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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 19, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the uk government is accused of sending confused messages about foreign travel, just as the eu is set to relax rules for british tourists. more surge testing across the uk to stop the spread of the indian variant, but borisjohnson says there's no need to deviate from the covid road map. are you trying to book a holiday abroad? or do you have concerns about the opening up of foreign travel? please do get in touch — i'm on @bbcbenthompson or use the hashtag bbcyourquestions new york's attorney general says its investigation of donald trump's organisation is now a criminal inquiry. and violence between israel and palestinian militants in gaza continues for a tenth day, with more air strikes
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and rockets overnight. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. travel rules for british tourists heading to europe could be released today. it comes as borisjohnson has said that people should not be taking holidays in most european countries. eu ambassadors will today consider whether to allow visits from travellers who have been fully vaccinated against covid—19. the ambassadors are also expected to lift the current ban on nonessential travel from the uk. their meeting comes as the government here has been accused of causing confusion with conflicting advice over its own traffic light system. meanwhile, surge testing
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is being stepped up in areas where there are concerns about the india variant. later today at 5pm, uk time, the health secretary, matt hancock, will be holding a downing street coronavirus briefing. our europe correspondent, jean mckenzie, has the latest from brussels. what we are expecting here in brussels today is for eu ambassadors to make two decisions. the first decision is about whether to put the uk onto its equivalent of a green list. this would end the ban on nonessential travel to the eu as a whole. essentially, it would mean holidays here from an eu perspective were allowed again. then you had a second decision about what to do about people who had been fully vaccinated. should fully vaccinated people be able to come to europe this summer without any restrictions? without needing to have a test or needing to quarantine? these things are going to be discussed. we might get a decision on one, both or neither. when we saw what happened
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with portugal as far as lifting those restrictions for british travellers being able to go, there was some concern about the eu not acting collectively, that they didn't have a coordinated approach. this is some attempt to have a collective view on what those restrictions should be right across the block. absolutely. this is an attempt to have one set of rules applied to the whole of the eu because countries have been making their own individual decisions. some countries have been frustrated that this eu position is taking so long to come to, particularly around the idea of the vaccine passport, and have decided to make their own rules. so portugal, greece, italy have already said british travellers can come back and have dropped quarantine restrictions. spain wants to allow tourists back from next month, regardless of what is decided at an eu level. so regardless of what is decided here today, it is still up to the individual countries to make their own rules
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and even if we do see some of these restrictions relax, you could still see discrepancies in how these individual countries choose to implement them. some countries may choose to be a little bit more conservative, even if the rules are relaxed, and they could still ask for quarantine and tests. so this isn't necessarily going to provide us with a clean picture. let's head to westminster. good morning. what is so interesting that further change has potentially another easing of travel restrictions for the eu but it is still far from clearjust restrictions for the eu but it is still far from clear just how restrictions for the eu but it is still far from clearjust how easy will be to travel this summer. there have been mixed _ will be to travel this summer. there have been mixed messages - will be to travel this summer. ti” have been mixed messages coming from the government over the last 2a hours, one cabinet minister saying it was possible for people to visit countries on the amber list to see
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friends or family. countries on the amber list to see friends orfamily. another countries on the amber list to see friends or family. another saying that people might consider a holiday essential for their well—being, so travel to one of those countries. another said we shouldn't be considering foreign travel at all anywhere this year. so the prime minister yesterday attempted to clarify things and say that people shouldn't travel to countries on the amber list for anything other than absolutely essential reasons. but the reason we are getting some confusion if there is guidance from the government but no legal restrictions now on international travel. those countries on the amber list mean that if you travelled there, you have to quarantine for ten days on your return, and we are seeing an attempt this morning again by ministers to clarify that guidance from not least the health minister, the skills minister gillian keegan. we minister, the skills minister gillian keegan.— minister, the skills minister gillian keegan. we are allowing --eole gillian keegan. we are allowing eo - le to gillian keegan. we are allowing peeple to use — gillian keegan. we are allowing people to use their _ gillian keegan. we are allowing people to use their common -
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gillian keegan. we are allowing i people to use their common sense gillian keegan. we are allowing - people to use their common sense and be sensible _ people to use their common sense and be sensible but we are not advising people _ be sensible but we are not advising people. great list countries are holiday— people. great list countries are holiday countries and there are 12 countries — holiday countries and there are 12 countries on that list. many people are hoping — countries on that list. many people are hoping that more countries will be added _ are hoping that more countries will be added to that list —— green list. we have _ be added to that list —— green list. we have to — be added to that list —— green list. we have to look at vaccination rates, — we have to look at vaccination rates, the _ we have to look at vaccination rates, the cases and the new variants _ rates, the cases and the new variants in _ rates, the cases and the new variants in those countries and we have _ variants in those countries and we have to _ variants in those countries and we have to look at all that evidence and obviously give the guidance. but it is not— and obviously give the guidance. but it is not in— and obviously give the guidance. but it is not in law, it is guidance. so there it is not in law, it is guidance. there are it is not in law, it is guidance. sr there are three lists — green, red and amber. they determine what the guidances in terms of whether you should travel to those countries are not and also the rules you have to abide by on your way out and on your return. as we have been hearing this morning, many popular uk holiday destinations, they are in the eu and there may be a decision on which has a further bearing on people's decisions whether to travel or not. i wanted to ask that, because the
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point is, and whether confusion is, whether the eu or uk changes the rules, that is only half of the story. you have to check where you are going to as well as going back. and left in the middle people whether to travel, whether to book a holiday and whether it is feasible to travel abroad or not. as you point out, the decisions made in brussels today will have some bearing and some influence perhaps in the decisions people make, but at the end of the day there are restrictions and rules in place for foreign travel here in the uk and the decisions in brussels and in various countries around europe will not change. the listing of countries in the uk and the quarantine they have to abide by when they returned from the countries on al that the green, amber or red lists.-
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green, amber or red lists. thank ou. green, amber or red lists. thank yom let's _ green, amber or red lists. thank yom let's get — green, amber or red lists. thank you. let's get the _ green, amber or red lists. thank you. let's get the response - green, amber or red lists. thanki you. let's get the response from green, amber or red lists. thank- you. let's get the response from the travel industry. paul charles is the founder and ceo of travel consultancy the pc agency. nice to see you. what are you expecting today? as we were discussing, some changes to those rules in some respects welcomed by the industry, but the lack of clarity is still a problem. it is clarity is still a problem. it is and we need _ clarity is still a problem. it is and we need to _ clarity is still a problem. it is and we need to see - clarity is still a problem. it 3 and we need to see more cavity and less confusion from the uk government. i think what is happening is that they are getting nervous and worried about other countries moving faster. the eu is indeed likely to vote to open up its borders are much more during june, enabling fullyjabbed citizens to enter without having to quarantine. and it is interesting to see that happening across the world. in the us they are allowing fullyjabbed citizens to travel without having to quarantine when they return. in europe you are likely to see this decision in the next 4081 was. and
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in the uk there are no different rules that apply if you are fully jabbed and i wonder why not, bearing in mind so many have now had their second dose safely. so it remains to be seen how the uk is going to respond to this. there is a feeling it has been left behind, losing its competitive advantage which it had from the roll—out of the vaccine programme. from the roll-out of the vaccine programme-— from the roll-out of the vaccine programme. from the roll-out of the vaccine rouramme. ., ., ., programme. you will note there have been changes — programme. you will note there have been changes this _ programme. you will note there have been changes this week _ programme. you will note there have been changes this week to _ programme. you will note there have been changes this week to the - programme. you will note there have been changes this week to the nhs i been changes this week to the nhs app been changes this week to the nhs app that will prove vaccination status. that was part of the government's plans from may to 17th. what is interesting, we now have the beginnings of what seems to look like a passport, but the government says it is not a passport. it is like a passport, but the government says it is not a passport.— says it is not a passport. it is a diuital says it is not a passport. it is a digital certificate, _ says it is not a passport. it is a digital certificate, of _ says it is not a passport. it is a digital certificate, of course, . says it is not a passport. it is a l digital certificate, of course, and it does enable those who have been jabbed twice to prove that they had been fully jabbed. jabbed twice to prove that they had been fullyjabbed. and i think you will see that use much more over the summer. that will help those who have had the fulljab. but we need to see the government been more supportive of the sector. the very
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language they use isn't right. listening to the minister they're talking about holiday countries in the green list, i can go to portugal to see family and friends and fiances. that is a reason people are wanting to travel so urgently. they are notjust for holidays or holiday countries. we need to see the governments about the sector in not just tone but also in that green list. there are many countries around the world especially small islands, that rely on tourism and they deserve to be on the greenness because they meet the criteria. in because they meet the criteria. in benidorm in spain there are restrictions in place there is a lot of frustration that they say they have made all the changes, make sure it is said to be there, to be in a hotel, bar, but yet they still cannot welcome their biggest market. give me a sense of what you are hearing from travel operators about how frustrating it is as far as timing is concerned. they need the bookings now if some is to happen.
