greater powers to stop protests which cause "serious unease" — as well as introducing criminal penalties for people who cause "serious annoyance". helen catt is in westminster. tell me more about how the photos went. , , _, , tell me more about how the photos went. , , ,., tell me more about how the photos went. ,, ,., tell me more about how the photos
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went. ,, , went. this bill covers a vast number of thins. went. this bill covers a vast number of things- it — went. this bill covers a vast number of things- it is _ went. this bill covers a vast number of things. it is the _ went. this bill covers a vast number of things. it is the police _ went. this bill covers a vast number of things. it is the police crime - of things. it is the police crime sentencing in courts bill and it contains measures like the ones you said but everything from making a starting point from judges for people who murder children should spend their whole life in prison, outlawing relationships between sports coaches and 17—year—olds. a huge amount of stuff in it but there were those two things he mention that attracted particular controversy, and that is the idea of giving police more powers to use against nonviolent protests. labour the main opposition objected to this, they put forward their own what they call an amendment to stop the bill in its tracks. that fell and it has been voted through to the next stage and part of this is to do with the system of how it works here, this is what is known as a second reading so mps have to decide whether they will back the whole thing so it goes on to the next stage and that is when they could start to change individual measures that they perhaps do not like. full support decide whether to oppose the
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whole thing on this occasion labour decided to oppose the whole thing not just decided to oppose the whole thing notjust because of the issues around protest but because they said it didn't enough to tackle the issue of violence against women. it wanted to see many more measures built into it. : ., to see many more measures built into it. : . ~ :, ., it. and hell and we know that there have been concerns _ it. and hell and we know that there have been concerns expressed - it. and hell and we know that there | have been concerns expressed even within the prime ministers conservative party about how strict some measures are in this bill. what is the government's case that these stricter measures are necessary? tt stricter measures are necessary? if we look at that issue of protest for example, there have been going calls from within government from some police officers, dame cressida dick, the commissioner of the metropolitan police in london, had been going for some tougher powers to be able to restrict protests that were really disruptive, particularly after the extinction rebellion protests that had a really big effect on london. there was a call for more powers for that. the government's argument is "we respect a peaceful protest but we want to be able to take action
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against things that are really severely disrupted to people's way of life". but labour say that protest is by its nature destructive and this legislation would crack too hard on that and allow the home secretary to decide what is disruptive and what is not and they felt that was not an acceptable way of going about it. that was where the argument is here. just of going about it. that was where the argument is here.— of going about it. that was where the argument is here. just a quick procedural— the argument is here. just a quick procedural question _ the argument is here. just a quick procedural question for _ the argument is here. just a quick procedural question for if - the argument is here. just a quick procedural question for if this - the argument is here. just a quick procedural question for if this is i procedural question for if this is the second reading, what happens from here? :, the second reading, what happens from here?— from here? now it goes on to the next stage _ from here? now it goes on to the next stage which _ from here? now it goes on to the next stage which is _ from here? now it goes on to the next stage which is where - from here? now it goes on to the next stage which is where mps i from here? now it goes on to the - next stage which is where mps would try to change it to amend it. there is a committee stage where mps will look at the build line by line and it is a massive bill and suggest changes and the report stage where it comes back to the comments and again mps will use that to try and make changes to when it comes back and make changes to the bills and see if they can change things what they don't like.— they don't like. helen, thank you very much _ they don't like. helen, thank you very much indeed. _ they don't like. helen, thank you very much indeed. the _
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they don't like. helen, thank you very much indeed. the us - they don't like. helen, thank you very much indeed. the us vice i very much indeed. the us vice president kamala harris has addressed the un for the first time speaking about the importance of gender equality. let's take a moment to listen to what some of what she said. , :, , to listen to what some of what she said. , ., , :, ., said. the status of democracy also de-ends said. the status of democracy also depends fundamentally _ said. the status of democracy also depends fundamentally on - said. the status of democracy also depends fundamentally on the - depends fundamentally on the empowerment of women. not only because the exclusion of women in decision—making is a marker of a flawed democracy but because the participation of women strengthens democracy. and that is true everywhere. looking around the world i am inspired everywhere. looking around the world iam inspired by everywhere. looking around the world i am inspired by the progress that is being made. and i am proud to report that while the united states still has work to do, we too are making progress and that women strengthen our democracy every day. vice president kamala harris speaking to the un. let's switch to mars. scientists believe they may have solved one of the biggest mysteries surrounding mars. what happened to the water that flowed across its surface billions of years ago? they published their findings today in the journal science, and eva scheller
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of the california institute of technology is one of the authors. here she is on what they found. we have a lot of observational evidence showing that we have a lot of water on mars in its ancient past. and today we have some water but it's not at all in the same amount. and so previous studies had suggested that all this water actually got lost to space and what we are showing in this new study is that most of the water was actually lost to the crust in the sense that it got incorporated into minerals and rocks in the crust that actually contain water in their crystal structure. it's actually very interesting from the perspective of life and planetary habitability as we call it because this new discovery that the water loss to the crust actually constrains the water to have been lost on mars already by 3 billion years ago.
