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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 18, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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otherwise 10-12 celsius. spots, otherwise 10—12 celsius. similar stories as we head on into sunday and also next week, many places will state cloudy and dry. this is the latest bbc news headlines around the world. the bite and ministration starts the stage for its first face—to—face talks with china, promising frank discussions on thorny issues like hong kong and taiwan. each of these actions threaten the rules based order that maintains global ability. that's why they are not merely internal matters, and why we feel an obligation to raise these issues here today. china is firmly opposed to us interference in china's internal affairs — interference in china's internal affairs. we have expressed our staunch — affairs. we have expressed our staunch opposition to such interference and we will take firm actions _ italy, germany, and france resume roll—out of the astrazeneca vaccine
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after europe's medicines authority says the jab is safe and effective. the french prime minister announces a new month—long lockdown for paris and surrounding areas, warning the country is suffering a third wave of coronavirus. and joe biden says the us will hit its target of getting 100 million vaccine jabs into people's arms tomorrow — that's over a month ahead of schedule. hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. it was billed as a chance to re—set relations between the world's two biggest economies, but there's no indication so far that these two giants are warming up to each other. america's top diplomat antony blinken is meeting his opposite numberfrom china, against the snowy backdrop of alaska.
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but in their opening remarks, the two sides leveled sharp rebukes of each others' policies. today, we will have an opportunity to discuss key priorities, both domestic and global, so that china can better understand our administration's intentions and approach. we'll also discuss our deep concerns with actions by china, including in xinjiang, hong kong, taiwan, cyber attacks on the united states, economic coercion towards our allies. i've said that the united states' relationship with china will be competitive where it should be, collaborative where it can be, adversarial where it must be. translation: the people of the two i countries and the world are hoping l to see practical outcomes coming out of our dialogue. and for xinjiang, tibet, and taiwan, they are an inalienable part
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of china's territory. china is firmly opposed to the us' interference in china's internal affairs. we have expressed our staunch opposition to such interference, and we will take firm actions in response. the venue for their meeting is the us state of alaska, and i'm joined now by our state department correspondent barbara plett usher, who's in anchorage. the fact they are meeting face—to—face during a time of when everyone is doing everything via conference call is actually a big deal. , conference call is actually a big deal , , conference call is actually a big deal. , , ,, . ., , deal. yes, it is. the us officials who talked _ deal. yes, it is. the us officials who talked to _ deal. yes, it is. the us officials who talked to us _ deal. yes, it is. the us officials who talked to us about - deal. yes, it is. the us officials who talked to us about this - deal. yes, it is. the us officials} who talked to us about this said they didn't just want to who talked to us about this said they didn'tjust want to do it by phone because they do actually want to have extended conversations about these issues. but there are many areas of intense disagreement. you heard antony blinken list them there, you also heard the response
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from the chinese. there is a tendency to just stick with the rhetoric and say how you feel about it, and the americans are hoping this will be a place where they are actually honest and blunt about what they think, but also then try to move the conversation along about what the expectations are and how they can actually work together, if they can actually work together, if they can, on various issues. these positions that have been placed out are well—known, and the biden administration has been talking them up administration has been talking them up coming into this meeting. but it's interesting in a diplomatic setting, where you have opening statements for a series of meetings, that they come out so forcefully face—to—face in front of cameras. so we will what they say behind the cameras, a us official said they figured the talk would be pretty tough. but he also said there was genuine interest in trying to find some areas where they may be able to co—operate, especially on global issues like the pandemic and climate
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change, and so on. so issues like the pandemic and climate change, and so on.— issues like the pandemic and climate change, and so on. so when it comes to, change, and so on. so when it comes to. because — change, and so on. so when it comes to, because there's _ change, and so on. so when it comes to, because there's so _ change, and so on. so when it comes to, because there's so many - to, because there's so many different issues where it's been quite a strained relationship between these two states, what can we expect? can we expect any kind of level of agreement on so many different points, just thinking from the uighurs to the human rights, etc? ., , , ., ., ., , etc? probably not, not at this meeting- _ etc? probably not, not at this meeting- the _ etc? probably not, not at this meeting. the way _ etc? probably not, not at this meeting. the way the - etc? probably not, not at this meeting. the way the eunice | etc? probably not, not at this . meeting. the way the eunice and ministration has billed it as this is an initial discussion so we can lay out our position both out on the table dashed us administration. both taking measure of each other, making sure that what said in public is also said in private, that there's no daylight between positions that you say to the world and to each other. then from there, then formulating the policy of how they will work forward. there won't be a
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joint statement, we were told, probably no real agreements to issue, but they said that's not the purpose of this meeting. the meeting is the first step to the decide how we will go on from here. although they are quite keen to point out that this is not the beginning of a formal dialogue process, this is a one—off, and we will see what happens. it's been reported the chinese are quite easy to reform a regular dialogue process and would like to have a summit between the two leaders, particularly they like the biden administration to reverse some of those steps the trump administration took in terms of sanctions and restrictions. so there are different agendas here, for sure, and what we've been told is that this is a chance to lay out everything on the table and see where they can go from there. it where they can go from there. it would be fascinating to be a fly on the wall. barbara, thanks so much. several leading eu states have said they'll re—start the roll—out of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine after europe's medicines regulator concluded the jab was "safe and effective".
