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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  March 17, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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a damning report into child sexual abuse in football says there were "significa nt institutional failings" by the football association. to keep children safe. there's a theme of people knew or suspected but none of the officials had the gumption to raise it with anyone, police, social services, at all. we'll have more about the findings from our sports correspondent. also this lunchtime. a man has been arrested in connection with the murder of stuart lubbock 20 years ago, who died after attending a party at the home of the entertainer michael barrymore. as we stated last february, and have continually stated over the last 20 years,
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we believe someone or some people at that party know what happened. the former downing street adviser dominic cummings describes the department of health as a "smoking ruin" in the early months of the coronavirus pandemic. a digital travel certificate — the eu suggests a way for holiday—makers to prove they've had a covid vaccination. bird song. and, why this is so unusual? the bird that's now so rare in the wild, it's forgotten how to sing its own song. coming up in sport later in the hour on bbc news, we will have the latest from the cheltenham festival, where champion hurdle star rachel blackmore has more rides on day two.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. a damning report into child sex abuse in football says the football association failed to do enough to keep children safe after the scale of the problem came to light. the independent review found the fa was "too slow" to put protection measures in place following the high profile convictions of abusers in 1995. it identified significant institutional failings. our sports correspondent natalie pirks, reports. this is the day survivors have been waiting for, to see black—and—white what they have always known, the fa should have done more to keep them safe. iii should have done more to keep them safe. u, �* should have done more to keep them safe. u, �* ., , should have done more to keep them safe. �* ., , �* safe. ifi can't dealwith this, i'm not going — safe. ifi can't dealwith this, i'm not going to _ safe. ifi can't dealwith this, i'm not going to be _ safe. ifi can't dealwith this, i'm not going to be a _ safe. ifi can't dealwith this, i'm not going to be a footballer. - safe. ifi can't dealwith this, i'm not going to be a footballer. in l not going to be a footballer. in 2016, it was the harrowing story of survivor andy woodward which. the
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game to examine its darkest rude's. the impact it has had on my life is just catastrophic == the impact it has had on my life is just catastrophi— the impact it has had on my life is just catastrophic -- darkest truths. you live with _ just catastrophic -- darkest truths. you live with that _ just catastrophic -- darkest truths. you live with that all _ just catastrophic -- darkest truths. you live with that all your - just catastrophic -- darkest truths. you live with that all your life - just catastrophic -- darkest truths. you live with that all your life and i you live with that all your life and i can't put it into words what that has done to me. for i can't put it into words what that has done to me.— i can't put it into words what that has done to me. for years on, clive sheldon 00s _ has done to me. for years on, clive sheldon qc's report _ has done to me. for years on, clive sheldon qc's report makes - sheldon qc�*s report makes uncomfortable reading for football's governing body in england and wales. we do wedoa we do a lot of talking to them as well as showing skills and explaining the game to them. barry bennell is explaining the game to them. barry iz’ennell is a — explaining the game to them. barry bennell is a former _ explaining the game to them. barry bennell is a former coach _ explaining the game to them. barry bennell is a former coach at - explaining the game to them. barry bennell is a former coach at crewe alexandra, stoke city and manchester city, he was the star maker for
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aspiring footballers, and he was also a prolific be there for. the report says the fa failed to ban him and other predators from involvement in football. gary cliff was repeatedly abused. i in football. gary cliff was repeatedly abused.- in football. gary cliff was repeatedly abused. i feel sort of indicated but _ repeatedly abused. i feel sort of indicated but i _ repeatedly abused. i feel sort of indicated but i don't _ repeatedly abused. i feel sort of indicated but i don't think - repeatedly abused. i feel sort of indicated but i don't think it - repeatedly abused. i feel sort of indicated but i don't think it has| indicated but i don't think it has gone far enough throughout the whole report i have read, there is a theme of people knew or suspected but none of people knew or suspected but none of the officials had the gumption to raise it with anyone, police, social services at all. that is the theme running through it. it is disappointing in that respect. the sheer scale _ disappointing in that respect. the sheer scale of the report is alarming, abuse and failings took place at clubs all across england and wales from 1970 to 2005. there are known to be at least 240 suspects and 692 survivors. the review has made 13 recommendations to the fa including developing a five year strategy on safeguarding but survivors say we must not assume