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so, this means that at 3 billion years ago, mars was pretty much the kind of dry planet as we know it is today. and so if you want to look for more habitable conditions and environments that could have sustained life, you want to look at that period between four and 3 billion years ago. so scientists believe vast quantities of liquid on mars became trapped in minerals below the planet's crust. the study was based on evidence from orbiting spacecraft, and rovers on the martian surface. one of these is nasa's perseverance rover. you may remember it landed on mars last month. these are images of that landing. the rover�*s main mission is to find signs of ancient life on mars, and it's currently exploring thejezero crater, this is a simulation of it. it's thought to be an ancient lake. here's eva scheller again on what the discovery means for the perseverance rover�*s mission. it's actually very interesting for the perseverance rover because the perseverance rover is going to investigate this very
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ancient 3—4 billion—year—old crust where all this water went at the time and is going to characterise the processes that enabled the water loss of the martian environment and the drying of the planet as a whole, and it is going to explore for the first time for any rover the most ancient part of the martian crust that is really the key to unlocking the secrets between when was mars habitable, could it have sustained life, and ultimately what led it to become the dry planet that we know it as today? gwenllian williams is from the centre for astrophysics research at the university of hertfordshire. thank you very much forjoining us on outside source. i wonder what your reaction is to these latest findings? t your reaction is to these latest findin . s? ~ your reaction is to these latest findinus? ~ 3 your reaction is to these latest findinus? ~ �*, ., , findings? i think it's really interesting _ findings? i think it's really interesting first _ findings? i think it's really interesting first that - findings? i think it's really interesting first that the i findings? i think it's really - interesting first that the water on
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mars has been trapped in the crust and in the soil of the planet, and that it wasn't walked there and that it couldn't be recycled because there is no tectonic plates on mars to recycle materials so it is been stuck there. —— it was locked there. what does this tell us about the volume of water or liquid that would have been on mars at some point? the stud have been on mars at some point? tt9 study that was published today combined lots of observations from meteorites, orbiters and rovers and also created computer simulations and it tells us that the water on mars may have been enough to cover the surface of an ocean from 100 to 1,000 metres deep, so that is a lot
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of water and to understand part of the process of that loss of all of that water is really interesting. in fact that it has been locked up in the service and evaporated into space. the service and evaporated into sace. : the service and evaporated into sace.: , , .,_ the service and evaporated into sace. , , space. and presumably understanding what happened _ space. and presumably understanding what happened on _ space. and presumably understanding what happened on mars _ space. and presumably understanding what happened on mars with - space. and presumably understanding what happened on mars with that - what happened on mars with that water may help us understand what happened to our earth. yes. water may help us understand what happened to our earth. yes, exactly. the study thinks _ happened to our earth. yes, exactly. the study thinks that _ happened to our earth. yes, exactly. the study thinks that most _ happened to our earth. yes, exactly. the study thinks that most of - happened to our earth. yes, exactly. the study thinks that most of the - the study thinks that most of the water was lost in these processes between three and 4 billion years ago and it was at that time it was perhaps habitable and looked very similar to perhaps habitable and looked very similarto earth, and perhaps habitable and looked very similar to earth, and so making those comparisons between what mars perhaps used to look like and what earth he used to look like and what it looks like today is really interesting in our understanding of our place in the universe as well. but learning more and more about mars in this report is helping with that if you could choose what we would learn about next, what would
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it be, what do you want to understand to build on this report? i think the great next steps for the nasa perseverance rover with the jezero crater which used to be a lake on mars with a river flowing into, it has a river delta where there may be these clay deposits which may have that water trapped in it. and so having that river traffic to that river delta and take sapper and macro samples of the clay to test rectory for past signs of ancient life, i think that is the next big step on the study, is to understand its place and habitability of mars. thanks for acuidin us habitability of mars. thanks for guiding us through _ habitability of mars. thanks for guiding us through it. - habitability of mars. thanks for guiding us through it. that - habitability of mars. thanks for guiding us through it. that is i guiding us through it. that is gwellian williams from the centre of astrophysics research at university of hertfordshire. you can find more analysis from outside source