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the european medicines agency has been conducting a review of after 13 member states suspended use of the astrazenica vaccine, over fears of a possible link with blood clots. now the ema is saying that while it cannot definitively rule out a connection, these cases are very rare, and the benefits of using the astrazeneca vaccine outweigh the risks. the committee has come to a clear scientific conclusion. this is a safe and effective vaccine. its benefits in protecting people from covid—i9 with the associated risks of death and hospitalisation outweigh the possible risks. the committee also concluded that the vaccine is not associated with an increase in the overall risk of thromboembolic events or blood clots. germany, france, italy, and spain have all now said they will resume using the jab. and, as if to underline his own confidence in it,
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prime minister borisjohnson has said he's getting the astrazenica vaccine on friday. first, the independent medicines and health care products regulatory agency has reviewed the evidence, as it does every week. they've confirmed that the benefits of the vaccine in preventing covid far outweigh any risks, and people should continue to get their vaccine when asked to do so. and june will say a little bit more about that in a moment. it's also very important for our european friends that today, the european medicines agency has come to a clear scientific conclusion, and i quote, "this is a safe and effective vaccine." we also saw yesterday the evidence from public health england that a single dose of either vaccine provides 60% protection against getting covid and reduces the chances of hospitalisation by 80%, and the risk of death by 85%. so the oxford jab is safe,
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and the pfizerjob is safe. the thing that isn't safe is catching covid, which is why it's so important that we all get ourjobs as soon as oui’ turn comes. and, as it happens, i'm getting mine tomorrow, and the centre where i'm getting jabbed is currently using the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine for those receiving theirfirst dose. and that's the one i'll be having. france will resume the roll—out of the astrazeneca vaccine from tomorrow. the country is facing a third wave of coronavirus, with intensive care beds in the region of paris almost completely full. the french prime minister, jean castex, has announced a regional lockdown on the capital and in other regions with high infection rates. translation: in these 16 regions, | new massive measures to restrain| the epidemic will be in place on friday night at midnight, for four weeks. it's a third path that we've taken, a path which should allow us
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to restrain the virus without locking up. these measures will be different from lockdowns we had in place last march and november. because, since the beginning of the epidemic, exactly one year ago, the crisis has gone on, but we have learned. earlier, i spoke to mep dr veronique trillet—lenoir, an oncologist and a member of the european parliament's public health and food safety committee about the implications of the ema review. it's very good news, the vaccine is safe and efficient. the analysis will be continued on an eventual new, atypical cases of blood clots, but we can safely start again the vaccination which was temporarily suspended. i think that it was legitimate to use the precautionary principle.
