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tv   The Papers  BBC News  May 9, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm BST

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that's particularly cold, mind you. that's how the week is shaping up, it is sunshine, showers, some of those will be quite heavy, and not as cold as was last week — it mainly frost free, i don't know if we're done with frost at the moment, but certainly not around this week.
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hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment, first the headlines. a reshuffle for labour's shadow cabinet — after the party's disappointing election performance. changes made by sir keir starmer include a new shadow chancellor and chief whip, and a new front bench role for angela rayner. labour's tracy brabin is elected as the first mayor of west yorkshire. but she'll have to resign her westminster seat, triggering a by—election
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in batley and spen. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, warns it would be "completely outrageous" for the westminster government to block a second independence referendum. hugs are to be — officially — ok again in england with an announcement due tomorrow on the next lockdown easing. the government is calling on the rail industry to fix disruption on some of britain's busiest rail lines, after small cracks were found in some high speed trains. hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are parliamentaryjournalist tony grew, and journalist and broadcaster caroline frost.
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first, look at tamara's front pages. "starmer�*s leadership in crisis" is the guardian's front page as the labour leader reshuffles his top team. the paper says a plan to demote angela rayner was derailed and led to hours of negotiations. the former leaderjeremy corbyn warns that a reshuffle won't save the party — that's the main story for the online independent newspaper. some good news for labour on the front of the yorkshire post, as tracy brabin celebrates becoming the first west yorkshire metro mayor. but her victory will mean a by—election in batley and spen. "darling hugs of may" is the headline on tomorrow's metro, which reports the prime minister will tomorrow lay out the next relaxation of coronavirus restrictions for 17 may, which will include a return of hugs. the daily mail says borisjohnson will ride on the back of this week's election success, as well as that of the vaccine roll—out, as he announces that friends and families can once again
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hug one another. same lead story for the express — the papers says that the prime minister intends the unlocking to be cautious but "irreversible". so let's begin. tony, caroline, thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us. let's go to you caroline, the front page of the guardian, as with so many front pages this evening, understandably talking about circular starmer, the issues that —— circular starmer, the issues that —— circular starmer, the issues that —— circular starmer, and the issues that labour i've faced the last one he for hours, we can talk about the reshuffle, because we have had the news, some of the papers haven't had them —— kier starmer. news, some of the papers haven't had them -- kier starmer.— them -- kier starmer. that's right. so riaht them -- kier starmer. that's right. so right up — them -- kier starmer. that's right. so right up until— them -- kier starmer. that's right. so right up until we _ them -- kier starmer. that's right. so right up until we have _ them -- kier starmer. that's right. so right up until we have come - them -- kier starmer. that's right. so right up until we have come on i so right up until we have come on air, it has all been changed as they try to regroup after. some people have put a good spin on comes —— some labour members have said it doesn't affect the entire national
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consensus on the opposition, however, clearly, circular starmer is in a position where he has to somehow tie up these loose ends, regroup from is about the different parts of his party together. —— kier starmer. with a lot of infighting. i mean, you think you have your opposition on the other side of the house, but clearly, it is a fractured opposition at the moment, hence these debates about where angela rayner should go. because the minute he did come it was leaked that she would be going immediately to backlash, she has her own power base as the deputy leader of the party. they accused her of scapegoating or where the buck stops at his desk. it's all a bit fractured, and he didn't is visage spending at this we can. that fractured, and he didn't is visage spending at this we can.- fractured, and he didn't is visage spending at this we can. that is the ke oint, spending at this we can. that is the key point. isn't _ spending at this we can. that is the key point, isn't it? _ spending at this we can. that is the key point, isn't it? this _ spending at this we can. that is the key point, isn't it? this is _ spending at this we can. that is the key point, isn't it? this is not - key point, isn't it? this is not normally how a leader wanted to be going or to go. normally how a leader wanted to be going or to 90-— normally how a leader wanted to be going or to go-_ going or to go. know, the entire rocess going or to go. know, the entire process has _ going or to go. know, the entire process has been _ going or to go. know, the entire process has been shambolic. - going or to go. know, the entire l process has been shambolic. here starmer_ process has been shambolic. here starmer came out on friday morning and said. _ starmer came out on friday morning and said. i'rn — starmer came out on friday morning and said, i'm going to take response
