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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 28, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news — i'm lewis vaughanjones. our top stories. the international community expresses horror at the killing of dozens of protestors by security forces in myanmar. fierce fighting is reported in northern mozambique between islamists and government forces near giant gas projects in the north of the country. thousands of women protest in turkey against president erdogan�*s decision to withdraw from a treaty on preventing gender—based violence. a huge container ship remains stuck in the suez canal despite hopes that it would be dislodged by the high tide.
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we start with another day of bloodshed on the streets of myanmar. world leaders have expressed outrage at the killing of dozens of protestors, on what was the deadliest day since last month's military coup. the un secretary general antonio guterres said the violence was unacceptable and demanded a resolute international response. our correspondent laura bicker has this report from bangkok. defiant, determined and undaunted. armed with wooden sticks and slingshots. they scream in protest as the bullets continue to fly. street battles sprung up in over a0 towns and cities. some sheltered behind makeshift barriers in their neighbourhoods but the gunfire at times appeared relentless.
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attempts were made to save as many lives as possible. the applause here offering hope to these makeshift medics but casualties including children were reported across the country, making it the bloodiest day since the army seized power on the 1st of february. the military turned in its own people on what was supposed to be a national holiday to honour the armed forces. myanmar�*s british ambassador said the security forces have disgraced themselves. as general min aung hlaing inspected the troops in a grand parade, he said he would protect the country from danger. he blames protesters for the violence and a tv message warned they would be shot in the head. translation: violent acts that affect stability - and security in order to make demands are inappropriate. but the people of myanmar appear ready to continue
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their protest, and fight for democracy to be restored, whatever the cost. laura bicker, bbc news. tom andrews is the un special rapporteur on human rights, and he's been briefing the un's human rights council. he's in washington. thank you for coming on the programme. what is your response most of all to the latest bloodshed on the streets of myanmar?— latest bloodshed on the streets of myanmar? this armed forces da is a of myanmar? this armed forces day is a day _ of myanmar? this armed forces day is a day of — of myanmar? this armed forces day is a day of infamy, - of myanmar? this armed forces day is a day of infamy, the - day is a day of infamy, the brutality and the horror of this military seems to know no bounds whatsoever. it is just completely outrageous, what's going on in myanmar as we speak. going on in myanmar as we seak. ~ . ., speak. we have had international - speak. we have had - international condemnation, speak. we have had _ international condemnation, but to be honest, we have had that for quite a while now. nothing seems to be happening.-
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seems to be happening. well, that's right. — seems to be happening. well, that's right, that's _ seems to be happening. well, that's right, that's a _ seems to be happening. well, that's right, that's a fair- that's right, that's a fair statement. it seems particularly if you are in myanmar, words of condemnation are beginning to ring hollow. what the people of myanmar would like and desperately need is for the international community not to just condemn but also to take action and to hold this military fully accountable. there are many things that can be done that have not been done and should be done. �* , ., ., have not been done and should be done. �*, ., ., ,., be done. let's get down to some secifics, be done. let's get down to some specifics. what — be done. let's get down to some specifics, what are _ be done. let's get down to some specifics, what are some - be done. let's get down to some specifics, what are some of- be done. let's get down to some specifics, what are some of the l specifics, what are some of the concrete things you think could and should be done?— concrete things you think could and should be done? let's start with the united _ and should be done? let's start with the united nations - with the united nations security council, that is why the security council exists, to deal with just such crises. this has not come before the security council for a debate and a resolution and a boat, it should, that is what they are there for. if they can't act for whatever reason, it is important for those countries willing to take action to work together to co—ordinate a full range of options including
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tough locust sanctions that working together can have a cumulative impact. —— a resolution and a vote. cumulative impact. -- a resolution and a vote. you talk about like _ resolution and a vote. you talk about like minded _ resolution and a vote. you talk about like minded countries i about like minded countries coming together and agreeing sanctions, that is what you think should happen? well, that's right. _ think should happen? well, that's right, it _ think should happen? well, that's right, it has - think should happen? well, that's right, it has to - think should happen? well, that's right, it has to be - think should happen? well, that's right, it has to be an| that's right, it has to be an emergency summit of countries willing to take action if the security council can't take action. there are dozens of various sanctions on regimes around the world. we need to co—ordinate them and focus them together so they will have the strongest possible punishment. to direct themselves to the source of revenue flowing into the pockets of this regime and empowering its brutality. find empowering its brutality. and to be clear. — empowering its brutality. and to be clear, part _ empowering its brutality. and to be clear, part of— empowering its brutality. and to be clear, part of the reason you think the united nations security council may not be the route is because of the positions of china and russia? well, that's right. people
