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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 22, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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hello this is bbc news i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the latest headlines: sirens. police vans are set on fire and officers hurt as a protest in bristol against plans to give the police more powers over demonstrations turns violent. i would say that the people who were down here protesting where disgraceful criminals. they were hell—bent on causing the sort of damage you described and a violent mob erupted from it. let damage you described and a violent mob erupted from it.— mob erupted from it. let me know our mob erupted from it. let me know your thoughts _ mob erupted from it. let me know your thoughts on _ mob erupted from it. let me know your thoughts on last _ mob erupted from it. let me know your thoughts on last night - mob erupted from it. let me know your thoughts on last night and . mob erupted from it. let me know| your thoughts on last night and the police anchor i bill. borisjohnson is set to speak to eu leaders this week as the row
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over the supply of the astrazeneca vaccine continues. it's as results from the us trial of the jab show it's both safe and highly effective. i'm really encouraged to see this data, it supports all the results that we've already seen with this vaccine. around 10,000 soldiers are expected to be cut, as part of big restructuring to the armed forces. ...lift off of this beautiful rocket. and a uk—led mission to remove dangerous spacejunk lifts off from kazakhstan. two police officers suffered broken bones, and a dozen others were injured when a protest in bristol turned violent last night. thousands of people had gathered to demonstrate against the government's police and crime bill, which would
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give police more powers to restrict demonstrations. the home secretary priti patel says the violence was �*unacceptable'. avon and somerset police said the peaceful demonstration had turned violent because of a small minority of protesters. seven people have been arrested. 0ur reporter andrew plant was there. in a protest against new police powers, it was soon police themselves who became the target. vans and a police cars set on fire, fireworks thrown into the crowd as around 1,000 protesters gathered in bristol city centre in what has been, police say, the worst violence the city has seen in years. there's a row of police blocking off what is the central police station here in bristol. but you can see at the end of the road, they've also blocked off now the end of this city centre street, but also the side roads, too. and they're doing it from behind, but there's still about 1,000 people in here. and now they're being left with nowhere to go.
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protesters here holding banners concerned, they say, that the uk is becoming a police state. the kill the bill march started in the early afternoon, but as night fell, the clashes began. projectiles thrown at officers in riot gear. we saw several people with head injuries being helped from the crowd. i think it's horrible. and i agree with the cause of the protesters, but i think this is not going to do anybody any good. several officers have been injured. the chair of the avon in somerset police federation said people's right to protest had been hijacked by protesters hell bent on violence. andrew plant, bbc news, in bristol. 0ur correspondentjohn maguire is in bristol. what maguire is in bristol. is the latest, john? it what maauire is in bristol. is the latest, john? ., , been what is the latest, john? it has been a morning _ what is the latest, john? it has been a morning of— what is the latest, john? it has been a morning of clearing - what is the latest, john? it has been a morning of clearing up. | what is the latest, john? it has - been a morning of clearing up. the physical damage when i arrived here, fire crews were still in position
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making sure some of the earlier fires, you will have seen the police vehicles, were extinguished. glass all over the ground. this is the police station, a big glass office building and some of the building peppered with stones. you can still see some of them at the base of the building. there were hundreds strewn across the pavement. bristol city council have been out clearing them up. but you get the sense of the type of damage, the sense of ferocity events got to last night. earlier i spoke to the chief constable of avon and somerset and asked him what his thoughts were and indeed, the state of the current investigation? what was a largely peaceful demonstration on the college green, a core _
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demonstration on the college green, a core of— demonstration on the college green, a core of 400, 500 move down here and it_ a core of 400, 500 move down here and it is_ a core of 400, 500 move down here and it is my— a core of 400, 500 move down here and it is my conclusion they were intent _ and it is my conclusion they were intent on — and it is my conclusion they were intent on violent disorder, criminal damage _ intent on violent disorder, criminal damage and assaulting as many police officers _ damage and assaulting as many police officers they could. what damage and assaulting as many police officers they could.— officers they could. what set it off, was there _ officers they could. what set it off, was there a _ officers they could. what set it off, was there a moment - officers they could. what set it off, was there a moment or i officers they could. what set it off, was there a moment or a l officers they could. what set it - off, was there a moment or a spark that ignited that anger? at off, was there a moment or a spark that ignited that anger?— that ignited that anger? at every level of peeple — that ignited that anger? at every level of people are _ that ignited that anger? at every level of people are trained - that ignited that anger? at every level of people are trained and l level of people are trained and experienced at dealing with protest. what happens in a mob, they will look for— what happens in a mob, they will look for a — what happens in a mob, they will look for a trigger incident, a perceived _ look for a trigger incident, a perceived act of force by the authorities again is one of the protesters, which some of them don't want to— protesters, which some of them don't want to be _ protesters, which some of them don't want to be drawn into, get drawn int0~ _ want to be drawn into, get drawn int0~ we — want to be drawn into, get drawn into. we did everything we could to avoid _ into. we did everything we could to avoid that— into. we did everything we could to avoid that flashpoint. but i would say the _ avoid that flashpoint. but i would say the people who are down here, so called _ say the people who are down here, so called protesters, where disgraceful criminals _ called protesters, where disgraceful criminals. they were hell—bent on causing _ criminals. they were hell—bent on causing the — criminals. they were hell—bent on causing the damage you have described and despite our efforts and patience, a violent mob erupted from it _
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i have also spoken to the elected mayor of bristol, marvin reece. he said he is not a fan of many aspects of the new police and i bill but this is something well beyond that, it has gone beyond the fact that they wear those protests early in they wear those protests early in the day. police had asked people not to attend because of pandemic restrictions but they did so in their thousands. they then seem to be a smaller group of hundreds who came down to the police station in the centre of bristol, intent on causing trouble and damage. both the chief constable and marvin reece, the mayor of bristol, both adamant that this is a very different element, it was a criminal element that were intent on causing physical damage to buildings, to vehicles and two police officers themselves. thank you, john. let's speak now to martin booth. he runs the website bristol 24/7 and was at the protests last night. you were there for the whole of it, from when it was peaceful, it was still illegal, but then it turned.
