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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 17, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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hi, good morning, welcome to bbc news. here are the headlines... the minimum wage, pensions, and holiday pay — tens of thousands of uber drivers will now get them. the european commission is expected to present proposals for covid vaccine passports called digital green pass to allow eu citizens to travel within the eu for summer holidays. the government, the world health organization and the european medicines agency all say the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine is safe, despite some european nations suspending use of the vaccine. the number of people sleeping on the streets in england may be nine times the government's official estimate, according to a new report from a cross—party committee of mps. it has been a year since
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the prime minister asked people to start working from home where they could — we look at the impact on the climate. coming up, an independent review into the historical sexual abuse of aspiring young football players by paedophile coaches will be published this lunchtime. we'll ask one survivor what he hopes will come out of it. more than 70,000 uber drivers across the uk will start getting the minimum legal wage from today — along with paid holiday and pension rights. it follows a ruling in the uk supreme court which could have a big impact on the "gig economy" for freelance workers. the ride—hailing app giant said all drivers would earn at least
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the national living wage, which rises to £8.91 next month. uber has told the bbc it did not expect the change in drivers�* conditions to mean higherfares. union leaders and employment experts say the move will have far reaching consequences for the gig economy. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davies reports. it was the company that shook up the system. but the system seems to have caught up with uber. after last month's verdict by the supreme court, it's announced that all of its drivers will be classed as workers. for years, politicians and unions have said you have been playing fast and loose with employment rights. does this not prove they were right all along? i think the situation for employment in the uk has been ambiguous for some time by government. you have taken advantage of those ambiguities, haven't you? we have worked as hard as we can to try and provide drivers with a good way of earning,
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the flexibility they want and the protections they have. but we can now go further than we have gone before because of the clarity the supreme court ruling brings us. drivers will still be able to work where and when they want. the company's minimum wage only applies once a driver accepts a ride. are passengers going to see their fares rise, because this will be costly to you? so we're not expecting to raise prices at the current time. we absolutely want to remain price competitive. so is this going to come out of the drivers�* income instead? where is that money going to come from? 0ur expectation is actually we can grow the business by treating drivers well, bringing drivers onto the platform, and also, by growing with cities as they unlock. 0ne drivers�* union was pleased. i wish they'd have done those five years ago. i wish they'd have listened then. however, they appear to be listening now. and this is a tremendous victory
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for working people in this country. this decision could have implications across the gig economy. uber is probably the most well known and potentially the biggest player in the gig economy. and other operators will be looking closely at this and thinking, well, after six years of litigation, uber had to give in to the inevitable and agree that their drivers were workers. so we probably need to be doing the same. this move is a fundamental change and it is one that will be closely watched around the world. caroline davies, bbc news. let�*s get more on this. with me now is colin dodds, an uber driver in glasow. and james farrar an ex uber driver who�*s now general secretary of the app drivers and couriers union. he�*s spent years battling for better workering conditions for uber drivers. james, what you think this means? well, i mean, it is a step forward but it we are still far short of
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what the supreme court actually ruled last month. they ruled that drivers should be protected under the law every time that they are working from login, making themselves available on the alpha work until late out again. but what do —— uber has decided is that you should only be entitled to those entitlements from when you are dispatched to when you drop the passenger. that means half of your time is not protected. we are still half leg 50% away from —— we are still 50% away from what the supreme court said. it is a step forward but uber not complying with the law still. white mesh —— uber not complying with the law still. white mesh —- are uber not complying with the law still. white mesh --_ uber not complying with the law still. white mesh -- are you think the will still. white mesh -- are you think they will not _ still. white mesh -- are you think they will not be _ still. white mesh -- are you think they will not be paid _ still. white mesh -- are you think they will not be paid while - still. white mesh -- are you think they will not be paid while cell- they will not be paid while cell waiting? they will not be paid while cell
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waitin: ? , ., , , they will not be paid while cell waitin? , ., , ., ., ., , waiting? yes, and this is analogous to bein: a waiting? yes, and this is analogous to being a barrister _ waiting? yes, and this is analogous to being a barrister at _ waiting? yes, and this is analogous to being a barrister at starbucks. i to being a barrister at starbucks. we do not tell them that they will only be paid whilst making a cappuccino and whilst waiting for the next customer they will not be paid. we do not say to shopkeepers, we will pay you less and less busy days and more on busy days. the initial tribunaljudge spell this out nicely. he quoted milton and said, they too serve who stand and wait. when you are serving a network and making yourself available and that availability is really important, it means it can get to customers quickly and that is because so many people are waiting around and they have to be paid that time. ., , ., ., “ around and they have to be paid that time. ., i. ., ~ .,, time. cullen, are you working as soon as you _ time. cullen, are you working as soon as you log _ time. cullen, are you working as soon as you log in _ time. cullen, are you working as soon as you log in to _ time. cullen, are you working as soon as you log in to that - time. cullen, are you working as soon as you log in to that or- time. cullen, are you working as soon as you log in to that or are | soon as you log in to that or are you only working when you are dispatched to a passenger? —— colin.