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expect and predict that if it comes to a vote, russia and china would veto it. first of all, china has been making some statements, they have condemned the violence at least, they have called for the release of political prisoners. so i'm not sure how they would vote if it happened. and i don't know how russia would vote, but that is the point, it has not been before the security council, i think it should and that china, russia and all of the other members should stand up and be counted one way or another. get a bit more _ counted one way or another. get a bit more clarity on the economic sanctions you were talking about. are you confident that if the international community got together to try to cut off international funding to any institutions and organisations funding the myanmar government, and the funds going to prop up the militaryjudge, would that work, would it be enough? i think it would be a very, very important step. i think the key
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is the people in myanmar, it's extraordinary what they are doing, the civil disobedience movement is powerful, growing, tenacious, creative. that ultimately is whether success is to come, but they are reliant on the support of the international community. $1 billion alone each year going to the pockets of the generals from the oil and gas industry. if we stop that flow of oil and gas revenue into their pockets, that would make a big difference, as well as cutting off revenue in the various businesses and conglomerates they have control over. by itself, it's not going to end this brutality, but taken together, we have a real shot at making a big dent in what is going on and changing the trajectory of this horrible nightmare.— nightmare. that is really interesting, _ nightmare. that is really interesting, i _ nightmare. that is really interesting, i am - nightmare. that is really i interesting, i am interested nightmare. that is really - interesting, i am interested to get a concrete number on the kind of impact it would have. clearly, the moral pressure, international words of condemnation hasn't come close to changing the course of the events within the country. i
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know it's slightly woolly, but optimism and pessimism, are you optimistic that actually in the course of the coming days and weeks, something can be done to change the course of what's happening and stop these deaths on the streets? i happening and stop these deaths on the streets?— on the streets? i am terrified that unless — on the streets? i am terrified that unless there _ on the streets? i am terrified that unless there is _ on the streets? i am terrified that unless there is a - that unless there is a refocused emergency summit, international summit, refocused emergency summit, internationalsummit, on refocused emergency summit, international summit, on this crisis where all the power that we can possibly muster is focused diplomatically, politically, economically on this crisis, i am terrified of what is going to happen, this could be the beginning of a wave of brutality that is going to be even more shocking that what we have seen today. that is a really _ what we have seen today. that is a really powerful _ is a really powerful way to end, thank you very much were coming on, tom andrews. fighting in mozambique is continuing between islamist militants and government forces near giant gas projects
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in the north of the country. the french news agency quotes security sources as saying the jihadists have seized the town of palma. the french energy group total has suspended plans to resume work at its nearby facility. our correspondent catherine byaruhanga has this update. so, when the attack began, you had a group of foreign workers, and then even local residents in palma who were all congregated at the hotel. they had been trapped there for two days, and finally, on friday, they tried to make a break for it to try to get to the beach and hopefully onto boats that would take them to safety. now, what we understand from people on the ground is that this convoy came under attack twice, at least seven of the vehicles were hit. some of the people tried to run back to the hotel, others we understand did eventually manage to get out of palma. but right now, it is very hard to verify numbers. witnesses claim parts of the northern town of palma in mozambique have been
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destroyed with bodies lying in the streets. security analysts say the islamist group al shabab, based in somalia, trained the insurgents and they now say this group has now pledged allegiance to isis and is proving to be better prepared and equipped than expected. as we heard, french energy giant total has had to suspend production at its natural gas plant near palma. the company says none of its workers were victims of the fighting. the government is under increasing pressure to get the violence under control. al venter is a warjournalist, author of 50 books and also served as africa and middle east correspondent forjane's international defence review. he's in southern england. thank you for coming on the programme. thank you for coming on the programme-— programme. it's a pleasure. details of — programme. it's a pleasure. details of exactly _ programme. it's a pleasure. details of exactly what - programme. it's a pleasure. details of exactly what is . details of exactly what is happening are quite difficult to come across. could you sketch out in the first instance what we know is happening right now? right, we
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are dealing _ happening right now? right, we are dealing with _ happening right now? right, we are dealing with an _ happening right now? right, we are dealing with an incredibly i are dealing with an incredibly efficient insurgent force. the russians sent in a mercenary group 18 months ago, 2019. they lasted three months, they went in with gigantic heavy freighters, infantry fighting vehicles and helicopters and the lock. or modern equipment, radio communications, electronics, it didn't last, they couldn't take it. i believe some of the helicopters were shot down. the biggest eventin were shot down. the biggest event in the last 2a hours is the french foreign legion has now sent into the area. they have a large base in the indian ocean about 350 kilometres from the border with mozambique.
