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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 27, 2021 11:00pm-11:30pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. more than 100 people are reported to have been shot dead in myanmar on the bloodiest day of protests yet against the military junta. lockdown eases in wales — the first uk nation to lift travel restrictions within its borders. germany's health minister says, he'd like an immediate lockdown to stem the rising tide of coronavirus infections. fierce fighting is reported in northern mozambique between islamists and government forces near major gas works. and work continues to refloat the giant container ship blocking egypt's suez canal, initial investigation suggests the vessel grounded
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due to strong winds. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. more than 100 people including children are reported to have been killed by security forces in myanmar, on the deadliest day since last month's military takeover. us, uk and eu officials have condemned the violence, with the british foreign secretary, dominic raab calling it a "new low". laura bicker reports. defiant, determined and undaunted, even when faced with bullets. they scream in protest,
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armed with sticks and slingshots. street battles sprung up in over a0 towns and cities across the country. protesters sheltered behind makeshift barriers in their neighbourhoods, but the gunfire at times two other cars here. attempts were made to save as many lives as possible. the applause here offering hope to these makeshift medics but casualties including children were reported across the country, making it the bloodiest day since the army seized power on the 1st of february. the military turned in its own people on what was supposed to be a national holiday to honour the armed forces. myanmar�*s british ambassador said the security forces have disgraced themselves. as general min aung hlaing inspected the troops in a grand parade, he said he would protect the country from danger. he blames protesters for the violence and a tv message warned they would be shot
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in the head. translation: violent acts that affect stability - and security in order to make demands are inappropriate. but the people of myanmar appear ready to continue their protest, and fight for democracy to be restored, whatever the cost. laura bicker, bbc news. let's have a look back at the events that led to saturday's bloodshed. myanmar held a general election in november —— where ms suu kyi's party secured enough seats in parliament to form the next government. on february first, she was detained along with other officials, as the military seized control. in the next few days, protesters took to the streets in the first such protests of their kind. the us imposed sanctions on the military leader and other officials on february 11th.
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nearly a week later, the uk and canada followed with their own sanctions. but on february 26, an election official appointed by the military declared the november election results invalid. and protests have continued since, with march 14th becoming the bloodiest day before saturday —— 7a protesters were killed across the country then. derek mitchell was the us ambassador to myanmar from 2012 to 2016 he says it's necessary for the international community to continue putting pressure on the military regime, to end the violence in the country, but strong—worded statements alone are not enough. there needs to be much more international action and solidarity. different countries may do different things. the united states are imposing sanctions. the uk in the eu
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have followed in turn, that kind of pressure is very important to cut off funds, weapons, access to the family and things that they care about. but i think the neighbours, japan, india, even china, the study brutality and the steady degradation of the conditions on the ground are leading to a potential failed state in the heart of asia. and that is in no 1's interest. it can cross borders, it will be damaging and it can have all of them to put some further pressure, but also some very urgent engagement, ratchet up the urgency of their engagement to get the generals to think about an alternative path. there's much more reporting and analysis of the situation in myanmar on our website. that includes eyewitness testimony —— and the work of our colleagues at bbc burmese. just go to bbc.co.uk/news for all that. it's also all available on the bbc
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news app for mobiles and tablets. wales has become the first nation in the uk to relax the covid lockdown measures, which have been in place since december. the �*stay local�* rule has been scrapped in favour of unlimited travel within wales —— and groups of six people from two households can now meet up outdoors in private gardens. next week will see some rules change in england and scotland too. 0ur wales correspondent, tomas morgan has this report. things are beginning to look a little brighter in wales today. as beaches across the nation are open once again. travel is allowed, much to the delight of these visitors to barry island. breath of fresh air. the kids love being out here, ice—cream and chips. it feels amazing. really hot. being out with our family. tourism has also partially re—opened.
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a welcome relief for the mcleer family, who have travelled to saundersfoot after being in lockdown in merthyr tydfil since 19th december. we started off this morning at 8:15, the traffic was very good, weather was very good. we got down here at about quarter to ten. we were saying, you know, "we've escaped, we've escaped." there is that feeling. although travel within wales is permitted, crossing the border either way is still not allowed, other than for work, childcare or emergencies. some holiday premises rely heavy on the english coming here. however, the prospect of any tourists coming back is good news for those in the industry. getting the owners back today will really help bring the park back to life. we only have a handful of local owners, of people within the county, but even so, that is a start to the season where we can start looking forward to getting back to some sort of normality. last year when restrictions began to lift, beauty spots across wales were flooded.