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i would agree with james that with being _ i would agree with james that with being off— i would agree with james that with being off the app, you are still working — being off the app, you are still working whilst waiting for a trip. i agree _ working whilst waiting for a trip. i agree with — working whilst waiting for a trip. i agree withjames on working whilst waiting for a trip. i agree with james on that aspect. with starbucks example, those people are fully _ with starbucks example, those people are fully employed and private higher— are fully employed and private higher drivers do not want to be fully— higher drivers do not want to be fully employed. they want to be truiy _ fully employed. they want to be truly self—employed and have the flexibility to work in different platforms while working there. so youii _ platforms while working there. so youii find — platforms while working there. so you'll find online, they all want to be self—employed and the workers status _ be self—employed and the workers status -- — be self—employed and the workers status —— worker's status is a minefieid~ _ status -- worker's status is a minefield-— status -- worker's status is a minefield. . ., ., minefield. are you saying you do not want to be legal— minefield. are you saying you do not want to be legal minimum _
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minefield. are you saying you do not want to be legal minimum wage, - want to be legal minimum wage, holiday pay, pension rights? indie holiday pay, pension rights? we actuall holiday pay, pension rights? - actually earn more than £8 91 per hour and it is how you... it is where you were, the location, it is up where you were, the location, it is up to you to maximise where you are on the system. up to you to maximise where you are on the system-— up to you to maximise where you are on the system. what you say to colin about that, — on the system. what you say to colin about that, james? _ on the system. what you say to colin about that, james? it _ on the system. what you say to colin about that, james? it is _ on the system. what you say to colin about that, james? it is clear - on the system. what you say to colin about that, james? it is clear in - about that, james? it is clear in evidence we _ about that, james? it is clear in evidence we have _ about that, james? it is clear in evidence we have given - about that, james? it is clear in evidence we have given to - about that, james? it is clear in evidence we have given to the l evidence we have given to the tribunal but i end others were earning £5 power and that is what we were taking home. it is true that some people do not want legal protection, but i am the general secretary of the union and our members absolutely do want basic legal protections and everybody should have these basic legal protections. let should have these basic legal protections-— should have these basic legal protections. let colin respond. their membership _ protections. let colin respond. their membership is _ protections. let colin respond. their membership is small. - protections. let colin respond. their membership is small. alli protections. let colin respond. i their membership is small. all of these _ their membership is small. all of these union's membership is very
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small— these union's membership is very small compared to the actual membership and it isjust not reflecting facebook and whatsapp groups _ reflecting facebook and whatsapp groups. you are talking about the many _ groups. you are talking about the many thousands of drivers on these groups— many thousands of drivers on these groups and — many thousands of drivers on these groups and are saying they want to truly be _ groups and are saying they want to truly be self—employed and, yes, uber— truly be self—employed and, yes, uber doesn't say, this is the greatest _ uber doesn't say, this is the greatest recruitment drive ever for uber and _ greatest recruitment drive ever for uberand there greatest recruitment drive ever for uber and there will be so many drivers— uber and there will be so many drivers come to work for them and been _ drivers come to work for them and beep percentage cut the drivers will take more _ beep percentage cut the drivers will take more —— the drivers will have more _ take more —— the drivers will have more taken — take more —— the drivers will have more taken off them. i do not think there _ more taken off them. i do not think there will_ more taken off them. i do not think there will be benefit for the drivers _ there will be benefit for the drivers. ,., there will be benefit for the drivers. , ., ,, there will be benefit for the drivers. ,, ,, ., , , drivers. do you think anything else flows from this, _ drivers. do you think anything else flows from this, ie _ drivers. do you think anything else flows from this, ie other— drivers. do you think anything else flows from this, ie other drivers i drivers. do you think anything else flows from this, ie other drivers in | flows from this, ie other drivers in the gig economy or is itjust about uber? the gig economy or is it 'ust about uber? ., ., ., uber? one thing that made it more easy poised — uber? one thing that made it more easy poised to _ uber? one thing that made it more easy poised to win _ uber? one thing that made it more easy poised to win the _ uber? one thing that made it more easy poised to win the case - uber? one thing that made it more easy poised to win the case is - uber? one thing that made it more easy poised to win the case is the l easy poised to win the case is the regulatory regime places responsibility on uber to act in a