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they are there ostensibly to help french citizens and others, but they have come up against some pretty restrictive actions by this movement, which is part of islamic state. a lot of people are not aware of the fact that a large number of islamic state personnel have moved from asia, from iraq and syria, to africa. they are fighting at the moment central african republic and elsewhere. on that, is there a mismatch now between the sophistication and the drive of this islamist group against government forces, which don't seem to have this in anywhere near under control at the moment? government forces are totally inept. they can't handle the situation, they haven't been able to handle it. they have a reputation for running when the fighting gets top. they did so when other areas were attacked
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in the north. it seems they are not able to handle the situation.— not able to handle the situation. , . . , situation. given that, in any kind of containment, - situation. given that, in any kind of containment, it i situation. given that, in any kind of containment, it will| kind of containment, it will rely on support from the international community? well, there is a ukrainian _ international community? well, there is a ukrainian helicopter. there is a ukrainian helicopter combat group that was supposed to have... they went in yesterday, and i heard tonight from one of the helicopter pilots that one of their helicopter gunships had been shot down. following that, they all returned to their base and refused to do actions. the only effective air cover, well, it's not really affected because it is tiny, is the dag mercenary group, who were supposed to have left the country three days ago and the mozambique government said, please stay and help us out, and they have done so. we spoke to somebody
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from that group and he confirmed that a convoy this morning, following the attack around the hotel in parma, had got all the people together, as many as they could, into 28 vehicles, which was ambushed, and only seven of the vehicles got back. so right now, you have hundreds of ex—pats and others, including british, hiding in thejungle others, including british, hiding in the jungle from these insurgents. hiding in the “ungle from these insurgents.— hiding in the “ungle from these insuruents. . ~ , . insurgents. thank you very much for bringing _ insurgents. thank you very much for bringing us — insurgents. thank you very much for bringing us up-to-date i insurgents. thank you very much for bringing us up-to-date with l for bringing us up—to—date with what is happening, al. let's get some of the day's other news. thousands of women have demonstrated in istanbul, calling on the turkish government to reverse its decision to pull out of a treaty designed to protect women from domestic violence. women's rights groups say the istanbul
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convention saves lives. at least 16 people are now known to have died after a nine—storey building collapsed in the egyptian capital, cairo, in the early hours of saturday. the city's governor has called for surrounding buildings to be inspected in case they, too, are at risk. some local residents have suggested building work being carried out on the ground floor may have caused the collapse. brazil has recorded 3,650 deaths from covid—19 in the latest 24—hour period — its highest daily figure since the pandemic began. coronavirus infections are spreading rapidly across much of the country, driven by a new variant, which is thought to be more contagious. let's get an update on the ship stuck in the suez canal now. it's still stuck. high tide on saturday wasn't enough to dislodge it. more than 300 ships are waiting either side of the ever given, which became stranded on tuesday. our correspondent sally nabil was given access
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to the operation trying to free the ship. the operation to refloat the giant container ship blocking one of the world's busiest waterways, continues into the night in egypt's red sea. tug boats and dredgers have been operating here around the clock to try and dislodge this giant ship that has been blocking the suez canal for the past few days. we understand that huge amounts of sand have been removed to make room for the ship to move. congestion continues to pile up in this strategic waterway, and the longer this ship is stuck here, the more disruption there will be to global trade. a vast trafficjam continues to build, with more than 300 ships stuck on either side of the vessel, which is holding up £7 billion worth of goods each day. strong wind had been given
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as the reason for the grounding of the ever given, but today officials suggested other factors could have been to blame. translation: there could be a lot of mistakes but we can'tl say what they are now. the only mistake we can be sure of now is the wind and the sandstorm. this is not the main one, like i said, but the rest will become clearer in the investigation. tonight, the ship's manager said initial investigations suggested strong winds led to its grounding. more tug boats will arrive on sunday to help, with all efforts focused on freeing up the canal as soon as possible. sally nabil, bbc news, suez. the international community has expressed horror at the killing of dozens of protestors by the security forces in myanmar — on what was the deadliest day since last month's
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military coup. diplomatic sources in mozambique say fighting is continuing between islamist militants and government forces near giant gas projects in the north of the country. let's get an update on the coronavirus in europe now. wales has become to the first nation in the uk to relax lockdown measures which have been in place since december. the �*stay local�* rule has been scrapped in favour of unlimited travel within wales. groups of six people from two households can meet up outdoors in private gardens. next week will see some rules change in england and scotland too. our wales correspondent tomas morgan has this report. things are beginning to look a little brighter in wales today. as beaches across the nation are open once again. travel is allowed, much to the delight of these visitors to barry island. breath of fresh air. the kids love being out here, ice—cream and chips.
