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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 18, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 5pm. keeping to the plan — the prime minister says there is "nothing conclusive" in current data that means the lockdown roadmap will need to be delayed. i don't see anything conclusive at the moment to say that we need to deviate from the road map. we have got to be cautious and we are keeping everything under very close observation. extra vaccination centres have been opened and surge—testing is continuing in areas affected by the indian covid variant. a call to tackle the global imbalances in covid vaccine rollouts. it feels completely wrong to be in a situation, morally, first of all, where we are allowing that to happen, whilst in many countries, vaccines are being rolled out to younger and younger
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populations at very low risk. police prepare to excavate a cafe in gloucester, searching for mary bastholm — she disappeared in 1968, and it's thought she may have been murdered by the serial killer, fred west. when mary went missing in 1968, she was wearing a blue coat, a blue and white dress and a blue bag. from looking at the material, i can't say if it's a bag or a coat or dress but what i can say is, it's a blue bit of material within a void. palestinian protestors and israeli security forces clash in the west bank town of bethlehem — president biden hasjoined calls for a ceasefire in the conflict between israel and hamas. hospital admissions for obesity—related treatment in england reach a record high of more than a million a year. and coming up, kiyan prince — the teenage footballer who was killed in a knife attack 15 years ago — is honoured virtually with an appearance
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in computer game fifa 21. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister says he will be able to tell in the next few days whether the indian variant will mean a delay to the end of lockdown in england. but he said there was currently no conclusive evidence to suggest deviating from the government's �*roadmap�* would be necessary. the variant is now the dominant strain in bolton, blackburn and darwen, and is rising in all age groups. ministers are urging anyone eligible to get a vaccine. some are questioning why restrictions were eased yesterday in england when the government's own tests for unlocking suggest that a variant of concern might prompt a rethink. restrictions were also
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eased yesterday in wales and in parts of scotland. our health correspondent jim reed reports. as people across england, wales and scotland celebrate their new freedoms... cheers! ..the wait for data begins. ministers will watch the figures closely to see if this kind of meeting up, leads to another spike in covid infections. personal details there... another big unknown, data on a variant of the virus first found in india and now spreading in places like blackburn and bolton. we are looking at the epidemiology the whole time as it comes in, and at the moment i think, partly because we have built up such a wall of defences with the vaccination programme, i don't see anything conclusive at the moment to say we need to deviate from the roadmap. but we have got to be cautious and we are keeping everything under very close observation. we will know more in a few days. scientists are still trying to work out how easily
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the new variant transmits, how many fall seriously ill and, crucially, how effective vaccines are against it, although the early signs are positive. we know it has generated some large clusters and outbreaks, and there is a bit of chance involved in that. so what we are seeing is some of those that have been largerjust by chance. so one of the things that we need is a bit of time so that the effect of those initial introductions calms down and we can see what the local transmission looks like. other scientists though think the government is taking too much of a risk and unlocking society too quickly. the government didn't pass- their four tests on the road map, especially the test around the risk assessment on new _ variants of concern. we failed that test. but the government have gone ahead.
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in blackburn and bolton there is a drive to get more people vaccinated, with dedicated mobile units sent to areas with high infection rates. public health officials expect the variant to become the dominant form of the virus in the uk over time. the government has said there have been 2,323 confirmed cases across the uk, with five or more infections now found in 86 local council areas. ministers have identified bedford as another possible hotspot, cases there are now the second highest in england. what we know is what we have been seeing locally, a massive rise in cases. about three or four weeks ago we had three or four cases a day and now it is ten times as that in bedford. it is important people understand how quickly the situation can change. the final question is how this could affect the last stage of unlocking, currently pencilled in forjune 21st in england. a government review of social distancing measures has been delayed, with local lockdowns not ruled out if cases continue to rise in certain areas.
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there is still a month to go and ministers could face a tough decision, with lives and livelihoods at stake. jim reed, bbc news. let's speak to our political correspondentjonathan blake. so, how realistic is the government's aim of unlocking next month in england?— month in england? well, that is to be decided in _ month in england? well, that is to be decided in the _ month in england? well, that is to be decided in the coming - month in england? well, that is to be decided in the coming days. - month in england? well, that is to | be decided in the coming days. and as if you underline that point we have had details of the official readout from today's cabinet meeting from number ten which we are told the prime minister closed by reminding ministers that it was important to closely watch the data in the coming days ahead of making a decision on step four. he could've said that at any time during the road map out of lockdown in england
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this year, but it does feel especially relevant now that big lifting of restrictions yesterday, the most significant so far come at a time of increased concern over the rising number of cases of the indian variant. the key questions is how transmissible is it, and how easily it will spread and how effective are the vaccines against that? those the questions that ministers wants to answer. whether they decide to delay and water down the planned lifting of all legal restrictions we will have to wait and see but if they do decide to deviate at all even slightly from what is hoped could go ahead on that date there will be conservative mps ready to criticise the government and ready to take borisjohnson to task on that, because there are many people within the party on the back benches on the government's side of the house of commons that are deeply