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there is huge frustration among tour operators and travel agents as well as airlines about the fact there is no clarity from government. without this clarity, what is happening is that they have to cancel scheduled flights and package holidays and that means having staff brought back from furlough to deal with those cancellations, refunds, re—bookings and then there is no revenue coming in. so you can imagine there is enormous frustration in the sector and even the world travel and tourism council this morning said half a millionjobs tourism council this morning said half a million jobs are now at risk because of the lack of clarity over the summer. so the government needs to put out some reassuring words, notjust to put out some reassuring words, not just for the sector to put out some reassuring words, notjust for the sector but to put out some reassuring words, not just for the sector but also to protect jobs and not just for the sector but also to protectjobs and i hope the prime minister will focus on that. absolutely. paul, it is good to talk to you. we will speak to you again about this very soon. thank you. thank you. a decision on whether final lockdown restrictions will be lifted in england onjune the 21st remains in the balance, because of concerns over the spread
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of the indian variant. latest figures show there were more than 2,300 confirmed cases of the new strain in at least 86 local authorities across the uk. bolton, where the outbreak is most severe, has seen cases double in the last week. most, though not all, are of the indian variant. as we've been reporting surge testing is under way there, as well as in other hotspots, including bedford and glasgow. nuneaton is the latest area where extra testing is being deployed. where that leaves the full unlocking of restrictions is still under review, with a decision expected within days. the transmissibility advantage of the b.1.617.2 variant first identified in india might be a little lower than first feared, but vaccines might be less effective at limiting its spread. that's according to professor neil ferguson, an epidemiologist at imperial college london. a glimmer of hope from the recent data that the, whilst the variant
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still does appear to have a significant growth advantage, the magnitude seems to have dropped a little bit with the most recent data. the curves are flatting a little, but it will take more time. it is something that is being studied very carefully. we don't really have enough data to really distinguish between the vaccines. first of all, i should say there is a good deal of confidence and the data is being gathered that vaccines will protect against severe disease, the effect of the indian variant will be fairly marginal. so vaccines protect individuals. we are slightly concerned that there may be in impact on the ability to prevent infection and therefore prevent transmission in the community. i'm joined now by professor ravi gupta from the university of cambridge. he's a professor of clinical microbiology and has been researching the evolution
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of covid—19, including new strains. welcome. i don't know if you were able to hear the clip, but essentially looking at whether transmissibility is lower than first feared, that vaccines may be less affected at limiting its spread. is that how you say? absolutely, i think the early indications of increased transmissibility were potentially driven by the way that the virus was introduced and forming a cluster of infections in particular communities. so i think the estimates were probably come down a little bit in terms of transmissibility, but one thing that is important to clarify if it is difficult to understand whether this is all transmissibility of a virus thatis is all transmissibility of a virus that is better able to get around the immune system to transmit between people. and i am certainly convinced that there is a significant contribution of the
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latter thing, which is partial vaccine resistance, but not really resistance in the typical form. just thereby that is better able to infect someone who has a level of infection from past infection or relaxing. these individuals are still protected from severe disease, but they may be able to transmit, or may get infected and transmit and cause problems. that may get infected and transmit and cause problems.— may get infected and transmit and cause problems. that raises lots of cuestions. cause problems. that raises lots of questions the _ cause problems. that raises lots of questions. the first _ cause problems. that raises lots of questions. the first being - cause problems. that raises lots of questions. the first being how - questions. the first being how worried we should be. we note that the virus mutates and changes constantly. the big question if the impact on us and whether we should be worried. i wonder if we should be concerned by that? i be worried. i wonder if we should be concerned by that?— concerned by that? i think this reall is concerned by that? i think this really is the — concerned by that? i think this really is the next _ concerned by that? i think this really is the next in _ concerned by that? i think this really is the next in a - concerned by that? i think this| really is the next in a sequence concerned by that? i think this i really is the next in a sequence of new variants, each of which is doing similar things new variants, each of which is doing similarthings in new variants, each of which is doing similar things in that they have mutations that show they are adapting to the immune responses we make, which is what we would have
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predicted. it is happening at a fairly quick pace, so i'm not saying we should panic every time there is a new variants, but the problem with this one is it also has a mutation that enables it to potentially fuse membranes faster and therefore transmit faster. we saw a similar mutation earlier. and it has its mutations in the protein that enables it to partially evade our antibodies. so this particular one does have features that we should take really seriously. we should take really seriously. we should take note of what is happening in india where the variant is overtaking other variants in the country and is causing disease in people who are vaccinated, even though it is mild and it is transmitting. and we are hearing reports are fully vaccinated people succumbing to the disease, even those who are young. so it must take this very seriously. these may be rare events but if it happens in the uk is in hospitals it will cause panic. we need to mitigate alarming
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this virus to take hold in the uk. therefore, what would you advise to be the next steps taken by the government here to avoid a repeat of some of the things we saw earlier in the year? some of the things we saw earlier in the ear? , , , some of the things we saw earlier in the ear? ,, i, ., the year? this is my personal oinion the year? this is my personal opinion in _ the year? this is my personal opinion in that _ the year? this is my personal opinion in that we _ the year? this is my personal opinion in that we should - the year? this is my personal opinion in that we should be l the year? this is my personal- opinion in that we should be very cautious. we have taken a long time to get here. we lock down at the start of the year and it is now bay. a few more weeks to understand the virus would not be an ace and it would not be a u—turn on the part of the government. it would be adaptation of scientific discoveries and change, the changing landscape. caution is needed and we need to slow things down to we know what's going on. slow things down to we know what's auoin on. . ~' ,, slow things down to we know what's rroin on. ., ,, i. ., slow things down to we know what's rroin on. ., ,, ., , ., ., going on. thank you for sharing that insirht with going on. thank you for sharing that insight with us. _ going on. thank you for sharing that insight with us. from _ going on. thank you for sharing that insight with us. from the _ going on. thank you for sharing that insight with us. from the university| insight with us. from the university of cambridge, one of the scientists advising the government new and virus threats. advising the government new and virus threats. the uk government failed to plan sufficiently for a threat on the scale of the pandemic, according to the spending watchdog.
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the national audit office has also urged ministers to come up with ideas to prevent "widening" inequality caused by the virus. the government says it's been guided by the data and that it has acted "quickly and decisively" throughout. india has recorded the highest ever daily deaths due to coronavirus, anywhere in the world. in the past 24 hours, 4,529 people have died. but the overall cases reported is falling. it comes as the country's largest vaccine manufacturer, the serum institute, says it won't be able to send shipments to developing countries until the end of the year, because of the demand for vaccines in india. the state attorney's general... the state attorney general�*s office in new york has said its investigation into donald trump's business — the trump 0rganisation — is now a criminal probe and not purely a civil matter. the company has been under investigation for over two years by the manhattan district attorney. the trumps deny wrongdoing.
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laura podesta, of cbs news, gave me this update from outside trump tower in new york city. there are two pending investigations right now. one by the new york attorney general office and the other by the district attorney in manhattan and now they are both criminal investigations. it means they could go to trial if this investigation needs to proceed in that way. they are looking into the pre—presidential business dealings of president trump and people within his organisation, the trump organisation, and whether president trump manipulated the value of assets such as trump tower right behind me here, potentially inflating the price of this property in order to secure bank loans or deflating it in order to get a tax break. explain the significance if you will of this investigation
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moving from being purely a civil matter to a criminal investigation. a civil matter would be the plaintiff trying to recoup some sort of monetary amount from the defendant. and a civil trial doesn't necessarily mean that there was a problem to society as a whole. in the meantime, a criminal trial could potentially result in a much harsher penalty than just paying a sum. it could result in prison time, for example. it could result in prison time, for example. therefore, that leads me to my next question, what are the implications for president trump? depending of course on the outcome of this investigation. a really good question and one we all want the answer to but it will depend if it is... if they can link to various crime
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such as tax fraud and insurance and insurance fraud, or if someone else will get the blame, such as an accountant within the trump 0rganisation. it will really be about going through records, e—mails, phone calls, perhaps there are recordings, in order to tie president trump, pre—presidential trump, and these crimes. cbs correspondent in new york outside trump towers. air raids and rocket attacks have continued overnight in the conflict between israelis and palestinians. two palestinian militants were killed and two israeli soldiers were injured in the latest violence, according to officials on both sides. the un says about 50,000 palestinians in gaza have been displaced so far. the israeli prime minister has once again accused hamas of using human shields.
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french calls for a u.n. security council resolution to help end the conflict have been dismissed by america as mark lobel reports. more israeli air strikes, more militants killed in gaza for a tenth day. a palestinian rocket intercepted by israel's air defences. after an earlier strike in southern israel killed two foreign farm workers. so continues a cycle of violence. visiting an air in southern israel, its prime minister appeared relaxed, saying hamas has been set back by many years. translation: we will continue as necessary to restore peace . to all israeli citizens. but things are not getting more peaceful. last seen 16 years ago, the al—aqsa martyrs brigade, armed palestinians, rear their heads
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in the occupied west bank. injericho, arab protesters are met with rubber coated steel bullets and tear gas. also feeling the heat from all this is america, who despite voicing its support for a ceasefire, has so far blocked united nations backed efforts to end hostilities. where should the poor go? where should the weak go? isn't the un the house of all people? france now wants the un's powerful security council, which includes america, to vote for a ceasefire and greater humanitarian access in gaza. but... the us view has been for many years been that the security council - is not the place to resolve issues between non—state actors - like hamas and israel. i think the us is going to veto it, but it will be part of this growing
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sense that the us will support, that we have to begin - winding this up. i think, within days. with all eyes on gaza, whichever way the us proceeds, its push for peace here unilaterally or inside the un, it is now under sustained political pressure, both at home and abroad to do so fast. i want to take you live to tel aviv where benjamin netanyahu is speaking. he is addressing the media and responding to some criticisms about the tactics used by israeli forces over the past ten days. you want out of this flare up in violence between israel and palestinian militant groups, the worst hostilities since 2014, we have been hearing from the israeli prime minister. he has spoken about going to great lengths to prevent civilian casualties. he says he hopes their actions can help restore
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quiet. and responding to specific criticisms about the bombing of civilian areas. the israeli prime minister saying that they are simply trying to degrade hamas terror capabilities. that was one of the specific criticisms of the bombing of an apartment office building used predominantly by international media, citing that as a location where hamas had capability. they said they had intelligence that hamas operatives were within the building, so we're just hearing there at this press conference being given by the prime minister that they have gone to great lengths to prevent civilian casualties and now hopes to restore quiet. let's talk about some implications.
