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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  April 5, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. boris johnson confirms another easing of england's coronavirus restrictions on monday the 12th, i will be going to the pub myself and cautiously but irreversibly raising a pint of beer to my lips. the uk prime minister has also announced that free, twice—weekly rapid testing will be available to everyone in england — and trials of a new �*covid status certification�* will start mid—april. big events, you know, getting 20,000 people into wembley on may the 15th, that's kind of thing, getting people back into a theatre. also in the programme — the emergency doctor who pronounced george floyd dead gives testimony in the murder trial against former police officer derek chauvin —
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as it enters its second week. we were trying to resuscitate mr floyd. to save his life? correct. mediation talks are reportedly under way to resolve a rift within jordan's royal family two days after prince hamza was accused of plotting to destabilise the kingdom. he denies being part of a conspiracy. let's begin here in the uk. the uk's prime minister boris johnson has confirmed the next steps in england's road map out of lockdown. people in england have been living under one of the strictest lockdowns in the world since the start of the year — but a rapid roll—out of vaccinations, has enabled the government to continue relaxing the rules. non—essential shops, hairdressers and gyms can reopen
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and pubs and restaurants can serve customers outdoors from next monday. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. it's been a long road out of lockdown, but now, if you live in england, you may well be working out what to do this time next week. getting in shape in the gym? snipping off the lockdown locks? taking a trip to the shops or relaxing outdoors with a drink? yes, what was once normal will feel like a bit of a treat. the next stage of unlocking will take place from april to 12. at his press conference today, the prime minister said to cheers to that. monday the 12th, i will be going to the pub myself, and cautiously, but irreversibly raising a pint of beer to my lips. but, and you know i am going to say this, we can't be complacent. we can see the waves of sickness afflicting other countries, and we have seen how this story goes. we still don't know how strong
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the vaccine shield will be when cases begin to rise. to help keep the virus under control, from friday, everyone in england will be offered regular rapid lateral flow tests. and the prime minister is looking at how other areas of the economy can reopen safely. but to get closer to normality, it could be that we will all have to do things that would have seemed highly unusualjust a year ago. 0ur uk politican correspondent rob watson joins us now. he is watching that statement from the prime minister. good to have you on the programme. what did you make of what borisjohnson had to say? what did i make of it? i made of it that it was an interesting mix of cautious optimism is what i made a bit, because if you had to sum up what he said, and he was speaking along with the scientific advisers for about 30 minutes basically what
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he said was, look, we are on track for this easing of the lockdown that we have laid out a few weeks back and that we hope all restrictions basically, the lockdowns will be done with byjune the 17th, but, and the big but in there is it is not clear as to what the extent that, for example is going to include international travel either out of the uk or back into the uk. it's also not clear the extent to which that post lockdown world is going to involve things like vaccine passports, people having to prove whether they are fit to go to the theatre or whatever event. so optimistic that the uk's government is on the right track, but a lot of uncertainty as to what the new normal might involve, if you like. and sometimes the government has liked to put a date on when it will tell us more. do we know when it may give us more details on what life looks like beyond the end ofjune?
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well, for things like the aviation industry and the international travel, the prime minister was pressed on this and he just said, look, as soon as possible. clearly the government wants to let airlines know, people know, companies know what they can and cannot do, and international travel was supposed to be no earlier than may the 17th, but essentially the prime ministers said i don't want to tell you exactly when we can do this or what's going to be possible because i don't want to be possible because i don't want to have a hostages to fortune. star; to have a hostages to fortune. stay with us, to have a hostages to fortune. stay with us. please. — to have a hostages to fortune. stay with us, please, rob, because one thing the government didn't make a decision on, was allowing foreign travel to resume. borisjohnson said it was "too soon to say" whether the target date of may 17th would be hit. he did say that a traffic light system, would be introduced, for whenever foreign holidays are allowed. we don't yet know which countries will be designated as red, amber or green. we do know anyone arriving to england from designated green countries won't need to quarantine.
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but they will need to take a test before they return, and again once they're back in the uk. those travelling from amber countries need to take all of these tests, and will be required to quarantine at home for ten days. they will be able to pay for an extra test on the fifth day and leave quarantine if negative. only uk residents will be allowed in from red countries. they'll need to pay for quarantine at a hotel, as well as taking these tests. so so there is an outline, rob, but i guess the bit that is missing is the date. , . guess the bit that is missing is the date. ., date. yes, and the specifics, i should say. — date. yes, and the specifics, i should say. by _ date. yes, and the specifics, i should say, by the _ date. yes, and the specifics, i should say, by the way, - date. yes, and the specifics, i should say, by the way, just l date. yes, and the specifics, i | should say, by the way, just to share my experience with everyone, i am in an amber quarantine myself right now. my family and i had to go to france for a funeral, so we are done with the second and eight—day tests. we are quarantining at home, we have a 50 test and release that we have a 50 test and release that we hope. it is quite an involved process, but to get away from me and
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the general, absolutely. we don't know, the kind of things that we don't know is will it be possible to have international travel on may 17 and beyond? and of course, which countries will be on the red list, which will be on an amber list, and which will be on an amber list, and which will be on a green list? and you can sort of see why it is a rapidly moving international pattern, but obviously, if you are running a travel company weather in this country or in the kind of destinations popular with britain or vice versa coming into the uk, you can see it is just immensely difficult to plan. can see it isjust immensely difficult to plan.— can see it isjust immensely difficult to plan. rob, thank you very much _ difficult to plan. rob, thank you very much indeed. _ difficult to plan. rob, thank you very much indeed. that - difficult to plan. rob, thank you very much indeed. that was - difficult to plan. rob, thank you | very much indeed. that was rob difficult to plan. rob, thank you - very much indeed. that was rob live with us from oxford. the trial of derek chauvin has resumed in minneapolis. he's the police officer accused of murdering george floyd in may last year. this is week two of the trial — and is expected to take at least a month. today we've heard from this man — dr bradford langenfeld. he's the doctor who tried to resuscitate george floyd in hospital, and later pronounced him dead.