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uncomfortable with restrictions or many a place for as long as they have done never mind even further. is also mounting questions about the traffic light system for travel. yes this is coming _ traffic light system for travel. yes this is coming under scrutiny despite the contrasting measures we have getting from ministers. document countries on the amber list which people are legally allowed to travel to be the government advice is not to travel to those places. for anything other than the most essential of reasons. but the environment secretary talked this morning about perhaps people wanted to go to visit family and friends and some of those countries, just a few hours later the prime minister, borisjohnson, took a much stronger line saying that people should be very aware those are not places they should be going on holiday and it reminded people if they don't comply with the quarantine rules on the return they could face fines of up to £10,000. this is a leading to
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labour saying the government is putting out conflicting and confusing messages and international travel is in a disarray. but as more people look to travel abroad and go on holiday were they possibly can in the coming weeks and months, the travel industry wanting to get things going and open up again as quickly as possible. there may well be more debate around this in the weeks to come.— weeks to come. jonathan blake re ”ortin weeks to come. jonathan blake reporting there _ weeks to come. jonathan blake reporting there from _ weeks to come. jonathan blake i reporting there from westminster. dr andrew furber is the regional director in the north west of england for public health england. and hejoins me now. good afternoon to you. how concerned are you about the indian variant in your patch in the indian variant in your patch in the northwest of england? goad the northwest of england? good afternoon- _ the northwest of england? good afternoon. we _ the northwest of england? good afternoon. we are _ the northwest of england? good afternoon. we are very - the northwest of england? (emf. afternoon. we are very concerned. we are seeing a rapid increase in case rates in bolton and blackburn. we have also seen a tremendous response from the community in terms of getting tested and getting
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vaccinated, and we are not seeing case rates in any increase in hospital admissions or more severe disease. we are concerned but we are managing it very actively. that disease. we are concerned but we are managing it very actively.— managing it very actively. that is interesting _ managing it very actively. that is interesting because _ managing it very actively. that is interesting because i _ managing it very actively. that is interesting because i was - managing it very actively. that is interesting because i was going i managing it very actively. that is| interesting because i was going to ask you about the correlation between the numbers infected and those in hospital. can you give us any specifics within the we are watching the numbers very carefully, and at the moment of the numbers of hospital admissions in hospitals in this area seem to be about what we would expect. 0ne this area seem to be about what we would expect. one note of caution and may be a little bit early to tell because we normally see an increase in hospital admissions two, three, four weeks after we see the increase in the case rates. so with the next couple of weeks that we will need to watch that very carefully. so they have been going up carefully. so they have been going up the last two weeks? yes carefully. so they have been going up the last two weeks?— up the last two weeks? yes they have. do up the last two weeks? yes they have- do you _ up the last two weeks? yes they have. do you have _ up the last two weeks? yes they have. do you have evidence - up the last two weeks? yes they have. do you have evidence on l up the last two weeks? yes they l have. do you have evidence on the basis of the _ have. do you have evidence on the basis of the numbers _ have. do you have evidence on the basis of the numbers that - have. do you have evidence on the basis of the numbers that you - have. do you have evidence on the| basis of the numbers that you have for this variant that it's
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transmissible than others? and they asked that question because one of our correspondence pointed out that there has been a significant cluster of this indian variant in london, but case numbers have not risen in the same way that they have in bolton. and one of the speculation, one of the reasons maybe that a lot of people may have returned from india to bolton and brought the virus with them, is that possible? it is possible. we have seen an outbreak in sefton, for example and we had the surge testing there. the case numbers there's to be coming to back down again. we do think that it is being transmitted beyond blackburn and bolton, but we are not yet seeing the very rapid increase in case rates. so epidemiology it says it's more transmissible than the uk variant but we cannot say
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that with certainty of the lab tests are done. that were take another week or so. are done. that were take another week or se— week or so. you say a bit more transmissible, _ week or so. you say a bit more transmissible, a _ week or so. you say a bit more transmissible, a a _ week or so. you say a bit more transmissible, a a lot - week or so. you say a bit more transmissible, a a lot more? . week or so. you say a bit more transmissible, a a lot more? aj week or so. you say a bit more i transmissible, a a lot more? a bit more. i transmissible, a a lot more? a bit more- ident— transmissible, a a lot more? a bit more. i don't think _ transmissible, a a lot more? a bit more. i don't think it _ transmissible, a a lot more? a bit more. i don't think it is _ transmissible, a a lot more? a bit more. i don't think it is a - transmissible, a a lot more? a bit more. i don't think it is a vastly i more. i don't think it is a vastly more. i don't think it is a vastly more transmissible otherwise we certainly would have seen a very rapid increase in case rates in other parts of the northwest which we are not yet seeing. you other parts of the northwest which we are not yet seeing.— other parts of the northwest which we are not yet seeing. you have been surue we are not yet seeing. you have been surge testing — we are not yet seeing. you have been surge testing in _ we are not yet seeing. you have been surge testing in bolton _ we are not yet seeing. you have been surge testing in bolton and _ we are not yet seeing. you have been surge testing in bolton and in - surge testing in bolton and in blackburn and darwin. in terms of the people who you are reaching now, i wonder about their reasons for not having a vaccine the first time around, were people vaccine hesitant or was it because they were finding it difficult to access the vaccine? 0f it difficult to access the vaccine? of the combination of the both. some communities that are more uncertain about getting vaccine and perhaps some of the pictures we have seen on the tv from india and elsewhere have made people think of it more seriously about getting the vaccine