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this is broadcaster chris gunness, former director of strategic communications for the un. he was previously a spokesperson for the united nations relief and works agency for palestine refugees in the near east. i wonderfirst i wonder first about what you make of those comments from the israeli prime minister, saying we have gone to great lengths to civilian casualties.— to great lengths to civilian casualties. ., , �* casualties. one of the things i'd like to see _ casualties. one of the things i'd like to see after _ casualties. one of the things i'd like to see after the _ casualties. one of the things i'd like to see after the ceasefire, i like to see after the ceasefire, which i hope will be soon because enough civilian life has been lost, there must be an international criminal investigation in which israel will be given the chance to put its case. if it is the case that civilian life is being spared, that is excellent, but there must be an independent criminal investigation that includes hamas as well as the israeli army. it needs to be balance. i hope all this will come out because they have been previous conflicts and this has resulted in more conflict later on, because there hasn't been a proper resolution. so the international
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criminal court said just ate a few days ago that it is looking it is looking very closely at what is going on with both, so there must be an independent criminal investigation into such issues are despairing of civilian life. secondly, i would like to see the underlying causes address. —— despairing of civilian life. a grave breach of the geneva conventions of war crime because artists are because of deep grievance within gaza. there has to be a serious attempt at ending the occupation before. talking attempt at ending the occupation talking of palestinian dispossession, 1948, the refugee issue, millions of people are living around the middle east in a state of political limbo. these are individuals each with a dignity and destiny that must be respected. these are human beings and the best way to respect their dignity is to give them their political right. they don't want food hand—outs and
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bread baskets, they want to status, they want their full political rights. it is time for international law. law, not war. we need accountability from the international criminal court leading to a just and lasting resolution for the palestinians.— to a just and lasting resolution for the palestinians. perhaps if we can look first the palestinians. perhaps if we can took first of— the palestinians. perhaps if we can look first of all _ the palestinians. perhaps if we can look first of all at _ the palestinians. perhaps if we can look first of all at their _ look first of all at their short—term implications in the short—term implications in the short—term requirement quite clearly for a ceasefire and what is interesting over the past 48 hours, the us presidentjoe biden gave his support for a ceasefire but the us blocked the un statement causing for a cessation of violence. what blocked the un statement causing for a cessation of violence.— a cessation of violence. what do you make of that? _ a cessation of violence. what do you make of that? as _ a cessation of violence. what do you make of that? as ever, _ a cessation of violence. what do you make of that? as ever, the - a cessation of violence. what do you make of that? as ever, the united i make of that? as ever, the united states is protecting its israel in the united nations security council. but that will not lead to peace, thatis but that will not lead to peace, that is a recipe for more war. we needed to you in fully engaged at the political level to any political engagement of all parties involved in the middle east. that includes
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the quartet, but their record so far has given israel an enabling environment to carry on the war in gaza. but we also need justice. the international criminal court, that is one prong, we need political engagement and we need development and humanitarian engagement because gazza is being destroyed and here we are, many governments around the world dealing with the economic impact of covid—19, and israel for the fourth time since 2008 is destroying gaza and the international community, taxpayers like you and me, we are going to end “p like you and me, we are going to end up paying for this destruction, this overwhelming and disproportionate use of force. as i say, we need to be balanced and look at hamas and their potential war crimes and the israeli potential war crimes in an independent criminal investigation. one last point, the human rights watch have issued a report accusing
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israel of the international crime of apartheid. we have seen the families having discriminatory policies used against him to ethnically cleanse them from their homes, their ancestral homes. we have seen neo fascist, racistjewish gangster lynching and attacking palestinians. we have seen all the evidence ever needed of apartheid in israel. they have been directed by neofascist politicians in the israeli, the highest seat of political power in israel. so the international crime of apartheid also needs to be investigated. it is on the books of the international criminal court. there is no reason on earth bad politics why that shouldn't happen. we need accountability. it is time for law. the palestinians need their full rights. by the way, the palestinians and israel are also crying out. we have seen the support coming from the palestinians in the west bank, palestinians in israel
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proper and the palestinians in gaza. so i think a threshold has been crossed. we need accountability and weak kneed justice and we need a full political rights being afforded to the palestinians everywhere, including within israel. what i am interested in as well, you talked about this, this time is no different, we have heard platitudes before about resolving this crisis. i wonder if there's time how much has changed, particularly in an age of social media where, on both sides, we can see video of these things and also the spread of misinformation.— things and also the spread of misinformation. ., ., ,, ., ., ., misinformation. look at hong kong, look at myanmar, _ misinformation. look at hong kong, look at myanmar, people _ misinformation. look at hong kong, look at myanmar, people are - misinformation. look at hong kong, look at myanmar, people are crying| look at myanmar, people are crying out for justice. look at myanmar, people are crying out forjustice. generation z in palestine is no different to generation z in myanmar and hong kong and what is different now is the social media images are going to the social media images are going to the icc, they are going to the hague, international publics are saying to the government enough is enough. you saw the marches last weekend across the world, marches in
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america, and the democratic party, too, is increasingly split. the jewish community in america and all over the world is saying we will not stand for apartheid. decent, civilised people across the world have got to take this issue out of the hands of a few politicians blocking action in the security council, blocking political action in the eu. we need to see proper accountability, the palestinians must be given justice and their full rights. only that will lead to lasting peace in the middle east. chris kunitz, good to talk to you on bbc news, thank you and within the next 15 or 20 minutes, we will speak to a writer for thejewish chronicle, to a writerfor thejewish chronicle, a campaigner against anti—semitism and we will get his thoughts on some of the comments there from our previous guests. in there from our previous guests. in the uk, forensic teams have arrived at a cafe in gloucester where excavations are beginning in the search for a suspected victim of a
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serial killer fred west. 15—year—old mary bastholm worked at the clean plate cafe before she went missing in 1968. mary's parents died without finding out what happened to their daughter. andrew plant sent this report. initial searches at this cafe right in the heart of gloucester, police have said they will start excavation work in the cellar here and in the last ten minutes, we have seen some bands arriving and police forensic teams starting to go in and out with some bags. we heard they are focusing on three new discoveries, three new pieces of evidence, number one of which was a piece of blue cloth photographed by a documentary team making a film about the crimes of fred and rosemary west, they used a camera to people around some bricks and photograph some blue cloth in the corner of the seller. the second, we are told, is what they called yesterday some structural anomalies in the cellar, some boys on the floor and the walls that the police want to investigate —— some avoids. the third thing was
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a dog, trained to sniff out human remains, that they took down into the cellar a few days ago and police did have a reaction while it was down there, so those are the things they will begin to investigate in those excavations today. they have keptin those excavations today. they have kept in touch with mary's family throughout this process and have told them they can't, of course, guarantee they will find mary down there but well one way or another and so the question of whether or not she was buried in the cellar of that cafe after she disappeared here in gloucester in 1968. she was last seen not very far from where we are standing out in a cold january night in 1968, 15 standing out in a cold january night in1968, 15 years standing out in a cold january night in 1968, 15 years old, she had her monopoly board in a carrier bag, at a bus stop waiting to go and see her boyfriend and that was the last time she was seen anywhere at all. there was a massive police operation at the time to try and discover what happened to her but there was no trace. at that point, you have to fast forward to about 20 years to when the crimes of fred and rose west began to be uncovered and, at
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that point, people started to put two and two together and wondered whether or not fred west may have been behind mary's disappearance, he was a regular customer at this cafe, which has been here for decades under one name or another and when mary disappeared, she was working as a waitress at the cafe here in the centre of gloucester. police today said they will start those excavations but it won't be a quick process, it is underground and are fairly confined space but they say they will started by bringing forensic archaeologists on site, they will be the first to take a look down on the cellar and see what the next steps are but they say it could take several weeks before they have anything to report but, of course, for mary's surviving family it is a chance to finally perhaps discover what happened to her more than five decades after she disappeared. spain says it has returned half of the eight thousand migrants who crossed into the spanish territory of ceuta from morocco this week. moroccan guards are reported to have
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begun closing the border again after they were accused of turning a blind eye to the crossings. some migrants have also returned voluntarily. the spanish prime minister pedro sanchez vowed to restore order during a visit to ceuta. our correspondent nick beake has more from ceuta. that is morocco and it's from that country that 8,000 people began the very short journey on monday into tuesday. the latest we hear from the spanish authorities is that about half of the arrivals have since been pushed back to morocco. children, we are told, are being allowed to stay. overnight, relatively quiet. as far as we can see and hear, there weren't any more crossings across that border. the reason for that is that is that there are now 1,500 members of spanish security forces, and we saw them on the streets last night, a more low—profile presence today, but certainly on the streets we've seen many hundreds of mainly young men who have made thatjourney. i think the big question is what happens to them,
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because we know they haven't got work, they haven't got anywhere to stay, many have been asking for food. and so this is a crisis that isn't resolved yet and it's not going to be resolved in a matter of hours or days. let's get more on the violence between israelis and palestinians entering a tenth day. at least 217 palestinians have been killed in gaza including 63 children and 12 people have been killed in israel — including two children — that's according to officials on both sides. let's talk now to writer and broadcaster jonathan sacerdoti, who writes for the specator and thejewish chronicle. good morning, welcome to bbc news. we werejust hearing good morning, welcome to bbc news. we were just hearing from the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu, saying we have gone to great lengths to prevent civilian casualties, he says we hope we can restore quiet but, on the tenth day of violence, what are your hopes that quiet can be restored? i of violence, what are your hopes that quiet can be restored? i think if we listen — that quiet can be restored? i think if we listen to _ that quiet can be restored? i think if we listen to benjamin _ that quiet can be restored? i think| if we listen to benjamin netanyahu there, we understood exactly what
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israel's aims are, he hopes they can restore quiet but as far as israel is concerned, they see this as a legitimate response to thousands of rockets having been launched and top the gaza strip towards israeli civilians and, as you said, they managed to kill quite a few this time despite the iron dome system israel put quite a lot of money and research into developing, a system that does not over 90% of those rockets but can't catch them all. on the other side, you see israel's military actions in gaza wreaking havocin military actions in gaza wreaking havoc in some areas, including civilian areas, because israel says hamas but it's infrastructure embedded in those civilian areas. obviously, that has catastrophic results when civilians are caught up in that fighting, something netanyahu said israel is very keen to avoid, by unusual means like giving warnings and the like for people to evacuate buildings before strikes but, inevitably, there will be people who get caught up in that.
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i don't know if you are able to hear, we were speaking to chris guinness, and he was highlighting that we have been here before, we have heard of talks, cessation of violence and ceasefires and yet here we are once again and it raises the question of why there cannot be a political solution to this, rather than just the military response we see time and time again. absolutely, this is something _ see time and time again. absolutely, this is something we _ see time and time again. absolutely, this is something we have _ see time and time again. absolutely, this is something we have seen - this is something we have seen before, unfortunately and i think it is virtually impossible for there to be a political resolution to the conflict between hamas and israel, when hamas has embedded in its founding charter the idea that israel has to be destroyed, in fact at alljew ploo —— jews need to be destroyed, there really isn't a compromise area for that and hamas, despite the blockade of gaza and tight regulations from both israel and egypt for any goods to get in there, we can see has managed to
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amass thousands of rockets which they are launching indiscriminately on israeli civilian areas, which means there is obviously quite a porous border. those weapons are often coming from iran or the expertise on how to build the weapons internally in gaza is coming from iran and whilst there is a terrorist group like hamas, intent on destroying israel and its citizens, deploying these rockets into —— deploying its resources into this kind of weaponry and digging tunnels into underground areas, it is hard to imagine how israel can feel secure enough that it doesn't undertake these sorts of retaliation is when it is attacked with thousands of rockets. liis is when it is attacked with thousands of rockets. us president joe biden voicing _ thousands of rockets. us president joe biden voicing his _ thousands of rockets. us president joe biden voicing his support - thousands of rockets. us president joe biden voicing his support for. thousands of rockets. us president joe biden voicing his support for a l joe biden voicing his support for a ceasefire but, at the same time, the us has blocked the un security council statement that calls for that cessation of violence. how do you account for that very different approach from the united states? indeed, i think there were those who wondered howjoe biden might be
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different from his predecessor in dealing with israel and the palestinians. donald trump managed to bring about in the middle east some unusual normalisation deals between israel and some of its arab neighbours. joe biden is standing firm and saying he believes israel has the right to self—defence but finally has come out and said he would like them to push towards a ceasefire. israel, for its part, says it is not hurrying towards a ceasefire while there is work to be donein ceasefire while there is work to be done in debilitating hamas, not only so it will stop these attacks which are ongoing but so it won't be able to launch them again in the future and restock and rebuild so quickly, so at least there will be a longer cap before the next one of these engagements. i think the reasonjoe biden has said this now and taken a bit of time is he realises there is the need for israel to protect its civilian population. much as it doesn't play out well on channels, watching war, war is extremely ugly, there is perhaps a realisation that some of this is inevitable and israel does, he feels, have the