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it feels amazing. really hot. being out with our family. tourism has also partially re—opened. a welcome relief for the mcleer family, who have travelled to saundersfoot after being in lockdown in merthyr tydfil since 19th december. we started off this morning at 8:15, the traffic was very good, weather was very good. we got down here at about quarter to ten. we were saying, you know, "we've escaped, we've escaped." there is that feeling. although travel within wales is permitted, crossing the border either way is still not allowed, other than for work, childcare or emergencies. some holiday premises rely heavy on the english coming here. however, the prospect of any tourists coming back is good news for those in the industry. getting the owners back today will really help bring the park back to life. we only have a handful of local owners, of people within the county, but even so,
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that is a start to the season where we can start looking forward to getting back to some sort of normality. last year when restrictions began to lift, beauty spots across wales were flooded. today, people were more cautious, planning their visits carefully. i was here five in the morning and i think there was only two other cars here. but i think it's more of a shock, knowing everyone's still in the phase of kind of going, "is it real? "are we allowed out now? is it ok to go out?" national parks and natural resources wales have asked people to be sensible. along with travel, six people from two households are also able to meet outside from this weekend and organised outdoor activities and sports for under 18s can resume. any travel further afield will be discussed at the welsh government's next three weekly review on thursday. but for now, an ice—cream on the sand will do in this glorious welsh sunshine. tomos morgan, bbc news, south wales. while wales is relaxing
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controls, the german health minister says he would like his country to enter an immediate and complete lockdown to slow the spread of coronavirus there. our correspondent in berlin, damian mcguinness, says the call from jens spahn has galvanised support for tight national restrictions. lots of countries want the health minister, they say we need a lockdown, that tends to build happens. germany, bit more complicated because the political system the federal system here, you have to co—ordinate an awful lot of political actors to make something like this happen. so it may not necessarily happen, but the fact that he has now quite clearly stated or put his support towards a complete shutdown of the country for up to two weeks, it is his proposal over easter, that really adds the momentum, because we are seeing in germany since this past week of confusion over whether germany is going to
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lockdown over easter and over what form of what restrictions we've got, different regions do different things and people here are confused and since on one hand, increasing irritation from voters over the restrictions. quite frankly, the year of restrictions, on one hand growing calls for a proper lockdown and from a brief period last year, for most of the past year, germany has not really seen the sort of restrictions that we have seen in the uk or other parts of europe. so what people are saying now is with this exponential rise in new infections that a complete lockdown of some form is looking increasingly unavoidable and the fact that the health minister is also of that opinion does make it more likely than it was even this morning. more now on the boat stranded in the suez canal. sal mercogliano is an expert in maritime history at campbell university, north carolina. my colleague philippa thomas
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asked him about the best options for freeing the vessel. we have never experienced a boat doing what it has done, this puts us in a precarious position, you have to worry about the stresses on the hull, there has been flooding in the forward compartments according to the operator, so a salvage operation like this requires time and methodical work, and unfortunately egypt is putting a lot of pressure to move the vessel very quickly but that could have catastrophic results if they are not careful.- if they are not careful. there has been _ if they are not careful. there has been some _ if they are not careful. there has been some talk- if they are not careful. there has been some talk about i if they are not careful. there i has been some talk about using helicopters to get the containers off the vessel, what do you think about that strategy?— do you think about that strategy? do you think about that strate: ? , , , ., ., do you think about that strate: ? ,, ., , strategy? the issue you have is this vessel _ strategy? the issue you have is this vessel is _