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which is good. but also huge efforts have been made in bolton and blackburn and elsewhere to make it as accessible as possible. so using the pop—up vaccination sites and mobile units to take the vaccine out into the communities. not requiring people to make an appointment to come you canjust people to make an appointment to come you can just turn up and get thejob and people have been responding really, really well. but are ou responding really, really well. but are you only giving the vaccine to people who are eligible for it? that is people in their late 30s and upwards. is people in their late 30s and u wards. ,, is people in their late 30s and u wards. , ., .., upwards. gas. so the “oint committee of vaccination _ upwards. gas. so the “oint committee of vaccination and — upwards. gas. so the joint committee of vaccination and immunisation - of vaccination and immunisation advice is being followed. so as of today anybody aged 36 or over can get thejob, today anybody aged 36 or over can get the job, anybody who is aged 18 and above who is a one of the high risk categories, perhaps a pre—existing health condition or a carer which can include informal carers or if somebody works in health and social care will be
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eligible for vaccination. and the person giving the vaccination will make that clinical assessment as to whether those eligibility criteria are met and deliver the vaccine appropriately. are met and deliver the vaccine appropriately-_ are met and deliver the vaccine auroriatel. . , . appropriately. thank you very much indeed. appropriately. thank you very much indeed- very _ appropriately. thank you very much indeed. very good _ appropriately. thank you very much indeed. very good to _ appropriately. thank you very much indeed. very good to talk— appropriately. thank you very much indeed. very good to talk to - appropriately. thank you very much indeed. very good to talk to you. i indeed. very good to talk to you. the regional director for public health england in the northwest. let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. 2,412 new infections have been recorded in the past 2a hours, as well as 7 new covid deaths — that's people who've died within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test. that takes the total number of covid deaths in the uk to 127,691. the office for national statistics has released its provisional data on the number of deaths registered in the uk in the week ending the 7th of may. the 0ns says the number of deaths registered was 9,202, 19% lower than the five—year average. 139 of those mentioned covid
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on the death certificate, which is 93 fewer than the previous week, and the lowest figure since last september. however, registry offices were closed over the early may bank holiday so the 0ns warned that the data should be "interpreted with caution". surge testing is being carried out in nuneaton in warwickshire, following the detection of the indian coronavirus variant. everyone over the age of 2 in the wembrook and abbey wards of the town is being encouraged to take a pcr test whether or not they are showing symptoms. enhanced contact tracing will be used for those who test positive for the variant. the director of the group which developed the astrazeneca covid vaccine says it seems �*morally wrong' that children in some richer countries are being offered a covid jab before high—risk adults in poorer countries. professor andrew pollard from the oxford vaccine group has been speaking to the all party parliamentary group on coronavirus. when you look at the overall aim of a global vaccination
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programme in a pandemic, it's to stop people dying. we know who those people are. it is the over 50s, it is those who have got health conditions and to some extent, also health care workers. those are the priority groups as they are initially here in the uk and the world health organisations policy recommendations. yet we are in a situation at the moment, where there are many unvaccinated people in the world and there are not enough doses for everyone yet but there are many unvaccinated people in the world, whilst people at risk that is extremely low are being vaccinated and including children, who have near to zero risk of severe disease and death. that inequity is absolutely plain to see at this moment. it is actually a very troubling way, as we see from the images in south asia on our television screens and the awful circumstances there. i work in nepal and bangladesh and colleagues there are just facing the most appalling circumstances.
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they are not working in a situation, where there is an nhs to support them and it feels completely wrong to be in a situation, morally, first of all, where we are allowing that to happen, whilst in many countries, vaccines are being rolled out to younger and younger populations at very, very low risk. a study in spain has found that people who've already received a first shot of the astrazeneca vaccine can safely be given a second dose of pfizer. the study found the presence of antibodies in the bloodstream after a pfizer shot was much higher than in the control group who only had the astrazeneca dose. the headlines on bbc news...
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the prime minister says there is "nothing conclusive" in current data that means england would have to deviate from the roadmap out of lockdown police prepare to excavate a cafe in gloucester, searching for mary bastholm — she disappeared in 1968, and it's thought she may have been murdered by the serial killer, fred west. palestinian protestors and israeli security forces clash in the west bank town of bethlehem — president biden hasjoined calls for a ceasefire in the conflict between israel and hamas. excavation work is to begin at a cafe in gloucester tomorrow, as police search for a suspected victim of the serial killer fred west. 15—year—old mary bastholm worked at the clean plate cafe before she went missing in 1968. jon kay reports. mary bastholm was 15 years old when she vanished in the centre of gloucester.
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she worked in a cafe and, half a century on, a tv crew has found what appears to be a piece of blue material buried in the basement. when mary went missing in 1968, she was wearing a blue coat, a blue and white dress and a blue bag. from looking at the material, i can't say if it's a bag or a coat or a dress, what i can say is it is a blue bit of material within a void. ground penetrating radar has now found six voids in the basement, six areas with anomalies. today police began removing doors from the building. tomorrow they will start digging. fred west was a regular in the cafe in the years before he was charged with 12 murders. he is rumoured to have done some building work there. he took his own life in 1995. as well as excavation work, police are now going back to the original investigation. mary bastholm was last
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seen waiting for a bus in the centre of gloucester. never really thought it would happen to us. her parents died without ever knowing what had happened to her. she was rather a nervous child. if she has run away, it is a sudden impulse to do so, or, apart from that, she has been enticed away. the family have welcomed the new search and have asked for privacy while the two week excavation is carried out. if mary bastholm's remains are found there, as a force, you're going to face questions about why you didn't search it sooner, aren't you? i understand that question, but i'm presented with new information, which is why i made the decision that we're going to excavate tomorrow. but police are being cautious. no human remains have been detected yet, and there are ancient burial sites in this historic part of gloucester which could explain the spaces under the basement.