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right to defend itself but calling for that ceasefire now indicates we are moving towards the end of this military operation and israel, perhaps in the next few days, will say there has been some result from the secret talks that are probably ongoing at the moment, using egypt as an intermediary, to come to a ceasefire agreement and perhaps this is the first sign thatjoe biden has said he would like israel to push towards that ceasefire, notably not using the word immediate, showing he still has that ongoing support of israel's right to undertake these military actions. that doesn't help the civilians of gaza caught up in this, many dying, many being injured, many having their lives ruined because of the hamas infrastructure that is buried deep within their civilian areas and even underneath their homes. what within their civilian areas and even underneath their homes. what are the [on a er term underneath their homes. what are the longer term implications _ underneath their homes. what are the longer term implications of _ underneath their homes. what are the longer term implications of this - longer term implications of this violence? i'm talking particularly about the violence between neighbouring israeli arabs and due reds which we have seen come to a head in a way that perhaps we haven't seen before —— jews. that
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head in a way that perhaps we haven't seen before -- jews. that is a depressing — haven't seen before -- jews. that is a depressing part — haven't seen before -- jews. that is a depressing part of _ haven't seen before -- jews. that is a depressing part of the _ haven't seen before -- jews. that is a depressing part of the story - haven't seen before -- jews. that is a depressing part of the story for. a depressing part of the story for israel is internally and one effect that may have is to undo some of the good work going on between israeli arab and israelijews, and this puts doubt in the minds of some israeli jews, who may wonder if some of their arab neighbours may be able to do this sort of thing and that is grossly unfair because the vast majority of israeli arabs live in peace and coexist very happily with theirjewish neighbours. of course, there are some complications, injustices, imbalances in israeli society, as there often is in society, as there often is in society where there is an ethnic minority which bills they suffer from form form of discrimination, but in israel, generally speaking, it has until now been relatively calm and continues to be, i must admit, between most people, these are the fringe is carrying out this
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unrest in israel. politically, it is interesting, because an arab party with islamist tendencies had done much better than expected in the last elections and had looked likely to hold the key to forming a coalition government, whichever side was able to form a coalition may have relied on that arab party. perhaps this unrest will have put paid to that and, of course, there are already talks about what the coalition government could look like, keep bearing in mind there has been this sort of unrest, with the arab party that has those islamist tendencies being part of any coalition, it may be impossible now for any of the more traditional israeli parties to countenance. jonathan, it is good to talk to you, jonathan, it is good to talk to you, jonathan sacerdoti with the latest on the ongoing violence between israeli forces and hamas. we will stay right across that story on bbc news as we get it. let's turn to business. the official rate of inflation — that measures how quickly
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prices are rising — more than doubled in april as energy costs soared and clothing retailers increased prices. the office for national statistics said the consumer price indexjumped from 0.7% in march to 1.5% in april. it is the highest level since march last year. let's get more on this from our business presenter alice baxter. alice, good morning. good morning. yes, you are absolutely right, that is the headline, uk inflation almost the month of april, up to 1.5%, it was 0.7% in march. of course, we are coming out of the pandemic, there is so much pent—up demand in the economy, rising costs for both energy and clothing. there is also a global story to do with rising commodity prices, oil, petrol at its highest rate since march 2020. lots to unpick. let's talk to liz martin, a senior economist at hsbc. the
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first question, is this a temporary burst of inflation or is it a sign of things to come? the burst of inflation or is it a sign of things to come?— of things to come? the first question — of things to come? the first question and _ of things to come? the first question and also _ of things to come? the first question and also the - of things to come? the firstl question and also the million of things to come? the first - question and also the million dollar question— question and also the million dollar question that is dividing economists at the _ question that is dividing economists at the moment. you know, i guess on our forecast, — at the moment. you know, i guess on ourforecast. it— at the moment. you know, i guess on our forecast, it is going to be temporary, it's going to be, clearly, _ temporary, it's going to be, clearly, there are further rises to come _ clearly, there are further rises to come back— clearly, there are further rises to come back to a limited degree. we might— come back to a limited degree. we might get— come back to a limited degree. we might get a little bit above the bank— might get a little bit above the bank of— might get a little bit above the bank of england's 2% target but not too far— bank of england's 2% target but not too far above it. a lot of economist saying _ too far above it. a lot of economist saying we — too far above it. a lot of economist saying we have had damage done to the supply— saying we have had damage done to the supply side of economy, demand is very— the supply side of economy, demand is very strong, so there is the possibility— is very strong, so there is the possibility that inflation goes a lot further than it has in recent years. — lot further than it has in recent years, where it has really been quite _ years, where it has really been quite subdued.— years, where it has really been quite subdued. years, where it has really been ruite subdued. . .,, i. quite subdued. and, liz, as you say, let's not be — quite subdued. and, liz, as you say, let's not be alarmist _ quite subdued. and, liz, as you say, let's not be alarmist about _ quite subdued. and, liz, as you say, let's not be alarmist about this, - let's not be alarmist about this, the bank of england's inflation target is 2%, we are still below that. the bank has also been keen to play down fears of imminent interest
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rate rises, but, should discontinue, might we see a hike interest rates before perhaps the year at the next, which is when we were expecting it? could we see an interest rate rise as early as next year?— could we see an interest rate rise as early as next year? again, we are not forecasting _ as early as next year? again, we are not forecasting that _ as early as next year? again, we are not forecasting that but _ as early as next year? again, we are not forecasting that but i _ as early as next year? again, we are not forecasting that but i think - as early as next year? again, we are not forecasting that but i think the i not forecasting that but i think the markets _ not forecasting that but i think the markets are starting to expect an interest _ markets are starting to expect an interest rate rise by the end of next _ interest rate rise by the end of next year _ interest rate rise by the end of next year and, if you think about it, next year and, if you think about it. the _ next year and, if you think about it. the bank— next year and, if you think about it, the bank of england cut rates in march _ it, the bank of england cut rates in march 2020, we were in an emergency situation, _ march 2020, we were in an emergency situation, the markets were seizing up situation, the markets were seizing up at _ situation, the markets were seizing up at the _ situation, the markets were seizing up at the beginning of the pandemic, nobody— up at the beginning of the pandemic, nobody knew what was going to happen — nobody knew what was going to happen. do we still need rates to be at that— happen. do we still need rates to be at that emergency level is the question— at that emergency level is the question the bank of england will be asking _ question the bank of england will be asking itself and do we need rates to be _ asking itself and do we need rates to be a _ asking itself and do we need rates to be a little bit higher to contain inflation? — to be a little bit higher to contain inflation? that is the question and it all depends on how far the supply side of— it all depends on how far the supply side of the — it all depends on how far the supply side of the economy can recover. if you are _ side of the economy can recover. if you are a _ side of the economy can recover. if you are a restaurant or you are a pub and _ you are a restaurant or you are a pub and you — you are a restaurant or you are a pub and you can only serve people doing _ pub and you can only serve people doing table service, suddenly your supply— doing table service, suddenly your supply is— doing table service, suddenly your
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supply is much so —— much smaller than _ supply is much so —— much smaller than it— supply is much so —— much smaller than it was — supply is much so —— much smaller than it was. and we have producing far less _ than it was. and we have producing far less goods and services for a year. _ far less goods and services for a year. so — far less goods and services for a year. so it— far less goods and services for a year, so it depends whether supply can bounce — year, so it depends whether supply can bounce back to what it was before — can bounce back to what it was before or — can bounce back to what it was before or whether we are looking at real supply — before or whether we are looking at real supply shortages in the economy, at which point inflation is likely— economy, at which point inflation is likely to _ economy, at which point inflation is likely to go — economy, at which point inflation is likely to go a bit higher and may be the bank— likely to go a bit higher and may be the bank of england does think about dealing _ the bank of england does think about dealing with that by raising interest rates.— dealing with that by raising interest rates. please, talking about the _ interest rates. please, talking about the factors _ interest rates. please, talking about the factors behind - interest rates. please, talking about the factors behind this i about the factors behind this number, we talked about our rise in clothing, in energy costs, there is also this global story about a rise in commodity prices. what would you point as being the majorfactors behind the numbers today? it is point as being the major factors behind the numbers today? it is a two speed story. _ behind the numbers today? it is a two speed story, partly _ behind the numbers today? it is a two speed story, partly bouncingl two speed story, partly bouncing from _ two speed story, partly bouncing from a _ two speed story, partly bouncing from a very low base. this time last year. _ from a very low base. this time last year. april— from a very low base. this time last year, april 2020, oil prices were so low _ year, april 2020, oil prices were so low, petrol— year, april 2020, oil prices were so low, petrol prices were so low, the comparison — low, petrol prices were so low, the comparison with that automatically -ives comparison with that automatically gives you _ comparison with that automatically gives you a big jump in inflation,
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but there — gives you a big jump in inflation, but there is— gives you a big jump in inflation, but there is also a rise in core inflation, _ but there is also a rise in core inflation, which strips out these more _ inflation, which strips out these more volatile bits and pieces and that is— more volatile bits and pieces and that is telling us there is demand in certain— that is telling us there is demand in certain sectors of the economy, so i in certain sectors of the economy, so i noticed — in certain sectors of the economy, so i noticed that hairdresser prices were _ so i noticed that hairdresser prices were up— so i noticed that hairdresser prices were up 7%— so i noticed that hairdresser prices were up 7% year—on—year, that is something — were up 7% year—on—year, that is something we all have a lot of pent-up — something we all have a lot of pent—up demand for, or we did in april— pent—up demand for, or we did in april when— pent—up demand for, or we did in april when they reopened and where supply— april when they reopened and where supply is— april when they reopened and where supply is again constrained by restrictions. accommodation, you know _ restrictions. accommodation, you know, anyone who has tried to book a cottage _ know, anyone who has tried to book a cottage in— know, anyone who has tried to book a cottage in cornwall will know about that, those kind of prices are going up, so _ that, those kind of prices are going up. so there — that, those kind of prices are going up, so there are areas where supply is constrained and demand is strong. there _ is constrained and demand is strong. there is— is constrained and demand is strong. there is the — is constrained and demand is strong. there is the commodity story, the e>
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now, to something entirely different. the family of a private investigator murdered in south london more than 30 years ago has described the decision to delay a long—awaited report into his killing as "an outrage". an independent panel has been looking into the murder of daniel morgan in south london in 1987 — and the role played by police corruption in the failure to find his killers. the panel planned to release its report next monday, but now the home office has said it needs to review it first. the department said this wasn't about the independence of the report, and it was not seeking to make edits to it. our correspondent sanchia berg told me more about background to the case. the first police investigation, the met later admitted, was tainted by corruption, no one was charged. four more investigations followed, a trial that had to be you aborted and, so, in 2013, the family, who were keeping on campaigning to find out who killed daniel morgan and why are there was no successful prosecution, the family were really
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pleased when theresa may, the home secretary, set up this panel inquiry and its remit was, as you say, to look into corruption and the part it played in the case, the involvement of police officers and the role played by the failure to confront that corruption over the years. as we said in the introduction, this report, we are told, is ready, so why the delay? the home office said it had called in the report, it would be reviewing the report, because it had concerns about whether it was in compliance with the human rights act and also whether there might be some national security concerns, but the panel said that it had addressed any potential concerns concerns of that nature through its own processes, panel put out a statement last night which made it clear they are pretty unhappy with what has been done and that they don't believe that it is consistent with the independence of the panel, which, of course, is crucial, because the family have campaigned for years and years and years to get this independent review. they had tried many times
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to interest the home office in their case and failed. france is taking a big step towards lifting its lockdown today, with the opening of bar and restaurant terraces, shops and cultural spaces. some experts still worry that this longed—for breath of fresh air could carry with it a new wave of the virus. but the government has met its target of vaccinating 20 million people by mid—may, and the infection rate is falling. sara monetta reports. after a long winter lockdown, france is dusting off, it is time to reopen. paintings are hung once again on the walls in the musee d'orsay ready to welcome back visitors. alain—luc�*s restaurant has been closed for six months but now his customers can return to enjoy their meals on the terrace, with an evening curfew pushed back from 6pm to 9pm, and the excitement is palpable.
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translation: my cellphone has not stopped ringing. _ i have a lot of regular customers who are very nice and were the first ones to make reservations. they were impatient, like us, to come back to this establishment and to our terraces. theatres and cinemas are also fully booked. to maintain social distancing, they can only fill one—third of the seats, so some are now scheduling matinee sessions, starting as early as 8:00am. over the past few months, france has been through a worrying new wave of infections but now the worst seems to be over. translation: i really hope we will not experience - a lockdown like the one we have just lived through in the last six months. it was just unbearable. with covid cases decreasing and the vaccine gathering pace, despite few initial hiccups, the joie de vivre is despite a few initial hiccups, the joie de vivre is finally coming back to france. sara monetta, bbc news.