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from your point of view, what changed, what did turn? it is from your point of view, what changed, what did turn? it is a really good _ changed, what did turn? it is a really good question, - changed, what did turn? it is a really good question, i - changed, what did turn? it is a really good question, i have i changed, what did turn? it is a i really good question, i have used changed, what did turn? it is a - really good question, i have used a sporting analogy, a game of two halves. there was a difference in the peaceful march in the afternoon and as night set, the violence just erupted, seemingly out of nowhere. there was a few flashpoints and your reporter was talking about the stones. that is an interesting one because some protesters, rioters had managed to get onto a flat roof overlooking the police station and they ended up graffiti in some of they ended up graffiti in some of the walls, smashing the window. i think at theirfeet, the walls, smashing the window. i think at their feet, there were these stones and they were throwing stones down onto the police lines while the protesters down below were
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shouting up at them saying, don't throw, don't throw. there was some animosity between the two sets of peaceful protesters and the ones seemingly hell—bent on the violence. the mayor of bristol was on the radio this morning and he seemed to suggest that a group turned up who were intent on violence, do you think that is right as someone who was there? , think that is right as someone who was there?— think that is right as someone who was there? , . ., , ., ., was there? they were certainly a lot of violence- — was there? they were certainly a lot of violence. there _ was there? they were certainly a lot of violence. there was _ was there? they were certainly a lot of violence. there was some - was there? they were certainly a lot of violence. there was some serious confrontations. i saw one group of rioters rip up some metal railings from around a building that was covered in scaffolding and used that to push into the police. whether they set out to cause the violence, i cannot answer that, but certainly there was some very ugly scenes. {line there was some very ugly scenes. one senior officer — there was some very ugly scenes. one
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senior officer is _ there was some very ugly scenes. 0ne senior officer is reported as describing the protesters, or as the rioters as you identify them as a mob of animals. the home secretary said on twitter it was thuggery and disorder. how would describe them? it was quite something to behold. the seated protesters on the road in front of the riot police, like i said, there where factions within the people outside the police station who clearly wanted this to remain peaceful. and others who were there to cause violence, seemingly. bristol has now gone around the world and these scenes are shameful. you were there because you object to the police and i bill, that is the short and title of the actual bill. what are you concerned about with it? , ., . ., . what are you concerned about with it? , ., . .,
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what are you concerned about with it? ., ., it? just to correct you, i am a journalist — it? just to correct you, i am a journalist myself _ it? just to correct you, i am a journalist myself so - it? just to correct you, i am a journalist myself so i - it? just to correct you, i am a journalist myself so i was - it? just to correct you, i am a i journalist myself so i was there it? just to correct you, i am a - journalist myself so i was there to report. journalist myself so i was there to re ort. ~ , ,., , journalist myself so i was there to reort. , , ., report. absolutely fine, fair enough- — report. absolutely fine, fair enough- i— report. absolutely fine, fair enough. i wondered - report. absolutely fine, fair enough. i wondered if - report. absolutely fine, fair| enough. i wondered if there report. absolutely fine, fair- enough. i wondered if there was part of you who was also protesting against the bill as well? this of you who was also protesting against the bill as well? as our elected mayor _ against the bill as well? as our elected mayor says, _ against the bill as well? as our elected mayor says, there - against the bill as well? as our elected mayor says, there are | elected mayor says, there are elements to this bill that seem particularly draconian and it is just hugely paradoxical that this violent protest erupted.- just hugely paradoxical that this violent protest erupted. having read the bill, it suggests _ violent protest erupted. having read the bill, it suggests the _ violent protest erupted. having read the bill, it suggests the kind - violent protest erupted. having read the bill, it suggests the kind of- the bill, it suggests the kind of conditions that the police would be able to impose in future on static protests would simply match the kind of powers they have to impose on marches? ., , , marches? one of the messages the rotesters marches? one of the messages the protesters were _ marches? one of the messages the protesters were trying _ marches? one of the messages the protesters were trying to _ marches? one of the messages the protesters were trying to get - marches? one of the messages the protesters were trying to get across was the imbalance in sentencing between some of the crimes now. off
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the top of my head i wouldn't be able to tell you what those where, but a lot of the protesters were unhappy of the seemingly unfairness that the bill is going to bring in. thank you very much, that is a separate part of the bill. martin booth, from the bristol website, the bristol 20 47. thank you for your messages. i don't agree with the policing bill but if you set up a protest called kill the bill you will get one outcome and the organisers knew it. someone else said, it has been common since the poll tax rise for anarchists to ignite themselves from hotel process into violence. marvin says, if you don't make peaceful protest possible, the only ones we will see will be valid. if you have read the bill, and if you agree it will make peaceful protests impossible. let me know what you think of the event in
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bristol last night and what you think of the bill itself. let me bring you this breaking news, the findings of the independent enquiry into scotland's's first minister into scotland's's first minister into the handling of the enquiry into the handling of the enquiry into alex salmond is expected today. the prosecutor, james hamilton qc, will decide whether or not nicola sturgeon broke conduct rules for ministers and if you think she did, if he ruled that she did, he will recommend sanctions. there was a partial leak from a committee of mps suggesting last week that they believed nicola sturgeon had misled the scottish parliament. nicola sturgeon denies that. she says, please wait for the independent report coming from james hamilton. the news today is the findings of that report will be out today.