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job vacancies in the uk have reached their highest level since the start of the pandemic — as the easing of lockdown measures led employers to start recruiting. the office for national statistics says between february and april, there were 657—thousand vacancies, up more than a8—thousand on the previous quarter. but there s also concern about a sharpjump in the number of people who ve been classified as long—term unemployed, after more than 6 months without work. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity reports. it's not the first time since last march that this brewery in ripon, north yorkshire, has restarted its beer making, but the hope is it will be the last. at one of the local pubs it owns, its boss told us it's struggling to find the staff it needs. we are absolutely envisaging that we are going to be really busy. i mean, bookings are already really strong. recruitment�*s been a real challenge, because there aren't a lot of people out there. you would think there would be
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an awful lot of people able to and looking for work, but there aren't. and, to be honest with you, we need significantly more staff because, obviously, it is a different type of sale. so we are doing table service, people can't come to the bar, so everything takes an awful lot longer, so we need three or four more people per shift than we had before. in spite of renewed lockdown, the number of vacancies has risen in recent months, especially in the worst hit sectors such as hospitality. in the first quarter of the year, the number of vacancies was just 125,000 below its pre—pandemic level. the industry has been hit very hard and we've pulled back a lot of our team members off furlough, and in some hotels the ramp up will take a little bit longer, so we still have some team members to come back. the figures predate the latest lifting of restrictions which has led to a surge in activity now all too evident on the roads. the bank of england's predicted unusual growth in economic activity this year of more than 7%. but while the jobs market's already recovering, it's got a long way to go.
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this chart shows you the number of employees, and as you can see, although it's recovered, it's still down by about three quarters of a million from where it was before the pandemic, and then there is the people on furlough, 11.2 million as of the end of march. not all of those people are going to be able to go back to their old jobs, so they have to be found new work. as restrictions have gone on, the number of people classified as long—term unemployed hasjumped by 28% since last year. we are seeing a rise in the number of people who have been unemployed for more than six months, and that is especially the case among those who are over 50 and also those who are under 25 and, of course, that is especially worrying because the longer the time someone spends out of work, the more damaging that could be to their future career prospects and their living standards. the proportion of under 25s classified as economically inactive has hit new highs as many stay in education. matching those keen to work with the vacancies available will be
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one of the biggest economic challenges in the months to come. andy verity, bbc news. president biden has voiced his support for a ceasefire, after more than a week of violence between israel and palestinian militants. more than 212 people, including 61 children, have died in gaza; and 12 people, including two children, have been killed in israel — according to officials on each side. paul adams reports. gaza's punishment continues, more air strikes at dawn. israel says it is not over. it doesn't just want the rockets to stop, it wants its opponent crippled. it has been hitting the homes of hamas leaders and destroying as much of their hardware as possible. hamas still has plenty of rockets, but launchers are vulnerable. translation: the directive is to | continue striking terrorist targets. the idf is doing this very well. we will continue to take whatever action is necessary
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to restore peace and security to all residents of israel. international outrage is building over the civilian cost — almost 40,000 people have been displaced, the territory's only covid testing lab partially destroyed. this man says he got a call from the israeli army telling him to get out of his home. the next house next door was bombed. when they returned, this is what they found. translation: my mother was with me at home and now she is out _ in the streets with no shelter. and i also have no shelterfor my children. here the whole house is totally destroyed. in the west bank, palestinians are again demonstrating over the situation in gaza. there is a general strike, notjust among palestinians, it is being observed by israeli arabs too. diplomatic efforts, much less visible, are gathering pace, international mediators are trying
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to stop the fighting, and when us presidentjoe biden spoke to mr netanyahu last night, he called for a ceasefire for the first time. the un is heavily involved, its envoy injerusalem one of few officials actually talking to hamas. with pressure mounting on israel, its window of opportunity in gaza is slowly closing. paul adams, bbc news, jerusalem. the families of the seven people killed in the croydon tram crash have paid tribute to their relatives, ahead of the first day of evidence at the inquest into their deaths. the 14—week inquest was initially due to begin in october 2020, but was postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic, as our correspondent theo leggett explains. seven people lost their lives on a dark and wet november morning in 2016 when tram number 2551 left the rails at sandiland junction and overturned. we know, broadly speaking, what happened. according to the rail accidents
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investigation branch, the tram was simply travelling too fast and failed to negotiate a sharp corner. the purpose of the inquest, which will be going on for the next three months or so, is to determine why that happened and whether anyone should be held accountable. today was an opportunity for relatives of those who died to explain what all this meant to them, to pay tribute to their loved ones. so, for example, we heard about robert huxley. he was one of life's true gentleman. a loyal family man with old—school values according to his son, ross. he was passionate about football. lorry driver donald collett was 62 when he died, his daughter tracy described a hard—working man who made his family feel special and loved. his death, she said, had left a trail of devastation. and the youngest victim, dane chinnery. an attribute read by a lawyer, his mother, beverly said he was a kind—hearted and generous man who loves to telljokes. she would, she said,
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never see him grow up, get married or have children. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. we are looking at lots of showers this afternoon. northern ireland, there is a much greater chance of seeing showers than yesterday. some of the heaviest downpours across southern england, across the midlands and across south—west england we are looking at clouds and it looks particularly wet here. north wales and perhaps north west england will not fare too badly. 0vernight tonight, it is a bit of rain across northern scotland and another batch of rain across southern counties of england. it does slowly get a little bit drier. tomorrow is another showery day. this time, the majority of the showers will be across eastern areas of the uk. further west, pressure rises
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and that means across south—west england, wales and north—west england, it should a finer and drier afternoon with long spells of sunshine. temperatures getting to 16. and that's your weather.
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hello this is bbc news with reeta chakrabarti. the headlines keeping to the plan — the prime minister says there is "nothing conclusive" in current data that means the lockdown roadmap will need to be delayed. i don't see anything conclusive at the moment to say that we need to deviate from the road map. we have got to be cautious and we are keeping everything under very close observation. extra vaccination centres have been
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opened and surge—testing is continuing in areas affected by the indian covid variant palestinian protestors and israeli security forces clash in the west bank town of bethlehem — president biden hasjoined calls for a ceasefire in the conflict between israel and hamas. a surge of migrants into the spanish territory — as thousands arrive from morocco. the government in madrid deploys the army. hospital admissions for obesity—related treatment in england reach a record high of more than a million a year sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's 0lly foster. roy hodgson is leaving crystal palace at the end of the season, that's this weekend. he's 73 and says the time is right to step away from the rigours of the premier league. though he has neverfinished the season in the top half of the table with palace, he's the only manager to keep them in the premier league for 4 successive seasons.