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more on coronavirus in europe now, and residents of two tower blocks in a west german town have been quarantined. a woman in the building tested positive for the indian variant of covid—19. public health officials say all residents have now been tested for the coronavirus but say that sequencing the samples to establish if they too had the indian variant could take several days. amazon has extended indefinitely a ban on the use of its facial recognition software by law enforcement agencies. the firm first announced a year—long moratorium lastjune at the height of protests in the united states, sparked by the police killing of george floyd. the speaker of the us house of representatives, nancy pelosi, has called for world leaders to boycott the winter olympics in beijing next year over china's treatment of uyghur muslims. while athletes would still participate, ms pelosi said heads of state should stay away. princess beatrice is expecting her first child in the autumn, buckingham palace has announced.
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the palace said, "her royal highness princess beatrice "and mr edoardo mapelli mozzi are very pleased to announce "that they are expecting a baby in autumn of this year." the couple wed at a private ceremony in windsor last year. at 11:30, we'll be answering your questions on international travel. we'll be putting them to travel industry experts, so send in your questions using the hash tag bbcyourquestions or by emailing yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. thank you for all the ones you have sent in. matt is asking about covid testing, asking if they are expected to decrease in price, pcr tests should be more affordable and currently a big factor in deciding whether to travel, the price is far too high. martin says my partner is a us citizen, relationship over zoom, i want to marry in san
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francisco in october, can i travel there? margaret asks about portugal, saying can she cross into spain for a day or will she need to quarantine on her return? we will answer all those a little later, you are watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. if you've recently put temporary structures in the back garden such as awnings or gazebos, now is the time to pin them down because even though many will see a bit of sunshine today, get ready for something wetter but also windier as we see out the next few days. it's this area of low pressure, an unseasonably deep area of low pressure, which will be pushing its way in for thursday and friday. ahead of it, though, we are building this little ridge of high pressure, this little bump in the isobars, which means wales and western parts of england, a much drier day than in recent days, many will avoid the showers altogether, there will be one or two around. sunshine and showers in northern ireland but eastern scotland, eastern england may well be prone to some heavy and thundery downpours through the second half of the day. it will feel cool once again once
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the showers come through, but, with more of you dry, the more of you will see a pleasant day, 15—17, the high. into this evening and overnight, the showers in eastern areas will slowly fade, clear skies for a time, which will mean a cooler night than we've had of late, temperatures down into single figures more widely, lower single figures across the eastern half of the country, but notice towards the west, the breeze already picking up, cloud spilling in and already a damp start to the day in south—west england and parts of wales. and it's because of this area of low pressure which will be pushing its way from west to east slowly during thursday and, indeed, friday, bringing with it outbreaks of rain. heaviest on thursday morning in northern ireland but spreading its way northwards and eastwards, that rain on and off. some in the south won't see too much in the way of rain but it's across southern and western areas where the winds will be picking up the greatest. certainly widespread gales across the west as we go into thursday afternoon and thursday evening. temperatures, well, 12 to 14 celsius, lower than we will see today. add on the wind, it will feel rather cool out there. and, then, through thursday night into friday, that low pressure, the centre of which will gradually push its way eastwards, bringing the stronger of the winds through this period on friday
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towards the southern half of the country. it's where we could see some damage and disruption. don't forget, the trees are in full leaf. some of the heaviest of rain will be pushing across england and wales, a bit more showery for scotland and northern ireland with a little bit of brightness, but it's a north—easterly wind, which will make it feel cool. the winds in the south, well, west to south—westerly, which could touch 50, maybe 60 mph in the gusts. as i said, there will be some travel disruption, even a little bit of damage in places. feeling cool, particularly across the north and cooler still as we go into the weekend. still with that mixture of sunshine and showers. hopefully things look a little bit drier next week.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. the headlines at 11... the government's accused of sending confused messages about foreign travel, as eu ambassadors are expected set to relax rules for uk tourists. more surge testing to stop the spread of the indian variant, but the prime minister says there's no need to deviate from the covid road map. and we'll be answering your questions about the latest international travel rules in your questions answered at 11.30. excavation work begins at a cafe in gloucester in the search for a suspected victim of serial killer fred west. new york's attorney general says its investigation of donald trump's organisation is now a criminal inquiry. a rise in the cost of petrol
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and clothes led to a jump in the uk inflation rate last month. and coming up, we're with the yorkshire police officers as they raid a cannabis factory in doncaster. good morning and welcome to bbc news. travel rules for british tourists heading to europe could be relaxed today. it comes as borisjohnson has said that people should not be taking holidays in most european countries. eu ambassadors are considering whether to allow visits from travellers who have been fully vaccinated against covid—19. the ambassadors are also expected to lift the current ban on nonessential travel from the uk.
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their meeting comes as the government here has been accused of causing confusion with conflicting advice over its own traffic light system. meanwhile, surge testing is being stepped up in areas where there are concenns about the india variant. later today at 5pm, the health secretary, matt hancock, will be holding a downing street coronavirus briefing. jon donnison has this report. let's face it — who isn't ready for a little bit of this? portugal — the only eu country on the green list — finally welcomed back british tourists this week. but what about the rest of europe — much of which is rated amber? the government has been accused of sending out confusing messages. the government should crack down and tell people once and for all if it's safe or not, particularly for leisure travel — so the summer holiday — and right from the very beginning, we think they should have been clear if they said that amber means stop, rather than prepare to go. that should have been clear from the beginning, and it's not, and i think people are very confused.
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we don't want to stop... it comes after the environment secretary, george eustice, said it was ok to travel to countries on the amber list to see family or friends... ..only for the prime minister visiting a vaccination centre a few hours later to contradict him, saying he was clear amber countries were not places people should be going on holiday yet. the travel industry is calling for clarity. government ministers are clearly confused themselves at the moment, and that breeds through to consumers who will be confused if the government doesn't know what the message is. but, fundamentally, the prime minister has delivered on what he said he would deliver in february this year, when he announced his road map. he said that, in may, overseas travel would start. so that's to be welcomed. i think the problem is, now, we've got government infighting leading to this mixed messaging. all this as the eu is expected to sign off on a plan at their end to allow fully vaccinated britons to fly to europe without having to take a covid test or quarantine.
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meanwhile, surge testing is being stepped up in covid hotspots, where there are concerns about the new indian variant. these include bolton, blackburn, bedford, and now nuneaton. for the moment, though, borisjohnson says there's no evidence to suggest the government will have to deviate from the road map to fully ease restrictions on social contact by june the 21st. but he said ministers would let people know in a few days' time, once the data was clearer. thank you. thanks for having me. jon donnison, bbc news. our europe correspondent jean mackenzie explained more about what the european rules surrounding travel this summer might look like. the rules actually could change as early as today or later on this week because eu ambassadors are meeting in brussels today to decide what to do
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about two key things. so the first is whether to add countries into its green list. at the moment there is a ban on nonessential travel to the eu for most countries in the world. the list of countries who can travel here is very restricted. so the ambassadors will be deciding whether to broaden that list out and add in more countries where the infection rate is relatively low. the second thing they are discussing is what to do about travellers who have been fully vaccinated, so whether they should be allowed to come on holiday here without any restrictions, so without a need for tests, without the need to quarantine. and we could have a decision on one of those things today, on both of those things today, or they could take a little longer. so, at the moment, things are still a little unclear. our political correspondent jonathan blake is at yesterday boris johnson yesterday borisjohnson said amber is not green and now it seems it
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might be read. is not green and now it seems it might be read-— is not green and now it seems it might be read. is not green and now it seems it mirht be read. ~ ., , ., , ., might be read. what is the latest on government — might be read. what is the latest on government thinking. _ might be read. what is the latest on government thinking. you _ might be read. what is the latest on government thinking. you can - might be read. what is the latest on | government thinking. you can forgive --eole for government thinking. you can forgive people for getting — government thinking. you can forgive people for getting confused _ government thinking. you can forgive people for getting confused about. people for getting confused about the travel advice. there is a traffic light system, the green list is pretty clear, you can travel to those locations on holiday with minimal testing and no quarantine requirements on return. it is the amber list that is causing confusion. we have had government ministers saying, yes, you can travel there to visit family or friends another saying no travel should be allowed anywhere at the moment anyway because it is too dangerous and another saying people might consider a holiday and essential reason to travel to one of the countries. that is why we saw the countries. that is why we saw the prime minister tried to make it very clear to people that the government advises you should not travel to any countries on the amber list unless it is for an absolutely pressing, essential reason. the reason there is some confusion
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perhaps because there is guidance in place but no legal restrictions on and so to an extent, it is up to people's individual choice, but the rules and guidance the government is attempting to set is being interpreted in different ways. the skills minister in explained more. we are really relying on people to use their common sense, look at their own situations, look at their own position and be sensible. but we are not advising people to... you know, the green list countries are the holiday countries and there are 12 countries on that list. i think it is for sure true many people are hoping that more countries will be added to that list by the time we come to the next unlocking, but of course what we have to do is look at vaccination rates, look at the cases and the new variants in those countries and we have to look at all that evidence and obviously give the guidance. but it isn't in law, it's guidance. so the messages you should not
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travel to countries on the amber list but the government has stopped short at this point of legally stopping people doing that. there is a requirement to walk quarantine for ten days once you return to england from any of those countries on the amber list. that will not change regardless of any decisions made in brussels or other countries as we have been hearing about that could be taken imminently to allow uk travellers into eu countries for leisure purposes and to relax the testing and quarantine requirements that countries have in place at the moment. . .. that countries have in place at the moment. ., ,, , ., that countries have in place at the moment. . ~' , ., , that countries have in place at the moment. ., ,, , ., , . let's speak to linsey mcneill from the travel industry website travel gossip. thank you very much forjoining us. we mentioned europe is looking at allowing brits in and that may be announced today. how will that tally with the rules here? you
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announced today. how will that tally with the rules here?— announced today. how will that tally with the rules here? you can already ao with the rules here? you can already ro to with the rules here? you can already go to some — with the rules here? you can already go to some european _ with the rules here? you can already go to some european countries - go to some european countries anyway, it isjust go to some european countries anyway, it is just that simply looking today at whether they will allow us to go in test free when we have been fully vaccinated. band allow us to go in test free when we have been fully vaccinated. and what do ou have been fully vaccinated. and what do you make — have been fully vaccinated. and what do you make of _ have been fully vaccinated. and what do you make of the _ have been fully vaccinated. and what do you make of the confusion - have been fully vaccinated. and what do you make of the confusion here i have been fully vaccinated. and what do you make of the confusion here in terms of how freely we should be able to travel? the terms of how freely we should be able to travel?— terms of how freely we should be able to travel? the problem is the government _ able to travel? the problem is the government is _ able to travel? the problem is the government is being _ able to travel? the problem is the government is being quite - able to travel? the problem is the government is being quite clear. able to travel? the problem is the government is being quite clear inj government is being quite clear in saying they don't want us to travel for leisure to the amber list countries, but tour operators are still offering holidays and operating holidays to amber list countries which means you are not necessarily entitled to a refund, you may be able to delay it but you won't get your money back and that is a problem for people trying to decide whether to go on holiday or not. �* ,., decide whether to go on holiday or not. �* , ., ., , decide whether to go on holiday or not. �* ., , ., , decide whether to go on holiday or not. . ., , ., , ., , not. also lots of flights have been leavinr to not. also lots of flights have been leaving to amber _ not. also lots of flights have been leaving to amber list _ not. also lots of flights have been leaving to amber list countries - not. also lots of flights have been leaving to amber list countries so | leaving to amber list countries so you are seeing sometimes people will decide just to
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you are seeing sometimes people will decidejust to go you are seeing sometimes people will decide just to go because they will lose out financially if they don't go despite of government guidance. if they have booked a flight, they are not entitled to a refund or a change to another destination or postponement, if they booked a package holiday, they can usually postpone or change destination, so some people will be in a situation where they think they could lose their money, what will they do. the government doesn't say they can't travel, only they shouldn't travel so they think they will just go. what are you detecting in terms of numbers of people booking to go to the countries.— the countries. people now, if they haven't already _ the countries. people now, if they haven't already booked, _ the countries. people now, if they haven't already booked, then - the countries. people now, if theyj haven't already booked, then they probably are not many people booking. some people will book for amber countries because if there is no foreign office advice telling them not to go, then they will think they can go. i think people have already booked to go to those countries before the government
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announced the traffic light system so they have already committed. ltrul’heh so they have already committed. when it comes to travelling, _ so they have already committed. when it comes to travelling, if _ so they have already committed. when it comes to travelling, if the _ so they have already committed. when it comes to travelling, if the rules to allow fully vaccinated adults to travel to european destinations, but leaves an issue with families travelling with children, it could get very expensive when it comes to testing. get very expensive when it comes to testinr. ., , ., �* ~' testing. countries i don't think will say if _ testing. countries i don't think will say if you _ testing. countries i don't think will say if you have _ testing. countries i don't think will say if you have been - testing. countries i don't think will say if you have been fullyl will say if you have been fully vaccinated, some countries are, but in europe they are saying either you have to have a vaccine passport to prove you have been vaccinated or take a test and it is usually a pcr test before you can go in. they are expensive, the cost is coming down, but for a family it will add up because you have to pay for tests to come back to the uk as well.- come back to the uk as well. thank ou ve come back to the uk as well. thank you very much- _ come back to the uk as well. thank you very much. we _ come back to the uk as well. thank you very much. we will— come back to the uk as well. thank you very much. we will be - come back to the uk as well. thank. you very much. we will be answering your questions at 11:30am also. a decision on whether final lockdown
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restrictions will be lifted in england onjune the 21st remains in the balance, because of concerns over the spread of the indian variant. latest figures show there were more than 2300 confirmed cases of the new strain in at least 86 local authorities across the uk. bolton, where the outbreak is most severe, has seen cases double in the last week. most, though not all, are of the indian variant. as we've been reporting surge testing is underway there, as well as in other hotspots, including bedford and glasgow. nuneaton is the latest area where extra testing is being deployed. where that leaves the full unlocking of restrictions is still under review, with a decision expected within days. the transmissibility advantage of the b.1.617.2 variant first identified in india might be a little lower than first feared, but vaccines might be less effective at limiting its spread. that's according to professor neil ferguson, an epidemiologist at imperial college london. a glimmer of hope from the recent
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data that the, whilst the variant still does appear to have a significant growth advantage, the magnitude seems to have dropped a little bit with the most recent data. the curves are flatting a little, but it will take more time. it is something that is being studied very carefully. we don't really have enough data to really distinguish between the vaccines. first of all, i should say there is a good deal of confidence and the data is being gathered that vaccines will protect against severe disease, and the effect of the indian variant will be fairly marginal. so vaccines protect individuals. we are slightly concerned that there may be an impact on the ability to prevent infection and therefore prevent transmission in the community. and the health secretary matt hancock will be holding a downing street coronavirus briefing at 5pm today.