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way that it is controlling drivers. the supreme court ruling is such a moral imperative. what the lord said was that the purpose of the legislation was to protect vulnerable workers and if you are platform employer like uber and are creating artificial contracts and artificial paid for the purpose of avoiding legislation, which cheating workers out of statutory protections, it will not stand in law. i think it creates room for other workers to be protected although they are not working in a licensed industry like we are. thank ou ve licensed industry like we are. thank you very much. _ licensed industry like we are. thank you very much, james, _ licensed industry like we are. thank you very much, james, and - licensed industry like we are. thank you very much, james, and colin, i you very much, james, and colin, still an uber driver in glasgow. breaking news now and it is to do with the indecent assault and murder
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of 31—year—old stuart lubbock. it happened at the home of michael barrymore and they say they have arrested a 50—year—old man in cheshire. this is essex police, who, at the beginning of last year, actually assigned new investigators into the case. essex police now say detectives investigating the indecent into closure and murder of stuart lubbock at the hendon home of barrymore have arrested a man. —— at the home of michael barrymore. the government says that, by the end of this week, half the uk adult population will have been vaccinated against coronavirus. this comes as the number of european countries which have suspended the use of the 0xford—astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine has risen to 18. latvia and sweden are now on the list. that�*s despite the european medicines regulator declaring
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that fears about blood clots are unfounded. dan johnson reports. across europe there are questions... ..about the 0xford—astrazeneca vaccine, as more countries suspend its use. in italy, vaccination centres stand empty whilst presumably, coronavirus keeps spreading. the concern is blood clots. astrazeneca says there have been 37 incidents of blood clots in the uk and eu. but that is following 17 millionjabs. in germany, seven rare clots in the brain and three deaths have been recorded. health officials there say the responsible move is to pause, investigate each case and re—evaluate. but the european medicine regulator says the overall rates of clots are actually lower than you would expect
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in the general population. and delays could mean more covid cases and more lives lost. the damage to confidence in the vaccine just seems a dreadful price to pay in order to signal some sort of, yes, we are looking at safety and we are erring on the side of caution. this isn�*t erring on the side of caution, it�*s throwing caution to the wind. in austria, one batch of the vaccine has been held back, while others are still being given, leaving some people like manfred concerned. i wouldn�*t recommend to get it now for me. i�*m a bit scared to get ill of the vaccine. but this woman is pleased she has had herfirst dose. if you get covid—19 and you have really bad issues, you never know, then it's better to take it. vaccine take—up in the uk is among the highest in the world,
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and the message couldn�*t be clearer. the oxford—astrazeneca jab is safe. we know that over 10 million people have had it in this country. and that�*s what the british regulator says. but also the world health organization, and even the european regulator. a european safety review will be published tomorrow. france has said if it gets the all clear, it will restart immediately. for some countries, this is about being careful to ensure confidence in vaccination programmes. but there is also awareness that doubts about vaccines can be just as contagious as viruses. if one spreads, so will the other. dan johnson, bbc news. the former chief executive of the mhra, sir kent woods, says there has been a "dent in public confidence" after various countries suspended the use of the jab, but it has a very strong safety record and people shouldn�*t hesitate to get the vaccine.