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strategy? the issue you have is this vessel is coming _ strategy? the issue you have is this vessel is coming from i this vessel is coming from asia, so all of those containers are fully loaded, a lot of the weight in those containers may be beyond the capacity of most normal helicopters. plus you have an issue with the cell guides within the containers. when you off—load it, the ship has to be perfectly level so the ship does not rub up against the cell guides, and the vessel is not in that position. they may be able to get some of the top ones off, but you have the problem with the containers being stable underneath the helicopter. being stable underneath the helic0pter-— helicopter. and if you think about all— helicopter. and if you think about all the _ helicopter. and if you think about all the boats - helicopter. and if you think about all the boats delayed helicopter. and if you think i about all the boats delayed on theirjourneys, and all of the order is made, especially online during a pandemic, a lot of the world's trade is there and it is not all inert material, there is livestock as well. , , .,. ,, well. there is livestock, perishables, _ well. there is livestock, perishables, potentiallyj perishables, potentially medicinal medicine, there may be elements all covid in there, we operate the world economy on a just in, just out type of logistics, where all of our goods arrive just as we need
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them and we can consume them, so we don't have to keep large stockpiles in stores. unfortunately when you live that type of supply system, it's very susceptible to interruptions, and damage, and interruptions, and damage, and in this case you literally have a ship across the jugular vein of the trade routes... cities around the world have been turning off their lights on saturday to mark earth hour. paris, sydney, hong kong and others have gone dark for an hour — the organisers, the world wide fund for nature, say this year's event highlights the link between the destruction of the environment and increasing outbreaks of infectious diseases. that is it for me, i will be back with the headlines in a couple of minutes. you can get
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me online, social media. i am lewis vaughan—jones. this is bbc news. the clocks spring forward an hour tonight and the temperatures? well, they are set to spring upwards over the next few days. some upwards over the next few days. warm weather, al you some warm weather, although if you are in the north—west of scotland, prepare for heavy and persistent rain which could cause some localised flooding. the rain has already arrived and the band of rain to start sunday across parts of northern england, wales and northern ireland. the rain will be heavy across high ground and some brightness for north—east scotland. further south and east, a little bit of brightness, the cloud should break up across parts of eastern england, it will be windy with gusts of 40-15, will be windy with gusts of 40—15, maybe a little stronger
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in places. but mild, even warm in places. but mild, even warm in places, with temperatures might be up to 16 degrees. through sunday evening, further rain up towards the north—west, remember the sunset will be later, nearly eight o'clock across parts of northern ireland. 7:47pm in penzance, west cornwall. on sunday night, further outbreaks of rain, becoming focused across the western parts of scotland, which is where we could see flooding. exceptionally mild, particularly across the central suede. temperatures for some, staying in double digits. monday, a wriggling frontal system will continue to bring rain towards the north. —— central suede. rain towards the north. —— centralsuede. some rain towards the north. —— central suede. some very warm airfor the central suede. some very warm airforthe time of central suede. some very warm air for the time of year. monday, cloud and rain in northern ireland, especially across western scotland. eastern scotland seeing some brightness, england and wales will have spells of sunshine, cloud breaking up. in the sunny
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skies, temperatures might even reach 21 degrees. the temperatures have further to go. tuesday, rain still in north—west scotland, we could see 200 millimetres, but further south, with the sunshine, tuesday is when temperatures could reach 23 degrees. but don't get used to it. one mid week, the frontal system will push south, opening the door to some colder air to push in from the north in time for the end of the week. look at london, 23 on tuesday, just 10 degrees for good friday.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the international community has expressed horror at the killing of dozens of protestors by the security forces in myanmar — on what was the deadliest day since last month's military coup. the us and the eu have condemned the violence as "horrifying" and "indefensible". diplomatic sources in mozambique say fighting is continuing between islamist militants and government forces near giant gas projects in the north of the country. the french news agency quotes security sources as saying the jihadists have seized the town of palma. the french energy group, total, says it has now suspended plans to resume work at its nearby facility. a giant container ship remains stuck in the suez canal despite hopes that it would be dislodged by the high tide. local authorities say it could be afloat again before monday. more than 300 ships are stuck on either side of the vessel, which became stranded on tuesday.
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now on bbc news: dateline london.

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