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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 9, 2021 3:00pm-3:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, warns it would be "completely outrageous" for the westminster government to block a second independence referendum. the people of scotland have voted for the snp based on a second referendum. the labour leader sir keir starmer prepares to reshuffle his team after the party's disappointing performance in the elections — he's already removed his deputy, angela rayner, as campaigns chief. police are granted more time
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to question a man arrested in connection with the murder of community support the government is expected to end the advice against hugging each other, as part of the relaxation of lockdown rules in england next week. and disruption continues on some of britain's busiest rail lines, after small cracks are found in some high speed trains. good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has said any attempt by the westminster government to block a second independence referendum would show a "lack of respect" for scottish democracy. she was speaking after the cabinet office minister, michael gove, said the snp's failure to win an outright majority at holyrood proved that people in scotland weren't "agitating" for a new poll. mr gove said the snp should concentrate on recovering from the pandemic instead. from edinburgh, here's our political correspondent nick eardley.
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back in power, back to work. nicola sturgeon says her immediate priority will be the pandemic, but a battle is coming. the snp won the election by some distance, and even though they were short of a majority alone, with the greens, there is a comfortable pro—independence majority and the first minister says that is a mandate. the people of scotland have voted for the snp on the strength of offering, when the time is right, an independence referendum. and as in 2011 leading up to 2014, any uk government that has any respect for scottish democracy would simply accept that and come to an agreement with the scottish government that put it beyond any legal doubt. holyrood will now pass a referendum bill and ms sturgeon warned of the consequences of trying to block it in the courts. i think it would be absurd and completely outrageous if it ever got to that point, if it ever got anywhere close to that point. but the uk government does
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want to stop another referendum anytime soon. ministers won't give political consent to one and they don't want to talk about legal battles for now. the priority at the moment is not court cases, it is not independence legislation, it is recovery from the pandemic. and to be fair to the first minister, to be fair to nicola sturgeon, during the course of this election campaign, she said that was the single most important thing that we should all be concentrating on. and we should work together as team uk in order to deal with the pandemic. is scotland allowed to leave the uk? of course it is. it is? yes. how? well, through a legal referendum which would allow people to make that choice. the question is if and how that could ever happen. a question which downing street is none too keen to answer. but ministers in london will spend the next few months arguing another referendum would be a distraction, and that working together would mean
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a speedier recovery. independence supporters here disagree, saying that in a union based on consent, the election result means there is no legitimate argument for blocking a referendum. the prime minister has invited the leaders of scotland and wales to a summit on covid recovery. they all agree the pandemic is the priority for now, but over the next few months and years, the future of the uk is going to be a big issue. well, i spoke to nick a little earlier about how each government would approach the prospect of another referendum. i think we got a sign, a sample of the battle to come over the next few years with the first minister and the cabinet office minister for the uk government this morning. you had nicola sturgeon saying, look, we have to focus on the pandemic in the immediate term. but in two or three years�* time, i think i have a mandate
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to hold another referendum, and it would be anti—democratic for westminster to block it. michael gove said that now is not the time and we have to focus on the pandemic and the economic recovery. it was interesting that he was asked about this idea of the whole thing ending up in the courts and hejust did not want to go there this morning. i think the uk government's strategy is to talk about what it sees as the other priorities and the positives of the union. but, look, there is no doubt that there is a big constitutional clash coming in the next few years over whether or not nicola sturgeon, who is based here — bute house in edinburgh — whether or not she can hold another referendum. there's an argument as well that the recovery is going to take a nationwide effort. we understand borisjohnson will want to have the scottish government and the welsh and northern irish assemblies also involved. so they have got to try to get along. yes, so borisjohnson has invited ms sturgeon and the welsh first minister mark drakeford to a summit
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to discuss the covid recovery. ms sturgeon said that she is up for it and will attend, and i suppose the slight difference between the two positions is that nicola sturgeon says, when it comes to the health emergency, she will focus on that until she thinks about another referendum. michael gove this morning was saying, wait a minute, you need to think about the economic recovery process as well. the argument you will get from the scottish independence movement is they need the tools of independence to have an economic recovery that suits scotland. but the uk government will say, hold on, look at the vaccine roll—out and the furlough scheme, they are all things that have been made easier because they've been done across the whole of the uk. the snp are on course for 19 years of power now, and that is a big deal. that is going to be the longest term of any government since devolution in scotland.