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today, people were more cautious, planning their visits carefully. i was here five in the morning and i think there was only two other cars here. but i think it's more of a shock, knowing everyone's still in the phase of kind of going, "is it real? "are we allowed out now? is it ok to go out?" national parks and natural resources wales have asked people to be sensible. along with travel, six people from two households are also able to meet outside from this weekend and organised outdoor activities and sports for under 18s can resume. any travel further afield will be discussed at the welsh government's next three weekly review on thursday. but for now, an ice—cream on the sand will do in this glorious welsh sunshine. tomos morgan, bbc news, south wales. while wales is relaxing controls —— the german health minister has said, he would like the country to enter
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an immediate and complete lockdown, to slow the spread of coronavirus. 0ur correspondent in berlin, damian mcguinness, says the call from jens spahn has galvanised support for a new national shutdown. lots of countries want the health minister, they say we need a lot done, that tends to build happens. germany, bit more complicated because the political system the federal system here, you the federal system here, you have to co—ordinate an awful lot of political actors to make something like this happen. so it may not necessarily happen, but the fact that he has no quite clearly stated or put his support towards a complete shutdown of the country for at least for up to two weeks, it is his proposal over easter, that really adds the momentum, because we were seeing in germany since this past week a confusion over whether germany is going to lockdown over easter and over what form of what restrictions with god, different regions do different things and people who are confused and since the come up on
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one hand, —— we've got. quite frankly, the yearfor one hand, —— we've got. quite frankly, the year for restrictions, on one hand growing calls for a proper lockdown and from a brief period last year, for most of the past year, germany has not really seen the sort of restrictions that we have seen in the uk or parts of europe. so what people are saying now is with this exponential rise in the infections that a complete lockdown of some form is looking increasingly unavoidable in the fact that the health minister is also of that the health minister is also of that opinion doesn't make it more likely than it was even this morning. —— does. now let's turn to mozambique in southern africa —— where there are reports that islamist militants have seized control of a strategic town, palma,
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in the north of the country. security forces say government troops have been forced to withdraw —— and a huge gas installation run by international oil companies is now under rebel control. 0ur correspondent, catherine byaruhanga has this update. the latest information we have an northeastern mozambique is that there appears to be a lot of casualties from three to four days of this battle over the town. and we've heard from eyewitnesses that there have been dead bodies lying on there have been dead bodies lying on the road sides, by the beach and the real concerns that the fatalities around this attack. we real concerns that the fatalities around this attack.— real concerns that the fatalities around this attack. we heard there was a huge — around this attack. we heard there was a huge grow) _ around this attack. we heard there was a huge group of _ around this attack. we heard there was a huge group of local- around this attack. we heard there was a huge group of local and - was a huge group of local and foreign workers trapped in a hotel that are trying to get out, what happened was 7 ?pb ? pb had a group of foreign workers and even local— ? pb had a group of foreign workers and even local residents _ ? pb had a group of foreign workers and even local residents in - ? pb had a group of foreign workers and even local residents in parma i and even local residents in parma who all emigrated to the hotel, they
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were trapped there for two days and on friday, they tried to make a break for it and try to get to the beach and hopefully onto boats that would take them to safety. but we understand is from people on the ground, that this convoy came under attack twice and at least seven of the vehicles were hit and some of the vehicles were hit and some of the people try to run back to the hotel and others, we understand, did to get out of parma. her manage to get out of parma. her right now, it is very hard to verify numbers. it right now, it is very hard to verify numbers. ,., , ~' numbers. it sounds like the government _ numbers. it sounds like the government has _ numbers. it sounds like the government has lost - numbers. it sounds like the | government has lost control numbers. it sounds like the - government has lost control there. this is what a lot of people are telling us, some are even relatives of those in this attack and a lot of us saw this happening, even though there had been relative calm in this part of mozambique, we did not expect an attack like this to happen and questions as to why mozambique
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forces were not prepared to handle such an attack, there's also questions for the international companies that send workers to parma and villages and towns like this, there was a question about allies. in countries that have citizens in this location. for example, south africa, the uk, zimbabwe, are they doing enough to make sure that their citizens are safe and right now, there are a lot of questions and a lot of anger. in england — a couple of hundred people have gathered in front of brighton police station as part of a protest against the government's policing bill. some demonstartors held posters, including signs that read "kill the bill" and "defund the police". police say they have temporarily closed the front office of the police station. the bill, which is making its way through parliament, would give