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the club's chairman steve parish says he will be forever grateful for his immense contribution. the former england, switzeralnd and liverpool boss hasn't ruled out staying in the game in some capacity a decision which has not exactly been taken over nights, it has been really brewing for a long time. and i had in the back of my mind that the right time to leave the club, and maybe even to leave football for and maybe even to leave football for a while, will be at the end of the season and i am pleased, really that despite the speculation of the last two or three months we have still been able to keep things under on a pretty even keel. and that was important to me.— pretty even keel. and that was important to me. pallister at home to arsenal and _ important to me. pallister at home to arsenal and its _ important to me. pallister at home to arsenal and its front _ important to me. pallister at home to arsenal and its front of - important to me. pallister at home to arsenal and its front of some . to arsenal and its front of some fans tomorrow evening. it's the penultimate round of fixtures in the premier league over thte next couple of nights. for the first time in 1a months
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there'll be a crowd at old trafford, 10,000 expected for their game against already relegated fulham. you can see that some of them have a few placards protesting against the clubs ownership. the club have wraned that any pitch invasions or vandalism will be punished. remember the fixture against liverpool earlier this month had to be postponed after violence against police and stewards and fans broke into the stadium we have been waiting for a long time to welcome the fans back. the last couple of home games, especially the liverpool one with the protests, come it is never nice to see a club thatis come it is never nice to see a club that is not united, fans and the teams, so of course we are hoping that tuesday will be a positive day that tuesday will be a positive day that we move together and that we play a good game of football. tottenham play aston villa tomorrow but the pre—match news conference today was dominated
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by harry kane's future. although we understand that the england captain has not asked for a transfer, numerous reports say that he wants out this summer after anather trophy—less season. kane has another three years left on his contract at the club. i don't think anything about it. there is only speculation around the best players. i'm sure this been a lot of speculation and the last three or four weeks about the new manager coming in from all of these question marks, which is normal. when you are a big club, that is normal. 0urfocus, i've said all along, it is on the next game. my mind hasn't deviated from that. i'm sure harry's has not. the rest of the group. every individual hasn't deviated from that. we have to be ready tomorrow to compete and hopefully get three points. in the last few moments, britain's adam peaty has defended his title in the 100 metre breaststroke at the european
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swimming championships in budapest. he won with a time of 57.66 — to continue his preparation for the tokyo 0lympics later this summer — taking the title for a fourth straight championship. britain's james wilby took 3rd. england have named a 15 man squad for the two test series against new zealand next month. wicketkeeper batmsmanjames bracey and pace bowler 0llie robinson are both uncapped bracey was a reserve for england last summer, there's every chance that both will get a chance to impress ahead of a busy summer forjoe roots test side. a host of england players are being rested having just returned from the indian premier league. no ben stokes orjofra archer who are both injured. 0ne one of the benefits of covid as we have travelled with such a large squad, went through last summer as well, we got this midsummer time of the guys, get to know them, watch them play, probably seymour them and i would've done in previous years.
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so for me, for them to get the opportunity now, it is fantastic and great for the. —— great for them as well. keep across all the action tonight on the bbc or website. —— bbc sports website. thank you. spain has deployed soldiers and police to the land border of its north african enclave of ceuta, after an estimated 6000 people arrived there yesterday. the government says it's now returned nearly half of them to morocco. many of the migrants gathered at the border fence. witnesses said moroccan police appeared to do nothing to intervene, fuelling speculation that the relaxing of the border controls is a political move by morocco. spain's prime minister pedro sanchez says he will travel to ceuta. guy hedgecoe reports now live.
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reports in recent weeks of migrants trying to make the cross from north africa to spain. is that part of that save movement or something more specific about what is going on here? ~ . ., , , specific about what is going on here? ~ . . , , ., here? what we have been seeing over the last few — here? what we have been seeing over the last few months _ here? what we have been seeing over the last few months were _ here? what we have been seeing over the last few months were a _ here? what we have been seeing over the last few months were a lot - here? what we have been seeing over the last few months were a lot of - the last few months were a lot of migrants, many of them sub—saharan africans, taking a very perilous route from north africa, northwest africa across the atlantic to the canary islands. that is become the most popular destination for many migrants. what we saw yesterday here in the spanish city down in north africa, ceuta, 6000 suddenly crossing the border there. it is a much more direct route because they can take a makeshift raft around the border fence and if the weather is good it does not take very long. they can even swim around the fence. many of the migrants yesterday did that. some even managed to get
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around the fence when it was low. it is a new phenomenon in that it is not what we have been seeing the last few months. and also the other thing about these arrivals is the vast majority of them were from morocco. they were not for the most part sub—saharan africans without mainly moroccans. if part sub-saharan africans without mainly moroccans.— part sub-saharan africans without mainly moroccans. if there's some sense that — mainly moroccans. if there's some sense that the _ mainly moroccans. if there's some sense that the police _ mainly moroccans. if there's some sense that the police were - mainly moroccans. if there's some | sense that the police were standing by and doing nothing to intervene? yes, very much so. when eyewitnesses say that is exactly what happened. but as i've seen seems to confirm that. the feeling is that many people believe this is a reprisal by the moroccan government against spain. morocco is very angry that spain. morocco is very angry that spain taken a the front leader, the group which fights for sovereignty for the western sahara and their leader, he came to spain last month and receive medical attention and
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the spanish hospital. that has angered morocco would seize him as a rebel, and spain should not have taken the man in morocco warren spain that there would be repercussions for that decision and it appears that the repercussions have come in the form of the lifting of these controls on the border and at least yesterday allowing the 6000 people into spanish territory. thank ou ve people into spanish territory. thank you very much- _ people into spanish territory. thank you very much- guy _ people into spanish territory. thank you very much. guy has _ people into spanish territory. thank you very much. guy has co. - people into spanish territory. thank you very much. guy has co. in - you very much. guy has co. in madrid. hospital admissions for obesity—related treatment in england reached a record of more than a million in the year leading into the global pandemic. experts say the pandemic should be a wake—up call to people — because being overweight is one of the most significant risk factors for severe covid. here's our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. just nice to move your body, isn't it, outside? a path to a healthier life, a walk on the wirral for patients, prescribed and led by a local gp. this is a great location. this part of the north—west has one
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of the highest levels of obesity—related hospital admissions in england. oh, the sun's come out now. lovely. in the year to march 2020 as the pandemic hit, hospitals in england had seen a record one million admissions for obesity—related problems. they'd actually told me if i'd caught covid, that there's every chance that i would die. being significantly overweight like phil is a huge risk factor for getting dangerously ill with covid—19. at his heaviest, he was 25 stone. when he caught the virus, he ended up in intensive care. my wife, we said goodbye, but not really how i would like to. and then i was crying my eyes out in the ambulance, you know? it was heartbreaking. 0n the ward i was on, sadly i saw two people pass away. that was a massive, massive point. come here! come on, then. good boy! it really made me think, "i need to address this."