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the pro—independence parties have theirjoint biggest—ever majority, and that is a big deal because the last time they had 72 msps, david cameron said yes to alex salmond for the first independence referendum. but it's interesting when you dig into the figures of the election result. if you add up the tallies that all the pro—independence parties and the anti—independence parties got, they are pretty much the same, they're 50—50. if you look at the polls in the last few weeks, they have been around 50—50 as well. if you look at the average of those polls anyway. although the independence movement is in a really good place and they are really happy with the election result, the country is still pretty split and i think that means we will spend at least another three years talking about the process before we get to potentially, even then, the point of another referendum. and nicola sturgeon wants to work out the answers to some pretty big questions as well, so she's not going to be rushing into it. we can speak now to torcuil crichton, the westminster editor
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of the daily record. lovely to see you. nick said three years. how lonely you think it will take to get to a referendum? == years. how lonely you think it will take to get to a referendum? -- how [am take to get to a referendum? -- how lona do take to get to a referendum? -- how long do you — take to get to a referendum? -- how long do you think? _ take to get to a referendum? -- how long do you think? it _ take to get to a referendum? -- how long do you think? it is _ take to get to a referendum? -- how long do you think? it is a _ take to get to a referendum? -- how long do you think? it is a long - take to get to a referendum? -- how long do you think? it is a long way, l long do you think? it is a long way, because the uk government do not want to go there. whenever nicola sturgeon says referendum, they will say recovery. when the snp says constitution, the uk government will say cash. the uk government is trying to draw the scottish government onto the ground of covid recovery and a united kingdom and this summit that borisjohnson is calling. at the same time, nicola sturgeon wants to throw uk government into a big fight in the supreme court where the uk government has to strike down referendum bill and that would not be a good look for borisjohnson or the uk government. it would look like a denial of democracy. so the
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uk government has started boxing clever, and hopes the scottish government will do its job for it, because, as we all know, the scotland act of 1988 does not allow the scottish parliament to pass referendum or stage a referendum on its own. it depends on the competence of the scottish government to do that and the uk government to do that and the uk government hopes the scottish government's and was would simply tell nicola sturgeon that you cannot do this. —— government's own laws. so they hope they can put a legal obstacle in the path of the snp before it even gets to court. meanwhile, they are going to hug scotland and the are going to be a bit more muscular with what the union means as well and defending the union. ., ~ , , ., the union. how likely is it that boris johnson _ the union. how likely is it that boris johnson will _ the union. how likely is it that boris johnson will love - the union. how likely is it that i
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boris johnson will love scotland? the union. how likely is it that - boris johnson will love scotland? at borisjohnson will love scotland? at arm's length? he hasn't spent much time there. fix, arm's length? he hasn't spent much time there. �* arm's length? he hasn't spent much time there-— time there. a huge tactic will be auoin to time there. a huge tactic will be going to scotland _ time there. a huge tactic will be going to scotland and _ time there. a huge tactic will be going to scotland and he - time there. a huge tactic will be going to scotland and he now. time there. a huge tactic will be - going to scotland and he now cannot take any credit for the scottish conservatives being in holyrood for holding the line for the union in scotland. he did not come for a good reason, because borisjohnson himself is seen as as someone who drives support for independence. of nationalists do not talk about independence in terms of getting rid of westminster tory government. —— lots of nationalists. he is a bogeyman for the nationalists, so he is staying away. and him staying away and saying no, he has not said no forever, but not now, and i think, for as long as borisjohnson is prime minister, he cannot concede a second referendum, even though democratic votes and political