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ability— and said, i'm going to take response ability for— and said, i'm going to take response ability for our losses and emerges as the _ ability for our losses and emerges as the papers are going into publication in saturday evening that he will _ publication in saturday evening that he will sack angela rayner as no one had identified as having anything to do with_ had identified as having anything to do with this defeat that labour i've faced~ _ do with this defeat that labour i've faced. then he tries to have a reshuffle _ faced. then he tries to have a reshuffle. he hasn't. this has been going _ reshuffle. he hasn't. this has been going on— reshuffle. he hasn't. this has been going on now for 24 hours that he has been — going on now for 24 hours that he has been attempting to reshuffle his team _ has been attempting to reshuffle his team as _ has been attempting to reshuffle his team as if— has been attempting to reshuffle his team. as if that wasn't shambolic enough. — team. as if that wasn't shambolic enough. he — team. as if that wasn't shambolic enough, he then announces these new shadow— enough, he then announces these new shadow cabinet positions after this has come _ shadow cabinet positions after this has come to press. labour did have a bad has come to press. labour did have a had night, _ has come to press. labour did have a bad night, but it wasn't as bad as some _ bad night, but it wasn't as bad as some people have painted it. you know, _ some people have painted it. you know. the — some people have painted it. you know, the thursday to friday story was about — know, the thursday to friday story was about them losing the by election. _ was about them losing the by election, but today into monday's paper— election, but today into monday's paper should have been about tracy wihhihg, _ paper should have been about tracy winning, about how labour 111 out of 13 of the _ winning, about how labour 111 out of 13 of the seats that were up for etection— 13 of the seats that were up for election and how they did well and wales, _ election and how they did well and wales, and for the papers that are covering _ wales, and for the papers that are covering it. — wales, and for the papers that are covering it, it'sjust about chaos and confusion. covering it, it's 'ust about chaos and confusion.— covering it, it's 'ust about chaos and confusion. caroline, we move onto the independent, _ and confusion. caroline, we move onto the independent, because i and confusion. caroline, we move. onto the independent, because the
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front there, it talks about the former leader, jeremy corbyn, coming out and criticising sir kier starmer�*s boat. here it says that writing in the independent, he accused kier starmer of failing to inspire supporters and urged them to learn the lessons from this disaster and didn't develop a vision that can fix a broken system. do you think there are lessons to be learned here? , , , �* here? this is grueling, isn't it? because of— here? this is grueling, isn't it? because of course, _ here? this is grueling, isn't it? because of course, sir- here? this is grueling, isn't it? because of course, sir kier- here? this is grueling, isn't it? - because of course, sir kier starmer was always very careful when he was on jeremy corbyn's front bench. was always very careful when he was onjeremy corbyn's front bench. he kept his counsel. we didn't get these attacks coming in the other direction from about clearly it is open season. this follows john mcdonald's very sort of mild—mannered smiling assassin attempts this morning to say i have no beef with angela rayner, but this is a scapegoating exercise, and off he went. all these attacks coming from all sides of the party. i think certainly there are lessons to be learned, but probably one of them which the tory party and i hate to say this, have shown how you control