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this is all in the past.— this is all in the past. absolutely it would be _ this is all in the past. absolutely it would be nice _ this is all in the past. absolutely it would be nice to _ this is all in the past. absolutely it would be nice to think - this is all in the past. absolutely it would be nice to think it - this is all in the past. absolutely it would be nice to think it could | it would be nice to think it could not happen again, or that it isn't happening right now. make sure your children are safe and don'tjust assume because someone has a badge, assume because someone has a badge, a whistle and a tracksuit that they are ok to leave your children with. the report paints a picture of a sport that was not set up to protect its most vulnerable and was too slow to put that right. for many, action came far too late. and natalie is with me now. some very difficult things to listen to, there, and how damaging now is all of this for the fa? i to, there, and how damaging now is all of this for the fa?— all of this for the fa? i think this is damning _ all of this for the fa? i think this is damning for— all of this for the fa? i think this is damning for them. _ all of this for the fa? i think this | is damning for them. remember, all of this for the fa? i think this - is damning for them. remember, this report was about who knew what and when they knew it. significant, institutional failings. when they knew it. significant, institutionalfailings. we when they knew it. significant, institutional failings. we are going to hear a bit laterfrom the fa which of course bears the brunt of the criticism but we're also going to hear from manchester city because they have got their own review into they have got their own review into the abuse that they have been looking at later and we will hear a bit more from clive sheldon qc, the
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author of the report. individual clubs were named, southampton was one of them. the report says club was aware of rumours about coach bob higgins, who was jailed in 2019, for 24 years for abuse of children. it has released a statement, the club today, admitting considerable failings and said not preventing the abuse was inexcusable and it was deeply sorry. where do we go from here? a few people i have spoken to today said they would like to see the fa push for mandatory reporting. that would make it illegal to stay quiet if you think a child is being abused, significantly different from the rule we have now. for any parents watching this that might be concerned, the report found that between 1995 and 2000, child protection was not regarded as an urgent priority for the fa but it did find that the overwhelming majority of young people from 1970 to 2005 were able to engage in the sport safely. things are much better now but it is the time, survivors
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are saying, to ensure the sport really learns from its failings. natalie pirks, thank you. a 50—year—old man has been arrested in connection with the murder of stuart lubbock at the home of michael barrymore 20 years ago. stuart lubbock was a guest at a party hosted by the then hugely popular tv presenter at his house in essex. mr lubbock was found unconscious in the swimming pool, and died later in hospital. let's speak to our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. how much more do we know? as you said, in how much more do we know? as you said. in 20 — how much more do we know? as you said. in 20 years _ how much more do we know? as you said, in 20 years at _ how much more do we know? as you said, in 20 years at the _ how much more do we know? as you said, in 20 years at the end - how much more do we know? as you said, in 20 years at the end of- how much more do we know? as you said, in 20 years at the end of this i said, in 20 years at the end of this month, since 31—year—old stuart lubbock was found dead in the summing pool at the essex home of michael barrymore who at that time was one of britain's leading lights of entertainment. stuart lubbock had injuries which suggested a serious sexual assault and at his inquest, the coroner returned an open verdict, leaving open the possibility that stuart lubbock had been deliberately killed. there were
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only eight other guests at what appears to have been a spontaneous party at michael barrymore's home that night but no one has ever been charged. well, today, essex police said they had arrested a 50—year—old man in cheshire on suspicion of murder. detective superintendent lucie morris said they would be looking to talk to all of the partygoers again. over the coming days we will be contacting all those who were present at the party at the time as well as others who may have information. as we stated last february, and have continually stated over the last 20 years, we believe someone or some people at that party know what happened. this is the most significant moment in the police investigation since 2007, when michael barrymore, his then partnerjonathan kenny, and a man called justin merritt were all arrested on suspicion of murder but
