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tv   Sportsday  BBC News  March 17, 2021 6:30pm-6:46pm GMT

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has always the plan. nothing has changed. and that effectively rules out most weddings in england until may, when numbers gradually increase, another month before this sector starts to get back on its feet. emma simpson, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here and in the us. here's chris fawkes. yes, we're starting on the other side of the pond with severe thunderstorms breaking out, there have been reports of a tornado but we're only heading into the early afternoon and through the rest of today and tonight, the risk of some intense tornadoes and some of them could be on the ground for quite a long time so a risk of some significant damage and we are keeping a close eye on develop and we are keeping a close eye on developing stair. for us, skies have looked like this for much of the day with sunshine breaking through the early morning cloud and as we go through the night, the cloud will tend to roll back in. it will be thickest across eastern england with the threat of a few patches of light
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rain and drizzle so for a few of you, a damp night. many will be dry, though, and on account of all the cloud, not particularly cold, temperatures drifting to about 6—9 celsius. this area of high pressure still to the west of the uk where it has been for ages. the weather front coming southwards through the north sea bringing the chance of a bit of rain into shetland first thing and maybe a few spots of damp weather across eastern england through the morning. more general rain on the way for the afternoon, particularly for east anglia and south—east england. there will be some gaps in the cloud and on the brighter moments, it will feel quite pleasant in the sunshine for example across central and south—western scotland and other areas will see some sunshine, too. on friday, the greater chance of sunshine breaking out across east anglia and south—east england but this time, some cold north—easterly wind really limiting the temperature rise around the east coast, highs of 7—8. away from the chilly wind, temperatures should reaching 12—13 in the warmer spots again and some breaks in the cloud with a bit of sunshine.
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western areas always favourable for seeing the brighter moments. looking into the weekend and beyond, the same area of high pressure stays influencing our weather, so no great change in the forecast, a lot of dry weather, often pretty cloudy and there will be some bright and sunny spells breaking through at times. that is the latest. that's all from the bbc news at six, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are. hello and welcome to sportsday. i'm sarah mulkerrins. coming up on the programme... a dark day for the football association, as a report
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into historical sexual abuse finds there were �*significant failings' at the fa between 1995 and 2000 that left children unsafe. there was an institution failing by the fa. they acted far too slowly in developing their child protection arrangements. once they were aware of child protection being a problem. tiger roll thrills at cheltenham. the two—time grand national winner claims a remarkable fifth festival triumph in the cross country chase. and team new zealand defend the oldest trophy in international sport as they clinch a 7—3 series win over italy's luna rossa in sailing's america's cup.
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welcome along to sportsday this evening. the football association "did not do enough to keep children safe." those the words from an independent review into historical sexual abuse in football that was released today. that report found the fa failed to protect children between 1995 and 2000. the issue came to the public�*s attention in 2016, when former footballer andy woodward waived his right to anonymity to speak out about the sexual abuse he suffered while a child at crewe alexandra. more survivors came forward and this triggered an independent investigation led by clive sheldon 0c. today, after more than four years of work, a 710—page document was released. it found that "significant institutionalfailings" by the fa meant it was slow to act and left some children unsafe. here's the report's author. during the period of my review, i
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found _ during the period of my review, i found that — during the period of my review, i found that the fa did fail young kids between the period of 1995, kids between the period of1995, after_ kids between the period of 1995, after the — kids between the period of 1995, after the summer, and may 2000. there _ after the summer, and may 2000. there was— after the summer, and may 2000. there was an institutional failing by the _ there was an institutional failing by the fa — there was an institutional failing by the fa. they acted far too slowly in developing their child protection arrangements, once they were aware of child _ arrangements, once they were aware of child protection being a problem within— of child protection being a problem within the — of child protection being a problem within the sport, and they should have _ within the sport, and they should have done — within the sport, and they should have done more to keep children safe _ the bbc�*s sports editor dan roanjoins us now. dan, tell us what is in the report and what the reaction has been? absolutely. yes, this was a grim day for the fa and particular, but also the eight clubs that clive sheldon qc criticised for the missed warnings, the naivety, the ignorance, the failure to take complaints and rumours and concerns
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and a step in. he also referred to inadequate safeguarding and child protection measures at the time. he does absolve the fa of blame, i think it's fair to say, before 1995. bearin think it's fair to say, before 1995. bear in mind that the scope of this inquiry went to 2005, so it crossed four decades. he says that from 95, when there were high rofile convictions of paedophiles that have been working in football, the likes of barry burnell, it was inexcusable that there was a delay in rolling out better improved child protection measures. and he pointed specifically at the failure by the fa to ban from football involvement men like burnell and higgins, who abused youngsters at southampton and peterborough. this was the day that the survivors of that abuse across the survivors of that abuse across the game have been waiting for for