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police further power to limit protests in england and wales. the headlines on bbc news. more than 100 people are reported to have been shot dead in myanmar on the bloodiest day of protests yet against the militaryjunta. lockdown eases in wales — the first uk nation to lift travel restrictions within its borders. fierce fighting is reported from northern mozambique between islamists and government forces near major gas works. the giant container ship blocking egypt's suez canal remains stuck after high tide on saturday failed to dislodge it. more than 300 ships are waiting on either side of the ever given, which became stranded on tuesday. 0ur correspondent sally nabil was given access to see the work underway to free the ship. the operation to refloat the giant container ship blocking one
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of the world's busiest waterways, continues into the night in egypt's red sea. tug boats and dredgers have been operating here around the clock to try and dislodge this giant ship that has been blocking the suez canal for the past few days. we understand that huge amounts of sand have been removed to make room for the ship to move. congestion continues to pile up in this strategic waterway, and the longer this ship is stuck here, the more disruption there will be to global trade. a vast trafficjam continues to build, with more than 300 ships stuck on either side of the vessel, which is holding up £7 billion worth of goods each day. strong wind had been given as the reason for the grounding of the ever given, but today officials suggested other factors
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could have been to blame. translation: there could be a lot of mistakes but we can't _ say what they are now. the only mistake we can be sure of now is the wind and the sandstorm. this is not the main one, like i said, but the rest will become clearer in the investigation. tonight, the ship's manager said initial investigations suggested strong winds led to its grounding. more tug boats will arrive on sunday to help, with all efforts focused on freeing up the canal as soon as possible. sally nabil, bbc news, suez. sal mercogliano is an expert in maritime history at campbell university, north carolina. he explained what the best options are for freeing the grounded ship. i think the salvage work is the elite force in marine salvage.
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they're the best of the best. the problem with salvage of the vessel of the sizes we've never experienced a vessel of the size doing what it's done, bowing to asia and hanging its turn onto africa. it puts in a very precarious position. you worry about the stresses, the whole cracking, the stresses, the whole cracking, the departments and this requires time and very methodical work and unfortunately, putting a lot of work to move the vessel quickly and i could have catastrophic results of we are —— are not very careful. jailed kremlin critic, alexei navalny, has said that being woken up by a guard every hour during the night, amounts to torture and that his appeals for medical attention have been refused in a deliberate attempt to wear him down. the opposition politician — perhaps the most prominent critic of president putin — has been jailed for two and a half years, in connection
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with a case he says, was fabricated to thwart his political activities. vladimir asurkov, mr navalny�*s friend and executive director of his anti—corruption foundation. from what we know, his health has deteriorated with pain in his back and limited movement in one of his legs. and he has been subjected to torture in the form of sleep deprivation, every hour during the night, he is woken up by a guard. according to regulations and russian prisons, the prisoners should get on interrupted eight hours sleep. we have announced in protests, and we are collecting peoples signatures. the goal is to get 500,000 people to
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sign up to this mass protest that will take place all over russia and once we get to that number, which will be unprecedented in the history of the region, this protest in russia, we will announce the date for this demonstration. a nine—storey apartment building in cairo has collapsed, killing at least five people and injuring more than twenty others. rescue workers have been trying to pull people from the rubble. this is the latest in a series of building disasters in recent years in egypt — often caused by safety regulations being flouted. brazil has recorded three— thousand— six— hundred— and— fifty deaths from covid nineteen in twenty—four hours its highest daily figure since the pandemic began. coronavirus infections are spreading rapidly across much of the country,
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driven by a new variant that is thought to be more contagious. thousands of women have demonstrated in istanbul, calling on the turkish government to reverse its decision to pull out of an treaty designed to protect women from domestic violence. women's rights groups say the istanbul convention saves lives. it's considered one of the most important pieces of early renaissance art — the adoration of the mystic lamb — or the ghent altarpiece. painted by brothers jan and hubert vun ighk, it dates back to the early fifteenth century. recently restored — it's gone on display in a new state—of—the—art setting — as tim allman explains. this isn't so much a painting, more an overwhelming visual spectacle. 12 canvases, works of exquisite detail. a depiction of veneration, devotion and sacrifice.