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pressure might corner him into that. how strong a position is nicola sturgeon in giving that the snp didn't win the outright majority as the westminster government is not going to tire of —— telling her? had going to tire of -- telling her? had she not a going to tire of —— telling her? herc she got a bigger majority, there will be more pressure from within the nationalist party and from the fringes. alex salmond, who led the alba party for a referendum yesterday, did not score, didn't get any msps in this collection. so nicola sturgeon has got the kind of mandate that the parliamentary mandate, with the greens, to demand a referendum, but she does not have the outright majority of an snp dominated parliament to go ahead with that. so she could push on it, and she knows while the country is
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split 50—50, the country is split right down the middle, she knows she does not want a referendum on these terms. it is too risky. just as it is too risky for borisjohnson to allow it to go ahead. it might go up one way or another. she has to build a case for a referendum. because brexit kind of ruptured and changed scotland's relationship with the uk, a material change the snp say are the grounds for a second independence referendum. it also changed the terms of the skagen independence referendum, because then you would be talking about a brexit border between scotland of the united kingdom. you might talk about using the euro instead of sterling and nicola sturgeon will campaign to show she has the —— does not have the plan to do this. but
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the entire focus is on rebuilding the entire focus is on rebuilding the nhs, rebuilding the economy, catching up in education, creating jobs, supporting tourism, not a mention of independence. so it will be hovering in the background, but i think all politicians now have got the message that they need to get over covid first. find the message that they need to get over covid first.— the message that they need to get over covid first. and you know what ou will over covid first. and you know what you will be — over covid first. and you know what you will be writing _ over covid first. and you know what you will be writing about _ over covid first. and you know what you will be writing about quite - over covid first. and you know what you will be writing about quite a - you will be writing about quite a bit. thank you for talking to us. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, is preparing to announce a reshuffle of his shadow cabinet. the move comes after his party lost control of several councils in england's local elections, as well as the hartlepool by—election. he's already been criticised by some high—profile figures on the left of the party for removing campaigning responsibilities from his deputy, angela rayner. helen catt has the latest. morning, mr starmer. a laid—back look for the labour leader, his task ahead anything but. is this the first of many changes, mr starmer?
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these elections have been bruising for labour, losing councils in places like durham, which they had held for nearly a century beforehand, has been particularly painful. keir starmer said he would take responsibility for the results, but his decision last night to sack the deputy leader angela rayner from her role running campaigns and as party chair has reignited fights over labour's future and its leadership. when the leader of the party on friday says he takes full responsibility for the election result in hartlepool in particular, and then scapegoats angela rayner, i think many of us feel that is unfair. what public relations genius thought this was a good move on the very day, actually, we were having successes? he means brighter spots like these, labour has won in several mayoral races, such as greater manchester, where andy burnham was re—elected, and london, where sadiq khan secured a second term. some in the current shadow cabinet have defended their leader. the responsibility as leader
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is of course deciding what team you need around you for the next stage of what is a really difficult battle for us and labour, to rebuild trust with the voters. you know, taking tough decisions is what leaders do. who keir starmer decides to keep in his reshuffle and who he sacks may give an indication of where he thinks the party needs to go. does he keep on trying to unify all the different bits or does he, in effect, pick a side? and that might apply to the voters party wants to reconnect with, too. is it about what it has currently got, which is essentially young voters, graduates, social liberals, remainers, or is it still the party of the working class in britain, which is what it would still like to be, but, frankly, at the moment isn't? with its leader in office forjust over a year now, labour's challenge to find a message that chimes with voters looks just as tough as it ever did. let's speak to our political correspondent in westminster, chris mason.