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by changing his diet, phil has lost more than six stone. these researchers in glasgow are trying to understand why the virus is so dangerous for those who are very overweight. people who are heavier probably get a bigger viral hit. and that's really important, because the amount of virus you get will dictate the likelihood of having the immune response be exaggerated. they have less efficient body systems, so their lungs are perhaps not as efficient to expand, their blood vessels are less pliable, they have thicker blood to begin with. people effectively who are overweight have less capacity to cope with the damage that covid causes. pressure is piling on the government to take radical action to address the obesity problem, but last month experts wrote to the prime minister, urging him to stick to a landmark proposal to banjunk food advertising online and on social media after fears it
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could be ditched. it is good to get out. it is just one step at a time. that step, says the government, will be to introduce a ban onjunk food adverts on television before 9pm. how far it is prepared to go with restrictions online will be revealed in the next few weeks. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. i'm joined now by doctor chris van tulleken. he spent a month eating junk food for a bbc documentary. his experiment, featured in the bbc show what are we feeding our kids? indicated a link between processed food and rapid weight gain and is now being used for a clinical study. we will talk to you in just a moment. before we do, i want to show a clip of the documentary.— a clip of the documentary. doctor chris investigates _ a clip of the documentary. doctor chris investigates the _ a clip of the documentary. doctor chris investigates the food - a clip of the documentary. doctor chris investigates the food we - a clip of the documentary. doctor| chris investigates the food we are feeding _ chris investigates the food we are feeding our— chris investigates the food we are feeding our children. _ chris investigates the food we are feeding our children. it— chris investigates the food we are feeding our children. it might - feeding our children. it might change — feeding our children. it might change your— feeding our children. it might change your brain _ feeding our children. it might change your brain for - feeding our children. it might change your brain for avery. i feeding our children. it mighti change your brain for avery. if feeding our children. it might i change your brain for avery. if it could do that _ change your brain for avery. could do that to my 42 your change your brain for avery.- could do that to my 42 your brain, what is it going to the developing
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brains of our children? hagar what is it going to the developing brains of our children?— what is it going to the developing brains of our children? how far will he no in brains of our children? how far will he go in the _ brains of our children? how far will he go in the stomach _ brains of our children? how far will he go in the stomach turning - brains of our children? how far will he go in the stomach turning self. he go in the stomach turning self exuerimeni? _ he go in the stomach turning self experiment? 50 _ he go in the stomach turning self exoeriment?_ he go in the stomach turning self exeriment? .. , , ., experiment? so we can guess what it did to ou experiment? so we can guess what it did to you but — experiment? so we can guess what it did to you but tell _ experiment? so we can guess what it did to you but tell us _ experiment? so we can guess what it did to you but tell us anyway. - experiment? so we can guess what it did to you but tell us anyway. well, l did to you but tell us anyway. well, in fact i want to be more precise about something. i wasn'tjust eating junk food. i was eating a diet of 80% ultra processed food. almost all of our food is processed in some way but really there is a single cause of the obesity epidemic and it is the marketing sale and consumption of ultra processed food which has a long quite widely accepted scientific definition but it really means if it is something wrapped in plastic within a ingredient you don't find in a domestic kitchen. it now makes up about 60% of our calories across the uk. about 6096 of our calories across the uk. , about 6096 of our calories across the uk. y ., ., , about 6096 of our calories across the uk. sorry, what daily things? breakfast _ uk. sorry, what daily things? breakfast might _ uk. sorry, what daily things? breakfast might be, - uk. sorry, what daily things? breakfast might be, plenty i uk. sorry, what daily things? breakfast might be, plenty of healthy all fibre type cereals that are process. mid—morning you can
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have a low—fat health snack like chilli bar is almost all biscuit, lunch, high street sandwiches, and a packet of crisp and a soft drink, alter process. then it was a ready meal, a few vegetables come up in ships, things that didn't differ are frankly from my normal diet. what frankly from my normal diet. what was the effect _ frankly from my normal diet. what was the effect on _ frankly from my normal diet. what was the effect on you? _ frankly from my normal diet. what was the effect on you? i _ frankly from my normal diet. what was the effect on you? i gained a huge amount of weight without trying. huge amount of weight without t inc. , huge amount of weight without t in. _ , ., ., huge amount of weight without t inc. , ., huge amount of weight without t in. , ., , trying. this food has all been engineered — trying. this food has all been engineered very _ trying. this food has all been engineered very carefully - trying. this food has all been | engineered very carefully over trying. this food has all been - engineered very carefully over many decades and many focus groups to drive excess consumption. that is his purpose. to make profit, made cheap and large profit margin, long she” cheap and large profit margin, long shelf life and he drives excess consumption and has an addictive quality. as well as that, a lot of brain scans, my brain became significantly rewired in a sense of the reward centre of my behaviour, it became much more connected to the automatic behaviour centres at the back of my brain and the cerebellum.