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all elements of the party, not everybody approved of how boris johnson went about tidying up his cabinet, as we remember, but obviously, in hindsight, it did do thejob that he obviously, in hindsight, it did do the job that he wanted it to do. kier starmer seems to be having far more problems putting this big ball of wool back into a position at all. do you agree with that? is it about control? it’s do you agree with that? is it about control? �* , ., ,., do you agree with that? is it about control? �*, ., , . control? it's about competence rather than _ control? it's about competence rather than control. _ control? it's about competence rather than control. i _ control? it's about competence rather than control. i find - control? it's about competence rather than control. i find it - rather than control. i find it ironic— rather than control. i find it ironic that— rather than control. i find it ironic thatjeremy rather than control. i find it ironic that jeremy corbyn things he's in — ironic that jeremy corbyn things he's in a — ironic that jeremy corbyn things he's in a position to lecture anyone about— he's in a position to lecture anyone about party— he's in a position to lecture anyone about party unity or how to win elections. _ about party unity or how to win elections, but you know, here starmer— elections, but you know, here starmer has brought this mess, as it were, _ starmer has brought this mess, as it were, on— starmer has brought this mess, as it were, on himself. look, reshuffling can be _ were, on himself. look, reshuffling can be difficult, especially if you are a _ can be difficult, especially if you are a weak— can be difficult, especially if you are a weak leader. and the conservatives are in government, so what happens with the matters to voters. _ what happens with the matters to voters, whereas this isjust more of the labour— voters, whereas this isjust more of the labour party focused internally, having _ the labour party focused internally, having fights in the sand pit once again— having fights in the sand pit once again as — having fights in the sand pit once again as ordinary voters get on with their lives— again as ordinary voters get on with their lives and don't see anything relevant — their lives and don't see anything relevant that the labour party is doing _ relevant that the labour party is doing at— relevant that the labour party is doing at the moment nationally that
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affects _ doing at the moment nationally that affects their lives or interests them, — affects their lives or interests them, quite frankly.— affects their lives or interests them, quite frankly. let's talk about the _ them, quite frankly. let's talk about the yorkshire _ them, quite frankly. let's talk about the yorkshire post - them, quite frankly. let's talk about the yorkshire post front them, quite frankly. let's talk - about the yorkshire post front page. this is a victory for labour. you know, it's important to underline that there were victories for labour. it wasn't all bad news. this is a pretty big one for them. tracy celebrates her victory to become the first metro mirror of west yorkshire, a historic moment, really, in terms of what she has achieved. however, important to underline that this does also create problems. it's a bit of a bitter sweet pill, isn't it? because there will not be a by election triggered for her parliamentary seat. 50 will not be a by election triggered for her parliamentary seat. so two thins to for her parliamentary seat. so two things to say _ for her parliamentary seat. so two things to say about _ for her parliamentary seat. so two things to say about this, _ for her parliamentary seat. so two things to say about this, as - for her parliamentary seat. so two things to say about this, as 22nd l for her parliamentary seat. so two | things to say about this, as 22nd of this has gone to press too late... the yorkshire post must be congratulated on their national school, however, this should have been the headline and tomorrow morning's papers, but, yes, this is historic. this is history making. congratulations to her. i think that shows the power of personality. this is a tv actress turned politician
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and something that's, again, we mentioned earlier about lessons, perhaps this is about having some personality punch. i hope she will climb and rise through the ranks very quickly, however, the bittersweet moment comes with that by election that it has triggered, because, of course commits the seats of spend chart very poignantly and significantly for the labour party was the seat thatjo cox had. it significantly for the labour party was the seat that jo cox had. it was indeed. was the seat that jo cox had. it was indeed- tony. _ was the seat that jo cox had. it was indeed. tony, it _ was the seat that jo cox had. it was indeed. tony, it is _ was the seat that jo cox had. it was indeed. tony, it is not _ was the seat that jo cox had. it was indeed. tony, it is not hartlepool, i indeed. tony, it is not hartlepool, is it? it is very different, but there must be some worry amongst labour supporters in central office about what potentially could happen in those constituencies.