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decades, a day in which they hoped the institutions that could and should have protected them that failed to were finally held to account. now, one of the survivors is gary cliff. he was abused sadly hundreds of times by barry burnell when he was playing for a youth team near here. it was associated with manchester city and burnell was working as and a scout for the club on officially in the 1980s. he sat through burnell�*s court case, his trial and his conviction in 2018. i spoke to him then. i caught the him __ up spoke to him then. i caught the him —— up with him today. this is what he had to say. i -- up with him today. this is what he had to say-— he had to say. i don't think it's one far he had to say. i don't think it's gone far enough. _ he had to say. i don't think it's gone far enough. throughout i he had to say. i don't think it's i gone far enough. throughout the whole _ gone far enough. throughout the whole report, it seems people suspected, but none of the officials had the _ suspected, but none of the officials had the gumption to raise it with
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anyone _ had the gumption to raise it with anyone at— had the gumption to raise it with anyone at all. it was the theme running — anyone at all. it was the theme running through it, so it's disappointing in that respect. we're heafina disappointing in that respect. we're hearin: a disappointing in that respect. we're hearing a lot _ disappointing in that respect. we're hearing a lot from _ disappointing in that respect. we're hearing a lot from the _ disappointing in that respect. we're hearing a lot from the survivors - hearing a lot from the survivors today, and there has also been strong criticism from the fa. what is their reaction today?— is their reaction today? well, it's interesting- _ is their reaction today? well, it's interesting. there _ is their reaction today? well, it's interesting. there was _ is their reaction today? well, it's interesting. there was no - is their reaction today? well, it's i interesting. there was no evidence, sheldon said, of any cover—up or institutional conspiracy by the fa or by clubs, but he did as we've said say that there were inexcusable failings when it came to the length of time that it took the governing body to act on these concerns, and when it came to safeguarding protocols. and in response, mark bullingham, the chief executive, had this to say earlier.— this to say earlier. sheldon outlines — this to say earlier. sheldon outlines of _ this to say earlier. sheldon outlines of the _ this to say earlier. sheldon outlines of the number - this to say earlier. sheldon outlines of the number of i this to say earlier. sheldon - outlines of the number of reasons why you _ outlines of the number of reasons why you feet— outlines of the number of reasons why you feel the _ outlines of the number of reasons why you feel the fa _ outlines of the number of reasons why you feel the fa were - outlines of the number of reasons why you feel the fa were misled, | outlines of the number of reasons . why you feel the fa were misled, but the key— why you feel the fa were misled, but the key thing — why you feel the fa were misled, but the key thing there _ why you feel the fa were misled, but the key thing there is— why you feel the fa were misled, but the key thing there is no— why you feel the fa were misled, but the key thing there is no excuse. - the key thing there is no excuse. they— the key thing there is no excuse. they should _ the key thing there is no excuse. they should have _ the key thing there is no excuse. they should have acted, - the key thing there is no excuse. they should have acted, we - the key thing there is no excuse. . they should have acted, we should have but— they should have acted, we should have put reports— they should have acted, we should have put reports in—
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they should have acted, we should have put reports in place _ they should have acted, we should have put reports in place and - they should have acted, we should have put reports in place and we i have put reports in place and we could _ have put reports in place and we could have — have put reports in place and we could have done _ have put reports in place and we could have done it— have put reports in place and we could have done it quickly. - have put reports in place and we could have done it quickly. we l could have done it quickly. we should — could have done it quickly. we should have _ could have done it quickly. we should have trained _ could have done it quickly. we should have trained people - could have done it quickly. we should have trained people so| could have done it quickly. we - should have trained people so they knew _ should have trained people so they knew how — should have trained people so they knew how to — should have trained people so they knew how to deal— should have trained people so they knew how to deal with _ should have trained people so they knew how to deal with this, - should have trained people so they knew how to deal with this, we - knew how to deal with this, we should — knew how to deal with this, we should have _ knew how to deal with this, we should have incurred _ knew how to deal with this, we should have incurred a - knew how to deal with this, we should have incurred a culturel knew how to deal with this, we - should have incurred a culture where people _ should have incurred a culture where people could — should have incurred a culture where people could report— should have incurred a culture where people could report instances- should have incurred a culture where people could report instances that i people could report instances that people _ people could report instances that people were — people could report instances that people were aware _ people could report instances that people were aware of _ people could report instances that people were aware of the - people could report instances that people were aware of the risks, i people could report instances that i people were aware of the risks, such as we _ people were aware of the risks, such as we have _ people were aware of the risks, such as we have today _ people were aware of the risks, such as we have today.— people were aware of the risks, such as we have today. what are we likely to see happen _ as we have today. what are we likely to see happen now? _ as we have today. what are we likely to see happen now? this _ as we have today. what are we likely to see happen now? this is - as we have today. what are we likely to see happen now? this is all- to see happen now? this is all about's not — to see happen now? this is all about's not over, _ to see happen now? this is all about's not over, sarah. i to see happen now? this is all about's not over, sarah. legal action has been taking place for some time, and it continues at manchester city, who by the way lead their own independent report which referred to inadequacies in the way that senior management. that burnell was associated with the club —— this isn't over. they apologise for that. they have already paid out a significant amount of money said to be millions of pounds to dozens of