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my back of my brain and the cerebellum. my gut hormones were very disturbed, the signals that i would normally have about feeling full or feeling hungry, they no longer work. i was less hungry when i should be and much less full after eating a meal. so interesting. notjust that they are more calorific, actually you want to eat more of them and you do eat more than. it is want to eat more of them and you do eat more than-— degree of industrial processing and the way they have been designed from the way they have been designed from the additives him everything about them come the softness, they are also generally quite high in fat, salt, sugar and calories but it is the processing that is important. this meant very clearly show now and get in the uk nutritional guidelines is mentioned not once. these foods are really robust and showing to be the reason we are all gaining weight. we've had a lot of salt and fat and sugar onto tables for many years, many centuries actually. excess calories. the highly engineered foods are driving consumption that almost impossible
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to stop eating. 0nce consumption that almost impossible to stop eating. once you start looking at ingredients, you see they're all around us. so looking at ingredients, you see they're all around us.— they're all around us. so this particular— they're all around us. so this particular moment _ they're all around us. so this particular moment in - they're all around us. so this particular moment in time, | they're all around us. so this - particular moment in time, there are real worries about obesity and the covid—19 crisis has shown us how vulnerable overweight or very overweight people are in a situation like this. what conclusions did you draw from making the programme? people who have overweight, i have almost no suggestions for the part technically, i have overweight myself. my twin brother also does and he was badly affected by covid—19 as a result of that. i don't have any weight loss suggestions. human which is determined by the food environment around us. that is determined by the way we regulate the companies that produce sls food. it is nothing to do with willpower. most of us have far fewer choices and we would. i am protected to some extent by the privileges of my education and having enough money in the place i
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live but the way people eat is their food environment and these regulations we need to severely limit the ability of these companies to market and especially to children and to recognise the harmful role of ultra processing and creating this epidemic the entire way we subsidise farming and produce food and sell food, market food, our entire approach from cradle—to—grave needs approach from cradle—to—grave needs a complete overhaul and the junk food ban is great. don't get me wrong. but it is a tiny step in the right direction.— right direction. where would you like... right direction. where would you like- -- that _ right direction. where would you like... that is — right direction. where would you like... that is potentially... - right direction. where would you like... that is potentially... oe, | like... that is potentially... 0e, we like you. like... that is potentially... oe, we like you-— like... that is potentially... oe, we like ou. ., , ., ., we like you. don't worry. you have me. we like you. don't worry. you have me- good- — we like you. don't worry. you have me. good. one _ we like you. don't worry. you have me. good. one final— we like you. don't worry. you have me. good. one final question. - we like you. don't worry. you have i me. good. one final question. where should the government _ me. good. one final question. where should the government start? - me. good. one final question. where should the government start? it - me. good. one final question. where should the government start? it is i should the government start? it is well saying a radical overhaul of everything, you know these things are incremental. what will be the one thing you would like to see change? i one thing you would like to see chance? ., , ., change? i would start with incorporating _ change? i would start with incorporating the - change? i would start with | incorporating the definition change? i would start with i incorporating the definition of multiprocessing into our nutritional guidelines and having one exam
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packets that recognise ultra processed foods, food and plastic that contains ingredients like soy lecithin, stabilisers, all those things that you will start noticing our packages now. i will have the packets lagged, stop feeding it in schools and plain packaging and i would stop all advertising to children of these products children are the main market and children consume, most children in the uk start their lives in a 100% ultra processed food diet come into the formula and then move through baby food which is all after process and more more or less for their entire life they will consume high quantities of the food which we have evidence of our own eyes the growing child obesity in the huge problems it is causing. the recognition of the specific definition of ultra processed food which is very widely accepted by the who ammi canada,
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france, brazil, scientists where they came up with that, so i like to see that in the guidance. it is not about high fats and sugars. sobering stuff. thank you _ about high fats and sugars. sobering stuff. thank you very _ about high fats and sugars. sobering stuff. thank you very much. - you can watch the programme at bbc one next thursday evening at 9pm and 0ne next thursday evening at 9pm and it will be on the iplayer shortly afterwards. there's been anger over plans by some universities in the uk to continue online lecturing in the autumn term. students in leeds have started a petition, arguing there's no reason why they can't be taught in person when school children are — and when people can visit cinemas and pubs. matt graveling reports. when you move in, you get along with your flatmates and are part of the student lifestyle. you get lecture theatres and big lecture halls with lots of people in, you get to use the big labs and fancy technology. it has just not been that this year. fran's university experience has not quite gone to plan. one year into her biological
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sciences degree and more than £9,000 spent, she's yet to set foot inside a lab. i have had two in—person seminars, and that is all i have had all year in terms of any kind of in—person teaching. for the last year coronavirus restrictions have seen universities across the uk moving lectures online. but now with eyes on the autumn term, universities are starting to plan their return. but in leeds, a slow return to the classroom has been met with anger and a petition of more than 2500 people have criticised the lack of face—to—face teaching. a university of leeds spokesperson said that they intend to give every student a substantial on—campus experience next semester, and although face—to—face teaching would be the norm, they are currently planning on the basis that many large teaching events will be delivered online as part of a hybrid approach. but the caution being shown here at leeds is shared by staff at other universities.