— in those constituencies. look, first of all, in those constituencies. look, first of all. i'm — in those constituencies. look, first of all, i'm delighted _ in those constituencies. look, first of all, i'm delighted for _ in those constituencies. look, first of all, i'm delighted for tracy, - in those constituencies. look, first of all, i'm delighted for tracy, she | of all, i'm delighted for tracy, she is one _ of all, i'm delighted for tracy, she is one of— of all, i'm delighted for tracy, she is one of the — of all, i'm delighted for tracy, she is one of the smartest, kindest mps, she has— is one of the smartest, kindest mps, she has also— is one of the smartest, kindest mps, she has also realised something that a lot of— she has also realised something that a lot of the _ she has also realised something that a lot of the labour party happens, which _ a lot of the labour party happens, which is _ a lot of the labour party happens, which is that you can actually achieve — which is that you can actually achieve a _ which is that you can actually achieve a lot more and have a lot more _ achieve a lot more and have a lot more profile if you are a mayor andy burnham, _ more profile if you are a mayor andy burnham, like sadiq khan, and sadiq khan burnham, like sadiq khan, and sadiq khahahd_ burnham, like sadiq khan, and sadiq khan and tracy show us something that the _ khan and tracy show us something that the labour party seem to have forgotten _ that the labour party seem to have forgotten which is that they can win _ forgotten which is that they can win its — forgotten which is that they can win. it's not all doom and gloom for them _ win. it's not all doom and gloom for them there — win. it's not all doom and gloom for
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them. there are seats up for election. _ them. there are seats up for election, labour111 them. there are seats up for election, labour 111 of them, but what _ election, labour 111 of them, but what you — election, labour 111 of them, but what you need a strong personalities, people who are rooted in their— personalities, people who are rooted in their communities and most important _ in their communities and most important of all, most important of all, important of all, most important of all. people — important of all, most important of all, people to talk about the priorities of the voters. that's, you know. _ priorities of the voters. that's, you know, one of the reasons why tracy— you know, one of the reasons why tracv has— you know, one of the reasons why tracy has one. obviously, about the by election— tracy has one. obviously, about the by election from your absolute rights, — by election from your absolute rights, hartlepool isn't those other places. _ rights, hartlepool isn't those other places, but the tories will be gunning _ places, but the tories will be gunning for that seat just as much as they— gunning for that seat just as much as they have done for hartlepool. but, you — as they have done for hartlepool. but, you know, just at a personal level. _ but, you know, just at a personal level. realty— but, you know, just at a personal level, really delighted for tracy, -- because— level, really delighted for tracy, —— because she is a big star in the labour— —— because she is a big star in the labour party. _ —— because she is a big star in the labour party, it's good to see her io labour party, it's good to see her go out _ labour party, it's good to see her go out there, put forward her case and but _ go out there, put forward her case and put forward her personality and when _ and put forward her personality and when. ., ., ., ., when. caroline, the front page of the daily mail. — when. caroline, the front page of the daily mail, you _ when. caroline, the front page of the daily mail, you chug - when. caroline, the front page of the daily mail, you chug for- the daily mail, you chug for britain. this is the fact that we will be allowed to hug each other, hopefully, that announcement totally forthcoming from may the 17th. how important is this going to be for so many people out there? such a morale booster. it's the news we have all been waiting for. the government have been delivery —— deliberately vague about some of
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these aspects that will be released tomorrow. they were very, i think purposefully unspecific about which dates the masks would be coming off, hugs would be allowed, contacted be allowed from all of those things, so it other things that were very much benchmarks, this was not, so this was really, i think the government have perhaps learned from some of the mistakes from last year, this has been over delivered. this has caught people by very pleasant surprise, people will be able to have events, hopefully the sun will come out from this is another good news story on this end of what has been an awful 18 months.- news story on this end of what has been an awful 18 months. tony, the front -a~e been an awful 18 months. tony, the front page of _ been an awful 18 months. tony, the front page of this _ been an awful 18 months. tony, the front page of this one, _ been an awful 18 months. tony, the front page of this one, i _ been an awful 18 months. tony, the front page of this one, i quite - been an awful 18 months. tony, the front page of this one, i quite like l front page of this one, i quite like that. , ., ., , , that. they do have some good sub editors and — that. they do have some good sub editors and punny _ that. they do have some good sub editors and punny headlines - that. they do have some good sub editors and punny headlines from | editors and punny headlines from time to— editors and punny headlines from time to time. i agree with what caroline — time to time. i agree with what caroline said. we are on course for a summer— caroline said. we are on course for a summer of— caroline said. we are on course for a summer of fun. the government in particular— a summer of fun. the government in particular wants to try and get things— particular wants to try and get things started again, but you know, there _ things started again, but you know, there was— things started again, but you know, there was a — things started again, but you know, there was a road map that set them hopefully, _ there was a road map that set them hopefully, by the time we get to the 17th of— hopefully, by the time we get to the 17th of may, we will be in a