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the intention was that there should be a single safety review at the european medicines agency and that the member states would follow the advice of the european medicines agency. there was a press conference from the ema yesterday afternoon in which the advice was repeated that the vaccine was considered to be safe and that countries should continue to use it. that has been a consistent message out of the world health organization, it has been a consistent message out of the mhra in this country, and we have largest experience of the astrazeneca vaccine. we have given 11 million doses. we have an excellent system of monitoring safety in vaccine roll—outs and there has been confidence that the vaccine is performing as it should. let�*s talk to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. what is the latest from politicians on this? liii< what is the latest from politicians on this? , ., ., on this? uk is not getting involved in any diplomatic— on this? uk is not getting involved in any diplomatic spat _ on this? uk is not getting involved in any diplomatic spat with - on this? uk is not getting involved in any diplomatic spat with the - on this? uk is not getting involved in any diplomatic spat with the eu | in any diplomatic spat with the eu or eu member states because their priority at the moment is to
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reassure public that the vaccine is completely safe. there is a separate conversation within government about vaccine certificates and what are the pros and cons about them being played in the uk for people to access particular services. we have heard from the business minister this morning. we are having debates and discussions are travel and it is important _ discussions are travel and it is important people can travel safely, but what _ important people can travel safely, but what we also have to do is be driven _ but what we also have to do is be driven by— but what we also have to do is be driven by the data. we have got to see how _ driven by the data. we have got to see how the coronavirus develops and once we _ see how the coronavirus develops and once we have reopened the economy, we will— once we have reopened the economy, we will he _ once we have reopened the economy, we will be looking at other measures to make _ we will be looking at other measures to make sure people are safe and that the _ to make sure people are safe and that the public in the confidence is maintained. that the public in the confidence is maintained-— that the public in the confidence is maintained. ~ ., , ., , , , maintained. what is happening behind closed doors at _ maintained. what is happening behind closed doors at whitehall— maintained. what is happening behind closed doors at whitehall at _ maintained. what is happening behind closed doors at whitehall at the - closed doors at whitehall at the moment is michael gove is running a review of vaccine passports. this week, he asked people to submit evidence to it. there is a series of
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questions about medical considerations, ethical considerations, ethical considerations, what it means for venues and the legal rights and responsibilities of employers, and they are just a few of the westerns they are just a few of the westerns they are just a few of the westerns they are asking, which shows you what a thorny issue it is in the uk. in brussels, the eu commission will publish their proposals of what they call digital green passes, their version of vaccine passports. the focus of that will be on travel of eu nationals to other eu countries within the eu and i am sure you are well aware, we have left the eu so i am not sure that means for british travellers going to the continent. we should have more details by lunchtime. we should have more details by lunchtime-— we should have more details by lunchtime. ., ,, , ., ~ ., . lunchtime. thank you, adam. but --eole lunchtime. thank you, adam. but people need _ lunchtime. thank you, adam. but people need to — lunchtime. thank you, adam. but people need to know— lunchtime. thank you, adam. but people need to know because - lunchtime. thank you, adam. but| people need to know because they potentially want to book a summer holiday! it hasjust potentially want to book a summer holiday! it has just gone quarter past nine. a five—year independent review into the historical sexual abuse of aspiring young football players
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by paedophile coaches will be published this lunchtime. clive sheldon qc was asked by the fa in 2016 to look at safeguarding failures of the fa and to find out whether clubs like crewe and manchester city knew about the abuse of the boys between 1970 and 2005. the inquiry was ordered after several former players waived their right to anonymity and spoke publicly about their experiences. here are andy woodward, steve walters, jason dunford and chris unsworth, talking to me in an exclusive interview in november 2016. he used to pick me up and the abuse started in the car. he used to touch, we used to play games in the car and that is when it all started. and that would be on the way to training? 0n the way to training and on the way back. right. and then he invited you to stay over at his house. yeah, that happened a little bit later but not long after.
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at first, there was, you know, two, three, four lads that used to stay there and there was always two or three in the bed. right. and for decades, keeping this kind of cataclysmic secret. i know, i chatted with my friend the other night about this and you just get on with your life and you forget everything that has happened. as i say, luckily, i had my golf to go to and that guided me through, i think. but both my... both my parents have died and that hurts me. yeah. not telling them. does it? yeah.
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i don�*t know if it�*s a good thing that i did or didn�*t tell them, because they would have blamed themselves, so... let�*s talk to gary cliffe, who helped convict ex—football coach barry bennell by giving evidence against him. bennell absued him at his home and on the pitch at city�*s old ground maine road. mr cliffe is ambassador for the 0ffside trust and is an advisor to the football association�*s survivor group. how significant is today for you? this is a massive day for me, the lads, those lads that are not here now and also the families of those affected. i have waited 35 years for this day and it is finally here. and not only the initial report, but the manchester report is out today as well, so it is quite a monumental day for us all.