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released without charge. today, stuart lubbock�*s father terry welcomed the news of the arrest, saying it has been 20 years and it has nearly killed him. terry lubbock is in a care home where he has terminal cancer.— is in a care home where he has terminal cancer. daniel sandford, thank you- _ the prime minister's former aide dominic cummings has criticised the department of health's performance during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, comparing the department to a "smoking ruin". appearing in front of a parliamentary committee, dominic cummings urged mps to take a "very hard look" at the way the government had handled the crisis. and a warning, there's flash photography from the start of iain watson's report. last autumn, the former campaign director of vote leave and the prime minister's most controversial adviser, dominic cummings, left downing street. and it seems some of the contents of these boxes may finally have been divulged today. he was taking a batch of documents to a committee of mps who wanted to talk about science policy. could a second wave have been
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prevented, mr cummings? but he also suggested parliament should soon look closely at the government's handling of the covid crisis. as the country emerges from the current lockdown and as there is, as there should be, an urgent, very, very hard look by this building into what went wrong and why in 2020. and using stark imagery he offered an example of what had not gone well. in spring 2020, you had a situation where the department of health wasjust a smoking ruin in terms of procurement and ppe and all of that. dominic cummings himself came underfire last spring when it was revealed he'd made a trip from london to durham when the official advice was to stay at home. he had justified his actions in unconventional actions in an unconventional alfresco press conference. but today he insisted that, behind the scenes, number ten was taking vital decisions to tackle the crisis. it is not coincidental
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that the vaccine programme worked the way that it did. it is not coincidental that, to do that, we had to take it out of the department of health. we had to have it authorised very directly by the prime minister and say strip away all the normal nonsense. but in response, sources close to the health secretary insisted that setting up the vaccination task force had been a team effort. dominic cummings came into downing street to help sort out, in his words, the brexit nightmare. but pretty soon, it was a pandemic that was giving ministers sleepless nights. and today, we got a sneak preview of the kind of evidence that any inquiry into the covid crisis is likely to hear. and it appears not everyone who has been in government will be singing from the same song sheet. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. people aged 50 and over in england are being invited to book their first coronavirus vaccine. more than half of britain's adult population will have
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received their first shot of the jab by the end of this week. the eu has announced plans for vaccine certificates, which would allow its citizens to travel within the bloc for holidays. the digital document would prove someone has received the jab and is considered safe to enter another country. ministers here are considering a similar scheme, as alice baxter reports. it's been a torrid 12 months for the travel industry, one of the major victims of the covid pandemic. but today the european union outlined their proposals for what it is calling a "green certificate" so that eu citizens can travel between member states. it shows all states whether the person has either been vaccinated or a recent negative test or has recovered from covid and thus has
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antibodies. meanwhile, the uk government says that they are drawing up plans for a covid certificate and will publish a report on april the 12th. we are having debates and discussions about travel. i think it is really important that people can travel safely but i think what we also have to do is be driven by the data. we have got to see how the coronavirus develops and once we have reopened the economy, i'm sure we will be looking at other measures to make sure that people are safe and above all, that the confidence of the public is maintained. where governments have hesitated, perhaps because a certificate or passport throws up ethical questions, discriminating against the young, those awaiting a second jab, those who opt out of vaccinations, business has set the pace. p&0 this morning announced the resumption of cruises around the british isles later this morning on board the iona, so long the british isles later this summer on board the iona, so long as passengers can show they have been vaccinated before boarding.