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if we are involved in planning, if we can get the ventilation right and the social distancing right in classrooms and also recognise that some staff really are panicking about coming back on board and taking it as an individual case—by—case basis rather than forcing everyone to go back into the classrooms, i think, would help massively. elsewhere, the university of liverpool says it wants as much face—to—face teaching as possible but is expecting a blend of online and in—person. the london school of economics expects the vast majority of seminars and classes to be taught in person, but lectures will be largely delivered online. and the university of manchester is planning a blended approach, with a mix of both on—campus and online elements. a lot of people would say there is a pandemic, this has to be done? i understand this year, however from september there is no logical reason, coronavirus—wise, hopefully, from what we are being told at the moment, that lectures should remain online.
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the department for education says universities have a strong track record in delivering excellent blended tuition and quality and quantity should not drop. matt graveling, bbc news. a teenage footballer who was killed in a knife attack 15 years ago is being added as a player to the computer game, fifa 21. kiyan prince was part of the youth team at qpr when he lost his life — and has now been created virtually to play for the club as a 30—year—old. graham satchell reports. my name is kiyan prince. and i am a professional footballer. at least, i would have been. had i not been killed when i was 15. kiyan prince was trying to break up a fight when he was stabbed and killed outside his school.
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he was just 15. his bubbly, joyful personality was infectious to everyone around him. for such a big guy, at such a young age, you know, looked intimidating but honestly, just a gentle giant. some people are special, like, they are, and he was special. and he didn't have, special in the sense that, never thought he was better than anyone but he was better than a lot of us. 15 years on, kiyan's friends remember him as a boy becoming a man with huge potential to be a great footballer. he'd already been signed as an academy player for qpr. from watching him play at that age, and i think the progress he would have gone through, he would have been at the euros in two weeks' time, 100%. beautiful boy. beautiful. the kind of son that every parent, especially a father, just wants to have. kiyan's dad mark was determined to do something in his son's name.
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he set up the kiyan prince foundation, a charity dedicated to stopping knife crime. on this, the 15th anniversary of his death, the foundation has done something remarkable to keep kiyan's name alive. this picture of star wars character han solo is by the artist chris scalf, renowned for the photorealism of his work. the foundation commissioned chris to create an image of kiyan as he would look today. there's a certain point where halfway through, when i start to feel like i'm getting it, and feeling confident, but not confident enough, until i get the final acknowledgement from the people who it really matters too. to say that it looks like kiyan. working with the special effects team behind avengers endgame, chris created this 3d model of kiyan. and this is the moment mark prince
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saw the picture of his son at 30 for the first time. he looks absolutely fantastic. what a greatjob. kiyan's image will be on billboards, on match attax cards, and he'll become a qpr player on fifa. kiyan prince, how about that! brought back to life as the footballer he should have been. graham satchell, bbc news. george is coming up with the bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes this afternoon we will see widespread showers and thunderstorms so keep your umbrella handy. today's clouds have already been bursting upwards through the skies above nuneaton in warwickshire and today's clouds could get to be about six miles tall. clouds that big are capable
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of really heavy downpours and we've already seen some of those. we have a more organised feature pushing in showers across wales and south—west england and that is going in this kind of direction this afternoon. showers will be widespread from that and then we have another curl of cloud that will be pushing on across south—west england, so here we are looking at more general cloud and heavy outbreaks of rain pushing in through the course of the afternoon. heavy downpours for south—east england and some big thunderstorms crossing the midlands towards lincolnshire and a greater chance of showers compared with yesterday across northern ireland and today's showers in scotland will be slow—moving but there will be some areas that dodge the downpours and favoured spots will be north wales, north—west england seeing fewer showers so you might get away with a dry afternoon with some sunshine. 0vernight tonight, cloud and rain pushes east across southern counties of england and we are seeing thicker cloud moving across northern scotland, bringing rain here overnight as well. for wednesday, another day of sunshine and showers but most of the showers will be forming across eastern areas of england and to a degree across eastern areas of scotland by this trough.
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further west, pressure will be a building underneath the ridge and south—west england and the west midlands and wales and north—west england should have a dry afternoon with some spells of sunshine, long spells of sunshine at that and temperatures of around 15 or 16 degrees, so not too bad at all. 0n into thursday's weather, not looking too good at all. low pressure moving on from the atlantic and this one bringing heavy rain widely and also some pretty strong winds, so although it starts off on a bright note across eastern parts of the uk, cloud will gather and outbreaks of rain will spread in and it will become windy and the strongest winds looked to be heading on across the southern coastal hills of wales where we could get gusts of 50 or 60 miles an hour, strong enough to bring down tree branches and localised transport disruption and not just through thursday, the same area of low pressure is with us on friday bringing rain and strong winds and even though it clear through the weekend,
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we are looking at a return of those showery conditions. that is your latest weather.
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today at six — borisjohnson backs his covid road map, even as cases of the indian variant continue to rise. from bolton to bedford, health experts are tracking the latest variant — they want more data about how threatening it is. —— from bedford to glasgow. i don't see anything conclusive at the moment to say that we need to deviate from the road map, but we've got to be cautious. and we'll be looking at the growing argument over travel guidelines — is amber the new red? also tonight... the fred west murders — gloucestershire police are ready to begin excavations in their search for the remains of mary bastholm. how a walk in the park could help our obesity crisis — for the first time, there were more than a million weight—related
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hospital admissions.

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