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well, so it is quite a monumental day for us all-— well, so it is quite a monumental day for us all. are you hopeful that the records — day for us all. are you hopeful that the records today _ day for us all. are you hopeful that the records today it _ day for us all. are you hopeful that the records today it will _ day for us all. are you hopeful that the records today it will get - day for us all. are you hopeful that the records today it will get to - day for us all. are you hopeful that the records today it will get to the | the records today it will get to the truth of how much clubs, the fa knew about what was going on? i truth of how much clubs, the fa knew about what was going on?— about what was going on? i am, but also very realistic, _ about what was going on? i am, but also very realistic, knowing - about what was going on? i am, but also very realistic, knowing the - also very realistic, knowing the gravity of evidence required in these sorts of things. i don�*t hold out much hope for culpability and many answers, to be frank with you. really? many answers, to be frank with you. reall ? . many answers, to be frank with you. really?- answers _ many answers, to be frank with you. really?- answers to _ many answers, to be frank with you. really? yeah. answers to questions like, did the — really? yeah. answers to questions like, did the manager _ really? yeah. answers to questions like, did the manager of _ really? yeah. answers to questions like, did the manager of the - really? jeai. answers to questions like, did the manager of the first team at crewe alexandra really not know at the time that his youth football coach, barry bennell, was abusing children? he has always said he had no idea, but you do not think those sought answers will come today? those sought answers will come toda ? ~ ., , ., , today? we need to see what is in the re ort and today? we need to see what is in the report and it — today? we need to see what is in the report and it is _ today? we need to see what is in the report and it is embargoed _ today? we need to see what is in the report and it is embargoed until- report and it is embargoed until 1pm. i am
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report and it is embargoed until 1pm. iam hopefulthere report and it is embargoed until 1pm. i am hopeful there will be some answers in there and that i�*m very interested in the recommendations that the qc will be making. what that the qc will be making. what kind of recommendations - that the qc will be making. what kind of recommendations do you want to see? . . . . kind of recommendations do you want to see? . . . , ., , to see? law change, it is the only wa . i to see? law change, it is the only way- i want _ to see? law change, it is the only way. i want mandatory _ to see? law change, it is the only way. i want mandatory reporting, | way. i want mandatory reporting, there is no silver bullet for this. there will always be predatory paedophiles. it is in their dna to gravitate towards children. we cannot stop that. we can only take awake the opportunities as far as possible and mandatory reporting which is not in this country, which many people will be astounded at, that there is no requirement to report suspected abuse, notjust football but the whole of sport and regulated activities. there would be a standard of that and it is a vital tool in... you need law, basically,
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tool in... you need law, basically, to force people to report, i�*m afraid. to force people to report, i'm afraid. ~ . . to force people to report, i'm afraid. . . , ., afraid. was it the right decision ou made afraid. was it the right decision you made to — afraid. was it the right decision you made to speak— afraid. was it the right decision you made to speak out? - afraid. was it the right decision - you made to speak out? absolutely, es. you you made to speak out? absolutely, yes- you sat — you made to speak out? absolutely, yes- you sat on _ you made to speak out? absolutely, yes. you sat on this _ you made to speak out? absolutely, yes. you sat on this very _ you made to speak out? absolutely, yes. you sat on this very safe - you made to speak out? absolutely, yes. you sat on this very safe out i yes. you sat on this very safe out with me three or four years ago and —— this very sofa with me. i kept anonymity through the trial but i felt empowered by the lads you had on the programme and the support from my colleagues, family, friends, and it is about shedding a that weight, the gravity, the horrible weight, the gravity, the horrible weight within your heart and carrying it on your back. it is too much to carry and i was empowered and it feels good, it is a cliche, but it is good to talk. 50 and it feels good, it is a cliche, but it is good to talk.— but it is good to talk. so that decision has _ but it is good to talk. so that decision has transformed - but it is good to talk. so that l decision has transformed your but it is good to talk. so that - decision has transformed your life to a certain extent?— decision has transformed your life to a certain extent? there is not a da that to a certain extent? there is not a day that goes _ to a certain extent? there is not a day that goes by _ to a certain extent? there is not a day that goes by that _ to a certain extent? there is not a day that goes by that it _ to a certain extent? there is not a