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so when people book they don't need to prove their vaccination but when they travel, they will need to prove they travel, they will need to prove they are vaccinated. this is moving at pace, as your programme has reported this morning so we anticipate by the 27th ofjune, which is our first sailing, anticipate by the 27th ofjune, which is ourfirst sailing, there will be a government accredited scheme to prove your vaccination but at the very least, then of course, a letter from your gp would suffice. saga have already announced similar rules for all of their holidays while ba have said that they are working on a covid passport app. after one of the most difficult years in living memory, glimmers of hope. alice baxter, bbc news. let's speak to our brussels correspondent nick beake. tell us a bit more about what the commission is proposing, then. imilieu commission is proposing, then. when the commission _ commission is proposing, then. when the commission started _ commission is proposing, then. ensign the commission started talking commission is proposing, then. tween the commission started talking about this at the start of the year, the message was, they hope was that the summer could be saved and this was something that would maybe help countries such as greece who has
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been calling for a so—called vaccine certificate so that they could try and restart their tourist industries that have been so badly battered by the covid crisis but i think that tone was very different today when the eu announced this. that is because we are beginning to see the crest of a third wave, in the words of ursula von der leyen, the president of the european commission with new cases on the rise and at the same time, scepticism of vaccines does seem to be increasing, particularly the astrazeneca jab and we have seen lots of eu countries suspend the use of the jab, even though in britain, the authorities are saying it is absolutely fine to use and the world health organization says countries should 0rganization says countries should continue to use it under european union medicines agency has said it is looking at everything but for now, the benefits certainly outweigh the risks of taking the jab. 0ne the risks of taking the jab. one other thing i should tell you about, in the past half an hour or so, ursula von der leyen, head of the commission here, has said that she is really angry about the way that
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vaccines are leaving the eu and she is not seeing them coming into the european union. so she has said that the commission will use all the at their disposal to stop that. what could that mean? she was accused of potentially starting a vaccine war with the uk. she rejected that but i think things are going to get very nasty potentially in the coming days and weeks. shill nasty potentially in the coming days and weeks. �* .~ ., ~ and weeks. all right, nick, thank ou from and weeks. all right, nick, thank you from brussels. _ many southern european countries want tourists to return as soon as possible. british holiday—makers represent a huge part of spain's economy, and hotels there say they can't survive another summer with no bookings. 0ur correspondent guy hedgecoe has been to benidorm, where local businesses say they're desperate to welcome brits again. the beaches of benidorm. normally brimming with tourists at this time of year, covid has left them virtually empty. it's a year since spain introduced a strict lockdown and more recently,
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partial restrictions on movement and social activity have remained in place. for businesses such as the cimbel hotel, the impact has been enormous. the most important market here is the uk market, the second from belgium, from holland, from the east of europe, from france. and nobody coming. nobody�*s coming now. the clients, they don't have the trust to make the reservation. last year, spain received 65 million fewer tourists than normal. with tourism representing nearly 15% of the spanish economy, gdp shrank more than any other countries in europe. restaurant ownerjosef fuster is among those desperately hoping the worst is over. translation: we need - guarantees that this summer we'll be able to work. we can't go back to more restrictions, because if we do go back, then we're finished. but many in the sector
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see hope in the shape of a proposed covid passport, aimed at easing travel for those who have received eu approved vaccines. the new certificate will be available on paper and in a digitalformat. the idea is that it will provide information about any vaccines that the holder may have received, but it will also show the results of any covid tests they may have undergone, and show whether or not they have actually had the virus. the importance of this travel certificate is definitely very much for southern european countries, which are main destinations in summer of northern european countries. that travel certificate will benefit both sides and hopefully will start slowly, slowly, to recapture all the traditional tourism flows. some countries have expressed ethical and logistical concerns about such a document, but spain is hoping it will be up
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and running as early as mid—may. if the vaccine passport does come into use before peak season kicks in, it could transform the summer, both for tourists and national economies. guy hedgecoe, bbc news, benidorm. our top story this lunchtime. an independent report into child sex abuse in football accuses the fa of "significant institutional failings", and says it "did not do enough to keep children safe" following high profile convictions in 1995. and energy customers may soon get an automatic refund, if they overpay their gas or electricity bills. coming up in the sport in the next 15 minutes on bbc news. we'll look ahead to tonight's match at stamford bridge. chelsea defend a one goal lead against atletico madrid with a place in the champions league quarterfinals at stake.