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he's told the court that the most likely cause of george floyd's cardiac arrest was asphyxiation — or lack of oxygen. and we've been hearing testimony from the chief of the minneapolis police department, medaria arradondo. he fired derek chauvin the day after george floyd's death, and later called it "murder". the questions put to him so far have been mostly about police procedure. larry madowo joins us now from minneapolis. explains why he is a crucial witness. larry, for people who haven't been following the detail of this story. explain why the police chief is so central to it. the this story. explain why the police chief is so central to it.— chief is so central to it. the chief ofthe chief is so central to it. the chief of the minneapolis _ chief is so central to it. the chief of the minneapolis police - chief is so central to it. the chief- of the minneapolis police department is a tent pole witness, and his testimony is critical to the prosecution's case, because he is expected to essentially say that
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derek chauvin, the former minneapolis police officer, did not follow procedure. this is not what he was trained to do. it is extremely rare to have a police chief testified against an officer former or current. as will be adding a president across america because the entire prosecution case is that derek chauvin betrayed his badge, he used excessive force over and above what is required, and when george boyd was on the ground already handcuffed, many of the witnesses we heard from last week said he should have stopped. —— george floyd. and have stopped. -- george floyd. and do we know — have stopped. —— george floyd. and do we know how long he will be on the stand for? we do we know how long he will be on the stand for?— the stand for? we do not know all sto we the stand for? we do not know all stop we heard _ the stand for? we do not know all stop we heard about _ the stand for? we do not know all stop we heard about an _ the stand for? we do not know all stop we heard about an hour- the stand for? we do not know all stop we heard about an hour and l the stand for? we do not know all - stop we heard about an hour and some change from him this morning. mostly it was about background from harmony jobs has he had? he's been in the minneapolis police department 32 different years. he has had every position possible. i spent a lot of time near the end of it talking
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about the minneapolis police department's de—escalation policy. you try and talk to people if possible. you try and stabilise and slow down the situation until help arrives. the reason why they are spending a lot of time on that is because the prosecution is trying to say this is what derek chauvin and these are the officers failed to do in this instance with george floyd and it led to his death. presumably as well, and it led to his death. presumably as well. there _ and it led to his death. presumably as well, there will _ and it led to his death. presumably as well, there will be _ and it led to his death. presumably as well, there will be questions - as well, there will be questions about the actions of the other three police officers who were there and why they didn't try and persuade derek chauvin to take an alternative course of action. that derek chauvin to take an alternative course of action.— course of action. that will, probably — course of action. that will, probably in _ course of action. that will, probably in the _ course of action. that will, probably in the trial - course of action. that will, probably in the trial later. course of action. that will, | probably in the trial later in course of action. that will, - probably in the trial later in the summer. they are coming up for trial, but they are not accused of the murder of george —— george floyd, but they are accused of standing by and doing nothing, which is aiding and abetting, which is not as serious as the charges facing derek chauvin, second degree intentional murder, second degree manslaughter and third—degree murder. if he is convicted for any of them, he is looking atjail time of them, he is looking atjail time of well a decade. of them, he is looking at “ail time of well a decadefi of them, he is looking at “ail time of well a decade. larry, thank you very much — of well a decade. larry, thank you very much indeed. _ of well a decade. larry, thank you very much indeed. that _ of well a decade. larry, thank you very much indeed. that is - of well a decade. larry, thank you very much indeed. that is larry i of well a decade. larry, thank you | very much indeed. that is larry live with us for minneapolis. we are expecting the court to return in just under 20 return injust under 20 minutes. so when that happens, the police chiefs testimony continues and we
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chief's testimony continues and we will of course watch and listen in. let's turn to israel. the israeli prime minister — benjamin netanyahu — has appeared in court — after his much—delayed corruption trial resumed in jerusalem. the veteran political leader is facing charges of fraud, breach of trust and bribery in three cases. one of the charges involves accepting gifts from businessmen — mainly cigars and champagne — in exchange forfavours. another charge alleges he helped the controlling shareholder of telecoms giant bezeq in exchange for favourable coverage from a news website. he denies all charges. the resumption of his trial comes with talks due to begin as to whether his likud party can form a new government. 0ur correspondent yolande knell sent this report. it has been called israel's split screen moment. at thisjerusalem court, benjamin netanyahu beginning his corruption trial in earnest. the prosecution accuses him of accepting expensive gifts
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from businessmen and offering favours for more positive news coverage. charges he denies. meanwhile, across the city at the president's office, talks start on who should be given the first chance to form a new coalition government after last month's election, israel's fourth in two years. he is known as the great survivor, but this is another day when benjamin netanyahu's personal and politicalfate lies in the balance. simply put, israel is divided into two camps, those for and against the prime minister. and you've got small groups of both here outside the court. anti—netanyahu protesters accuse mr netanyahu of putting his personal interests before those of the country. they want him to resign. he is doing everything that he can, and the last year has proved that he is doing everything that he can to escape justice, actually. and he will take 9 million citizens, israeli citizens, down the drain,
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only to escape justice. but his supporters claim legal proceedings are a political witch—hunt. now they're trying to do a governmental coup, and we are against it. because benjamin netanyahu is the one and only leader. he has no faults, maybe, he's not perfect, but he didn't do anything, he didn't do any of what they're saying. leaving court, mr netanyahu, the defendant, is quick to return to business as prime minister. but it won't be easy to keep public attention where he wants it. his trial could last for years and looks set to decide his legacy. yolande knell, bbc news, jerusalem. tojordan — where a rift in the royal family is threatening to destabalize the country. it's been reported tonight that king abdullah has called for mediation with the former crown prince hamzah — who king abdullah's government accuses of attempting to arrange a coup.
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this is prince hamzah. he is the half—brother of king abdullah — who largely oversees the current government. the prince leaked a video to the bbc on saturday saying he's been placed under house arrest. another recording, this time of his voice, has also emerged — in which prince hamzah says he won't stay quiet. translation: i am not going to make | any moves or escalate the situation, l but for sure i won't obey when the head of staff tells you that you cannot go out, or tweet or reach out to people, but are only allowed to see the family, this is totally u na cce pta ble. the public rift between prince hamzah — and king abdullah — is unprecedented. but tensions within the royal family are widely rumoured. let's take a look at where prince hamzah fits in to the family. his father is king hussein who ruled the country until his death in 1999. the second wife was queen muna — their son is the current king abdullah. but king hussein's favourite was his fourth wife - queen noor.
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their son is prince hamzah and many thought he would one day be king. but abdullah decided differently and appointed his own son — hussein — as the current crown prince. thejordanian armed forces has confirmed that multiple arrests have taken place over the alleged plot to destablize the government. it's outraged prince hamzah's mother queen noor — who tweeted praying that truth and justice will prevail for all the innocent victims of this wicked slander. god bless and keep them safe. so just how badly could this rift unravel stability injordan — and how much of an impact could it have across the middle east? lyse doucetjoins me to discuss this. this is an awful lot for all of us to take in. what is your assessment of where we have got to for this call of mediation? the mediation
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underlines _ call of mediation? the mediation underlines this _ call of mediation? the mediation underlines this crisis _ call of mediation? the mediation underlines this crisis is _ call of mediation? the mediation underlines this crisis is not - call of mediation? the mediation underlines this crisis is not over. underlines this crisis is not over yet, but it also underlines that king of dolla commander think of the members of the family are anxious that in the midst of this public airing of criticism within the family, they can still try to find a way out with the family, because it is the hashemite kingdom ofjordan, which has long been regarded as a pillar of stability in the country. —— abdullah. some of the last few hours, there has been a twitter post from the royal court saying that in the tradition of the hashemite family, king abdullah has asked his uncle prince hussein to be the mediator, and that prince hom saw, and emphasises that within the tradition has also accepted that this is the tradition within the family because —— hamzah. but the fact that this could not be resolved without arrests being made and these dramatic video and audio statements from prince hamzahjust underlines the depth of the crisis this time.
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and what are we learning about those arrests and what that tells us about what plots may or may not have existed? ~ ., ., ., existed? we are learning that we don't know _ existed? we are learning that we don't know very _ existed? we are learning that we don't know very much _ existed? we are learning that we don't know very much because i existed? we are learning that we i don't know very much because when this story first broke on saturday night, shocking everyone injordan and beyond, there was talk of authority who attempt, but since then, we simply have not seen the kind of evidence put in the public domain that could indicate something like a coup was under way. there's been no indication that senior members of the security or intelligence services have been arrested. we have heard about conspiring with foreign entities. we don't know which foreign country that could possibly be. we have heard about a plot to destabilise the kingdom. that's not clear as well. we also have a dramatically different account from prince hamzah himself, where in that first video shared with the bbc he said, yes, he
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had been in meetings where there had been criticism of the king or the government but that he had not been the one to criticise. and what we understand as there had been many meetings between prince hamzah and the very important tribes ofjordan where criticism was expressed, and i think the all powerful intelligence services, knowing how much of a support the tribes or to the stability ofjordan got worried. thank you very much indeed. ijust want i just want to mention just in the last few seconds, i can see a royal court statement here from jordan in which prince hamzah has signed a letter saying the interest of the homeland must remain above every consideration. we must all stand behind the king and his efforts to protectjordan and its national interest. so perhaps as they were saying, both sides were looking to step back a little from this, but they have quite a way as to step back from after the escalation over the last couple of days. we will
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keep a close eye on that. now, let me update you on the pandemic. and the number of new cases globally has steadily been rising in the last month. this chart shows the worst affected countries currently. this is from johns hopkins university. you can see us cases in orange, brazil pink, and india — which is spiking at a weekly average of 88,000 new daily cases — is green. variants of the coronavirus are believed to be driving a considerable part, of the current spread. let's look at how this has developed. in the united states, 36% of covid cases are a us variant which first appeared late last year — 32% of cases are thought to be the variant from the uk. the rest is a mix of other variants. in brazil, it's a different story... almost all cases are the local brazilian variant. there's no evidence these variants are significantly more likely to cause serious illness — but the uk variant is thought to be around 70% more contageous, and the south africa and brazil variants may be more contagious too — which could lead to more cases, and more deaths. michael osterholm is the director at the center
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for infectious disease research and policy at the university of minnesota. and he's very worried about the new variants in the united states. this variant that we have talked about, this one from the uk, just as we have talked about how it's not 50-100% not 50—100% more infectious, it causes more severe illness —— this b117 variant, the one that we've talked about, the one from the uk, just as we have talked about how it's now 50—100% more infectious, it causes more severe illness, 50—60% of the time. this is almost like having a whole new pandemic descend upon us. the only good news is our vaccines do work against it. let's look at the role variants are playing more closely. we know that the more contageous variant which was first detected in the uk is now by far the most prevalent variant across europe. this graph helps show this — it has the distruibution of the main covid strain which spread widely across europe in 2020. scientists refer to that variant 20—e. apologies, i can show you that graph. —— can't show you that graph.