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day that goes by that it is - to a certain extent? there is not a day that goes by that it is not - to a certain extent? there is not a day that goes by that it is not in i day that goes by that it is not in the front of your head, the acts and the front of your head, the acts and the shame, the embarrassment. i still feel weak, ifeel the shame, the embarrassment. i still feel weak, i feel weak now and felt weak at the time. but to shed that burden has helped me cope with the mental—health side of it. find that burden has helped me cope with the mental-health side of it.- the mental-health side of it. and in terms of the _ the mental-health side of it. and in terms of the other _ the mental-health side of it. and in terms of the other guys _ the mental-health side of it. and in terms of the other guys that - the mental-health side of it. and in terms of the other guys that we - the mental-health side of it. and in| terms of the other guys that we saw in that clip there, and there are others of course and will all feature in a bbc documentary coming out next monday, you are in regular contract and support each other, don�*t you? contract and support each other, don't you?— contract and support each other, don't ou? , , ., . don't you? yes. due to the pandemic, it is difficult — don't you? yes. due to the pandemic, it is difficult and _ don't you? yes. due to the pandemic, it is difficult and we _ don't you? yes. due to the pandemic, it is difficult and we have _ don't you? yes. due to the pandemic, it is difficult and we have not - don't you? yes. due to the pandemic, it is difficult and we have not been - it is difficult and we have not been able to meet up, but we have phone calls and video calls and we get strength from each other and support each other. when someone is low, we are there to prop them up and hopefully help them along and look after them. ~ . .. hopefully help them along and look after them. ~ ., ., , ., , after them. well, thank you very much, after them. well, thank you very much. gary- _ after them. well, thank you very much, gary. thank— after them. well, thank you very
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much, gary. thank you - after them. well, thank you very much, gary. thank you talking i after them. well, thank you very | much, gary. thank you talking to after them. well, thank you very i much, gary. thank you talking to us this morning. we will report on the enquiry when it comes out at 1pm. thank you and we will look out for 1p thank you and we will look out for 1p recommendations are, of course. that is out at 1pm. four years and some of the survivors have been waiting for this and today is the day it will finally be published. and if you�*ve been affected by our discussion of child abuse in football, go to bbc.co.uk/actionline for details of organisations offering information and support, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 0800 066 066. there�*s increasing controversy about so called �*low traffic neighbourhoods�* where bollards and fines are introduced to restrict cars. many of the schemes have been introduced in cities during lockdown, when the roads have been quieter. the idea is to encourage alternative forms of transport, but discontent is growing.
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0ur chief environment correspondent justin rowlatt reports. communities have been divided. there have been death threats... ..vandalism and huge protests. all the result of attempts to get us to use our cars less. this is all for the cyclists and all for the middle classes and the crackpots. no! where does it say 'no entry'? passions are probably running highest in the london borough of ealing. if you take targeted air strikes on syria, brexit, coronavirus, of all of those, i would say low traffic neighbourhoods has been the most divisive issue that has inflamed like no other. so there are a couple of signs to mark the barrier, but the centre is open. drive through it and you�*ll be issued with £130 fine — 65 quid if you pay within two weeks. now, within weeks of opening these low traffic neighbourhoods, they had issued almost 6,000 fines
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and raised almost half a million quid. the initiative comes from westminster. the government has said cycling and walking should become the natural choice for shorter journeys. and when the pandemic struck, it gave local authorities new powers and new cash to change the road system. as britain returns to work, our cities could face daily gridlock if people choose to drive to work. in went planters and bollards to block the roads. and back came the complaints. my taxi driver has dropped me off here because he can�*t get through. it's absolute nonsense about saving people's lives and air quality. single women who need to get around to go places, _ are no longer able to get directly to their houses of residence. - many planters were vandalised, shunted out of the way orjust driven around. and in the process, it has set neighbour against neighbour.