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talks between the prime minister and eu leaders are expected this week, as tensions rise over vaccine supply. it comes after the eu threatened to ban the export of astrazeneca vaccines, unless the company increases its deliveries to the bloc. the government says the eu must allow the firm to meet its contractual obligations to the uk. let's talk to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. can you be really clear about what is going on this week on this? i is going on this week on this? i will be as clear as i can be because it is shrouded in a bit of uncertainty and imposition. there is the general and the specific things going on. eu leaders will meet on thursday for a virtual summit, where they will have to talk about what to do about the eu's export mechanism for vaccines. which means if an eu country wants to export a vaccine other components for a vaccine outside of the eu it has to get
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permission from the european commission and the european commission and the european commission can veto the export. they should have underlined, the president of the european commission, says she wants to toughen that up and broaden the criteria that would allow the commission to say no to an export and that could affect the uk. but we have nothing on paperfrom the commission. we don't know what they are proposing an eu leaders could reject it, tweak it or stick with what the existing mechanism is. that is what is building up to thursday. separately, under the existing rules, eu officials had been telling journalists in brussels, there is a plant in the netherlands that is due to export some components of the vaccine or vaccine doses to the uk potentially soon as this week. that will come under the existing mechanism which could potentially be stopped the eu. that is what is going on this week and that is why this issue is getting more heated in the last couple of days. up to now,
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the last couple of days. up to now, the uk has been keeping out of it but i know ministers' rhetoric is dialling up. what the uk is probably proposing behind eu is that they work together to ramp up vaccine production for everyone. and that is certainly the message that the health and social care minister was putting forward interviews this morning. what is really important — and this is part of a conversation with the eu — is that countries have to work together on this. this is a global supply chain, as you mentioned — india as well as the eu — we all play our part in this. anti—vaccine nationalism or protectionism doesn't do anybody any good. what is important is that countries that play a part in the production of the vaccine should work together to maximise the production of the vaccine. (05) and now i know it is annoying when i say, let's wait and see, but i am going to say, let's just wait and see. what actually happens with the
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dutch plant this week. it could be nothing, it might have no impact. but if it does happen, what does the commission propose about the new mechanism to what extent does that get adopted by eu leaders on thursday. there will be a lot of diplomacy, may be a bit of sabre rattling and then a decision later in the week. rattling and then a decision later in the week-— the american trial of the oxford astrazenica vaccine has finally reported and the news is very good. it includes data for older people and it suggests that all participants including the elderly are well protected, and that the vaccine completely protected against serious illness. there was no evidence of serious side effects. let's speak now to professor sarah gilbert, co—designer of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. you must be delighted by this news? good morning, yes, very pleased to see the results coming out this morning. see the results coming out this morninu. ., ,., ., see the results coming out this morninu. ., ., ., , :: , morning. how important of it is 2096 of those who — morning. how important of it is 2096 of those who took _ morning. how important of it is 2096 of those who took part _ morning. how important of it is 2096 of those who took part in _ morning. how important of it is 2096 of those who took part in this - morning. how important of it is 2096 of those who took part in this very . of those who took part in this very big trial were elderly? it is of those who took part in this very big trial were elderly?— big trial were elderly? it is very aood to
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big trial were elderly? it is very good to have — big trial were elderly? it is very good to have data _ big trial were elderly? it is very good to have data from - big trial were elderly? it is very good to have data from a - big trial were elderly? it is very l good to have data from a clinical trial which has included older adults, people over the age of 65. we do have a lot of data coming through from the uk on the use of the vaccine in older people, in people over 70 and people over 80 and showing that in real—world use of the vaccine, there is very high effectiveness of the vaccine. it is keeping people out of hospital, stopping them getting infected, even in these older age groups. to be able to have the data from a trial and retrial data is very useful. what does it mean for your vaccine in the us as a result of this trial? this means that astrazeneca can now go through the process of preparing a submission to the fda using the data from this trial. that will take some time to achieve, possibly a number of weeks and that will then be reviewed by the fda, he will make their decision on whether to licence their decision on whether to licence the vaccine for use in the us. the fda is the —
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the vaccine for use in the us. the fda is the regulator over there? yes, it is the equivalent of the ema in europe and the mhra here. what in europe and the mhra here. what about places — in europe and the mhra here. what about places like _ in europe and the mhra here. what about places like norway for example, who are saying they are convinced there is a link between a very rare blood clot and your vaccine and are continuing with the suspension, what do you think of that? ' �* ' �* suspension, what do you think of that? ' �* ~ ~ ., suspension, what do you think of that? ~ �* ~ ~ ., . ., that? the mhra, the ema and who have said is no proven — that? the mhra, the ema and who have said is no proven link _ that? the mhra, the ema and who have said is no proven link and _ that? the mhra, the ema and who have said is no proven link and the _ said is no proven link and the benefits of the vaccine far outweigh the risks. when vaccines are used in tens of millions of people, there will be some adverse events that happen after some people have been vaccinated. it is very difficult to work out if the vaccine had anything to do with that. it is important that we continue to investigate, but it is important to remember these events are very rare and there is no proven link. but we haven't seen anything like that in the clinical
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trials, although that is in tens of thousands, ratherthan trials, although that is in tens of thousands, rather than millions of people. i thousands, rather than millions of --eole. ., , thousands, rather than millions of ..eole, ., ~' ., thousands, rather than millions of ..eole. ., ~' ., ., thousands, rather than millions of n-eole. . ~ ., . , thousands, rather than millions of ..eole. ., ~' ., ., , ., people. i was talking to a number of --eole at people. i was talking to a number of people at the _ people. i was talking to a number of people at the weekend _ people. i was talking to a number of people at the weekend about - people. i was talking to a number of| people at the weekend about getting the vaccine. some were telling me they preferred your vaccine because it was british. some were telling me they preferred the pfizer vaccine because of the publicity surrounding the astrazeneca vaccine. some were saying they were just waiting, holding back because the vaccine roll—out had been so swift theyjust wanted to see if there was any big reaction in the wider population. some women were saying they were trying to get pregnant and therefore didn't want to have a vaccine at all. there are still some concerns, evenin all. there are still some concerns, even in this country, were confident in your vaccine is high. what would you say to those people? fin in your vaccine is high. what would you say to those people?— you say to those people? on the pregnancy. _ you say to those people? on the pregnancy. there _ you say to those people? on the pregnancy, there is _ you say to those people? on the pregnancy, there is no _ you say to those people? on the pregnancy, there is no reason i you say to those people? on thel pregnancy, there is no reason not you say to those people? on the i pregnancy, there is no reason not to have either of the vaccines. if you are contemplating becoming pregnant, formal trials have not been carried out in pregnant women, but many