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it peaked in most parts of europe in the autumn. by december, it had started to drop off. but while that variant started to go away, a new one started to spike. it's called 20—i, and is also known as b117 — it was first detected in the south east of england — and is now the main variant on the continent. over 98% of covid cases in the uk are now this variant, and in europe it accounts for 80%. and in india, the virus is really spiking at the moment — with multiple variants spreading quickly. india recorded more than 100,000 new cases of the virus on sunday. there it's a mix — including the uk and south african variants and others, and now there's concern over what's being called a new "double mutant" variant. it's been detected in about 20 percent of cases in the western state of maharashtra. for more on variants, i'm joined now by virolgist dr lawrence young. doctor, it's a confusing picture for
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someone who is not an epidemiologist or overall itjust like me, but is this standard for a virus to mutate in all of these different ways? yes. in all of these different ways? yes, this is pretty _ in all of these different ways? yes, this is pretty standard. _ in all of these different ways? yes, this is pretty standard. in - in all of these different ways? yes this is pretty standard. in fact, for this particular virus, it is quite a slow changing virus. but when you have more than 130 million people around the world infected, the virus is going to change. what we're seeing, essentially come as a virus evolving and adapting in our bodies as it continues to spread. and how should our monitoring of these variants impact our response to them? ~ . ., these variants impact our response to them? ~ �*, these variants impact our response tothem? �*, ., , to them? welcome it's really important — to them? welcome it's really important that _ to them? welcome it's really important that we _ to them? welcome it's really| important that we understand to them? welcome it's really - important that we understand where these are and what they do. so we know the particular changes are associated with increased infectiousness. that is what we have seen for the uk variant, and the —— why the variant is spreading so much more. and it demonstrates how important it is to detect these changes. the only way we can detect them is by sequencing the 30,000 letters that make up the genome of the virus. so so—called genomic
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surveillance is very important, but not all countries have the ability to do that. i not all countries have the ability to do that-— not all countries have the ability to do that. ., ., ., to do that. i was meant to ask you how practical _ to do that. i was meant to ask you how practical that _ to do that. i was meant to ask you how practical that kind _ to do that. i was meant to ask you how practical that kind of- to do that. i was meant to ask you how practical that kind of detailed | how practical that kind of detailed testing is. it’s how practical that kind of detailed testin: is. �* , ., ., testing is. it's getting more and more practical. _ testing is. it's getting more and more practical. we _ testing is. it's getting more and more practical. we are - testing is. it's getting more and more practical. we are really i testing is. it's getting more and i more practical. we are really good at it here in the united kingdom. other countries are pretty good too, but the technology is such that you can turn these things around within a few days, and indeed, you can modify standard tests like the gold standard pcr test so it can specifically identify particular mutants or variance, and understanding that is really important, not only for having a detailed appreciation of the spread, but also where we have some of these changes in the virus that appeared to make it more resistant to our bodies immune system. you to make it more resistant to our bodies immune system. you may have heard from you — bodies immune system. you may have heard from you probably _ bodies immune system. you may have heard from you probably did _ bodies immune system. you may have heard from you probably did come i bodies immune system. you may have heard from you probably did come of l heard from you probably did come of the clip i playjust a moment ago of a leading american scientist saying it is almost like a new pandemic. that is a scary phrase for all of us to hear. do you agree with that
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analysis? to hear. do you agree with that anal sis? ., ., , , , analysis? not really. this is the same virus. _ analysis? not really. this is the same virus, it's _ analysis? not really. this is the same virus, it'sjust _ analysis? not really. this is the same virus, it'sjust changing . analysis? not really. this is the same virus, it'sjust changing a | same virus, it's just changing a little bit. the important thing is that most of the current vaccines appear to be very effective, not only against the uk variant, but again some of these other variance. there is a reduction in the efficacy of current vaccines against the south african variant and the brazilian variant, but we know that we can change these, and indeed some of the accompanies —— companies that manufacture these vaccines are already on the case of modifying the vaccine to cover those other changes. j vaccine to cover those other changes-— vaccine to cover those other chances. .,, ., ., ., ,., changes. i was going to ask you that. changes. i was going to ask you that- how _ changes. i was going to ask you that. how confident _ changes. i was going to ask you that. how confident can - changes. i was going to ask you that. how confident can be i changes. i was going to ask you that. how confident can be an l changes. i was going to ask you | that. how confident can be an -- that. how confident can be an —— vaccine manufacturers be that by adopting what they have they can cover off all versions of this virus? ~ , , ., virus? well, it is interesting that as we learn _ virus? well, it is interesting that as we learn more _ virus? well, it is interesting that as we learn more about - virus? well, it is interesting that as we learn more about the i virus? well, it is interesting thatl as we learn more about the virus, virus? well, it is interesting that i as we learn more about the virus, we are identifying similar changes occurring in the virus in different parts of the world. so it's as though the viruses going the same pathways to just trying to evade and
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dodge around our body's immune system. so we can almost predict where the key changes are and generate a vaccine that is likely to be able to cover all of these changes. indeed, that's what a couple of accompanies including modernity in the us, they have already modified their rna vaccine and is being tested as we speak in clinical trials. and is being tested as we speak in clinicaltrials. so and is being tested as we speak in clinical trials. so i'm confident that we will be able to generate very rapidly vaccines that will cover these various changes. for 30 seconds or — cover these various changes. for 30 seconds or so. _ cover these various changes. for 30 seconds or so, doctor _ cover these various changes. for 30 seconds or so, doctor young, i cover these various changes. for 30 seconds or so, doctor young, what | seconds or so, doctor young, what you make of the latest uk figures. i assume you are reasonably optimistic about them. i assume you are reasonably optimistic about them. ., assume you are reasonably optimistic about them-— about them. i think we have done a treat “ob, about them. i think we have done a great job. i — about them. i think we have done a great job, i think _ about them. i think we have done a great job, i think the _ about them. i think we have done a great job, i think the vaccine i greatjob, i think the vaccine coverage has been fantastic. we are seeing the impact of us all being and locked for quite a while, but we are taking the right approach year, which is a very gradual easing out of lockdown, being mindful of these variance and that they can always crop up in the country and cause another outbreak. so we have to be careful, but i think it's cautious optimism. careful, but i think it's cautious optimism-— careful, but i think it's cautious otimism. ., ., . .,