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the street that i�*m on had over a million cars passing my front door in a year. it meant that i couldn�*t sleep properly. you're pushing your problem, and you're pushing it with everyone else's road onto very, very few roads. this is allowing people to have fresh air, cleaner air and choices about how they get from a to b. there are four schools on the main roads that are now chugging down a massive amount of pollution. but your plan is to rip them all out. and then we just want to have the status quo. consultation is a really fair way to do things. i agree, yeah. and there has been no consultation for these ones that have been implemented. low traffic neighbourhoods are being introduced across the country. manchester has closed more than 20 city centre streets in the last year, and has said it wants nine out of every ten journeys into the city to be by foot, bike or public transport within ten years. we have an existential crisis with climate change. we have a health epidemic. down here? yeah. olympic gold winning cyclist chris boardman is greater manchester�*s walking
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and cycling commissioner. 20 billion more miles being driven around homes now than there were just ten years ago. and if we consulted on that, there would have been a much bigger uproar than there is for low traffic neighbourhoods. of course, the pandemic means traffic volumes have plummeted. but in the coming weeks, as the coronavirus restrictions begin to lift, that is going to change. and remember, there are strict limits on how many people can travel on buses, trams and trains. it's been a thoroughfare for 200 years. but now you're not allowed to go through. ijust don't get it. so the controversy over traffic reduction measures is only likely to intensify. justin rowlatt, bbc news, manchester. that is the most watched video on the bbc website at the moment. that is the most watched video on the bbc website at the moment. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood.
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hello again. as we go through today, a bit more cloud will develop, particularly across some western areas and also some eastern areas. that cloud will be thick enough to produce some showers across east anglia, the south—east and the grating ——greater london area and the home counties, but we will not all see them. thicker cloud across north—west scotland and the north—west of northern ireland may well produce some drizzle, but in between a lot of dry weather, some hazy sunshine with highs up to 15 degrees. as we go through the overnight period, they will be more cloud developing but where the cloud remains broken is where it will be cold enough for a touch of frost. for example, across parts of the southwest. and you can see once again some patchy rain moving southwards and feeling cool like it will do today across the north sea coastline. that holds true for tomorrow as well, with this onshore breeze. the rain continuing to push down into the south—east, not particularly heavy. there will be a lot of cloud in its wake. the brightest skies across eastern scotland and north—east england.
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we will take you to westminster because dominic cummings is being questioned by mps about the new high risk scientific research agency that he championed before his dramatic departure from number ten. this is his first public appearance since quitting as the chief aide. the new secretary of _ quitting as the chief aide. the new secretary of state _ quitting as the chief aide. the new secretary of state and _ quitting as the chief aide. the new secretary of state and his - quitting as the chief aide. the new secretary of state and his lead - secretary of state and his lead official— secretary of state and his lead official on science policy in what will he — official on science policy in what will be their first appearance before — will be their first appearance before this committee. this is a session— before this committee. this is a session on— before this committee. this is a session on science funding. the committee has also been inquiring into the _ committee has also been inquiring into the covid—19 pandemic and there are questions that we would like to ask mr— are questions that we would like to ask mr cummings about the response to the _ ask mr cummings about the response to the pandemic. he has kindly agreed — to the pandemic. he has kindly agreed to— to the pandemic. he has kindly agreed to give evidence on that to the joint _ agreed to give evidence on that to the joint enquiry that we are holding _ the joint enquiry that we are holding with the health and social care select committee on lessons learned _ care select committee on lessons learned from the pandemic. that will
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allow us _ learned from the pandemic. that will allow us to— learned from the pandemic. that will allow us to focus today's session on science _ allow us to focus today's session on science funding. perhaps i can start with a _ science funding. perhaps i can start with a question to mr cummings. what is the _ with a question to mr cummings. what is the problem to which it is the solution? — is the problem to which it is the solution? . is the problem to which it is the solution? , ., ., ., solution? there is a view overall problems- _ solution? there is a view overall problems. almost _ solution? there is a view overall problems. almost all _ solution? there is a view overall problems. almost all science i solution? there is a view overall - problems. almost all science funders globally operating the same way. they have the same metrics, papers, the same kind of horrific bureaucracy. they waste huge amounts time for the researchers in filling out forms and they get the same results. secondly, you have some examples historically of things that work in completely different principles and are super productive. but the sort of entities, the sort of things tend to be destroyed by bureaucracy pretty quickly over time. the people who run them tend to be driven away. it is to head out