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pregnant women have been vaccinated and the benefits for them outweigh any possible risks. 0n the concerns over safety, i think we should be looking at the data coming from the uk where very large numbers of people have been vaccinated. we are seeing high levels of effectiveness protecting people, even older people against infection and hospitalisation, severe disease and thatis hospitalisation, severe disease and that is very similar results for both pfizer and the astrazeneca vaccine, the two being used widely here. there is very little difference between them. the most important thing is accept vaccine when offered, whatever it is because they are approved by regulators to be safe and effective and they will people from becoming infected and contracting severe disease. what people from becoming infected and contracting severe disease.- contracting severe disease. what is our view, contracting severe disease. what is your view, finally _ contracting severe disease. what is your view, finally on _ contracting severe disease. what is your view, finally on this _ your view, finally on this controversy, this row between the eu and the uk over astrazeneca vaccine supplies to the eu and whether we
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will get into some tit—for—tat export ban? will get into some tit-for-tat exoort ban?— will get into some tit-for-tat exortban? . , ., export ban? that is not something i can comment _ export ban? that is not something i can comment on. _ export ban? that is not something i can comment on. i _ export ban? that is not something i can comment on. i am _ export ban? that is not something i can comment on. i am interested i export ban? that is not something i can comment on. i am interested in the science and developing vaccines and protecting public health, i don't get into the supply issues. does it frustrate you to see this kind of row? it does it frustrate you to see this kind of row?— kind of row? it is not helpful to ublic kind of row? it is not helpful to public health. _ kind of row? it is not helpful to public health, we _ kind of row? it is not helpful to public health, we need - kind of row? it is not helpful to public health, we need to i kind of row? it is not helpful to public health, we need to be i kind of row? it is not helpful to i public health, we need to be making our best efforts to protect the populations across the world with a vaccines that are now available. thank you for your time this morning, professor sarah gilbert, co—designer of the astrazeneca vaccine. a cut in the size of the army is expected to be announced later as part of the government's defence review. other changes include the phasing—out of old tanks, aircraft and ships to fund new equipment and technologies. 0ur defence correspondent, jonathan beale reports. the government says the armed forces of the future will be better equipped with troops supported by robots and drones able to operate in small teams anywhere in the world. it says they will be backed up
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by a new kind of army — skilled in information, electronic and cyberwarfare. but it'll also be leaner. the size of the regular army is expected to be cut by as much as 10,000 to 70,000 troops. that may concern close allies like the us, who say size matters. quantity has a quality all its own, as stalin taught us, and we are concerned about the shrinking size of britain's military. but i would rather have a fully capable, fully resourced, smaller british force than i would have a larger, less capable one. extra investment is going into the royal navy, with new frigates already being ordered. but it's still expected to retire some older ships early, briefly seeing a reduction in its surface fleet from 19 to 17 warships. and there's likely to be fewer of the us—designed f—35jets than originally planned,
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to fund investment into the development of a new british—built fighter. the government insists this defence review will make the armed forces more agile and better equipped to fight the wars of the future — but they will be smaller. jonathan beale, bbc news. let's speak now with drjack watling, research fellow for land warfare at the royal united services institute. i think tank for defence and security. hello, to you. it looks like the army will be cut by around 10,000 to 70,000 troops, is that the right thing to do? i 10,000 to 70,000 troops, is that the right thing to do?— right thing to do? i think the ministry of _ right thing to do? i think the ministry of defence - right thing to do? i think the ministry of defence has i right thing to do? i think the - ministry of defence has determined it is prepared to risk today in order to make sure the armed forces are fit for purpose in around ten years time. they faced a very difficult choice. they could either
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reinvest in the old army, but then they could see it becoming obsolete by the end of the decade. 0r they could see it becoming obsolete by the end of the decade. or they could take that risk early and investing capabilities that will become more relevant over time. thea;r become more relevant over time. they chose the latter. _ become more relevant over time. they chose the latter. i _ become more relevant over time. they chose the latter. i will— become more relevant over time. they chose the latter. i will ask you about the technology in a moment, what size of town or city could an army of 70,000 take a hold if it needed to? it army of 70,000 take a hold if it needed to?— army of 70,000 take a hold if it needed to? it depends what the threat is, but _ needed to? it depends what the threat is, but the _ needed to? it depends what the threat is, but the structure i needed to? it depends what the threat is, but the structure of i needed to? it depends what the l threat is, but the structure of the british army at the moment, we will have one aviation with an isolating objective. we will have combat team screening it and then be able to take one small town in terms of close combat and defensive activity. if you try to do any more, you will be biting off more than you chew. taking in terms of combat now but we
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have made it more deployable and more relevant to what we might describe as operating in complex environment, supporting partners and allies to an organisation like isis, deter certain weapons being deployed. we need to improve our ability to meet the threat in competition. i ability to meet the threat in competition.— ability to meet the threat in cometition. . ., ., ., competition. i am going to leave it there, competition. i am going to leave it there. just — competition. i am going to leave it there, just because _ competition. i am going to leave it there, just because the _ competition. i am going to leave it there, just because the lines i competition. i am going to leave it there, just because the lines are i there, just because the lines are starting to get a little bit distorted. thank you for talking to us. with more and more of us expected to take a holiday in the uk this year, the rnli is gearing up for another busy summer season across britain's coastline. fiona lamdin is on exmouth beach for us where new and returning lifeguard recruits are being put
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through their paces. it looks absolutely gorgeous, fiona, how are you?— how are you? good morning. it is ”oreous how are you? good morning. it is gorgeous todav- _ how are you? good morning. it is gorgeous today. we _ how are you? good morning. it is gorgeous today. we are - how are you? good morning. it is gorgeous today. we are on i how are you? good morning. it is i gorgeous today. we are on exmouth beach, as you say. staycation is on the rise and you can see we have returning lifeguards. they are training and they have to pass their fitness test before they can come back. they have been training on the land all morning. in a moment we will see them at training on the sea, but i have been to bournemouth to see how they are getting ready there. as lockdown eased lastjune, nearly half a million visitors headed to the coast in dorset. roads were gridlocked, beaches were full, and extra police officers were brought in as a major incident was declared in bournemouth. you can't even see the sand when there's that many people down there. in the water, it actually looks like a mexican wave — there's just that many people in there.
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last year rnli lifeguards saved 110 lives, and responded to over 10,000 incidents. it changed in a second. ijust tried to catch a wave on my bodyboard, missed the wave, went to stand up and i was just out of my depth. amanda and her 11—year—old son were bodyboarding at perranporth beach in cornwall when a flash rip tide started pulling her out. ajet ski came up towards me, another lifeguard. he told me to grab on and ijust couldn't — ijust had no energy left. and in his voice, he told me — he shouted at me to grab hold and i realised that it was my one chance. if i didn't grab hold of it, i would have perished. you know, my son would have gone home from that beach on his own. i don't even know how he would have got home from the beach. and without the rnli, i would be dead, i wouldn't be here today. and it was a similar story for dad—of—three ben. he was bodyboarding at perran sands beach in cornwall.