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now, some people are calling them more divisive than brexit — low traffic neighbourhoods, or ltns, are being introduced in cities across the country — they mean local roads are closed to anyone except pedestrians or cyclists in an attempt to reduce emissions. one in 20 londoners, for example, now live in an ltn — but many schemes were introduced without public consultation, and some councils are making million of pounds from the fines issued to drivers. 0ur chief environment correspondent justin rowlatt has been finding out just how controversial the schemes are. this is all for the cyclists and the middle classes and the crackpots, yeah? there is a battle on the streets of britain. death threats... vandalism... huge protest. all the result of efforts to get us to use our cars less.
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no! so where does it say no entry? yeah, if you take targeted air strikes on syria, brexit, coronavirus, of all of these, i would say low traffic neighborhoods has been the most divisive issue that has inflamed like no other. so there are a couple of signs to mark the barrier, but the centre is open. drive through it, and you'll be issued with a £130 fine. 65 quid if you pay within two weeks. now, within weeks of opening these low traffic neighborhoods, they had issued almost 6,000 fines and raised almost half a million quid. when the pandemic struck, the government gave new powers and new cash to local authorities to change the roads system. in went planters and bollards to block the roads. back came the complaints. so my taxi driver has dropped me off here because he can't get through to my house any more.
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it is absolute nonsense about saving people's lives and air quality. single women who need to get around and go places are no longer able to get directly to their house of residence. it has set neighbour against neighbour. the street that i'm on had over a million cars passing my front door in a year and meant that i couldn't sleep properly. you're pushing what was your problem, and you're pushing it with everyone else's road onto very, very few roads. this is allowing people to have fresher, cleaner air and choices about how they get from a to b. there are four schools on the main roads that are now chugging down a massive amount of pollution. but your plan is to rip them all out. and then we just, what, have the status quo? well, i think consultation is a really fair way to do things. i agree. and there has been no consultation for these ones that have been implemented. these low traffic neighborhoods are being introduced across the country. 20 billion more miles are being driven around homes now than there were just ten years ago. and if we consulted on that, there would have been
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a much bigger uproar than there is for low traffic neighborhoods. as coronavirus restrictions lift, traffic volumes will increase. so the controversy continues. justin rowlatt, bbc news. energy customers may soon get an automatic refund, if they overpay their gas or electricity bills by direct debit. proposals from the regulator 0fgem could mean an average return of 65 pounds per household. let's speak to our personal finance correspondent, kevin peachey. how could this work? it could affect millions of people. those who pay by direct debit for gas and electricity and have regular monthly payments even though energy use fluctuates during the year. what tends to happen is your balance builds up over the summer when you use less energy and then comes back down closer to parity during the winter.