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some serious soul—searching going on within the labour party. yes. some serious soul-searching going on within the labour party.— within the labour party. yes, the dayjubilant _ within the labour party. yes, the dayjubilant party _ within the labour party. yes, the dayjubilant party celebrates - within the labour party. yes, the dayjubilant party celebrates and | dayjubilant party celebrates and disappears and has a glass of something bubbly, and the one that is wounded begins some pretty public introspection. i havejust is wounded begins some pretty public introspection. i have just looked is wounded begins some pretty public introspection. i havejust looked to bring you the latest on this reshuffle and there is no sign of any of the labour leadership, sir keir starmer or any of his team. they have gone very quiet in preparation for the queen's speech, the new term of parliament coming in a couple of days' time. it looks like we might get something soon, not least because the leadership needs to clear up what on earth was going on around mount angela rayner, the deputy leader of the party. —— around angela rayner. the other role of responsibility she had been given ljy of responsibility she had been given
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by sickest armour, particularly around campaigning. there are those from labour and today saying it has been a mix—up and she will still be a seniorfigure, but been a mix—up and she will still be a senior figure, but there been a mix—up and she will still be a seniorfigure, but there has been no clarification yet from sir keir starmer. and at the same time, all sorts of blood—letting and introspection and anger and commentary all happening in public. some on the left who were loyal to jeremy corbyn under his leadership suggesting a variation of i told you so, one suggesting you should not rule out a leadership race. i think thatis rule out a leadership race. i think that is unlikely, but it gives you some sense of the anger. and the huge questions that plenty of those in labour are asking, which is how unearthly they bounce back from this? how do they overcome massive hurdles that stand between where they are now in winning a general election? and, brutally, for lots of labour mps looking at that by—election result in hartlepool, they will be thinking, how do we go on to win an election but how on earth do i go on to hold my seat if
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thatis earth do i go on to hold my seat if that is what happened in hartlepool? that had a labour mp since 1964. so huge number of difficult questions for the labour party to wrestle with. and the prospect of at least some answers as far as personnel is concerned in the couple of hours to come. but perhaps that will leak over into the beginning of next week. ., ., , the government is expected to announce we'll be able to hug each other as part of the next relaxation of lockdown rules in england on may 17th. our correspondent sangita myska is here. sangita, what more can you tell us? you can tell from migraine how happy i am about this. i would rather have a hug than a holiday. hat i am about this. i would rather have a hug than a holiday.— a hug than a holiday. not quite yet! you are right. _ a hug than a holiday. not quite yet! you are right, you _ a hug than a holiday. not quite yet! you are right, you said _ a hug than a holiday. not quite yet! you are right, you said this - a hug than a holiday. not quite yet! you are right, you said this to - a hug than a holiday. not quite yet! you are right, you said this to me i you are right, you said this to me earlier that this is the story of the day for most around the country because we know what an impact lockdown has had on people's mental
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health. not being able to hug or see each other, not being able to kiss each other, not being able to kiss each other, not being able to kiss each other when we have friends around even in the garden, this could feel like i really massive turnaround for much of the country. but, and i hate to do this to you, i will stand by everybody�*s mother, cautious optimism is the way to treat a sneeze. —— i will sound like everybody�*s mother. —— is to treat this disease. the line government is using is they would like to see intimate contact between family and friends restored. we don't have any idea what that means until the press conference tomorrow, but we can't bring you what michael gove said on the andrew marr show this morning. the prime minister will confirm tomorrow that there will be a relaxation. we have already indicated a proportionate relaxation on international travel. very, very limited at this stage because we have to be safe. and in the same way as we move into stage three of our road map, it will be the case that we will see
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people capable of meeting indoors, and without prejudice to a broader review of social distancing, it is also the case of friendly contact, intimate contact between family and friends is something that we want to see restored. the 17th of may or thereabouts hugging, as we call it. - yes. michael gove talking to andrew marr. we have to say, it is not going to be compulsory when it comes happen. —— when it comes about. it will not be compulsory! but there will be some science behind this i imagine about what is going to be permissible and by whom. yes, so far no solid details, _ permissible and by whom. yes, so far no solid details, but _ permissible and by whom. yes, so far no solid details, but what _ permissible and by whom. yes, so far no solid details, but what we - permissible and by whom. yes, so far no solid details, but what we do - no solid details, but what we do know is what the government has been doing at each stage of raising restrictions, waiting for four—week blocks they can assess the data and we are expecting that press conference tomorrow. needless to say, news organisations have been going out to get a reaction and we
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are already hearing from scientists involved in assessments that they want to see tomorrow is something thatis want to see tomorrow is something that is very cautious move forward. for example, a professorfrom the university of leeds sits on the sage committee that has been advising the government and is one of the voices that says, look, we must do everything on a case—by—case basis so the government must be crystal—clear with the public about what they can do safely and what they cannot. here she is. we need to be a bit careful with that. i mean, it's perhaps depends on who you are hugging. if you are hugging a grandparent, hugging a grandchild and the grandparents are fully vaccinated, that is probably quite a low—risk activity most of the time. but it would worry me if we were advocating we can hold all ——hug all of our friends every time we meet, because i think that is going to perpetuate an awful lot of additional close contact that could still spread the virus.