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it went from being probably waist height to over my head in a couple of steps. and then i could just feel myself being pulled really fast out into the sea. it's a lonely place to be when you're out there and you don't know if you're going to get the help, if people know that you're missing. i'll be honest, i didn't think he was going to survive. i kept losing him, his head would go down and i'd lose him for a few seconds. yeah, it was the scariest thing i think i've ever been through. i've never felt fear like i did in those few minutes. it was awful. nine, ten. 0k, she's not breathing, _ can we update the ambulance and let them know that we're doing cpr? it's early spring and we're still in third lockdown, and so beaches are pretty quiet. but these lifeguards have been out training for four hours, so they're fit and ready when the public return. it's been really tough. so all the pools have been closed, so we've had to go swimming in the sea with really thick wet suits, boots, gloves,
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and it's been cold — like, six degrees over the winter. so it's been tough, but we've kept a good level of fitness. ok, so this summer we're expecting the staycation factor to be very much present for everybody, so we're gearing up and expecting busy numbers at the beaches again. it's easter in two weeks — when they'll be patrolling 50 beaches across the country, hoping that this time the public will take a more measured approach as we slowly ease out of lockdown. they are about to start their sea training. let's come over to abbey. it is about 7 degrees?— it is about 7 degrees? yes, it is uuite it is about 7 degrees? yes, it is quite cold _ it is about 7 degrees? yes, it is quite cold at — it is about 7 degrees? yes, it is quite cold at the _ it is about 7 degrees? yes, it is quite cold at the moment. i it is about 7 degrees? yes, it is quite cold at the moment. you | it is about 7 degrees? yes, it is i quite cold at the moment. you have been a lifeguard _ quite cold at the moment. you have been a lifeguard for _ quite cold at the moment. you have been a lifeguard for three _ quite cold at the moment. you have been a lifeguard for three years, i been a lifeguard for three years, what was the challenges last year? it was a lot busier, a lot more paddle — it was a lot busier, a lot more paddle boarders, kite surfing and we expect— paddle boarders, kite surfing and we expect it _ paddle boarders, kite surfing and we expect it to— paddle boarders, kite surfing and we expect it to be just as busy, if not more _ expect it to be just as busy, if not more this— expect it to be just as busy, if not more this year. we expect it to be 'ust as busy, if not more this year.— expect it to be 'ust as busy, if not more this year. we need to let you aet more this year. we need to let you net on more this year. we need to let you get on and — more this year. we need to let you get on and do _ more this year. we need to let you get on and do your— more this year. we need to let you get on and do your training. i i more this year. we need to let you get on and do your training. i think they are all going to go in? just
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coming over to henry. henry, you are in charge of 30 lifeguards down in devon, tell us, what are the challenges, how will it be different this year? we challenges, how will it be different this ear? ~ , , this year? we will still be providing _ this year? we will still be providing the _ this year? we will still be providing the same i this year? we will still be l providing the same service this year? we will still be i providing the same service as this year? we will still be - providing the same service as ever. but we _ providing the same service as ever. but we will— providing the same service as ever. but we will see the lifeguards wearing — but we will see the lifeguards wearing masks. they are still fully approachable and behind the scenes, we have _ approachable and behind the scenes, we have put in a huge amount of work to make _ we have put in a huge amount of work to make sure — we have put in a huge amount of work to make sure we can provide a safe and effective service by employing more _ and effective service by employing more lifeguards. how and effective service by employing more lifeguards.— more lifeguards. how many more lifeguards? _ more lifeguards. how many more lifeguards? around _ more lifeguards. how many more lifeguards? around 100 _ more lifeguards. how many more | lifeguards? around 100 nationally, so around 1700 _ lifeguards? around 100 nationally, so around 1700 around _ lifeguards? around 100 nationally, so around 1700 around the - lifeguards? around 100 nationally, so around 1700 around the uk i lifeguards? around 100 nationally, so around 1700 around the uk this| so around 1700 around the uk this summer~ — so around 1700 around the uk this summer. |s— so around 1700 around the uk this summer. , ., so around 1700 around the uk this summer. , . , ., so around 1700 around the uk this summer. , ., .., , ., ., summer. is that in case of them to isolate? we _ summer. is that in case of them to isolate? we will _ summer. is that in case of them to isolate? we will be _ summer. is that in case of them to isolate? we will be running - isolate? we will be running lifeguards _ isolate? we will be running lifeguards within _ isolate? we will be running lifeguards within bubbles i isolate? we will be running l lifeguards within bubbles this isolate? we will be running i lifeguards within bubbles this year to reduce — lifeguards within bubbles this year to reduce the risk of transmission of covid _ to reduce the risk of transmission of covid and we have had to stagger the training and train in smaller groups. — the training and train in smaller groups, outdoors in the sea in the
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cold _ groups, outdoors in the sea in the cold. �* ., groups, outdoors in the sea in the cold. �* . �* , groups, outdoors in the sea in the cold. �* ., v groups, outdoors in the sea in the cold. . �*, cold. britain, let's quickly come over and find _ cold. britain, let's quickly come over and find out _ cold. britain, let's quickly come over and find out how _ cold. britain, let's quickly come over and find out how it - cold. britain, let's quickly come over and find out how it was i cold. britain, let's quickly come over and find out how it was in l cold. britain, let's quickly come i over and find out how it was in the sea. if i can get across the beach. how cold was that? it sea. if i can get across the beach. how cold was that?— how cold was that? it was quite refreshing. _ how cold was that? it was quite refreshing, yes. _ how cold was that? it was quite refreshing, yes. are _ how cold was that? it was quite refreshing, yes. are you - how cold was that? it was quite refreshing, yes. are you all- how cold was that? it was quite i refreshing, yes. are you all feeling fit, ready? — refreshing, yes. are you all feeling fit, ready? i— refreshing, yes. are you all feeling fit, ready? ithink— refreshing, yes. are you all feeling fit, ready? i think we _ refreshing, yes. are you all feeling fit, ready? i think we are _ refreshing, yes. are you all feeling fit, ready? i think we are ready. i refreshing, yes. are you all feeling fit, ready? i think we are ready. al fit, ready? i think we are ready. a bit more training _ fit, ready? i think we are ready. a bit more training and _ fit, ready? i think we are ready. a bit more training and we - fit, ready? i think we are ready. a bit more training and we will- fit, ready? i think we are ready. a bit more training and we will be i bit more training and we will be ready— bit more training and we will be ready to — bit more training and we will be ready to start.— ready to start. this beach in exmouth — ready to start. this beach in exmouth opens _ ready to start. this beach in exmouth opens for - ready to start. this beach in exmouth opens for the i ready to start. this beach in i exmouth opens for the lifeguards ready to start. this beach in - exmouth opens for the lifeguards in two weeks, so from good friday there will be a lifeguard here but it has been a perfect morning to be down here, we certainly picked a good one. absolutely, fiona, you certainly did. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood as we progress through the week the weather is going to become more unsettled. in the east and south, it should remain dry, sunshine with more cloud during the day, but in the west and north, there will be thicker cloud, thick enough for some
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drizzle. temperatures from 8—13 or 14 degrees. through this evening and overnight we see more cloud developing, less of a chance of a frosted developing, but there will still be showers coming on across the north and west of the uk. these are the overnight low temperatures, three and 8 degrees. tomorrow we start with lots of cloud, still showers across western areas, wrecks developing in the cloud, for example north—east england, round the moray firth but this next with different approaches bringing rain into northern ireland and western scotland. particularly gusty winds in the north—west quarter of the uk. hello, this is bbc news with victoria derbyshire. the headlines... police vans are set on fire and officers are hurt, as a protest in bristol against plans to give the police more powers over demonstrations turns violent
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i would say the people who were down here, so say protesting, were disgraceful criminals. they were hell—bent on causing the sort of damage you've described and despite our efforts and our patience, a violent mob erupted from it. borisjohnson is set to speak to eu leaders this week as the row over the supply of the astrazeneca vaccine continues it's as results from the us trial of the jab show it's both safe and highly effective really encouraged to see this data out and it supports all the results that we've already seen with this vaccine. and coming up... scott howell from caerphilly whose heart stopped twice when he was being treated for covid last year — goes back to see the medics who saved his life — to tell them he will be �*eternally grateful�* sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougal. good morning.