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translation: they were painted very meticulously, down - to the smallest details. if you look closely, you can see that in the buildings, there are people in the windows, horses in the street. everything is painted so meticulously you wonder how were they able to do such a thing in 1432? the altarpiece was undoubtedly magnificent. its location, less so. officials at the cathedral along with the local government spent more than $35 million to spruce things up. virtual reality headsets will allow you to step back in time, relating a 600—year history. napoleon, the king of prussia and adolf hitler have all coveted this artistic masterpiece. it's a miracle that it still exists. otherwise, you only see texts on what has happened with it. with this augmented reality, we can really bring visitors to this past so they can experience themselves with their eyes what has happened.
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the covid pandemic means that, for now, visitor numbers will be limited, but soon enough the ghent altarpiece will be on display for everyone, in all its glory. tim allman, bbc news. now millions of people in the uk are giving their boots, tennis whites, and golf clubs a clean — ready for outdoor, grassroots sports being allowed again. from today in wales and monday in england, it follows the restart in scotland earlier this month, and, in northern ireland there's only until next thursday to wait before some activites can resume. it's the 3rd time, in 9 months that grassroots sports have emerged from a shutdown —— as mike bushell reports. it is time to say goodbye to those workouts. farewell to cloud coaching sections on zoom in the
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backyard, outside again for the return of grassroots ports and for most of us, the first time this year. they'll be beating dad at goal again, on monday, they can be reunited with her team—mates and played proper matches once more. i'm really excited, football has been a big part of my life. so i'm just really happy to have it back. it gives you that freedom, like an escape from reality being able to run round and not caring about what is going on. pretty much lost over half the year to know footballi at all and they are not seeing each other, they are getting _ very anxious at home i so it is getting fresh air, exercise, having fun playing with each other again. - i first came to the pitches at harbour town football club last july as grassroots sport started to come back after the first lockdown. i remember seeing the relief, enthusiasm, excitement on the faces of players of all ages and no one thought there would be further months when the pitches would fall empty. it mentally drains you, whether you are young or an adult,
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you suffer your mental well—being. and the mental well—being is a key to social communication and social participation. it'll take a while to get used to the stuff— it'll take a while to get used to the stuff again, but i think we'll be all_ the stuff again, but i think we'll be all right. it the stuff again, but i think we'll be all right-_ be all right. it will feel more normal that _ be all right. it will feel more normal that it _ be all right. it will feel more normal that it is _ be all right. it will feel more normal that it is now, - be all right. it will feel more normal that it is now, we . be all right. it will feel more| normal that it is now, we get be all right. it will feel more . normal that it is now, we get to actually see people and get a little bit closer to people because you are playing football. ill bit closer to people because you are playing football-— playing football. ill be more immediate _ playing football. ill be more immediate this _ playing football. ill be more immediate this time - playing football. ill be more immediate this time with i playing football. ill be more - immediate this time with safety protocols still followed, team sports can be resumed today in wales and for monday with contact allowed in training and for matches played early next month. training can also include some contact, and this would be the same and much to start again. sport england since all outdoor activities that are not considered high risk can start up again for monday with northern ireland opening up monday with northern ireland opening up more gradually from next
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thursday. this follows the restart earlier this month in scotland as people across the uk embrace some freedom again. part people across the uk embrace some freedom again-— freedom again. part of the three very excited _ freedom again. part of the three very excited people, _ freedom again. part of the three very excited people, trish - freedom again. part of the three very excited people, trish and i very excited people, trish and tracy, — very excited people, trish and tracy. you _ very excited people, trish and tracy, you are a visually impaired to the _ tracy, you are a visually impaired to the store, this could be the last time _ to the store, this could be the last time if— to the store, this could be the last time if the — to the store, this could be the last time if the chat about this, the return— time if the chat about this, the return on— time if the chat about this, the return on zoom. to time if the chat about this, the return on zoom.