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thank you very much. i do not think i have ever talked about hugging so much. g ., ., much. the next time we ce java, we miaht be much. the next time we ce java, we might be able _ much. the next time we ce java, we might be able to! _ much. the next time we ce java, we might be able to! -- _ much. the next time we ce java, we might be able to! -- the _ much. the next time we ce java, we might be able to! -- the next - much. the next time we ce java, we might be able to! -- the next time | might be able to! -- the next time we see each _ might be able to! -- the next time we see each other. _ might be able to! -- the next time we see each other. sport - might be able to! -- the next time we see each other. sport now. - good afternoon. manchester city could be crowned premier league champions, were their nearest rivals manhcester united to lose. we'll start with the early kick off as brighton were made to wait in securing their premier league survival after losing to wolves. it was the vistors who took the lead, a goal from captain lewis dunk. however, dunk was then sent off to leave brighton down to ten men, and adama traore found the equaliser for wolves in the second half, before morgan gibbs—white sealed a last minute winner.
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brighton needing one more result to go their way to secure survival. west ham can close the gap to fourth placed leicester to just two points with a win over everton, while west brom will be relegated if they're beaten at arsenal. in the women's super league, chelsea will be crowned champions for a second consecutive season with victory over reading. they're two points clear of manchester city, who could pip them to the title on the final day were chelsea to lose and they beat west ham. it is not going to happen at the moment. chelsea are leading to— zero. at the bottom, bristol city the likely of the three teams that could go down. they're two points adrift and losing to brighton. cardiff blues edged out dragons by 17 points to 16 in the second
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round of the pro14 rainbow cup. despite losing their lead after centre owen lane was sent off for this foul, the hosts fought back to win at cardiff arms park. replacement lock teddy williams�* converted try giving cardiff their first win in this season's competition. world athletics president lord coe says athletes must be prepared to make sacrifices while competing at the olympic games this summer, with the coronavirus pandemic continuing to impact hosts, japan. a national state of emergency remains across large parts of the country, including tokyo, with competitors unlikely to enjoy many of the freedoms of previous games. the japanese public remain fearful the arrival of over 10,000 athletes from 200 different countries and regions could lead to a further rise in cases. in order to compete and in order to be at a games that has some of the most challenging complexities attached to it, there will be
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sacrifices that must be made. we will not do anything to put themselves in jeopardy or the local community. rory mcilroy is well placed to win his first title since 2019. he heads into today's final round of the pga tour event in north carolina two shots off the lead. this birdie putt in a third round 68 helped put him in position to challenge for victory. bryson dechambeau is down the field, but had to make a hasty 2000—mile round trip before saturday's third round. he'd gone home to dallas on friday thinking he'd missed the cut. halfway through the flight my agent texts, and he's like, "hey, you're 68th now" and i was like, "what?" there's no way i'm going to make it. sure enough, by the time i landed i was in 64th and connor goes, "whoops, that was a mistake!" too expensive and some rather
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unneeded fights for him. —— unneeded flights. —— unneeded flights. britain's billyjoe saunders has been left with a suspected broken eye socket after being stopped by canelo alvarez in their super—middleweight unification fight last night. the bout held in front of 73,000 fans in texas, the largest ever crowd for an indoor boxing event in america. and saunders appeared to be growing into the contest before a brutal uppercut from alvarez in the eighth round resulted in hevay swelling around his eye, and resulted in his team throwing in the towel. alvarez knew immediately after that his opponent would be unable to continue and so it proved with three rounds of the contest remaining. a reminder the spanish grand prix's under way — lewis hamilton with his 100th pole, but trails max verstappen in what is proving to be a fascinating tussle between the pair. around ten laps remaining. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport that is it from me from the socially