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leicester city are through to the semi—finals of the fa cup for the first time in 39 years, after they completely outclassed manchester united. an errorfrom united midfielder fred set them on their way — kelechi iheanacho pouncing. and he rounded off the scoring too — a worthy celebration of brendan rodgers 100th game in charge — they'll play southampton in the semi—finals at wembley. and chelsea earned a tie against manchester city, with a 2—0 win over sheffield united — an own goal from oliver norwood putting them ahead before hakim ziyech secured the winner in stoppage time. that extends chelsea's unbeaten run under thomas tuchel to 14 matches. arsenal manager mikel arteta said their premier league game at west ham would give him nightmares, after they had to come from 3—0 down, to draw 3—3. the home side tookjust 32 minutes to score three goals — the in—form jesse lingard
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with their opener — that's why he's back in the england squad. but arsenal were a different side after the break — two own goals — and this header from alexandre lacazette eight minutes from time — won them a point. tottenham managerjose mourinho said it was a pity it took their shock europa league exit for his side to produce the performance which gave them a 2—0 victory at aston villa. carlos vinicius putting them ahead — harry kane there scoring their second from the penalty spot. i will not happy with the feeling that if you did it tonight, why you didn't 48 hours ago. that match on thursday will be a scar for a long time, it's not going to healjust because we won.
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in scotland, the notoriously heated old firm match started with a show of solidarity. it's after rangers midfielder glen kamara was allegedly the victim of racism last week. celtic captain scott brown embracing him before kick off. the match ended in a 1—1 draw, but the champions elect had to come from behind. mohamed elyounoussi's diving header putting celtic ahead. their lead lasted only 15 minutes. alfredo morelos with his first goal in 15 old firm derbies. rangers still on course for an unbeaten premiership season. now, if you're a fan of women's football, we have some great news. the bbc has secured a new rights deal for the women's super league for the next three years. for the first time in the sport's history, the bbc will show live games from the wsl on bbc one and bbc two — starting from september this year.
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you speak about young girls and as footballers we try and be that inspiration and role models to so many but sometimes you can't be that role model when you are not being seen so far as to be on television more often, games being invisible for these young girls, it's the next step forward for women's football in general and i think it's going to really push our league to be the best in europe, if not the world. bristol city are off the bottom of the table. they drew 1—1 with tottenham yesterday — gemma evans with city's equaliser. that means tottenham's winless now stands at six matches. it was a good day all round for bristol — their rugby union side extended their lead at the top of the premiership — but only after a dramatic finish against newcastle. bristol were losing 21—14 with just six minutes remaining, when luke morahan went over to level the scores. and two minutes later, andy uren scored a bonus point try to snatch victory by 28 points to 21.
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and in the pro 14, the dragons kept their slim hopes of qualifying for the champions cup alive — coming from behind to beat glasgow 26—17. jordan williams with the first of their two tries. serena williams said she was sad at having to pull out of the miami 0pen, after oral surgery. it's her home state and she's won the event a record eight times — but she's still recovering from the operation. more details on all of those stories on the bbc sport website. that's all the sport for now. the historic abuse of young football players has once again come into the spotlight after a long awaited report last week found �*significant institutional failings�* by the football association that meant it �*didn�*t do enough to keep children safe�*. tonight, a documentary series looking at that abuse from the mid—1970s until the mid—1990s and the culture of silence
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that surrounded it, will be shown on the bbc. it will be on air from it will be on airfrom 9pm. here�*s a clip from the series. commentator: tottenham hotspur have won the fa cup _ for a record eighth time. i had some highs in my career. but i never enjoyed them like everybody else did. because i had this, this empty soul. i played a role that looked like he had everything, he had everything going for him and didn�*t have a worry in the world and in fact was one of the biggest jokers in the pack. alone, i was dying, i was just dying inside. so i masked it with drink, towards the end of my career at spurs, and drugs. i�*d already started taking cocaine and ecstasy.
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i can�*t remember much about it, i�*ll have to watch it on tv first, i haven�*t seen it. i was totally in self—destruct mode. paul stewart speaking there — as part of the documentary series football�*s darkest secrets. and that starts tonight. derek bell is one of the former players taking part. he was groomed and abused by newcastle coach george 0rmond between the ages of 12 and 16. george ornament was jailed for six years back in 2002 after being found guilty of a number of sexual assaults on young boys. a secret tape recorded by mr bell captured his abuser apologising for what he�*d done to him. 0rmond was sentenced again in 2018 for 20 years, for 35 counts of indecent assault. derek, good morning. good morning, victoria. how important is it for you to have been included in this documentary? it�*s you to have been included in this documentary?—
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documentary? it's not so much important _ documentary? it's not so much important for— documentary? it's not so much important for myself _ documentary? it's not so much important for myself as - documentary? it's not so much important for myself as a i documentary? it's not so much i important for myself as a person, i wanted to get my story out there. to the world, so i was happy, more than happy, when i got approached from the bbc, to do this documentary. along with other people, paul stewart, as you mentioned, david, andy, people who came forward in 2016, we thought if we could get it out there, yes, there has been a lot of publicity since then but we wanted to show the documentary in a light where it is hard—hitting, it can be emotional. but if we could tell our stories to highlight safeguarding and there still is issues around safeguarding, to put it out there, that�*s why we wanted to do the documentary. i it out there, that's why we wanted to do the documentary.— it out there, that's why we wanted to do the documentary. i wonder if ou could to do the documentary. i wonder if you could tell— to do the documentary. i wonder if you could tell our— to do the documentary. i wonder if you could tell our audience - to do the documentary. i wonder if you could tell our audience how i to do the documentary. i wonder if. you could tell our audience how what happened to you as a boy has affected the rest of your life. it�*s
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affected the rest of your life. it's had a major _ affected the rest of your life. it�*s had a major impact on my life. 0ver had a major impact on my life. over the years, obviously in 1995, i was sectioned under the mental health act for my own well—being after dry to end my life. i have had an off, 20 years of therapy, counselling. and ifound it difficult 20 years of therapy, counselling. and i found it difficult to wake up in the morning sometimes. you know, i�*m on medication and have been for a long, long time now to keep myself well. so the impact notjust on me but my family, my friends, i would disassociate myself from everybody, you know, i was an angry man inside for a lot of years.— for a lot of years. how many years did ou for a lot of years. how many years did you keep _ for a lot of years. how many years did you keep it _ for a lot of years. how many years did you keep it a _ for a lot of years. how many years did you keep it a secret _ for a lot of years. how many years did you keep it a secret for? i for a lot of years. how many years did you keep it a secret for? as i l did you keep it a secret for? as i sa , it did you keep it a secret for? as i say. it was _ did you keep it a secret for? as i say, it was 1995 _ did you keep it a secret for? as i say, it was 1995 when _ did you keep it a secret for? " i say, it was 1995 when i was sectioned and that was the first time i sort of disclosed to the