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we'll bring that to you live on the bbc news channel. you're watching bbc news. we will talk a more about what is happening with the outbreaks of the indian variant and i will be speaking to the director of public health for lancashire county council. the uk government failed to plan sufficiently for a threat on the scale of the pandemic, according to the spending watchdog. the national audit office has also urged ministers to come up with ideas to prevent "widening" inequality caused by the virus. the government says it's been guided by the data and that it has acted "quickly and decisively" throughout. the official rate of inflation — that measures how quickly prices are rising — more than doubled in april as energy costs soared and clothing retailers increased prices. the office for national statistics
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said the consumer price indexjumped from 0.7% in march to 1.5% in april. it is the highest level since march last year. the bank of england has already forecast that inflation will eventually push above its 2% target by the end of the year, but says the spike is likely to be temporary as the economy stabilises after the pandemic. the headlines on bbc news... the government's accused of sending confused messages about foreign travel, as the eu prepares to relax rules for british tourists. more surge testing to stop the spread of the indian variant, but the prime minister says there's no need to deviate from the covid road map. excavation work begins at a cafe in gloucester in the search for a suspected victim of serial killer fred west.
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forensic teams have arrived at a cafe in gloucester, where excavations are beginning in the search for a suspected victim of the serial killer fred west. 15—year—old mary bastholm worked at the clean plate cafe before she went missing in 1968. mary's parents died without finding out what happened to their daughter. andrew plant sent this report. more than a week of initial searches at this cafe right police now say they have enough evidence to bring excavating the seller here which they will start to do later on today, we are told. and that really focuses on three new discoveries. number one is a piece of blue cloth which has been photographed in the corner of that cellar and we know that when mary disappeared from here back in 1968, she was wearing a blue coat and carrying a blue bag. number two is what they called yesterday structural anomalies. essentially voids in the floor
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and walla of the cellar there that they want to investigate. a number three is a dog that they took down a few days ago trained to sniff out human remains which did have a reaction down in the cellar there, we are told. now, they have been in touch with mary's family throughout this process. they've told them that they can't guarantee, of course, that they will find mary's remains down there. but what they will do is definitively answer that question one way or another as to whether she was buried here after she disappeared in 1968. last seen, actually, not very far away at all from where we are standing right now on a cold january night back in 1968, vanishing from a bus stop here in gloucester and then never seen again. but it was really more than 20 years later when fred west's crimes came to light that people started to put two and two together and wonder whether he may have been responsible for her disappearance. now, at that time there wasn't really enough evidence to warrant a search of the cafe here, but police say they do now have that, they will start excavating today, but that won't be a quick process, of course. it is underground and it is a fairly small space. but they will have forensic archaeologists on site here today to at least begin that process that they say could take several weeks and finally the possibility
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of answering that question of exactly what happened to mary when she disappeared here in gloucester more than 50 years ago. let's return to one of our main stories — the growing concern about outbreaks of the indian variant in the uk. well, to discuss the current situation in the lancashire area, we can speak now to dr sakthi karunanithi, lancashire county council's director of public health. thank you very much forjoining us. can you bring us up today with the latest figures on the number of cases and hospitalisations in your area? . cases and hospitalisations in your area? , ., ., ., ., area? yes, the idea that more areas for vulnerable _ area? yes, the idea that more areas for vulnerable the _ area? yes, the idea that more areas for vulnerable the covid _ area? yes, the idea that more areas for vulnerable the covid is _ area? yes, the idea that more areas for vulnerable the covid is bearing i for vulnerable the covid is bearing up for vulnerable the covid is bearing up again and lancashire is very close to the bolton areas and we are starting to see case rates about 1500 and the positivity rate are about 2%. that is similar to near
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areas at the moment. so we are taking lots of steps in addressing that and that is the anxiety we have that and that is the anxiety we have that within the next couple of weeks we all want a cd case rates flattening and going down. what are our ho es flattening and going down. what are your hopes on _ flattening and going down. what are your hopes on how— flattening and going down. what are your hopes on how vaccination - flattening and going down. what are your hopes on how vaccination could help with that? it will take time to roll out vaccinations, i understand from the figures lots of vaccinations have already been delivered over the past few days, but even once someone has been vaccinated it takes a few weeks for the antibodies to develop. vaccines take three weeks' _ the antibodies to develop. vaccines take three weeks' time _ the antibodies to develop. vaccines take three weeks' time roughly - take three weeks' time roughly speaking to get the levels for a immune response and thereby to make different levels, the personal protection but also the population protection but also the population protection and we believe we still have time to have the flexibility to go in a faster lane are so more vulnerable areas are protected
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faster and prevent the transmission spreading further across wider geographical areas. and we have seen the evidence for that in the modelling, we see that in glasgow and we need to give serious consideration for that. not just for preventing transmission but also for preventing transmission but also for preventing serious disease which some areas are more vulnerable. would it make sense for this period of time for there to be local lockdowns at least some yngling inside houses that's been allowed since the relaxation to be reversed? we have to have a combination of approaches. having been in local restrictions for so long, carrying the public with us with yet another restriction, i think we need to think really hard before doing that and it is not for the want of people not trying to follow the guidance
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and so on it is about what more we can do and particularly vaccination and testing and tracing and supporting people in isolation. but more critically clear information to people about how to make choices is really becoming important. ltrul’hazyt really becoming important. what would ou really becoming important. what would you say — really becoming important. what would you say are _ really becoming important. what would you say are the _ really becoming important. what would you say are the reasons behind the outbreak there and buy it is spreading in the way it is? irate the outbreak there and buy it is spreading in the way it is? we all know the main _ spreading in the way it is? we all know the main driver _ spreading in the way it is? we all know the main driver for - spreading in the way it is? we all know the main driver for this - spreading in the way it is? we all know the main driver for this is i spreading in the way it is? we all i know the main driver for this is the variance and it is not something we didn't know about, we have a plan. the two risks at the moment our indirect sin and international travel —— indoor mixing. it is up to our colleagues in protecting our local population so we have introduced further guidance to our schools and colleges to keep their masks on and continue to keep the
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control procedures, asking people in addition to her the travel tests after arrival, we ask them to take a rapid lateral flow test on the day of arrival so we can detect the virus if they are carrying it. and we continue to work with our nhs colleagues locally who are working incredibly hard in getting the vaccines into people's arms and we want some areas to go further faster, like for instance we have seenin faster, like for instance we have seen in glasgow and what seems to be suggested in these age documents. when it comes to flexibility in lancashire, over18 when it comes to flexibility in lancashire, over 18 skin get the vaccination. do you think that would be a sensible strategy for the country, bearing in mind that is where the spread certainly begins, when a new outbreak starts to take old? has when a new outbreak starts to take old? �* . . when a new outbreak starts to take old? �* , ., ., ., when a new outbreak starts to take old? . , ., ., ., ., ., ,
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old? as a nation, we need to realise that some areas _ old? as a nation, we need to realise that some areas are _ old? as a nation, we need to realise that some areas are carrying - old? as a nation, we need to realise that some areas are carrying more i that some areas are carrying more risk and are more vulnerable than other areas and many of us, the colleagues in public health, have been requesting for that extra flexibility so we can protect more vulnerable areas faster and better before it can create issues for the wider parts of the geography. it certainly is notjust a local issue, we need a better national strategy that protects more vulnerable areas faster and better.— faster and better. thank you very much forjoining _ faster and better. thank you very much forjoining us. _ air raids and rocket attacks have continued overnight in the conflict between israelis and palestinians. two palestinian militants were killed and two israeli soldiers were injured in the latest violence, according to officials on both sides. the un says about 50 thousand palestinians in gaza have been displaced so far. french calls for a un security council resolution to help end the conflict have been dismissed by america as mark lobel reports.