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and it tends to even out. but there have been complaints all the year from thousands of people who say that direct debit is set too high and the energy companies have been hoarding this extra overpayment for their own use. the regulator attempted today said that amounts to attempted today said that amounts to a shocking £1.4 billion and that that money they say has been used to fund otherwise unsustainable business practices. so it has proposed that there is going to be this method of automatically refunding overpayments so in practice that will mean for example on the anniversary of your contract starting you will receive a refund automatically back into your bank account as you say typically around £65 or so. if you still owe money you can still pay that back gradually as is the case at the moment and to stop energy companies
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just putting their prices up during the rest of the year if you like there will be a limit on that as well. the suppliers, the industry, say that they have been looking in detail at these proposals and they are going to respond during the consultation which is coming up in the next few months.— consultation which is coming up in the next few months. kevin peachey, thank ou. the number of people sleeping rough in england may be nine times the government's official estimate, according to a cross—party committee of mps. the latest official figures suggest about 4,200 people are sleeping on the streets — but a scheme to help homeless people during the pandemic has housed more than 37,000. mark easton reports. because of covid, we've got these new hotels now. the everyone in scheme is praised by the mps for moving quickly and decisively to house people sleeping rough during the first lockdown last spring. but the numbers taking advantage of the policy suggest the true scale of street homelessness is many times greater than was previously acknowledged. the housing ministry's last official
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estimate before the pandemic suggested around 4200 people were sleeping rough on england's streets. but today's report notes that more than 37,000 street homeless, almost nine times as many, had been helped into accommodation by january this year. we know it can work. we know from everyone in that a huge effort can be made through local authorities and with the political leadership from central government. but it will only keep working if that turns into something which is sustained, long—term committed funding. the government is committed to providing 3300 extra homes for people sleeping rough by the end of this month. but the public accounts committee notes what it calls disappointing evasiveness from ministers as to whether the promise will actually be met, and whether the accommodation will be a genuinely new addition to housing stock. everyone in was a success in that it got people from the streets very quickly
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into temporary accommodation. the challenge now and the real need is to make sure that is permanent accommodation. and the government says it wants to do this, so we are saying there's a number of things they need to do to fund it, provide certainty of funding, and make sure there is permanent housing provided for these people so they don't go back onto the streets. the mps' report concludes that the ministry of housing still has no plan for ending rough sleeping by 2024 as it has promised, and risks failing to capitalise on the successes of the everyone in scheme. the ministry of housing has said it rejects the unfounded criticisms contained in the report, and remains committed to ending rough sleeping. mark easton, bbc news. police in the us state of georgia have arrested a man who's suspected of killing eight people, at three spas in atlanta. 21—year—old robert long was arrested about 150 miles outside the city. no motive has yet been established for the shootings, but there are concerns that they may have deliberately targeted people of asian heritage — at least four of the victims
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were of korean descent. the former racing driver sabine schmitz has died, at the age of 51. she is the only woman to have won the nurburgring 24 hours — a 14—mile circuit often described as the toughest in the world. sabine schmitz appeared on top gear alongsidejeremy clarkson, and became part of the show�*s presenting team in 2015. last year she revealed she'd been diagnosed with cancer in 2017. tiger woods has left hospital after suffering serious injuries in a car crash last month in california. the golfer, who has won 15 major titles, was found unconscious after what the emergency services said could have been a fatal accident. tiger woods said he would be "working on getting stronger every day". a species of bird in australia has become so endangered it's forgetting how to sing its own song.
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there are only about 300 regent honeyeaters left in the wild — and because they rarely hear each other, some have started imitating the songs of other species. so researchers are now playing recordings to birds being bred in captivity — as victoria gill explains. bird song. with only 300 left in the wild, the striking regent honeyeater and its song are disappearing from their native south australia. researchers had set outjust to find and monitor the remaining birds when they noticed that some honeyeaters no longer sang the right tune.
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what we're finding is the population is now so small and so sparsely distributed that some young males are actually unable to find other males of regent honeyeater to kind of learn their songs from. and so they are ending up just learning the songs of other species that they hear in the landscape. with so much of the forest habitat destroyed to make way for agriculture, the researchers say that about 12% of regent honeyeaters have now completely lost their natural song. and it is vital for them to attract a mate and to breed. there is some conservation hope, though. in an effort to preserve the bird calls the researchers are playing recordings of the most melodious wild honeyeaters to captive bred birds. reminding them how to sing properly before they are released into the wild could help them to find a mate and eventually make a tuneful recovery. victoria gill, bbc news. time for a look at the weather, here's chris fawkes.
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and we have some news from abroad.

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