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there will be specific inquiries because there is a suspicion that some very rare cases of atypical blood clots could happen. we have been transparent, and now we have to convince people it is important to go out and vaccinate against. and how damaging do you think concerns had been raised, and also, as a member of president macron�*s party, the things that he was saying, the concerns he had previously raised regarding over 65—year—olds and the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, when it comes to public perception of this? how concerned are you it has perhaps made people fearful? the decision has been changed, and we now use the vaccine, whatever the age. the prime minister has
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announced that he will, our prime minister, like yours, announced that he would soon receive the vaccine. the french authorities will continue. as you know, we have always had in france a high level of vaccine hesitancy, so we have to work on education and information of the population, but i think that being transparent and showing the people that when we have even a very low suspicion of toxicity, we do what we have to do to make sure that the vaccine will be administered in safe conditions. us presidentjoe biden has announced that his target of 100 million vaccine doses adminsitered
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in his first 100 days is due to be completed tomorrow, over a month ahead of schedule. the white house also said that it has vaccinated enough of its own citizens that it could start sending its stockpile abroad. 1.5 million vials are now due to be shipped to canada and 2.5 million will be sent across the southern border to mexico. mr biden says the majority of its most vulnerable citizens have receievd at least one dose. eight weeks ago, only 8% of seniors — those most vulnerable to covid—19 — had received a vaccination. today, 65% of people aged 65 or older have received at least one shot. and 36% are fully vaccinated. and that's key because this is a population that represents 80% of the well over 500,000 covid—19 deaths that have occurred in america.
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stay with us on bbc world news. still to come: as violence continue in myanmar, we speak to the family of a 17—year—old medical student who died in a protest. today, we have closed the book on apartheid, and that chapter. more than 3,000 subway passengers were affected. nausea, bleeding, headaches and a dimming of vision. all of this caused by an apparently organised attack. the trophy itself was on a pedestal | in the middle of the cabinet here. | now, this was an international trophy, and we understand - now that the search for it has i become an international search.
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above all, this was a triumph for the christian democrats of the west, offering reunification as quickly as possible, and that's what the voters wanted. this is bbc news, the latest headlines... the us secretary of state, antony blinken, says he won't shy away from raising issues such as china's actions in hong kong in the first high—level direct talks between the biden administration and beijing. in response, china said the us must stay out of its internal affairs. italy, germany, and france resume roll—out of the astrazeneca vaccine after europe's medicines authority says the jab is safe and effective.
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research into indigenous populations in australia, released on thursday, has praised their community response to major challenges including the the covid—19 pandemic and climate change. the annual close the gap report focuses on how to achieve health equity in australia — and what steps need to be taken to improve the health and well—being of australia's indigenous people. janine mohamed is the ceo of the lowitja institute, australia's national institute for aboriginal and torres strait islander health research. they led the report. thanks so much for coming on the programme to talk us through your findings. i know that particularly this time around, you wanted to change the whole perception of the indigenous community. talk us through what you found and what you're trying to do with this report. you're trying to do with this re ort. , ,., you're trying to do with this reort. , ., , ., you're trying to do with this reort. , ,., ., , ., ., report. yes, so we really wanted to do this report _ report. yes, so we really wanted to do this report through _
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report. yes, so we really wanted to do this report through a _ report. yes, so we really wanted to do this report through a strengths i do this report through a strengths —based lands, and really looking back at the year that was an highlighting the exceptional leadership and legacy in the face of multiple crises — the covid—19 pandemic, we had bushfires here in australia that we are still seeing the outcomes and the impact of from 2019-20, of the outcomes and the impact of from 2019—20, of course the mental health crisis facing many indigenous people across the globe and the black lives matter movement, putting that global spotlight on racial injustices. in the last three months, we've had three more deaths in custody here in australia. so, there is no greater example of our success than our covid—19 rate, where our communities are six times less likely to contract covid—19. we've had no community transitions and no deaths dashed transmissions. but the report doesn't shy away from the problems