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psychiatrist in hospital. 50, 20, 2a years, i've never told anybody, my parents, my brother, family, friends. ijust couldn't parents, my brother, family, friends. i just couldn't face the shame and the embarrassment which i thought had happened to me. so it was a long, long time before i actually, you know, unfortunately, the circumstances, of which i did disclosed to people, were not so good. disclosed to people, were not so aood. ., . ., ., ,, good. you decided to waive your anonymity _ good. you decided to waive your anonymity in _ good. you decided to waive your anonymity in 2016 _ good. you decided to waive your anonymity in 2016 after- good. you decided to waive your anonymity in 2016 after seeing l good. you decided to waive yourl anonymity in 2016 after seeing an interview with andy woodward, speaking publicly about the abuse he'd experienced as a boy at the hands of his coach. white was that the right point for you to then say, this happened to me, i was at newcastle, my name is derek bell. i think, as you mentioned, iwent
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newcastle, my name is derek bell. i think, as you mentioned, i went to court with my abuser in 2002. i waved my anonymity then, i wasn't in a well placed in 2002, i was still receiving quite intense therapy. i didn't cope with the case very well in 2002. i wanted my name to be, although close family and friends knew it was me in court, and then, 14 knew it was me in court, and then, 1k years later, watching the 1a years later, watching the television and one night, and then andy appears. and i thought in 2016, i thought i'm in a better place now than i was in 2002, to waive my anonymity so i obviously contacted newcastle united, northumbria police, i remember coming on your show way back in 2016, victoria. and i wanted to support other former professional footballers, i thought i was in a well place at that time and it was the right time for me to
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waive my anonymity, to help other people come forward and hopefully, and as accounts move forward, he was rearrested and went to court in 2018 for a0 other victories came forward. and he got 20 years in prison, a further 20 years. —— a0 other victims. further 20 years. -- 40 other victims. ,., , , victims. the report suggested newcastle _ victims. the report suggested newcastle united _ victims. the report suggested newcastle united should - victims. the report suggested newcastle united should have victims. the report suggested - newcastle united should have acted more quickly following disclosures of abuse at a youth club in 97. and that 0rmond was only removed from the club many months later after he'd been allowed to travel abroad with young players. what do you think about that? i with young players. what do you think about that?— with young players. what do you think about that? i think you've got to look way — think about that? i think you've got to look way back, _ think about that? i think you've got to look way back, yes, _ think about that? i think you've got to look way back, yes, the - think about that? i think you've got to look way back, yes, the report i to look way back, yes, the report says that but these people, they don't only groom the parents, they use their position to manipulate
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themselves into positions where he obviously did that at newcastle, manipulated himself and said he was the best coach or physio, whatever, his role was. he used his power to manipulate himself into a position where everybody believed him. he was a coach, although he had no coaching badges, physio, he had no physio qualifications. but you've got to look back some 20, 25 years. there wasn't safeguarding procedures around, there were no checks then, you've got to look in the context of what was around then. to try and stop these people infiltrating whether it be grass roots football or professional football.— or professional football. derek, thank ou or professional football. derek, thank you so — or professional football. derek, thank you so much _ or professional football. derek, thank you so much for- or professional football. derek, thank you so much for talking l or professional football. derek, |
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thank you so much for talking to or professionalfootball. derek, - thank you so much for talking to us this morning. thank you so much for talking to us this morning-— thank you so much for talking to us this morning._ thank- thank you so much for talking to us. this morning._ thank you. this morning. thank you. thank you. derek bell features _ this morning. thank you. thank you. derek bell features in _ this morning. thank you. thank you. derek bell features in a _ this morning. thank you. thank you. | derek bell features in a documentary which starts tonight on bbc one at 9pm. i've already watched it, it's really very moving and very thoughtful. and as derek said, it's really hard—hitting. if you are affected by any of the issues raised, you can go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline where you'll find details of organisations which offer advice and support. scott howell was a fit a8—year—old from the south wales valleys until he caught coronavirus last march. it nearly killed him. this time last year he was on a ventilator and in an induced coma at the royal gwent hospital in newport. for the medical team there — he was their first covid case. scott survived and a year on, bbc wales reunited him with some of the people who saved his life.
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when scott howell left hospital last may it took all his strength to walk to his car. but here he is today, feeling happy, healthy and so much stronger. we reunited him with some of the medical staff who treated him during his stay in intensive care. the last time i saw you which was in fact the day you left hospital, when you were walking with a zimmer frame, could just about put one step in front of the other so to see him looking like he is today, is truly extraordinary. it's been a roller—coaster of a year but fantastic that i actually am able to walk and talk and all thanks to the likes of you and your team. you built me and put me back together. this time last year, scott howell's doctors at the royal gwent in newport had no time to think about recovery. they were just trying to keep him alive. scott took this picture just hours before he was put in an induced coma, he was later put on a ventilator.
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only a8 but with diabetes and asthma, covid was attacking his body. the unique thing about scott, he was the first case that we had in the health board with covid. we were confronted with something we weren't familiar with, that we'd heard a lot about on social media, we'd seen pictures coming out of italy, pictures coming out of france and now, here you were. over the next few weeks, the intensive care team would find themselves under increasing pressure. nick documented it all by taking photographs as more and more patients came through the door, gwent area the early hotspot in the pandemic. as this happened, scott remained unconscious. and so from that period of time when you are on the ventilator and asleep, have you got any recollection at all? nothing. absolutely no memories, no discussions. because you flirted with death a number of times, i'm not sure you're aware of that. from my notes, i know twice my heart
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stopped and they brought me back. so yes, i know i was very ill and very close to death. once you left intensive care, the physics did the most amazing work and i can remember coming up and taking photographs of you. i remember the first time they stood me up and my legs were so weak i kept feeling myself go and saying i won't be able to walk. this is going to take months. and fair play, they were determined and they said no, you will be, you just need to work with us and within a fortnight, they got me walking up a flight of stairs. applause. since the day scott left hospital last may, the physio has continued. he still sees heart and kidney specialists but physically, he says he feels back to normal. seeing nick and two of the itu nurses who helped look after him, charlotte and shannon, is a chance to reflect. worst year of my life but also, the best year of my life in that i faced death but because of their help, they've rebuilt me and i'm back as i was.