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optimism. doctor lawrence young, thank ou optimism. doctor lawrence young, thank you very _ optimism. doctor lawrence young, thank you very much _ optimism. doctor lawrence young, thank you very much indeed. i optimism. doctor lawrence young, thank you very much indeed. just l thank you very much indeed. just remember, prime minister boris johnson has confirmed the next step of easing restrictions in england will kick in on monday. hello, there. the cold northerly winds have arrived today. they're going to be with us only for a day or so. but arctic air has now swept down across the whole of the country, which is why it feels a lot colder than it did yesterday. we had a band of cloud earlier on. that swept through, and you can see all the shower clouds that have been streaming in and that cold wind. it's been northern scotland bearing the brunt of the snow today. for many parts of england and wales, it's been dry, and there's been some welcome sunshine around as well, but temperatures a lot lower than yesterday. a very dramatic scene here in belfast in northern ireland. there has been some wintry showers here, and those are continuing through this evening and overnight. more snow to come in northern parts of scotland. some of those wintry showers head into west wales, the southwest of england, so some icy conditions where we have those showers. not far away from the east coast
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of england, but for many in land areas, it is going to be dry and clear and colder more widely than it was last night. so widespread so widespread frosts, —1 to —3. tomorrow is another cold day, more snow showers in the same sort of areas, so primarily the northern parts of scotland, but some for northern ireland heading into wales. gradually through the day, the cloud will build up in land, and almost anywhere in the afternoon could catch a passing snow shower. they are driven on by those strong northerly winds. strongest in northern scotland again, gusts of 50—60 mph. temperatures on tuesday, similar to what we had this afternoon, so 3—9 celsius if you're lucky, but given the strong and gusty winds, especially near those snow showers, it will feel a lot colder and it's more typical, really, of the middle of winter. by the time we get to wednesday, those colder, stronger winds are out of the way. still another cold start, mind you. many places, though, will have a dry day. we've still got some snow showers left over in the northeast of scotland,
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but most of them are now by this stage into the north sea, and instead, we look to the west to see advancing cloud coming in, maybe a little light rain or drizzle into northern ireland and parts of wales. many places will be dry, but as it clouds over after that cold start, it's still a cold day on wednesday, but not as windy by any means. the colder strong winds are heading away from the uk, and we are starting to see our weather coming in from the atlantic. so it's less cold air. we are left with low pressure to the north of the uk and some brisker winds probably on thursday and some rain, but still dry in the south.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. borisjohnson confirms another easing of coronavirus restrictions in england. on monday the 12th, i will be going to the pub myself and cautiously but irreversibly raising a pint of beer to my lips. the uk prime minister has also announced that free, twice—weekly rapid testing will be available to everyone in england and trials of a new covid—status certification will start mid—april. big events, like, you know, getting 20,000 people into wembley on may the 15th, that's kind of thing, getting people back into a theatre. also in the programme, the emergency doctor who pronounced george floyd dead gives testimony in the murder trial against former police officer derek chauvin.
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we were trying to resuscitate mr floyd. to save his life? correct. in the past few minutes, jordan's prince hamzah has signed a letter in support of his uncle, king abdullah two days after he was accused of plotting to destabilise the country. the issue of vaccine passports has been a big talking point in the uk the last few days. prime minister borisjohnson has confirmed that a new covid—status certification will be trialled within the next two weeks. and here's how they'll work. there are basically three
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ingredients to your covid—19 certification or three ways you can give reassurance to others if you go to a big, massive event. always you can, that people can be assured the people in the room do not have the risk of spreading covid—19. number one as your immunity. if you had the virus before in the last, certainly the last six months, you will have the last six months, you will have the antibodies. number two is vaccination status. but number three is testing. i want to stress that there are complicated, ethical and practical issues as i think i said last time, raised by the idea of covid—status certification because for vaccination, covid—status certification because forvaccination, using covid—status certification because for vaccination, using vaccination alone, just because after all, many people will be, for one reason or
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another, unable to get a vaccine for medical reasons for instance or perhaps because they are pregnant. we're told the certifications will be used to get into theatre, sports games, and other big events. according to the telegraph, the fa cup final will be one of the first mass event to pilot it on the 15th of may. the music industry's brit awards and the snooker championship are also expected to take part. before and after testing will also be rolled out in tandem. here's more from the telegraph. "the government could turn one of the nhs smartphone apps into a digital covid passport or run a separate app." michael gove is the the cabinet minister leading a review into vaccine passports and over the weekend, he said the move as "inevitable" and said they'd provide "valuable aid" in reopening parts of the domestic economy quickly. not everyone is on side. last week, more than 70 mps, including 41 members of borisjohnson's conservative party called the move "discriminatory and counterproductive". this is the former cabinet
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minister david davis. it is very different from anything we have done in britain outside of wartime. we are not used to presenting papers or indeed the electronic equivalent to go to the pub or a football match and that's not what we think of as our freedoms. ourfreedom is the not what we think of as our freedoms. our freedom is the freedom to have a normal life. the opposition labour party has reservations too. we have an amazing take—up of the vaccine _ we have an amazing take—up of the vaccine it— we have an amazing take—up of the vaccine it is— we have an amazing take—up of the vaccine. it is being rolled out incredibly— vaccine. it is being rolled out incredibly successfully by the nhs, not totally clear to me that we need a sledgehammer to crack and not. the bil a sledgehammer to crack and not. the big priority— a sledgehammer to crack and not. the big priority has got to be ensuring everybody — big priority has got to be ensuring everybody has been vaccinated so we can get _ everybody has been vaccinated so we can get back as quickly as possible to the _ can get back as quickly as possible to the things we love doing, whether that is— to the things we love doing, whether that is going to the pub or the restaurant, football or the concert. and here's the leading infectious diseases expert dr mike tildesley on the other legal and ethical issues.