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position— 17th of may, we will be in a position where indoor catering will be allowed, people will be able to mix indoors, and you know, to be fair to— mix indoors, and you know, to be fair to the — mix indoors, and you know, to be fair to the government, they have reached _ fair to the government, they have reached that target, but just a little _ reached that target, but just a little bit — reached that target, but just a little bit longer to go in terms of all the _ little bit longer to go in terms of all the restrictions being lifted, and then— all the restrictions being lifted, and then there is the issue of summer— and then there is the issue of summer holidays which is that britain — summer holidays which is that britain appears to be moving towards allowing _ britain appears to be moving towards allowing its citizens to go on holiday— allowing its citizens to go on holiday but the question is if there will be _ holiday but the question is if there will be any— holiday but the question is if there will be any major countries that will be any major countries that will be — will be any major countries that will be able to go on holiday two, portugal— will be able to go on holiday two, portugal is— will be able to go on holiday two, portugal is on the list that was announced last week, but as you know, _ announced last week, but as you know, many british people like to spend _ know, many british people like to spend our— know, many british people like to spend our holidays in turkey, and spain _ spend our holidays in turkey, and spain and — spend our holidays in turkey, and spain, and france, so there is still the? _ spain, and france, so there is still the? 0ver— spain, and france, so there is still the? overthe spain, and france, so there is still the? over the viability of some summer— the? over the viability of some summer holidays, but overall, it is good _ summer holidays, but overall, it is good news — summer holidays, but overall, it is good news l— summer holidays, but overall, it is good news-— summer holidays, but overall, it is aood news. , ., , ., good news. i must ask you before you io, good news. i must ask you before you go. caroline. — good news. i must ask you before you go. caroline. who _ good news. i must ask you before you go, caroline, who will— good news. i must ask you before you go, caroline, who will be _ good news. i must ask you before you go, caroline, who will be the - good news. i must ask you before you go, caroline, who will be the first - go, caroline, who will be the first person you will hug? i can't have favourites. ~ , ., ., i can't have favourites. will you go find caroline _ i can't have favourites. will you go find caroline to _ i can't have favourites. will you go find caroline to give _ i can't have favourites. will you go find caroline to give her— i can't have favourites. will you go find caroline to give her a - i can't have favourites. will you go find caroline to give her a hug? i find caroline to give her a hug? yes, that's definitely my plan. i so don't think— yes, that's definitely my plan. i so don't think it's _ yes, that's definitely my plan. i "r don't think it's either of your plans, but anyway, thank you very
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much, tony and caroline, thank you both of you forjoining me. i know you are back with me shortly for some more papers, so thank you once again. that's it for the papers this hour. thank you very much for your company. bye—bye. hey, welcome to click. this week we're going to talk about locking stuff up and keeping stuff safe, which is why lara currently has a safe on her lap. well, it's a safe with a bit of a difference. you know when you're at the dining table and it feels like everybody
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has a reason that they have to do something on their phone there and then? laughs. yeah, yeah, yeah. well, this aims to overcome that. it's somewhere to lock away your devices so that you can have some good quality family time. laughs. right! so does it have a key, a combination, or is it on a timer, what? ok, well, that is the problem. because there are timer options, you can set it for an hour, overnight, for 24 hours, but there's also a passcode to be able to open it in an emergency, so whoever knows the passcode needs to also be the person with the willpower not to open it. right. plus, it's not exactly the sturdiest of devices, so if you got really desperate... well, you're the boss of the safe in your house, yeah? obviously. ok, so that's locking up your phone, now we're going to talk about something even bigger to lock up — your bike, which no matter how good your bike lock is, runs the risk of being damaged or vandalised or having bits nicked off of it. well, tom brada has been looking at the latest tech aiming to keep your cycle secure.