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to be driven away. it is to head out to be driven away. it is to head out to be extremely hard for normal government systems to learn from the most productive enterprises. you also have a situation which issues around science and technology are increasing in importance. you also have this huge wall of money from people like in china and america. so there are all these different pressures. whitehall is not configured to think rationally about how to do science and technology policy. britain can�*t solve all its problems by itself and an agency can�*t. so a whole bunch of things have to change in overall system. what they can do is to look, to be decisively different from all other funding entities. i have a chat done by a brilliant scientist who wrote the textbook. i hope you can see
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this. i will put it on my blog. this is basically where all funders globally are. they are in this little bubble here. but this is the actual design space for how you can do science and technology. the purpose of that organisation are to be sample in this broader design space, to do things differently, to learn from things that have been super productive in the past. that means in simple terms extreme freedom. that is one of the great lessons of the things that have been most successful historically. that�*s what produced the internet and personal computing revolution. you need to strip out all of the horrific whitehall bureaucracy around procurement, state aid, human resources, civil service pay scales. all of the sort of things. and things like their treasury business case process which is horrific and causes huge delays in science and
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technology. there is logic elsewhere in the system, but as applied to science and technology, it is very damaging. in a nutshell, we are having to find... there is no point creating it if it willjust be another entity in that little red thing. the purpose is to sample the white space and to do things very differently. white space and to do things very differentl . ~ ., differently. with extreme freedom and bustin: differently. with extreme freedom and busting the _ differently. with extreme freedom and busting the bureaucracy - differently. with extreme freedom and busting the bureaucracy that l differently. with extreme freedom | and busting the bureaucracy that is already— and busting the bureaucracy that is already there? yes. we will ask more detailed _ already there? yes. we will ask more detailed questions about each part of that— detailed questions about each part of that my colleagues have follow—up questions _ of that my colleagues have follow—up questions i_ of that my colleagues have follow—up questions. i think it is evident that— questions. i think it is evident that most— questions. i think it is evident that most people accept that the proposal— that most people accept that the proposal to have a organisation like this was— proposal to have a organisation like this was yours. was it something that you — this was yours. was it something that you propose to the prime minister? _ that you propose to the prime minister? with a part of a deal that you did _ minister? with a part of a deal that you did with the prime minister to 'oin you did with the prime minister to join them? — you did with the prime minister to join them? i you did with the prime minister to 'oin them? ., �* _ .,, , join them? i wouldn't say it was my idea. all i join them? i wouldn't say it was my idea- alli am _ join them? i wouldn't say it was my idea. all i am doing _ join them? i wouldn't say it was my idea. all i am doing is _ join them? i wouldn't say it was my idea. all i am doing is suggesting i idea. all i am doing is suggesting what a lot of the best scientists
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and technology people have been suggesting for decades, that britain should learn from some of these examples. so i wouldn�*t in any way distort my idea. essentially, what happened in terms of what you�*re talking about is the prime minister came to speak to me the sunday before he became prime and said, come into downing street. i said yes, if there is no value are deadly serious about actually getting brexit done and avoiding a second referendum, secondly, double the science budget, third, create a public entity and forth, support me in trying to change how whitehall works in the cabinet office works, because it is a disaster zone. and he said, deal.— he said, deal. where did he say deal? where — he said, deal. where did he say deal? where were _ he said, deal. where did he say deal? where were you? - he said, deal. where did he say deal? where were you? in - he said, deal. where did he say deal? where were you? in my i he said, deal. where did he say - deal? where were you? in my living room, the sunday _ deal? where were you? in my living room, the sunday before _ deal? where were you? in my living room, the sunday before he -
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deal? where were you? in my living| room, the sunday before he became prime minister. just me and him. tbshd prime minister. just me and him. and now that you — prime minister. just me and him. and now that you are not there, are you confident— now that you are not there, are you confident that the government will stick to— confident that the government will stick to the four elements of that? as far— stick to the four elements of that? as far as _ stick to the four elements of that? as far as i — stick to the four elements of that? as far as i can see from the budget, the plan _ as far as i can see from the budget, the plan is _ as far as i can see from the budget, the plan is to— as far as i can see from the budget, the plan is to stick to the doubling of the _ the plan is to stick to the doubling of the science budget. there are some _ of the science budget. there are some issues around that. i think the fact they— some issues around that. i think the fact they brought in the bill shows that the _ fact they brought in the bill shows that the government remains committed to doing it. i think the problem — committed to doing it. i think the problem is — committed to doing it. i think the problem is much less likely to be the government not doing an offer. the problem it is a steeper is that there is a reason why... i think, you have this model from the 1960s.
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