— time if the chat about this, the return on zoom. to be able to get back on call— return on zoom. to be able to get back on call and _ return on zoom. to be able to get back on call and not _ return on zoom. to be able to get back on call and not play - return on zoom. to be able to get back on call and not play tennis i return on zoom. to be able to get back on call and not play tennis in my front — back on call and not play tennis in my front room. _ back on call and not play tennis in my front room, and _ back on call and not play tennis in my front room, and zoom - back on call and not play tennis in my front room, and zoom and - my front room, and zoom and everything _ my front room, and zoom and everything will— my front room, and zoom and everything will be _ my front room, and zoom and everything will be totally - my front room, and zoom and - everything will be totally amazing. i am everything will be totally amazing. i am so _ everything will be totally amazing. i am so excited, _ everything will be totally amazing. i am so excited, i— everything will be totally amazing. i am so excited, i cannot- everything will be totally amazing. i am so excited, i cannot wait- everything will be totally amazing. i am so excited, i cannot wait to l i am so excited, i cannot wait to jump i am so excited, i cannot wait to jump back into that cold water and it's just really important for my mental well—being and so, nothing is quite doesn't like swimming. i mental well-being and so, nothing is quite doesn't like swimming.- quite doesn't like swimming. i think i'm most looking _ quite doesn't like swimming. i think i'm most looking forward _ quite doesn't like swimming. i think i'm most looking forward to - quite doesn't like swimming. i think| i'm most looking forward to standing on the _ i'm most looking forward to standing on the first— i'm most looking forward to standing on the first tee with the group of my friends— on the first tee with the group of my friends and really, i suppose hoping _ my friends and really, i suppose hoping that i can still hit a decent write _ hoping that i can still hit a decent write down— hoping that i can still hit a decent write down on the first fairway. there's — write down on the first fairway. there's so _ write down on the first fairway. there's so much more optimism when
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many grassroots clubs felt they would not survive, the vast majority have things to grants and loans. but until they can start raising funds tjy until they can start raising funds by holding indoor functions again, it's going to be an ongoing battle. the financial income has gone back and we have to seek local sponsorship to fill that hole. there's a tendency before locked out not to support local events and people have learned that if they do not support the local businesses and local events, then they will melt away. local events, then they will melt awa . ~ local events, then they will melt awa , ~ , ., local events, then they will melt awa. away. we can show off the new tricks and skills that _ away. we can show off the new tricks and skills that we _ away. we can show off the new tricks and skills that we have _ away. we can show off the new tricks and skills that we have learned - and skills that we have learned during lockdown. talents however bizarre that we never knew we had, will be there again. and we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers
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with our reviewers penny smith and martin lipton — that's coming up after the headlines at 11:30. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good evening. the clocks spring forward an hour tonight and the temperatures? well, they are set to spring upwards over the next few days. the rain has already arrived and the band of rain to start sunday across parts of northern england, wales and northern ireland. the rain will be heavy across high ground and some brightness for north—east scotland. 0n the side light picture, a lot of clout extending out to the atlantic and that is heading in our direction, heavy rain through tonight across northern ireland and scotland, some of that into northwest england and wales as well, very strong gusty winds across north western parts of the uk. milder than it was with 69 degrees but many spots will start cloudy, certainly the area which will be with some showers. 0ur band of rain will push northwards in that room really setting and across western scotland in eastern scotland should see some brightness and some southern parts
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of england in south wales should brighten upjust a of england in south wales should brighten up just a little. of england in south wales should brighten upjust a little. wendy with gusts of a0 to 50 miles, a little warmer in up to 60 degrees and parts of eastern england. as we head into the evening, became and rain, particularly up towards the northwest, it stays quite windy but do not forget, you can extra hour of light, the sun is setting at 736 in the evening there in manchester. as we have through sunday night into monday, this wrinkling frontal system will bring further ran across northern areas, particularly northwest scotland and to the south, we will start to see some really warm airfor the we will start to see some really warm airforthe time we will start to see some really warm airfor the time of we will start to see some really warm air for the time of year. we will start to see some really warm airfor the time of year. so you can see we have the cloud and rain on monday, especially for high grounds in western scotland, for the south and east, the best of the function lifting with temperatures to 21 degrees in norwich and in tuesday, which could be warmer still, england and wales seen plenty of sunshine and some of that into northern ireland and southern
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eastern scotland, still that ran for northwest scotland and looking at the top temperatures on tuesday. 22, maybe 23 degrees. but don't get too used to it. another big change on the way from midweek onwards towards the way from midweek onwards towards the easter weekend, this frontal system sinks southward, cordero plunges back and from the north, quite a range of temperatures this week. london, for example, 23 on tuesday and down to 9 degrees by good friday.
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hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment — first the headlines. lockdown eases in wales — the first uk nation to lift travel restrictions within its borders.

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