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over the past year, there has been a cycling boom, with shops struggling to keep up with the sheer scale of demand. but at the same time, there has been a steady flow of bike crime. last year, there were more than 80,000 incidents of bike theft, and many, many thousands more going unreported. like many people living in a big city, i often leave my poor bike left locked up outside, fending for itself. and unfortunately, over the last 12 months, it's received a lot of unwanted attention. all looks normal except, oh, where are the handlebars? there's the brake cable snipped. so, my personal woes got me thinking — what pieces of tech are out there to help keep my bike safe? first up, you have the motion
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sensor alarm system. this is the kinoee, and it's a fairly simple device. you attach it to your saddle post using cable ties, then set the alarm using a handy remote control. device beeps. and then if somebody decides to move the bike, this starts going off over 100 decibels. if you decide to move the bike once... alarm blares. ..then it gives off a single warning shriek. if you move the bike again within ten seconds, then it goes off blaring for around a minute. siren wails. right. and if you decide to keep on moving the bike, well, it simply keeps on going off. and then, you simply want to run away with it? we're gonna run away with it! it's not worth it! at 20 quid, i'd say that's a pretty effective deterrent. 0n the flipside, the batteries — they're not rechargeable so you do have to replace them every few months, and if a criminal really wants to, and they do work out a source of the noise,
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they could disable it with a bit of brute force. it probably isn't very good idea. alarm beeps. that's one. siren wails. got it! and that, is how it's done. next up, we have the skunk lock, and from its name, you can probably guess what it has in store for me. its creators claim it is the only bike lock in the world which will literally fight back. so inside the carbon steel frame is a hollow chamber, and inside of that is a pressurised gas. according to the creators, if you cut about 30% of the way inside, the gas should spray out and the sheer stench alone should be enough to send any criminals running. so, let's put that to the test. saw buzzes.
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that smells pretty disgusting. it does absolutely stink. coughs. i'm not sure whether that would send me running, but i think i am changing my mind every second. the problem with the lock is, any part of your bike that isn't still locked up, you know, like if the front wheel wasn't locked up as well, then that's not going to be kept safe by that lock. and, coughs, the gas isn't refillable, so once you've cut through that one time, you're going to need to get yourself a complete another lock. um, yeah. finally we have a piece of kit which combines some of the tech we've already seen. this is the vanmoof s3. first of all, the lock is built into the bike itself. you'll spot a little silver button here... give a kick, and the bike immobilises, and the internal alarms are activated.
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so a little bit like the kinoee, if you move the bike, it should give you... alarm beeps. ..a rather loud warning. and, like the kinoee, the more you mess with it, the louder the warning gets until, eventually, this goes into a theft mode, and that's where things get really interesting because they provide a peace of mind service. peace of mind service is, if your bike should get stolen and we can't find it in two weeks of getting stolen, you will get a new bicycle provided by vanmoof. after trying out all this tech, i wanted to find out what the professionals think. i love technology, and anything that i think will help us stop crime is music to my ears. a lot of companies come to us saying, "oh, we've got this latest product," so we run a bit of an innovation panel so what we will do is look at it, we will provide a bit of advice as to whether it's a viable product — and i invest in some
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of this stuff myself — but you know what? the best crime prevention is i don't lock my bike up, i take it home with me every day. each of these devices have their pros and their cons, and there are plenty more clever pieces of kit out there. sadly, you can never 100% guarantee the safety of your bike, but investing in a piece of tech can provide an extra layer of security and give you a little bit more peace of mind. that was tom brada smashing and angle grinding stuff! brilliant! that's a way to work out your lockdown frustration, isn't it! so, as tom said, bike shops have been doing pretty well over the last year, but in general, it's been a terrible time for the high street. so lara has been out and about this week to find out whether this could be just the moment to put some cutting—edge retail tech to the test. for some time now, retailers have been trying to combine the online experience with the physical one, to create something that people actually want to use.