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i realise we need some level of i realise we need some level of security— i realise we need some level of security to _ i realise we need some level of security to allow _ i realise we need some level of security to allow these - i realise we need some level of security to allow these events i i realise we need some level of. security to allow these events to open _ security to allow these events to open again _ security to allow these events to open again what _ security to allow these events to open again. what we _ security to allow these events to open again. what we really i security to allow these events to j open again. what we really need security to allow these events to i open again. what we really need is a fair system _ open again. what we really need is a fair system that _ open again. what we really need is a fair system that is— open again. what we really need is a fair system that is not— fair system that is not discriminating - fair system that is not discriminating againstj fair system that is not- discriminating against certain members _ discriminating against certain members of— discriminating against certain members of society- discriminating against certain members of society so - discriminating against certain members of society so there | discriminating against certain i members of society so there is a need _ members of society so there is a need for— members of society so there is a need for safety _ members of society so there is a need for safety to _ members of society so there is a need for safety to come - members of society so there is a need for safety to come first i members of society so there is a l need for safety to come first which is need for safety to come first which is why— need for safety to come first which is why evidence _ need for safety to come first which is why evidence of _ need for safety to come first which is why evidence of a _ need for safety to come first which is why evidence of a negative i need for safety to come first which is why evidence of a negative testl is why evidence of a negative test or potentially— is why evidence of a negative test or potentially vaccinations - is why evidence of a negative test or potentially vaccinations may i is why evidence of a negative testj or potentially vaccinations may be needed _ or potentially vaccinations may be needed but — or potentially vaccinations may be needed but doing _ or potentially vaccinations may be needed but doing it _ or potentially vaccinations may be needed but doing it at _ or potentially vaccinations may be needed but doing it at a _ or potentially vaccinations may be needed but doing it at a time i or potentially vaccinations may bel needed but doing it at a time when or potentially vaccinations may be i needed but doing it at a time when a lot of— needed but doing it at a time when a lot of people — needed but doing it at a time when a lot of people may— needed but doing it at a time when a lot of people may not _ needed but doing it at a time when a lot of people may not have _ needed but doing it at a time when a lot of people may not have been i needed but doing it at a time when a | lot of people may not have been able to have _ lot of people may not have been able to have access — lot of people may not have been able to have access to _ lot of people may not have been able to have access to the _ lot of people may not have been able to have access to the vaccine - lot of people may not have been able to have access to the vaccine does i to have access to the vaccine does potentially — to have access to the vaccine does potentially cause _ to have access to the vaccine does potentially cause certain _ to have access to the vaccine does potentially cause certain issues i to have access to the vaccine does potentially cause certain issues ifl potentially cause certain issues if people _ potentially cause certain issues if people are — potentially cause certain issues if people are denied _ potentially cause certain issues if people are denied access - potentially cause certain issues if people are denied access to i potentially cause certain issues if. people are denied access to events when _ people are denied access to events when they— people are denied access to events when they have _ people are denied access to events when they have not _ people are denied access to events when they have not been _ people are denied access to events when they have not been in - people are denied access to events when they have not been in a - when they have not been in a position— when they have not been in a position to _ when they have not been in a position to have _ when they have not been in a position to have had - when they have not been in a position to have had the i when they have not been in a i position to have had the vaccine. let's be clear. right now you won't need a certificate to get into a pub. however, we're told that hasn't been ruled out further down the line as venues drop social distancing rules. here's times columnist hugo rifkind on that point. "the thing i still think about vaccine passes for pubs is that unless take—up takes an unexpected nosedive it would be toxically unfair before everybody has been offered a vaccine but probably totally unnecessary after everybody
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has been offered one. so won't happen." we'll see. but if we look outside the uk, a number of countries have a virus passport system in place. china has been using a covid—status pass since march. denmark has its own covid passport system for immunised citizens. then this is israel's green pass. you can show it on an app, or on paper like this. innoculated citizens use it to get into cinemas, gyms, bars and restaurants. using this, hundreds have been attending concerts. this is one was in tel aviv. and as you can see life is edging back to normal. ronni gamzu is israel's former coronavirus tzar on why he thinks this approach is a success. passports for a limited time is reasonable. it allows you to reopen
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vastly your country and this is what we're doing now. so in order to feel safer, to feel more relaxed, to do so, to reopen the entire country, yes, you give some for people that are not vaccinated and i believe gradually they will be less and less people that are not vaccinated. this is not the aim, but the aim is really to reopen in the most safe way. another motivator for this system is to kick—start travel. last month europe announced plans for its own digital certificate with boosting tourism the priority. greece has been leading this push. this is its minister of culture. everybody will feel really safe. and our model— everybody will feel really safe. and our model is safety first. but there are other factors to consider. last week the un secretary general, antonio guterres said this to the bbc. the main problem of vaccine passport
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is equity, is it possible to have a vaccine passport that facilitates exchanges and movement but at the same time creates a new level of inequality. in the world. that is the concern. next, this is saad omer. he's a member of the who's expert working group on covid—19 vaccines. there needs to be a multilateral engagement. so there could be a role of the _ engagement. so there could be a role of the who _ engagement. so there could be a role of the who or other entities where you ensure — of the who or other entities where you ensure that there is equity in terms _ you ensure that there is equity in terms of— you ensure that there is equity in terms of how they implemented. and as equitable as possible, but the reason _ as equitable as possible, but the reason i — as equitable as possible, but the reason i am saying they are inequitable is even if governments do not _ inequitable is even if governments do not do — inequitable is even if governments do not do this, there is so much incentive — do not do this, there is so much incentive for— do not do this, there is so much incentive for private entities to implement some form of verification of vaccination in one way or another~ _ of vaccination in one way or another. so for example, if airlines
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do not _ another. so for example, if airlines do not do _ another. so for example, if airlines do not do it. — another. so for example, if airlines do not do it, tourists destinations would _ do not do it, tourists destinations would do — do not do it, tourists destinations would do it, business locations would — would do it, business locations would do — would do it, business locations would do it, business locations would do it and all sorts of other entities — would do it and all sorts of other entities are likely to find it an attractive _ entities are likely to find it an attractive option to minimise and mitigate — attractive option to minimise and mitigate their risk. especially as things— mitigate their risk. especially as things open up. borisjohnson was asked whether parliament would get a chance to vote on introducing covid status vaccine certificates. here's political correspondent, chris mason, on the likelihood of that. the prime minister skirted around that. kept falling back on the phrase of the number of fences that were still to be jumped phrase of the number of fences that were still to bejumped before phrase of the number of fences that were still to be jumped before we arrive at that point. what be very interesting if and when we reach that point is where do labour go? because labour are expressing their reservations about the covid—status certificates but they are not wholeheartedly rejecting them, nor are they endorsing them. clearly lots of people of any political persuasion would balk at the idea of having to show some kind of proof of your status to do the sort of things that a couple of years ago we would
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have regarded as being totally free to do. we have regarded as being totally free to do. ~ . , have regarded as being totally free to do. . ., , ., . to do. we have been hearing evidence for the police — to do. we have been hearing evidence for the police chief _ to do. we have been hearing evidence for the police chief who _ to do. we have been hearing evidence for the police chief who sacked - for the police chief who sacked derek chauvin the day after george floyd's death. before we go to the courtroom, just a warning that there may be graphic video or details in the evidence — which people find distressing. we're not in control of the picture feed, so it's worth bearing that in mind, as you're watching. here is the feed from minneapolis. this is the police chief of the police force.— this is the police chief of the police force. most department members will _ police force. most department members will have _ police force. most department members will have at - police force. most department members will have at least i police force. most department i members will have at least basic training in terms of first responder, airway, breathing, circulation, the effects of applying direct pressure on wounds to stop bleeding. many of the things that we will respond to, perhaps just because we are closer to a call than