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so i will always be eternally grateful. thank you very much. it's an absolute pleasure. i love that story. dozens of former subpostmasters convicted of financial crimes will attempt to clear their names today, arguing their convictions were based on evidence from a faulty computer system, the post office's fujitsu—developed horizon it system. at a four—day hearing at the royal courts ofjustice in london, the court of appeal will consider appeals by a2 former subpostmasters against their convictions. i'm joined now by our business presenter ramzan karmali. 0k, ok, what is this about? this fujitsu rise was in place between 99 and 2015 and it was used, it basically came up with dodgy sort of stuff, basically. they were used for accounting and stock—taking, that
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kind of thing and these postmasters and supposed postmaster were using the system but they couldn't challenge the mystics within the system because they had no access to the software to say no, that's not what we put in the inventory. they were accused of convicting around more than 500 convictions of sub—postmasters and... forfraud? sub—postmasters and... for fraud? fraud, sub—postmasters and... forfraud? fraud, theft. a lot of them ended up injail, horrible stories, a woman who was pregnant with her trial, ended up injailfor ten months, people losing their businesses, their homes. it was a pretty devastating impact and at the time, this was what the post office said, they said the system was correct, we stand by the system and it was used to convict all these people and today we have a a7 appearing before the court and we don't expect the post office to challenge that appeal. even though we expect the
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sub—postmasters to have their convictions quashed, the process will still take three or four days. 0k. the will still take three or four days. ok. the post office isn't going to challenge it because they accept there was something wrong with the it system. there was something wrong with the it s stem. , ., , ., it system. they do indeed, they had aid in a it system. they do indeed, they had paid in a civil— it system. they do indeed, they had paid in a civil case _ it system. they do indeed, they had paid in a civil case around _ it system. they do indeed, they had paid in a civil case around £58 - paid in a civil case around £58 million to around 550 sub—postmasters, they have accepted it and apologised. the next interesting phases whether the director of public prosecutions decides whether they want to take this further because the officials in charge, fujitsu, encode claimed there was nothing wrong with the system, there weren't problems and they didn't know anything about any problems but there has been evidence coming out, e—mails which suggested perhaps they did know so that that the next stage, whether the director of public prosecutions will want to take this further.— take this further. thank you very much. the world's first commercial mission aimed at cleaning up so—called �*spacejunk�* has taken off today. elsa—d took off from kazakhstan, but is being
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operated from a control centre, 3,000 miles away — in oxford. our science correspondent, jonathan amos, reports. there are now millions of pieces of discarded metal and other materials in orbit — everything from old rocket segments to accidentally dropped astronaut tools, even flecks of paint. the fear is that unless we start taking some of the bigger litter items out of the sky, they could hit and destroy the active satellites that provide our communications and weather forecasts. the international astroscale company, with a division in the uk, will demonstrate how this can be done. it'll use one satellite to magnetically grab another, a dummy in this instance, and pull it down to earth. the manoeuvres will be complex and the demonstration will have to take care that it doesn't itself produce unnecessary debris. the key bit is to capture a tumbling object. so if a satellite fails, it can quite easily start tumbling, you know, about maybe all three axes. and that makes it considerably
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harder to capture it. so that is our key technology. but also we are going to show a lot of autonomous control. astroscale is hoping a vibrant market will emerge this decade in which spacecraft owners contract other operators to either service and repair hardware in orbit, or tow it out of harm's way. this should keep orbits free and safe for everyone to continue using. jonathan amos, bbc news. the largest asteroid to pass by earth this year reached its closest point earlier this morning, giving astronomers an opportunity to observe a space rock that formed at the dawn of the solar system. the asteroid — which was first discovered 20 years ago — is about 900 metres in diameter. the american space agency nasa says that at its nearest point, it was still two million kilometres away. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood
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hello. as we go through this week, the weather will turn unsettled, weather, windier, colder on friday before temperatures pick up as we head into saturday. today, what we haveis head into saturday. today, what we have is a bright afternoon across the east and the south of the country, some sunshine, variable amounts of cloud but the club thicker in the west and the north, they enough at for some drizzle. you see into the likes of aberdeen shah, lothian and the borders we see some sunshine. cloud in northern ireland, west wales, north—east england seeing some sunshine, hazy at times for parts of the midland, moving into southern england, back into the sunshine again. hazy in the channel islands. overnight we start to see more cloud develop, less of a chance of seeing some frost this coming night and still we have a shower is coming in across western areas. these are the overnight low
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temperatures. between three and 8 degrees. that's how we store the day tomorrow. on a fairly cloudy note. again, showers out towards the west. the high pressure that's been dominating the weather of late and giving us settled conditions pulls away onto the near continent allowing this atlantic front to come in, and look at the isobars, close together, it tells you it will be windy, especially in the north—west of the uk. a lot of cloud tomorrow, some breaks in north—east england, north—east scotland, showers followed by this weather from bringing rain to northern ireland and western scotland, gusts of wind around the western isles about 55—60 miles an hour, temperatures between nine and 12 degrees. that weather front coming from the west will sink south during the night, resting across parts of england and wales during wednesday. throwing cloud into the south—east. behind it, dry and bright weather with sunshine, this next system coming in across western areas again, introducing some more rain. as we move from
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wednesday into thursday, we continue with the unsettled theme. still a fair bit of cloud around, some sunny skies, showers in the west before this next system comes from the atlantic bringing in yet more rain. atlantic bringing in yet more rain. a breeze coming from the south—west as well. these are the temperatures, eight in the north, 1a as we push down towards the london area.
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netherlands this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. sirens. police vans are set on fire and officers are hurt, as a protest in bristol in western england against plans to give the police more powers over demonstrations turns violent. i would say that the people who were down here, so say protesting, were disgraceful criminals. they were hell—bent on causing the sort of damage that you've described and despite our efforts, our patience, a violent mob erupted from it. there is just a few hours now since there is just a few hours now since the final protesters were eventually disbursed here in bristol. the clean-no _ disbursed here in bristol. the clean-no is — disbursed here in bristol. the clean-up is well _ disbursed here in bristol. the clean—up is well under way in what was the plea say, the most violent night the city has seen in decades. borisjohnson is set
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to speak to eu leaders this

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