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that communities do face, which is short—term funding, systemic racism, and insufficient responses by mainstream organisations to our communities. but mainstream organisations to our communities-_ mainstream organisations to our communities. but it's interesting that, communities. but it's interesting that. when _ communities. but it's interesting that. when it _ communities. but it's interesting that, when it comes _ communities. but it's interesting that, when it comes to _ communities. but it's interesting that, when it comes to what - communities. but it's interestingl that, when it comes to what could have been, and givenjust how devastating the pandemic has been worldwide, it's interesting to see how community efforts have actually prevented the really negative aspects that we see in places where maybe there isn't such a community spirit. i maybe there isn't such a community sirit. ~ ., , maybe there isn't such a community sirit. ~' .,, ., ,., ., spirit. i think it was about who delivered the _ spirit. i think it was about who delivered the messaging - spirit. i think it was about who delivered the messaging for l spirit. i think it was about who i delivered the messaging for our indigenous communities. so here we have actually community controlled health services — they are the embodiment of self—determination, and they responded very quickly and are trusted by communities, so the health messaging was very much place based, so not that homogenous type of health messaging that we often get out of our governments. i think
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the strengths for us was our community controlled health organised action.— community controlled health ortanised action. , . �*, , organised action. janine, it's been brilliant to speak _ organised action. janine, it's been brilliant to speak to _ organised action. janine, it's been brilliant to speak to you _ organised action. janine, it's been brilliant to speak to you and - organised action. janine, it's been | brilliant to speak to you and thanks very much for bringing that report to us. ., very much for bringing that report to us. . ., ., the pressure on scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has intensified tonight after reports suggesting the majority of scottish lawmakers on the committee investigating the handling of harrassment claims against alex salmond believe she misled their inquiry. it's understood they voted five to four that ms sturgeon gave them an inaccurate account when she answered their questions last thursday. tonight, nicola sturgeon said the committee had prejudged her from the outset and that she stood by the eight hours of evidence she gave to the committee. 0ur scotland editor sarah smith has more from glasgow. that hollyrood committee to met tonight to finalise that report, and these stories were leaking out whilst that meeting was
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still going on. sources close to the committee say they have concluded by a very small majority that nicola sturgeon did mislead them about an aspect of a meeting she had with alex salmond in her home in april 2018. now it is important to stress these findings have not yet been published, but already there were calls for nicola sturgeon to resign. nicola sturgeon under oath. nicola sturgeon, under oath, gave eight hours of evidence to the holyrood harassment committee. if they conclude she misled them in any of what she said, that could be a breach of the ministerial code. the opposition are already calling for her to resign. it's absolutely abundantly clear that nicola sturgeon has breached the ministerial code. as first minister, you cannot continue if you have been untruthful, if you have misled parliament and you've misled the people of scotland. it is a resigning matter, pure and simple. two very different versions of events have come from nicola sturgeon and from alex salmond. they cannot both be
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telling the truth. a spokesperson for the first minister says... this committee has unfortunately experienced an awful lot of leaking information in ways that are neither helpful nor necessarily accurate. this is more of the challenge that we see again here, and i'll be waiting to hear from the actual report. it's notjust nicola sturgeon'sjob that could be in jeopardy if she is found to have misled parliament. she's about to lead her party into crucial scottish parliamentary elections in just seven weeks' time. the finaljudgment of the holyrood harassment committee, and another inquiry that's looking into whether or not she breached ministerial code, now look set to dominate that campaign.
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nicola sturgeon tonight has hit out at what she calls partisan leaks, saying that some opposition members of the committee had clearly made up their minds before she had even uttered a single word of evidence. we will get the final conclusion of that hollyrood committee and of another committee that specifically is looking at whether or not nicola sturgeon breach of the ministerial code of conduct in the next few days. once those are published, but we will have a final resolution, but the part democrat arguing will probably only just started. more than 200 protesters have been killed by myanmar�*s security forces in crackdowns since the coup in1 february. a un team investigating war crimes has asked people to collect evidence of atrocities by the military authorities. but the violence has continued and more people have been killed on the streets. bbc�*s nyein chan aye met the family of a 17—year—old medical student in yangon who died in a protest.