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more israeli air strikes, more militants killed in gaza for a tenth day. a palestinian rocket intercepted by israel's air defences. after an earlier strike in southern israel killed two foreign farm workers. so continues a cycle of violence. last seen 16 years ago, the martyrs brigade, and palestinians rear their heads in the occupied west bank. injericho, arab protesters are met with rubber coated steel bullets and tear gas. also feeling the heat from all this is america who despite voicing its part for a ceasefire has so far blocked united nations backed efforts to end hostilities. where
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should the _ efforts to end hostilities. where should the poor _ efforts to end hostilities. where should the poor and _ efforts to end hostilities. where should the poor and weak - efforts to end hostilities. where should the poor and weak go? i efforts to end hostilities. where i should the poor and weak go? isn't the un the house of all people? translation:— the un the house of all people? translation: ., . ., ., , translation: france now wants the owerful un translation: france now wants the powerful un security _ translation: france now wants the powerful un security council - translation: france now wants the powerful un security council to - translation: france now wants the powerful un security council to vote | powerful un security council to vote for a ceasefire — powerful un security council to vote for a ceasefire and _ powerful un security council to vote for a ceasefire and greater— for a ceasefire and greater humanitarian _ for a ceasefire and greater humanitarian access - for a ceasefire and greater humanitarian access in - for a ceasefire and greater. humanitarian access in gaza. for a ceasefire and greater humanitarian access in gaza. but... the us view — humanitarian access in gaza. but... the us view has _ humanitarian access in gaza. but... the us view has been _ humanitarian access in gaza. but... the us view has been for— humanitarian access in gaza. but... the us view has been for many - humanitarian access in gaza. but... l the us view has been for many years that the security council is not the place to resolve issues between non—state actors like hamas and israel, i think the us will veto it but it is part of this growing sense that the us will support that we have to do begin winding this up within days. have to do begin winding this up within days-— have to do begin winding this up within da s. ~ ., , , ., ., within days. with all eyes on gaza, whichever way _ within days. with all eyes on gaza, whichever way the _ within days. with all eyes on gaza, whichever way the us _ within days. with all eyes on gaza, whichever way the us proceeds - within days. with all eyes on gaza, whichever way the us proceeds its | whichever way the us proceeds its push for peace unilaterally or inside the un, it is now under sustained political pressure both at home and abroad to do so fast.
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in the past hour, the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has been holding a news conference and defended the miltary�*s actions. we try to target those who target us with great precision. that is not a surgical operation as it is. even in a surgical room in the hospital, you don't have the ability to prevent collateral damage around the affected tissues. even then you can't. and certainly in the military operation, you cannot. but there is no army in the world that does more than the israeli army and the israeli security services and israeli intelligence to prevent collateral damage. to have israel criticised for that is absurd. the state attorney general�*s office in new york has said its investigation into donald trump's business — the trump organisation — is now a criminal probe and not
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purely a civil matter. the company has been under investigation for over two years by the manhattan district attorney. our washington correspondent will grant sent us this update. this essentially is a look at the operations and the situation behind the scenes of the trump organisation, and the question of whether or not they have artificially inflated the value of their assets in order to obtain loans and tax breaks as a result, therefore misleading investors along the way. an important charge, and it has taken two years to get to this point and it is clear now that letitia james, the new york state attorney general, has decided there clearly is enough to move this from a civil investigation to a criminal one. as you mentioned as well, president trump is already under investigation for his tax affairs by the manhattan district attorney, and taken together that is an extremely sticky and difficult legal imbroglio he finds himself in
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both as an individual and for his organisation. now, the investigation has been going on since 2019, particularly after his personal lawyer, michael cohen, spoke about the allegation of this inflationary tactic to bump up the value of his properties, allegedly. it is worth underscoring that president trump, former president trump, has always denied any wrongdoing and suggested any investigation into him is a witchhunt and that journalists asking about his tax affairs were peddling fake news and so on, and although we are yet to receive a response from either him or his organisation, i think we can safely say it will be in that area that he responds. but, yes, this is largely about the operations of his organisation before he was president but it has been undertaken while he was present too. princess beatrice is expecting her
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first child in the autumn, buckingham palace has announced. the palace said, "her royal highness princess beatrice and mr edoardo mapelli mozzi are very pleased to announce that they are expecting a baby in autumn of this year." the couple married at a private ceremony in windsor last year. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. i , the day will be dry in england and wales, very few showers in the forecast. in northern ireland, showers will come and go but the heaviest shower is central, south—eastern scotland threw down the eastern counties of england. some hail mixing in some torrential downpours. forthem some hail mixing in some torrential downpours. for them rest, a bit warmer. it will turn cooler this evening and overnight particularly across eastern areas, showers will fade, temperatures down but signs of
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a we have to watch out for this. some increasingly wet and windy weather spreading its way, wetter of the morning conditions in northern ireland, north wales and into north—west scotland, north—west england and southern scotland. most will see rain at some point, not too much across the south by the strong winds, heavy rains will continue as we go into friday.
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hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: the government's accused of sending confused messages about foreign travel as eu ambassadors are expected set to relax rules for british tourists. more surge testing to stop the spread of the indian variant, but the prime minister says there's no need to deviate from the covid road map. excavation work begins at a cafe in gloucester in the search for a suspected victim of serial killer fred west.
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new york's attorney general says its investigation of donald trump's organisation is now a criminal inquiry. and, a rise in the cost of petrol and clothes led to a jump in the uk inflation rate last month. sport, and here's a full round up, from the bbc sport centre from jane dougal. in the last hour, the british and irish lions have confirmed that they will have a crowd of 16,500 fans at murrayfield for their match against japan next month. it'll be the first time that supporters will have watched live rugby at murrayfield since march last year. the game on the 26th ofjune will be a warm up ahead of the tour to south africa. the decision came after agreement from the scottish government. the all england club say they are confident capacity for this summer's wimbledon will be more than the minimum 25% they set out last month. the tournament is due to get
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under way on the 29th ofjune, a week after the government's roadmap for the further planned relaxing of covid restrictions. however, organisers say they will continue to leave things as late as possible, with online ticket sales not expected to begin before the middle of next month. in just under half an hour's time, scotland manager steve clarke will name his 26—man squad for next month's european championships. clarke will have some tough decisions to make for what will be a first major tournament for 23 years for a scottish men's side — and influential midfielders ryanjack and kenny mclean have already been ruled out. scotland of course are in the same group as england, as well as croatia, and begin their campaign against czech republic on the 14th ofjune. northern ireland's scheduled friendly against turkey at the end of the month has been postponed due to travel restrictions placed on the country. ian baraclough's side were scheduled to play in antalya on may the 31st, but the match has now been called
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off after turkey was placed on the government's red list for travel. northern ireland will now face malta from behind—closed—doors in austria. celtic have confirmed police scotland are investigating an explosion and fire at the home of chief executive peter lawwell. firefighters were called to his property in the early hours of the morning to extinguish a blaze. in a statement, celtic say "significant damage" has been caused to lawwell�*s house, but that he and his family are safe. chelsea manager thomas tuchel says securing a top four spot "is not yet done" despite taking a huge step towards champions league qualification with victory over nearest rival leicester last night. tuchel�*s side won 2—1 at stamford bridge, with antonio rudiger opening the scoring, celebrating in front of the returning stamford bridge crowd. jorginho then doubled the lead from the penalty spot to secure a win which moves chelsea up to third, while leicester will drop out of the champions league places
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if liverpool beat burnley tonight. four or five four orfive or six weeks four or five or six weeks ago nobody would have imagined that we could get that close and that is very positive, but being close is not being there and we know that, so since i am at liverpool, pretty much each season goes to the wire for different reasons. i can't remember a season where we had not finals until the end of the season, either a big cup competition or we had to fight in the league until the last second of the season. so, yeah, here we are again and now we have to make sure we have something to fight for. ahead of this weekend's monaco grand prix, british driver lando norris has signed a contract extension with mclaren. aged only 21, he's one of the rising stars in formula one and is currently fourth in the drivers championship following a strong start to the season. norris says he couldn't imagine being a part of any other team
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at this stage of his career. that's all the sport for now. now on the bbc news channel, it's time for your questions answered. now on bbc news, your questions answered. you've been sending in your questions about the international travel rules. we will rattle through as many as we can. here to try and answerjust some of them is the host of the big travel podcast — lisa francesca nand and the independent�*s travel editor, simon calder. thanks forjoining us. simon, i want to come to you first, because we have just had some news through from the eu ambassadors and what they are thinking in terms of allowing tourists in, and they are saying that for fully vaccinated people who have had an eu or who approved
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vaccine, nonessential travel to the eu would be allowed and one circumstances that and the other is from people with countries with low infection rates, waitlist countries and on that they have put a specific figure and recommended lowering the threshold for the white list including countries with an incident rate of 75 per 100,000 which theoretically includes the uk but it is a moving picture. iwas theoretically includes the uk but it is a moving picture. i was talking to the public health person in lancashire earlier who said that currently cases there are 50 per 100,001 area in particular, so how uncertain does this make it that the uk would be on the white list? i uk would be on the white list? i think we can absolutely be certain that initially, and let's assume that initially, and let's assume that the biggest fears about the indian variant do not materialise in the worst—case scenario, but we can be confident that the uk is there, and what is really important about this is it's not simply going to
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divide us into people who have been lucky enough to be jabbed and those who haven't, it's not going to mean you have got parents who had the vaccination and they are having to watch their two—year—old have a pcr test which cost them £100 to pay for before they can get a bit of sunshine, so the threshold is looking very good. the uk as a whole is well below it. it's interesting that in some parts of germany and even on the island ofjersey, they are very, very focused on making sure that they are looking at the risk in individual parts of the country, so it is conceivable that some countries may say, actually, we are not so sure about may be parts of northern england. that certainly happened last year. but in general, it is a move absolutely on the right direction. i havejust been over to portugal, which was fantastic, but it cost me £100 as a kind of admission fee for my pcr test, about the same for the test getting back
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and that is completely unsustainable for families just wanting to get on a hard earned holiday. for familiesjust wanting to get on a hard earned holiday.— for familiesjust wanting to get on a hard earned holiday. before we go to the questions _ a hard earned holiday. before we go to the questions from _ a hard earned holiday. before we go to the questions from viewers, - to the questions from viewers, travel, we can guarantee, we don't necessarily know what it will look like but it will be more expensive this summer because of all of these factors. . . this summer because of all of these factors. , ., ., factors. flights at the moment actually in _ factors. flights at the moment actually in june _ factors. flights at the moment actually in june are _ factors. flights at the moment actually in june are looking - factors. flights at the momentl actually in june are looking very cheap. — actually in june are looking very cheap. but— actually in june are looking very cheap, but yes it is going to be more _ cheap, but yes it is going to be more expensive and we don't know what's _ more expensive and we don't know what's happening to the green list and it— what's happening to the green list and it will— what's happening to the green list and it will be reviewed on the 7th ofjune _ and it will be reviewed on the 7th ofjune and — and it will be reviewed on the 7th ofjune and it is helped —— hope there _ ofjune and it is helped —— hope there will— ofjune and it is helped —— hope there will be more destination but i'm there will be more destination but i'm flying — there will be more destination but i'm flying as a mum with two children— i'm flying as a mum with two children and i couldn't afford to go anywhere — children and i couldn't afford to go anywhere at the moment and have up to three _ anywhere at the moment and have up to three tests for myself on the way back. _ to three tests for myself on the way back. so— to three tests for myself on the way back. so it — to three tests for myself on the way back. so it is — to three tests for myself on the way back, so it is prohibitively expensive for many people as it looks— expensive for many people as it looks at— expensive for many people as it looks at the moment.— expensive for many people as it looks at the moment. let's move on to viewers questions. _ looks at the moment. let's move on to viewers questions. deborah - looks at the moment. let's move on to viewers questions. deborah asks, j to viewers questions. deborah asks, my husband works in singapore which is on the green list and is due to return to the uk next month. does he have to fly direct into the uk or can he have a layover in an amber