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survivors, and i think you'll see further legal action both inducted the redress seems like that, but also through the courts, criminal action taking place, so i think that the prospect going forward. i think some survivors are unhappy that sheldon, while making certain recommendations about how safeguarding can still be improved, did not say they should now be mandatory reporting which is where people in positions of authority are legally obliged to report to the police any suspicions or concerns they may have about child abuse. there's also been calls for an external independent oversight agency when it comes to making sure that standards are maintained. but this is still a very significant day, a dark day for the game, and one that many people will now expect and desperately hope that it learns from to ensure that this great crisis, this great scandal has no repeat in the future and young players in the game are adequately protected. players in the game are adequately rotected. . ~ players in the game are adequately rotected. ., ,, , ., , players in the game are adequately rotected. . ~' , ., , . players in the game are adequately rotected. ., «r , . protected. thank you very much, dan
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roan. if protected. thank you very much, dan roan- if you — protected. thank you very much, dan roan- if you are _ protected. thank you very much, dan roan. if you are affected _ protected. thank you very much, dan roan. if you are affected by - protected. thank you very much, dan roan. if you are affected by any i protected. thank you very much, dan roan. if you are affected by any of i roan. if you are affected by any of the stories please go to the bbc action line. bbc .co .uk/ action line. now to the second day of action at cheltenham, where two—time grand national winner tiger roll cruised to victory in the cross country chase for his fifth career win at the festival. it was the second winner of the meet for trainer denise foster, who has stepped in while gordon elliott serves a six—month ban. joe lynskey reports. tiger roll makes each jump despite his size. he's one of racing's smallest champions, but may lead it's smallest champions, but may lead its greatest legacy. he's now won two grand nationals and five times at cheltenham. this horse takes on the cross country marathons, but just reaching start lines being challenged. tiger roll was trained by gordon elliott, he's now
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suspended from the sport. the horse's age and form meant few wins, but in the twilight of his career and perhaps his last race in the uk, they couldn't catch him. tiger and perhaps his last race in the uk, they couldn't catch him.— they couldn't catch him. tiger roll! for success — they couldn't catch him. tiger roll! for success at _ they couldn't catch him. tiger roll! for success at this _ they couldn't catch him. tiger roll! for success at this cheltenham i for success at this cheltenham festival! in for success at this cheltenham festival! ., , , 'j~ festival! in the end, he won by 18. he may not _ festival! in the end, he won by 18. he may not race — festival! in the end, he won by 18. he may not race this _ festival! in the end, he won by 18. he may not race this year, - festival! in the end, he won by 18. he may not race this year, but i festival! in the end, he won by 18. j he may not race this year, but still this horse inspires. keith donohue said tiger roll was all that kept them in the sport. that race would have her cheltenham roar, as it is every win between horse and jockey. in the champion chase, coleman said he rode the toughest mare in the sport. the horse's call put the kettle on. sport. the horse's call put the kettle om— sport. the horse's call put the kettle on._ this| sport. the horse's call put the i kettle on._ this was kettle on. will follow up! this was a race win — kettle on. will follow up! this was a race win for _ kettle on. will follow up! this was a race win for henry. _ kettle on. will follow up! this was a race win for henry. he's - kettle on. will follow up! this was a race win for henry. he's now i kettle on. will follow up! this was| a race win for henry. he's now won two out of two. looks to save its
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reputation, it's still the horse's names are most revered. tiger roll could just be cheltenham's most popular champion. dolinsky, bbc news. ——joe lynskey. you can follow this on the bbc sport website. let's take a quick look at some other stories making the news. three weeks after breaking his leg and ankle in a car crash in california, tiger woods is back home. he says "he's working on getting stronger every day." sale won't have the chance to defend the premiership rugby cup, as the competition has been scrapped this season. the decision has been taken because of continuing concerns around coronavirus. the british pair are up and running at the all england badminton championships in birmingham. seated forth, they beat the irish pair in the first round.
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now to international sport's oldest trophy — as team new zealand won the 36th americas cup with a 7—3 victory over italy's luna rossa. the defenders clinched the series in race ten just off the auckland coast, making it the fourth time new zealand have won the event. patrick gearey reports. after days spent at sea. one last chance. new zealand parties like it's 2019. large and free from coronavirus, waves conquered by the home group. the only social distancing was between the two boats, new zealand needing only one way race to win. they pulled clear of their italian rivals. they were ultimately left hoping for a mistake that never came. if that race became
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of pleasure cruise for a team that had been behind, but it surged back to defend sport's oldest prize. just to defend sport's oldest prize. just to see the to defend sport's oldest prize. jut to see the amount of people out there made it all feel real and, wow, you've been able to achieve something as a group. absolutely stoked for the team and for new zealand. you look at what it could look like, so we're stoked. triers? look like, so we're stoked. new zealand's_ look like, so we're stoked. new zealand's prime _ look like, so we're stoked. new zealand's prime minister said the country was proud of their team and already promised money to keep them together. and keep the event in new zealand, despite reported interest in bringing it to the uk in two years time. the wider world will hope by then, these scenes don't seem so strange. patrick geary, bbc news. it's nice to see people together. england netballer chelsea pitman says it is time to "start a conversation" about miscarriage
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and the challenges facing female athletes trying to start a family while still competing

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