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a young life cut short. this man was a medical student, just 17. he was shotin a medical student, just 17. he was shot in the head during a protest. kind—hearted and bright, he excelled in education. according to his chinese parents, who were born in myanmar. thejoint chinese parents, who were born in myanmar. the joint that she joined the protests on 1a march without telling anyone. all hearts are breaking out for his parents. translation: j breaking out for his parents. translation:— breaking out for his parents. translation: , , ~ ., translation: i took my bike and went out to search — translation: i took my bike and went out to search for _ translation: i took my bike and went out to search for him. _ translation: i took my bike and went out to search for him. then _ translation: i took my bike and went out to search for him. then i _ translation: i took my bike and went out to search for him. then i heard - out to search for him. then i heard gunfire. i heard someone say someone had fallen. kids were running. it was chaos. i didn't think it was my son totally. i did watch the videos. i can't bear it in my heart. when it
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happened, i was around the area looking for him. translation: ~ ., ., ,, looking for him. translation: ~ ., ., , , ., translation: what happened was that he was usina translation: what happened was that he was using a — translation: what happened was that he was using a shield _ translation: what happened was that he was using a shield to _ translation: what happened was that he was using a shield to protect - he was using a shield to protect others — he was using a shield to protect others. there were only 20 of them by the _ others. there were only 20 of them by the police station. they shot him from inside — by the police station. they shot him from inside. the video i've seen shows— from inside. the video i've seen shows that _ from inside. the video i've seen shows that he fell down. a girl was shielding _ shows that he fell down. a girl was shielding him as he felt. people wanted — shielding him as he felt. people wanted to help them, but there was gunfire _ wanted to help them, but there was gunfire so _ wanted to help them, but there was gunfire so no one dared to go there. they dragged him away like a dog. he they dragged him away like a dog. hg. was one they dragged him away like a dog. was one of they dragged him away like a dog. he: was one of more than 200 people killed during the military crackdown on protests since the coup on the 1st of february. despite the danger of losing their lives, young protesters are still taking to the streets in the hope of regaining the freedom they once enjoyed. nyein chan aye, bbc news.
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just before we go, a young marine scientist from mauritius is taking her environmental message to new depths. shaama sandoya dove into a remote stretch of the indian ocean, to highlight the importance of seagrass ecosystems. the under—water plant has become a priority for conservationists. it represents a tenth of the ocean's capacity to store carbon. shaama is trying to draw attention to the un's goal of protecting at least 30% of the planet's land and oceans by 2030. what a fantastic way of getting a message across. a reminder of our top story: america's top diplomat antony blinken is meeting his opposite number from china against the snowy
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backdrop of alaska. we will keep you updated as to any updates on that meeting. thanks for watching, i'll be back soon. lots of spring sunshine on the offer. and what a beautiful day it's been in the highlands of scotland. take a look at this weather watcher picture. kind of wish you were there, yeah? for scotland it was the warmest day of the year so far, temperatures reaching 15 celsius in edinburgh, but it wasn't a warm spot in the uk. a number of spots got up to 17 celsius, amongst them cardiff, making it wels's warmest day of the year so far. looking at the weather charts overnight tonight, clear skies so temperatures drop away pretty quickly. there may well be some clouds starting to waft in off the far north of scotland, perhaps a few showers there, but for the most part we keep those clear spot to make out skies for the rest of the
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night. a cold night last night, temperatures between 3—6 c, but cold enough for a dump of frost and our very coldest rural areas. high—pressure still to the west of the uk on wednesday, but this system dives southwards from the north sea and a warm front moves into scotland, bringing the prospect of a few spots of light rain and drizzle. showers could affectjust about anywhere across eastern england as we go through wednesday, the best of the sunshine towards the southwest. but with winds coming in from a northerly direction, they come in more across from the seat where temperature is only six celsius at the moment, and that subtle change in the wind direction means it will be a cooler day across central and eastern england, and across parts of northern and eastern areas of scotland as woelfel stopped temperatures typically around 10-11 c, but... temperatures typically around 10—11 c, but... thursday we could see some rain clipping parts of eastern england, but lots of dry weather with breaks in the cloud particularly across western areas,
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so they might see a few breaks towards county down and west wales, south wales in southwest england probably seen some sunshine as well at times. by the end of the week, high—pressure still there but we start to bring in these cold weather is from the north of the continent. nothing like an arctic blast, but there will be a sharp drop—off in temperatures particularly in east anglia, margate at 6—7 c over the weekend with strong winds around as well, making it feel really chilly. elsewhere quite cloudy but temperatures staying in double figures.
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this is bbc world news,
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the headlines... the us secretary of state, antony blinken, says he won't shy away from raising issues such as china's actions in hong kong — in the first high—level direct talks between the biden administration, and beijing. in response, china said the us must stay out of its internal affairs. italy, germany and france resume roll—out of the astrazeneca vaccine — after europe's medicines authority says the jab is safe and effective. several eu countries had suspended its use over fears of a link to blood clots. the french prime minister has announced a new month—long lockdown for paris and surrounding areas. he said the country is suffering a third wave of coronavirus. the new measures will take effect from midnight on friday. joe biden says the us will hit its target of getting

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