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and here in this concept store called cornershop, a few ideas are being put to the test. a bluetooth beacon recognises that you've arrived via your smartphone, which effectively then become your remote control for the store. now i come to the grocery counter where i could have preselected what i wanted in the app and then it will just work as a click and collect, but if i want to have a browse, see what i might fancy, then i can do that on these screens or by using the app. on a small shelf like this, the benefit isn't going to be huge. but when this shoreditch store opens next month, it's set to become a place to experiment with lots of different retail technologies, without the risk of upsetting current customers or the other limitations that regular stores have. this actually works by the app knowing your location, that's through a mix of bluetooth beacons and also lidar sensors have been used to create
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a digital twin of the store, so putting together those two bits of information, the phone will know exactly what you're looking at and whether you might want it or not. we've got a lot of computer learning models going on, so as people engage in the stores and we learn their preferences and their behaviours, we're able to vary what they experience when they come to different touch points, so we don'tjust use simplistic 'just because you bought x you suddenly get y' — we take in the different combinations of signals that we get. central to the experience here is the use of data. this can provide a shopping trip starting online and continuing here, or vice—versa. but the aim is for transparency, for the customer to understand the information that they're giving and what they're going to get back in return. when customers on—board into the store, it's a very open dialogue that we have with them. you share x, you share your location and we'll do this for you,
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we'll seamlessly recognise you when you come in the store. but move these ideas out of a concept store and into a regular one and not everyone may feel so comfortable. is the customer doesn't understand what the technology is doing, - and doesn't trust what it's doing in the background, they may be | afraid to engage with it and interact with it. - so retailers need to be really clear about why the technology - is there and how it's being used. and now onto the clothes shopping bit. here, the system is using digi.me so that you can virtually try on clothes. if i'd like to try this on, i scan the qr code, the app will already have a virtual me stored in it, so it means i should be able to try this on me, there i am! my neck is looking very long, but i'm wearing the top. but what's different about this experience is, i'm also getting to feel the fabric, i can actually see what the clothes
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are like in the flesh, and do that, although it might be easier to just go to a fitting room? i don't think that suits me, really... anyway, it was fun to try. this isn't about the ideas or the technology being perfect, though. its purpose is to learn what customers might want, or not want, from the shops of the future. did you buy the rugby shirt in the end? just curious? no, it's not very me. i thought you'd say that. anyway, that's it for the shortcut of click for this week, the full—length version is waiting for you right now on iplayer. and as ever you can keep up with the team on social media — find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter @bbc click. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. bye— bye.
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hello. 0n hello. on sunday the uk recorded its highest temperature since the end of march, 22.5 degrees some xl sea is in suffolk. nothing that i in the week ahead, temperatures will be close to average for the time of year and for monday, it's a mixture of sunshine and showers, in fact, that pretty much covers it for much of the week ahead, because for much of the week ahead, because for much of the week i took nick ahead, low pressure will be the source of the showers and for monday, some brisk swings as well, especially in england and wales. after a cloudy, breezy showery knight, well, this is where temperatures are to start the day. no frost out there, in fact, for some spots just around 10—12 some xl sea is. not expecting any frost in the week ahead, just a bit of rain skirting parts of eastern england to begin with, that moves off and may well some of that could
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be heavy and thunder, elsewhere, it's sunshine, the showers moving west to east, some heavy thundery, risk of hail and it will be quite illustrate, particularly in england and wales, average wind speeds will be higher gusts around 40—45 mph or so. temperatures generally in the range of around 13—17 celsius. quite a bit of sunshine to end the day around east anglia and southeast and glenn as the showers fade away. as ever, some places will avoid the showers, you may get one, brief wet moment in an otherwise dry day coming them and wales will be mainly dry and monday night, but a batch of showers move out of northern ireland and into parts of scotland. these are tuesday morning's temperatures, again, no frost out there. low pressure still very much close by as we go into tuesday, and from that, we go into tuesday, and from that, we are going to see some further showers. maybe notjust popping up but tending to move there in his own that will travel from southwest to northeast during the day. a weathered french close to northwest scotland and some outbreaks of rain. some places may well miss the
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showers if the system moves its way in. seeing all sorts of simple to connect temperatures on tuesday. 0r wednesday and thursday, sunshine, showers, not as breezy. by friday, mainly dry with a fair amount of cloud out there. with the air coming down from the northeast, it will turn a bit cooler, but not particularly cold, mind you. that's how the week is shaping up. it's sunshine, showers, some of them going to be quite heavy, and not as cold as it was last week, and mainly frost free. i don't know whether we are done with frost at the moment, but it is certainly not around this week.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm maryam moshiri. a third night of tension injerusalem, where unrest simmers over the possible evictions of palestinians. funerals have taken place in afghanistan for more than 60 people — mainly young girls — killed in a militant attack outside a school. uk labour's top team is reshuffled as leader keir starmer acts in the wake of the english election results. we bring you who's in and who's out. scotland's first minister tells uk leader borisjohnson that a second independence referendum is "a matter of when — not if". and potential disqualification at the kentucky derby after the winning horse, medina spirit, fails its post—race drug test.
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his trainer denies foul play.

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