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the ems or fire because we are closer to a call than the ems orfire before because we are closer to a call than the ems or fire before they get there, obviously they have a higher degree of training, but the training that we have and that we receive, it is very vital, because those seconds are vital. our officers carry tourniquets, we respond to situations where members of the community will have gunshot wounds. as a matter—of—fact, couple of my officers a couple of weeks ago saved a young man who was shot in the fever and was bleeding profusely, but because they got there quickly, knew how to apply the tourniquet. those are some of the basics, our officers have saved the lives of children who have choked or what have you because they have applied, been able to help start emergency breathing. so those are some of the basic types of first aid that are just, chest compression is, those types of basic first aid. £311" types of basic first aid. our officers then _ types of basic first aid. our officers then specifically trained at the _ officers then specifically trained at the training centre to provide this
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at the training centre to provide this basic— at the training centre to provide this basic sort of first aid? that this basic sort of first aid? that is correct- _ this basic sort of first aid? that is correct. does _ this basic sort of first aid? that is correct. does the _ this basic sort of first aid? that | is correct. does the minneapolis olice is correct. does the minneapolis police department _ is correct. does the minneapolis police department have - is correct. does the minneapolis police department have a i is correct. does the minneapolis police department have a policy| police department have a policy regarding any duty that an officer would _ regarding any duty that an officer would have two apply that training to a real—life situation? yes. would have two apply that training to a real-life situation?— to a real-life situation? yes. we recognise _ to a real-life situation? yes. we recognise again, _ to a real-life situation? yes. we recognise again, i _ to a real-life situation? yes. we recognise again, i mentioned i to a real-life situation? yes. wej recognise again, i mentioned we to a real-life situation? yes. we i recognise again, i mentioned we are often times going to be the first ones to respond to someone who needs medical attention, and so we absolutely have a duty to render that aid. ., ., _, , , that aid. that of course is in the oli that aid. that of course is in the policy procedure _ that aid. that of course is in the policy procedure manual, i that aid. that of course is in the policy procedure manual, is - that aid. that of course is in the | policy procedure manual, is that right? _ policy procedure manual, is that riuht? , policy procedure manual, is that riht? , it policy procedure manual, is that right?- it is _ policy procedure manual, is that right? yes. it is policy 7—350. right? yes. it is policy 7-350. emergency — right? yes. it is policy 7-350. emergency medical— right? me; it is policy 7—350. emergency medical response. you right? .;%3 it is policy 7—350. emergency medical response. you see that the _ emergency medical response. you see that the purpose of a policy is to layout _ that the purpose of a policy is to layout in — that the purpose of a policy is to layout in writing the roles and responsibilities of many hapless police _ responsibilities of many hapless police department employees in incidents involving a medical emergency, is that right? yes. if we
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can take a look _ emergency, is that right? yes. if we can take a look at _ emergency, is that right? .e:3 if we can take a look at the policy itself, — can take a look at the policy itself, does that explain what a minneapolis police officer is supposed to do when they come upon a medicat— supposed to do when they come upon a medical emergency or a medical emergency develops on a call? yes. what are they _ emergency develops on a call? .23 what are they supposed to do? emergency develops on a call? yes. | what are they supposed to do? while amazin: what are they supposed to do? while amazing ems. _ what are they supposed to do? while amazing ems, the _ what are they supposed to do? wu l2 amazing ems, the employee in an acute medical crisis shall provide any necessary first aid consistent with our training as soon as practical. with our training as soon as practical-— with our training as soon as ractical. v, , , , v, , practical. that presumes of course the are practical. that presumes of course they are waiting — practical. that presumes of course they are waiting for— practical. that presumes of course they are waiting for ems _ practical. that presumes of course they are waiting for ems or- practical. that presumes of course they are waiting for ems or some l they are waiting for ems or some kind of— they are waiting for ems or some kind of emergency services? that is correct. is kind of emergency services? that is correct- is it — kind of emergency services? that is correct. is it fair _ kind of emergency services? that is correct. is it fair to _ kind of emergency services? that is correct. is it fair to say _ kind of emergency services? that is correct. is it fair to say this - correct. is it fair to say this oli correct. is it fair to say this policy is — correct. is it fair to say this policy is into _ correct. is it fair to say this policy is into parts? - correct. is it fair to say this policy is into parts? officer correct. is it fair to say this - policy is into parts? officer has to request— policy is into parts? officer has to request ems or an ambulance, correct? — request ems or an ambulance, correct? , request ems or an ambulance, correct?- whilst _ request ems or an ambulance, correct? yes. whilst waiting for the ambulance correct? u23 whilst waiting for the ambulance they have to provide, are required _ ambulance they have to provide, are required to— ambulance they have to provide, are required to provide, what medical training _ required to provide, what medical training and skills they have to attempt — training and skills they have to attempt to save a person? that is
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correct. attempt to save a person? that is correct- are _ attempt to save a person? that is correct. are many _ attempt to save a person? that is correct. are many apples - attempt to save a person? that is correct. are many apples police . correct. are many apples police officers provided _ correct. are many apples police officers provided -- _ correct. are many apples police| officers provided -- minneapolis officers provided —— minneapolis notice _ officers provided —— minneapolis police officers provided with kits? it is basically an inhaler for it is basically an inhalerfor community members who we may respond to who have overdosed. it is if they have overdosed and are out, it's to give them that inhaler injection so theyit give them that inhaler injection so they it was a few years ago where they it was a few years ago where they for the most part a minneapolis fire department with the ones who responded. unfortunately, in the city as cities across the country saw an uptick in opioid overdoses and we had to make sure because we are often the first ones to come
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across the situations, we wanted to make sure we were in service to communities in making sure we, if we can save lives we are equipping folks with that. a; can save lives we are equipping folks with that.— folks with that. a policy has develouaed. _ folks with that. a policy has developed, is _ folks with that. a policy has developed, is that - folks with that. a policy has developed, is that right? i folks with that. a policy has i developed, is that right? that folks with that. a policy has - developed, is that right? that is correct. this _ developed, is that right? that is correct. this is _ developed, is that right? that is correct. this is the _ developed, is that right? that is correct. this is the policy - developed, is that right? that is| correct. this is the policy 7-348. our officers _ correct. this is the policy 7-348. our officers provided _ correct. this is the policy 7-348. our officers provided training - correct. this is the policy 7-348. our officers provided training in | our officers provided training in the administration?— the administration? under appmpriate _ the administration? under| appropriate circumstances. the administration? under- appropriate circumstances. yes. i would like to talk a little bit about — would like to talk a little bit about the use of force. does minneapolis have a written policy governing the proper authorised use of force? _ governing the proper authorised use of force? , v, governing the proper authorised use of force?_ is _ governing the proper authorised use of force?_ is this - of force? yes, we do. is this generally — of force? yes, we do. is this generally covered _ of force? yes, we do. is this generally covered in - of force? yes, we do. is this generally covered in the - of force? yes, we do. is this l generally covered in the policy of force? yes, we do. is this - generally covered in the policy and procedure — generally covered in the policy and procedure manual? yes generally covered in the policy and procedure manual?— generally covered in the policy and procedure manual?- i - generally covered in the policy and l procedure manual?- i would procedure manual? yes it is. i would like to discuss _ procedure manual? yes it is. i would like to discuss some _
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procedure manual? yes it is. i would like to discuss some of _ procedure manual? yes it is. i would like to discuss some of that - procedure manual? yes it is. i would like to discuss some of that manuall like to discuss some of that manual with you _ like to discuss some of that manual with you and policy with you at this timei _ with you and policy with you at this time, if_ with you and policy with you at this time, if we — with you and policy with you at this time, if we could pull the display exhibit— time, if we could pull the display exhibit to — time, if we could pull the display exhibit to 16. under the purpose of the policy— exhibit to 16. under the purpose of the policy which is 5—301, can you please _ the policy which is 5—301, can you please read — the policy which is 5—301, can you please read the first sentence? sanctity — please read the first sentence? sanctity of life and the protection of the public shall be the cornerstones of the mpd�*s use of force policy. cornerstones of the mpd's use of force policy-— cornerstones of the mpd's use of force oli .~ ., v, , ., ., force policy. what does that mean? of all the things _ force policy. what does that mean? of all the things that _ force policy. what does that mean? of all the things that we _ force policy. what does that mean? of all the things that we do, - force policy. what does that mean? of all the things that we do, as - of all the things that we do, as peace officers, and i mentioned that thousands of calls that are men and women respond to, it's my firm belief that the one singular incident we will be judged for ever on will be use of force. so while it is absolutely imperative that officers go home at the end of their shift, we want to make sure and ensure community members go home too. so sanctity of life is