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distanced distance, it is back to you. i think we are within the rules, john. virtual high fives until tomorrow! rules, john. virtual high fives untiltomorrow! i'm rules, john. virtual high fives until tomorrow! i'm sure we will get together at some point to celebrate it all being over. nice to see you. thank you. 3:27pm. 3:27pm. police investigating the death of community support officer julia james have been granted more time to question a man in his 20s. 53—year—old ms james was found dead on the 27th of april in woodland near dover. she'd suffered serious head injuries. police arrested a man from the canterbury area on friday. our correspondent simonjones is in aylesham and he gave us this update on the investigation. this is day 13 of the murder investigation. the man arrested was detained on friday evening at around 9:30pm and today officers have been granted more time to question him, an additional 36 hours.
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and that means they can continue to question him until tomorrow evening. now, at that point, they will have to decide whether to release him, charge him, or they could apply for another 24 hours to question him. today there has been a large amount of activity at this property close to the murder scene. we have seen forensic officers inside the house, coming and going, taking out objects from the property, carrying out a search of a skip, looking at the garden, they have been taking up paving slabs. we do not know whose house it is but the police have confirmed the searches are connected to the murder investigation. julia james was killed on tuesday of last week. she had been working from home that day. she took her dog for a walk when she was attacked. officers are continuing to appeal for information and want to hear from anybody who might have seen anything suspicious that day between 1pm and 4:30pm. police say particularly local people may have seen somebody strange
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or acting in an unusual manner, perhaps to the extent that they might have crossed the road to avoid that person or perhaps decide to take a different path. police want to hear from anyone who felt that way. there are hundreds of officers in this investigation. kent police are getting support from other forces too, and the national crime agency and the family are saying theyjust hope there is progress in this case soon. israel's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, has defended his handling of two nights of violence injerusalem, warning that threats to peace and order would not be tolerated. last night saw renewed clashes between palestinians and israeli police, after days of simmering unrest over possible evictions of palestinians from land claimed byjewish settlers. israel's attorney—general has now asked the supreme court to postpone a hearing on the planned evictions. our correspondent injerusalem — yolande knell — explained more.
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well, shaikh jarrah is an east jerusalem neighbourhood not far from here, and that's where there are many palestinian families who have been facing imminent eviction, withjewish settlers laying claim to the land saying that the land was owned byjews prior to 1948 when the state of israel was created. they were forced to leave because of fighting that took place then. those palestinian families are people, in the main, who are refugees from other parts of land that became the state of israel and they were resettled there by the united nations and with the backing of thejordanians when they were in control of the land. this has been a long—running court case with palestinian families really fighting for many years to try to keep their properties. there are small properties dotted around that already in the hands ofjewish settlers and it can be very tense in that neighbourhood although it remains a majority of palestinians living there. it's going to come as a huge relief
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that the attorney general has got involved and has asked israel's supreme court, which is due to have a crunch hearing on monday, about this case, to postpone that.

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