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elsewhere on the bbc. each week we tackle a different subject. you can see our videos on the bbc news website. if you're in the uk you can also find them on iplayer — in the news category. we're also on the bbc sounds app — you can hear audio versions of our reports there. there's lots of ways to find them — just search for my name. —— gwenellian williams. if you search for my name on bbc sounds, bbc youtube, the iplayer and bbc website, you will very easily find me. and a reminder of the top straight that the european medicines agency says it remains firmly convinced that the benefits of the astrazeneca vaccine outweigh its risks. the head of the inmate says there was no indication the jab causes blood clots. but more european countries have suspended the astrazeneca vaccine use and all eyes are now on thursday when we think the ema will come back with a further evaluation of the risks to
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the astrazeneca vaccine. plenty more on the bbc news website and i will see you very soon. hello, again. it's been a glorious afternoon with lots of spring sunshine on offer and what a beautiful day it has been in the highlands of scotland. take a look at this weather watcher picture. you kind of wish you were there, yeah? for scotland it was the warmest day of the year so far, temperatures reached 15 celsius in edinburgh but it wasn't the warmest spot in the uk. there were a number of the spots that got to 17 celsius — amongst them cardiff, making it wales' warmest day of the year so far as well. now, looking at the weather charts overnight tonight, we're going to start off with those clear skies. temperatures drop away pretty quickly and there may be some clouds to waft in across the far north of scotland, perhaps a few showers there in shetland for a time but for the most part we'll keep those clear skies for the majority of the night. and a colder night than last night. temperatures typically between 3—6 celsius but cold enough for a nip of frost in our very
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coldest rural areas. high pressure still to the west of the uk on wednesday but this weather system dives southwards across from the north sea and a warm front will move into western scotland thickening the cloud here, bringing the prospect of a few spots of light rain and drizzle. showers meanwhile could affectjust about anywhere across eastern england as we go through wednesday, the best of the sunshine towards the south west but with the winds coming in from a northerly direction, they're coming more across from the cold north sea where sea temperatures are only 6 celsius at the moment and that subtle change in the wind direction means that it's actually going to be quite a cooler day across central and eastern england and across parts of northern and eastern areas of scotland as well. temperatures more typically around ten or 11 but still very mild towards parts of southern wales and south west england. thursday — again, we could see some rain clipping parts of eastern england but otherwise a lot of dry weather. there will be some breaks in the cloud particularly across western areas — so dumfries and galloway, a favoured spot. might see a few breaks towards county down, and certainly north west england,
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west wales. south west wales and south west england probably seeing some south wales and south west england probably seeing some sunshine as well at times. by the end of the week, the high pressure is still there but we're going to be dragging some of these colder winds coming in from the near continent. it's not a bitter arctic blast — nothing like that, but there will be a sharp drop—off in temperatures particularly focused across parts of east anglia and around coastal areas of south east england. margate just 6—7 celsius on friday and the weekend with some strong winds around as well making it feel really quite chilly. elsewhere quite cloudy but temperatures staying in double figures.
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this is bbc news. i'm tim willcox. the headlines: borisjohnson unveils a new vision for britain's place in the world — less europe, more asia. but a necessity for the safety and prosperity of the british people in the decades ahead. the duke of edinburgh returns to windsor a month after going into hospital for an infection and having a heart procedure. meanwhile a us tv presenter friend of the duke and duchess of sussex reveals details of talks between harry and his brother prince william and their father, prince charles. harry has talked to his brother and fathen _ harry has talked to his brother and fathen the — harry has talked to his brother and
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father. the word i was given was those _ father. the word i was given was those conversations were not productive, but they are

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