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absolutely vital that is the killer for the use of force. has absolutely vital that is the killer for the use of force.— for the use of force. has this generally — for the use of force. has this generally always _ for the use of force. has this generally always been - for the use of force. has this generally always been the i for the use of force. has this - generally always been the course with a _ generally always been the course with a minneapolis use of force policy? — with a minneapolis use of force policy? it— with a minneapolis use of force oli ? , v, with a minneapolis use of force policy?- when - with a minneapolis use of force policy?- when did - with a minneapolis use of force policy?- when did thatj policy? it is not. when did that chance? policy? it is not. when did that change? we — policy? it is not. when did that change? we implemented - policy? it is not. when did that change? we implemented this| change? we implemented this articular change? we implemented this particular in — change? we implemented this particular in 2016. _ change? we implemented this particular in 2016. has - change? we implemented this particular in 2016. has the - change? we implemented this - particular in 2016. has the training and use of force _ particular in 2016. has the training and use of force and _ particular in 2016. has the training and use of force and application i particular in 2016. has the training and use of force and application ofj and use of force and application of the use _ and use of force and application of the use of— and use of force and application of the use of force policy been imparted including this philosophy onto police officers in training at the training centre? it onto police officers in training at the training centre?— the training centre? it certainly has, the training centre? it certainly has. yes- _ the training centre? it certainly has. yes- does _ the training centre? it certainly has, yes. does the _ the training centre? it certainly has, yes. does the policy - the training centre? it certainly has, yes. does the policy itself| has, yes. does the policy itself define force? _ has, yes. does the policy itself define force? what _ has, yes. does the policy itself define force? what is - has, yes. does the policy itself define force? what is force? i has, yes. does the policy itself i define force? what is force? yes, has, yes. does the policy itself - define force? what is force? yes, it does. if define force? what is force? yes, it does- if we — define force? what is force? yes, it does. if we could _ define force? what is force? yes, it does. if we could take _ define force? what is force? yes, it does. if we could take a _ define force? what is force? yes, it does. if we could take a look - define force? what is force? yes, it does. if we could take a look at - does. if we could take a look at exhibit 217, — does. if we could take a look at exhibit 217, published - does. if we could take a look at exhibit 217, published that. - does. if we could take a look at exhibit 217, published that. if i does. if we could take a look at l exhibit 217, published that. if you highlight— exhibit 217, published that. if you highlight use of force. generally
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speaking, what is force? it highlight use of force. generally speaking, what is force?- highlight use of force. generally speaking, what is force? it can be any physical— speaking, what is force? it can be any physical contact. _ speaking, what is force? it can be any physical contact. it _ speaking, what is force? it can be any physical contact. it can - speaking, what is force? it can be any physical contact. it can be - speaking, what is force? it can be | any physical contact. it can be with any physical contact. it can be with a weapon, a vehicle, but it is any sort of physical contact that is more likely to render harm or injury to someone. as restraint use more likely to render harm or in'ury to someone. as restrainti to someone. as restraint use of restraint considered _ to someone. as restraint use of restraint considered force? - to someone. as restraint use of| restraint considered force? that would be considered _ restraint considered force? “inst would be considered force. restraint considered force? that | would be considered force. what restraint considered force? that - would be considered force. what type of force is authorised _ would be considered force. what type of force is authorised under _ of force is authorised under departmental policy? of force is authorised under deartmental oli ? ~:: ' departmental policy? under 609, we 0 erate departmental policy? under 609, we eperate under _ departmental policy? under 609, we operate under the _ departmental policy? under 609, we operate under the use _ departmental policy? under 609, we operate under the use of— departmental policy? under 609, we operate under the use of force, - operate under the use of force, objectively reasonable force. if i objectively reasonable force. if i could display exhibit 217. first, go back to 5—303. it
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authorises force, is that right? you mentioned — authorises force, is that right? you mentioned 609 state statute authorising force under certain circumstances, is that right? yes. the phrase _ circumstances, is that right? yes. the phrase that _ circumstances, is that right? yes. the phrase that is _ circumstances, is that right? yes. the phrase that is used _ circumstances, is that right? yes. the phrase that is used for- circumstances, is that right? 123 the phrase that is used for the authorisation of force is what type of force? — authorisation of force is what type of force? ., ,v, ., , authorisation of force is what type of force?_ and - authorisation of force is what type of force?_ and that i authorisation of force is what type | of force?_ and that can of force? reasonable. and that can be authorised _ of force? reasonable. and that can be authorised under— of force? reasonable. and that can be authorised under certain - be authorised under certain circumstances, is that right? yes. if ou circumstances, is that right? yes. if you would _ circumstances, is that right? yes. if you would go — circumstances, is that right? yes. if you would go to _ circumstances, is that right? yes. if you would go to the _ circumstances, is that right? yes. if you would go to the next - circumstances, is that right? u23 if you would go to the next page. let's _ if you would go to the next page. let's talk— if you would go to the next page. let's talk about the circumstances under— let's talk about the circumstances under which a police officer is authorised properly to use force. i like that — authorised properly to use force. i like that. what are the circumstances under which an officer is authorised to use force? an officer is is authorised to use force? jifu officer is authorised to use force affecting lawful arrest, executing a legal process, forcing an order of
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the court and any other duties imposed upon that office. that is further delineated _ imposed upon that office. that is further delineated in _ imposed upon that office. that is further delineated in policy, - imposed upon that office. that is further delineated in policy, is i further delineated in policy, is that right?— further delineated in policy, is that right? yes. underthe that right? yes. under the definition _ that right? yes. under the definition of _ that right? u23 underthe definition of objectively reasonable force _ definition of objectively reasonable force can— definition of objectively reasonable force. can you read that definition? you discussed a case and i would like you to— like you to first of all, is the oli like you to first of all, is the policy referenced _ like you to first of all, is the policy referenced you - like you to first of all, is the policy referenced you just i policy referenced you just mentioned? if you could display 217, pa-e mentioned? if you could display 217, page two _ mentioned? if you could display 217, page two. we have three bullet points— page two. we have three bullet points here. the officer is supposed
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to look— points here. the officer is supposed to look at— points here. the officer is supposed to look at the totality of the circumstances, right? the three bullets — circumstances, right? the three bullets year, the officer is supposed to consider are what? the officer supposed to consider are what? i3u2 officer should consider the severity officer should consider the severity of the crime at issue, whether the suspect poses an immediate threat to the safety of the officers or others, and whether he is actively resisting arrest or attempting to evade arrest by flight. fair resisting arrest or attempting to evade arrest by flight.— resisting arrest or attempting to evade arrest by flight. fair to say these three _ evade arrest by flight. fair to say these three different _ evade arrest by flight. fair to say i these three different considerations are things _ these three different considerations are things that you cannot tribute to the _ are things that you cannot tribute to the subject, correct? yes. that to the sub'ect, correct? yes. that is the to the subject, correct? yes. that is the subject's — to the subject, correct? u23 that is the subject's conduct, not someone _ is the subject's conduct, not someone else?— is the subject's conduct, not someone else?- it - is the subject's conduct, not someone else?- it has. is the subject's conduct, not someone else? yes. it has to be 'udied of someone else? yes. it has to be judged of course _ someone else? yes. it has to be judged of course by _ someone else? yes. it has to be judged of course by a _ someone else? u23 it has to be judged of course by a reasonable police _ judged of course by a reasonable police officer on a scene at the time. _ police officer on a scene at the time, correct?— police officer on a scene at the time, correct?- do - police officer on a scene at the time, correct? yes. do you recall and obviously _ time, correct? yes. do you recall and obviously you _ time, correct? yes. do you recall and obviously you are _ time, correct? u23 do you recall and obviously you are here talking about _ and obviously you are here talking about what happened on may 25 2020
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involving _ about what happened on may 25 2020 involving george floyd. do you recall— involving george floyd. do you recall why the officer two were responding on that day? the original reason _ responding on that day? the original reason for— responding on that day? the original reason for the call? the responding on that day? the original reason for the call?— reason for the call? the original reason for the call? the original reason for _ reason for the call? the original reason for the _ reason for the call? the original reason for the call _ reason for the call? the original reason for the call was - reason for the call? the original reason for the call was a - reason for the call? the original. reason for the call was a response regarding a counterfeit situation at the store, at the intersection of 30th and chicago. in the store, at the intersection of 30th and chicago.— the store, at the intersection of 30th and chicago. in terms of the deployment _ 30th and chicago. in terms of the deployment of — 30th and chicago. in terms of the deployment of your _ 30th and chicago. in terms of the deployment of your resources - 30th and chicago. in terms of the deployment of your resources of| 30th and chicago. in terms of the i deployment of your resources of the minneapolis police department, as chief. _ minneapolis police department, as chief. how— minneapolis police department, as chief, how do you rate the severity of that _ chief, how do you rate the severity of that offence, the seriousness of that offence? it of that offence, the seriousness of that offence?— of that offence, the seriousness of that offence? it would probably not rise to the level _ that offence? it would probably not rise to the level of, _ that offence? it would probably not rise to the level of, particularly - rise to the level of, particularly in light of last year, the level of violent crime we have experienced in the city, we would certainly respond to it but it would not rise to the level in terms of severity of the crime here. level in terms of severity of the crime here-— crime here. looking at that particular— crime here. looking at that particular type _ crime here. looking at that particular type of _ crime here. looking at that particular type of crime, i crime here. looking at that particular type of crime, is |
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crime here. looking at that - particular type of crime, is that one for— particular type of crime, is that one for which suspects are typically taken _ one for which suspects are typically taken into— one for which suspects are typically taken into a custodial arrest? typically— taken into a custodial arrest? typically not. taken into a custodial arrest? typically not-— taken into a custodial arrest? typically not-_ "i taken into a custodial arrest? l typically not._ if it taken into a custodial arrest? i typically not._ if it is typically not. why is that? if it is not a violent _ typically not. why is that? if it is not a violent felon, _ typically not. why is that? if it is not a violent felon, felony, - typically not. why is that? if it is not a violent felon, felony, we i not a violent felon, felony, we also, in coordination with ourjail system and courts, there has been a shift over the years to make sure that the individuals were going to jail are those who from a public safety standpoint need to be at least in that facility in a county jail and if we can properly identify and it is not a violent situation, we can always charge of your complaint and other things. so that is one of the reasons why. you complaint and other things. so that is one of the reasons why.- is one of the reasons why. you use the phrase — is one of the reasons why. you use the phrase violent _ is one of the reasons why. you use the phrase violent felony, - is one of the reasons why. you use the phrase violent felony, what - is one of the reasons why. you use the phrase violent felony, what is l the phrase violent felony, what is the phrase violent felony, what is the more — the phrase violent felony, what is the more important part, whether it is violent— the more important part, whether it is violent or — the more important part, whether it is violent or whether it's a felony? violence — is violent or whether it's a felony? violence. ~ , . is violent or whether it's a felony? violence. ~ , , .,
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is violent or whether it's a felony? violence._ certainly i violence. why is that? certainly endangering _ violence. why is that? certainly endangering the _ violence. why is that? certainly endangering the officers. - violence. why is that? certainly - endangering the officers. something that is merely _ endangering the officers. something that is merely labelled _ endangering the officers. something that is merely labelled a _ endangering the officers. something that is merely labelled a felony - endangering the officers. something that is merely labelled a felony may| that is merely labelled a felony may or may— that is merely labelled a felony may or may not — that is merely labelled a felony may or may not require a full custodial arrest? _ or may not require a full custodial arrest? . . v. . or may not require a full custodial arrest?_ are - or may not require a full custodial arrest?_ are many l arrest? that is arrest. are many haless arrest? that is arrest. are many hapless police — arrest? that is arrest. are many hapless police officers _ arrest? that is arrest. are many hapless police officers trained i arrest? that is arrest. are many hapless police officers trained in these _ hapless police officers trained in these force?_ hapless police officers trained in these force? yes. preservice in the academ , these force? yes. preservice in the academy. also _ these force? yes. preservice in the academy, also post— these force? u23 preservice in the academy, also post service, at service — academy, also post service, at service training?— academy, also post service, at service training? yes. are officers to ed service training? yes. are officers topped the _ service training? u23 are officers topped the standard of force must be reasonable at the time it is applied? reasonable at the time it is a- lied? . reasonable at the time it is applied?- the - reasonable at the time it is applied?- the entire i reasonable at the time it is applied? yes. the entire time it is a- lied? applied? yes. the entire time it is applied? yes- _ applied? yes. the entire time it is applied? yes. are _ applied? yes. the entire time it is applied? yes. are officers - applied? yes. the entire time it is applied? yes. are officers taughtl applied? yes. are officers taught the need to _ applied? u23 are officers taught the need to reassess and re—evaluate situations _ the need to reassess and re—evaluate situations in— the need to reassess and re—evaluate situations in the field? yes. are ou situations in the field? yes. are you familiar _ situations in the field? yes. are you familiar with _ situations in the field? u23 are you familiar with minneapolis police department's critical thinking model? — department's critical thinking model? . department's critical thinking model?- how _ department's critical thinking model?- how are - department's critical thinking model? yes. how are you familiar with that? —
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model? yes. how are you familiar with that? it _ model? yes. how are you familiar with that? it was _ model? yes. how are you familiar with that? it was something - model? yes. how are you familiar with that? it was something that l model? yes. how are you familiar with that? it was something that i wanted to embark— with that? it was something that i wanted to embark and _ with that? it was something that i wanted to embark and make - with that? it was something that i wanted to embark and make sure| with that? it was something that i - wanted to embark and make sure that was part of our training curriculum that also includes the aspect of procedural justice. that also includes the aspect of proceduraljustice. and procedural justice is really actually researched and evidence—based learning that has shown that if police departments treat people with respect, give them voice, establish neutral engagements, and build areas of trust, it, communities are more likely to cooperate with us. we are likely to cooperate with us. we are likely to cooperate with us. we are likely to be seen more as legitimate. it has actually shown that employees come to work, that wellness is better. studio: we are listening to the police chief of many hapless giving evidence under questioning from the prosecution in the, derek chauvin was sacked by that police chief. we
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will continue to bring coverage of that trial. thanks for watching. hello, there. the cold northerly winds have arrived today. they're going to be with us only for a day or so. but arctic air has now swept down across the whole of the country, which is why it feels a lot colder than it did yesterday. we had a band of cloud earlier on. that swept through, and you can see all the shower clouds that have been streaming in and that cold wind. it's been northern scotland bearing the brunt of the snow today. for many parts of england and wales, it's been dry, and there's been some welcome sunshine around as well, but temperatures a lot lower than yesterday. a very dramatic scene here in belfast in northern ireland. there has been some wintry showers here, and those are continuing through this evening and overnight. more snow to come in northern parts of scotland. some of those wintry showers head into west wales, the southwest of england, so some icy conditions where we have those showers. not far away from the east coast
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of england, but for many in land areas, it is going to be dry and clear and colder more widely than it was last night. so widespread frosts, —1 to —3. tomorrow is another cold day, more snow showers in the same sort of areas, so primarily the northern parts of scotland, but some for northern ireland heading into wales. gradually through the day, the cloud will build up in land, and almost anywhere in the afternoon could catch a passing snow shower. they are driven on by those strong northerly winds. strongest in northern scotland again, gusts of 50—60 mph. temperatures on tuesday, similar to what we had this afternoon, so 3—9 celsius if you're lucky, but given the strong and gusty winds, especially near those snow showers, it will feel a lot colder and it's more typical, really, of the middle of winter. by the time we get to wednesday, those colder, stronger winds are out of the way. still another cold start, mind you. many places, though,
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will have a dry day. we've still got some snow showers left over in the northeast of scotland, but most of them are now by this stage into the north sea, and instead, we look to the west to see advancing cloud coming in, maybe a little light rain or drizzle into northern ireland and parts of wales. many places will be dry, but as it clouds over after that cold start, it's still a cold day on wednesday, but not as windy by any means. the colder strong winds are heading away from the uk, and we are starting to see our weather coming in from the atlantic. so it's less cold air. we are left with low pressure to the north of the uk and some brisker winds probably on thursday and some rain, but still dry in the south.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm: borisjohnson confirms that the next step in england's road map out of lockdown can go ahead, with shops, hairdressers and outdoor hositality opening next monday. hospitality opening next monday. no decision has been made about when foreign travel can resume, but when it is allowed, a "traffic light" system of countries will be introduced. from this friday, everyone in england will have access to two free rapid tests a week. the emergency doctor who pronounced george floyd dead gives testimony in the murder trial against former police officer derek chauvin. police searching for missing 19—year—old student richard okorogheye say a body has been found in epping forest. tributes are paid to dame cheryl gillan, the conservative mp for chesham and amersham, who died today.

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