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country, and if he does, would he have to quarantine? ihe country, and if he does, would he have to quarantine?— have to quarantine? he certainly would have _ have to quarantine? he certainly would have to _ have to quarantine? he certainly would have to quarantine - have to quarantine? he certainly would have to quarantine and i have to quarantine? he certainly| would have to quarantine and the obvious place where we have changed places the uae or abu dhabi or doha are and that is completely off the agenda. if you even touch down there, you walk from one gate to another, you are only there for an hour, that is enough to put you in ii hour, that is enough to put you in 11 nights of hotel quarantine at a cost of £1750. yes, i know there are no flights from singapore to portugal at the moment, so you will have to get on a nonstop flight and get home, and that way, you will simply need to take a test before you leave singapore and fill in the declaration form, your passenger locator form, declaration form, your passenger locatorform, and declaration form, your passenger locator form, and you declaration form, your passenger locatorform, and you only declaration form, your passenger locator form, and you only do that when you have spent about £60 on ace pcr test book for when you get here, but you will not need to self—isolate. you'd go through any amber or red country, and you immediately become subject to the
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rules for that location. hzierr; immediately become sub'ect to the rules for that location._ rules for that location. very clear. ste - hen rules for that location. very clear. stephen says. _ rules for that location. very clear. stephen says, i've _ rules for that location. very clear. stephen says, i've been _ rules for that location. very clear. stephen says, i've been shielding | stephen says, i've been shielding for the past year. early last year i booked a holiday which i am now due to go on but the problem it is an amber list destination and obviously i don't want to go due to my will and ability, but however, as it stands i'm not entitled to a refund. he says there needs to be a definite rule on refunds. i know that is your area of expertise again, simon. if the foreign office warns against going to a destination which it does for the majority of amber list destination is then tour operators will not run the holiday and you will not run the holiday and you will get a full refund. if you've done what lots of people do, booking flights and accommodation separately, it's tricky, because if the flight goes ahead there is no legal obligation for the airline to give you a refund. however, i have rebooked trips with british airways, ryanair and easyjet and they are getting it right in terms of allowing you to move the flights, and the crucial thing is there are some destinations on the amber list
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and i'm thinking of the canary islands in spain and a number of greek islands where the foreign office says, we think it is ok to go and the government, as we've heard in the last couple of days have said we really don't think you should be going to amber list countries, so paul trevor hasn't got a clue what to do and people in this position who are worried about travelling, it's awful situation to be in. lisa. it's awful situation to be in. lisa, a question _ it's awful situation to be in. lisa, a question from _ it's awful situation to be in. lisa, a question from brian. _ it's awful situation to be in. lisa, a question from brian. my - it's awful situation to be in. lisa, a question from brian. my son i it's awful situation to be in. lisa, a question from brian. my son has had to postpone his wedding in majorca planned three years ago for the third time. shouldn't this be considered as a permission to travel? ., ~' ., considered as a permission to travel? ., ,, ., , , , travel? you know, this is the very human cost _ travel? you know, this is the very human cost of— travel? you know, this is the very human cost of the _ travel? you know, this is the very human cost of the travel- travel? you know, this is the very human cost of the travel ban - travel? you know, this is the very human cost of the travel ban and | travel? you know, this is the very i human cost of the travel ban and my heart _ human cost of the travel ban and my heart goes _ human cost of the travel ban and my heart goes out to him, because i got married _ heart goes out to him, because i got married abroad myself and i know how difficult _ married abroad myself and i know how difficult it _ married abroad myself and i know how difficult it was to organise and there — difficult it was to organise and there are _ difficult it was to organise and there are some small cases where weddings — there are some small cases where weddings can go ahead abroad but they are _ weddings can go ahead abroad but they are the exceptions at the moment— they are the exceptions at the moment and you can only travel for work— moment and you can only travel for work or— moment and you can only travel for work or study or in exceptional circumstances. i believe it should be a _ circumstances. i believe it should be a reason — circumstances. i believe it should be a reason that you should be able
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to travel— be a reason that you should be able to travel but it's also for a wedding. _ to travel but it's also for a wedding, and it's notjust about you. _ wedding, and it's notjust about you. it — wedding, and it's notjust about you. it is — wedding, and it's notjust about you, it is your guests on the destination and you might be having ten or— destination and you might be having ten or 20 _ destination and you might be having ten or 20 or— destination and you might be having ten or 20 or 30 people arriving, so it is so— ten or 20 or 30 people arriving, so it is so logistically difficult at the moment and my heart goes out to him, the moment and my heart goes out to him. and _ the moment and my heart goes out to him. and i_ the moment and my heart goes out to him, and i feel it should be on the list, him, and i feel it should be on the list. but _ him, and i feel it should be on the list. but at — him, and i feel it should be on the list, but at the moment it is going to be _ list, but at the moment it is going to be very— list, but at the moment it is going to be very difficult to implement so i am assuming he will probably have to be _ i am assuming he will probably have to be postponed again, unfortunately.- to be postponed again, unfortunatel. ,, . ., , ., . ., unfortunately. such a shame. brian, we hoe it unfortunately. such a shame. brian, we hope it happens _ unfortunately. such a shame. brian, we hope it happens soon. _ unfortunately. such a shame. brian, we hope it happens soon. anotheri we hope it happens soon. another question from stephanie. we have flights booked to san francisco for the 28th ofjune for a two month saturday with the sons and grandchildren. what are the chance of going on that date and if so, when you are expected to be permitted? we have received both doses of the vaccine. i permitted? we have received both doses of the vaccine.— doses of the vaccine. i love being asked the chances _ doses of the vaccine. i love being asked the chances and _ doses of the vaccine. i love being asked the chances and i - doses of the vaccine. i love being asked the chances and i know - doses of the vaccine. i love being i asked the chances and i know simon likes to _ asked the chances and i know simon likes to give — asked the chances and i know simon likes to give percentages and i'd say it's— likes to give percentages and i'd say it's about 5%, the next date for review _ say it's about 5%, the next date for review is _ say it's about 5%, the next date for review is the — say it's about 5%, the next date for review is the 7th ofjune and things might— review is the 7th ofjune and things might be _ review is the 7th ofjune and things might be leaked before that and it is hoped _ might be leaked before that and it is hoped the us will be on the green
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list but _ is hoped the us will be on the green list but after that it's the 28th of june that — list but after that it's the 28th of june that they were going to travel, but what _ june that they were going to travel, but what are the chances question mark— but what are the chances question mark at _ but what are the chances question mark at the moment, the vaccine doesn't _ mark at the moment, the vaccine doesn't make any difference and i feel that — doesn't make any difference and i feel that it— doesn't make any difference and i feel that it should do possibly buy them. _ feel that it should do possibly buy them. but — feel that it should do possibly buy them, but it doesn't. why are we having _ them, but it doesn't. why are we having the — them, but it doesn't. why are we having the vaccine if it doesn't get us out _ having the vaccine if it doesn't get us out of— having the vaccine if it doesn't get us out of this situation? i reckon the chances _ us out of this situation? i reckon the chances are pretty high. simon, i the chances are pretty high. simon, i don't _ the chances are pretty high. simon, i don't know— the chances are pretty high. simon, i don't know if you want to give it a mark— i don't know if you want to give it a mark out — i don't know if you want to give it a mark out of five for the trip. i�*m a mark out of five for the trip. i'm rroin to a mark out of five for the trip. i'm going to be _ a mark out of five for the trip. i“n going to be confident and say three out of five. the main obstacle for british people going to the us is nothing to do with the amber list or green list, is there is a big presidential proclamation signed by joe biden saying we don't want you if you have been in the uk in the past two weeks. he is coming over to cornwall next month. lucky him. he is going to bring what i call a disney dividend, basically saying, oh, look, we will drop a presidential proclamation and you can coming and i'm 90% sure that the
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uk government is going to say, ok, we will put you on the green list. with their successful vaccination campaign in the us, i give it three out of five that you could be there by the end ofjune and halfway through by the end ofjune and halfway throuthuly, i give you four out of five. it's really important and many people are desperate to travel, it is a favourite holiday destination for so many of us, but crucially so many people would want to see their loved ones and partners and families they have not seen for a year and they have not seen for a year and they say want to get back there and thatis they say want to get back there and that is really the deepest part of this whole coronavirus tragedy, the separation involved.— separation involved. business-wise we are losing _ separation involved. business-wise we are losing £32 _ separation involved. business-wise we are losing £32 million _ separation involved. business-wise we are losing £32 million a - separation involved. business-wise we are losing £32 million a day - separation involved. business-wise we are losing £32 million a day and j we are losing £32 million a day and not having — we are losing £32 million a day and not having the link between the uk and us— not having the link between the uk and us open so that's another important _ and us open so that's another important point to make as well as the human— important point to make as well as the human cost and people missing people _ the human cost and people missing people. find the human cost and people missing --eole. �* , ., ., people. and they have a high vaccination _ people. and they have a high vaccination rate, _ people. and they have a high vaccination rate, as - people. and they have a high vaccination rate, as we - people. and they have a high vaccination rate, as we have, people. and they have a high i vaccination rate, as we have, so i should say, it sounds like there is a good chance that things may move on that front. robert asks, how many pcr tests are needed to travel to a green country? i don't know which of you would prefer to answer that one.
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if i may, none, to leave the uk and the uk has no interest whatsoever in your coronavirus status when you leave for anybody who has symptoms should stay at home and get checked out by the nhs, but countries will impose whatever requirements they want and very often they will say a jab or a test, so greece is saying, we will probably let you in without any jabs we will probably let you in without anyjabs if you have had both of yourjabs, but the news is emerging this lunchtime from brussels that might change that. but absolutely, you have to find out what the destination country demands of you but make sure you meet it, otherwise you will fall at the first hurdle and you won't even be allowed on the plane. and you won't even be allowed on the lane. ., , ., ., plane. lisa, a question for you. i am an eu _ plane. lisa, a question for you. i am an eu citizen _ plane. lisa, a question for you. i am an eu citizen living _ plane. lisa, a question for you. i am an eu citizen living and i plane. lisa, a question for you. i i am an eu citizen living and working in the uk and have not been vaccinated. can i visit my family in the eu without quarantine? brute
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vaccinated. can i visit my family in the eu without quarantine? we are rroin to the eu without quarantine? we are going to hear _ the eu without quarantine? we are going to hear from _ the eu without quarantine? we are going to hear from the _ the eu without quarantine? we are going to hear from the eu - the eu without quarantine? we are going to hear from the eu today i going to hear from the eu today about— going to hear from the eu today about their requirements for going in and _ about their requirements for going in and i_ about their requirements for going in and i think the whole vaccine passport— in and i think the whole vaccine passport is— in and i think the whole vaccine passport is that people think you won't _ passport is that people think you won't be — passport is that people think you won't be able to get into a country unless— won't be able to get into a country unless you — won't be able to get into a country unless you have had the vaccine passport — unless you have had the vaccine passport but it's crucial to say that _ passport but it's crucial to say that for— passport but it's crucial to say that for most destinations, not all, it will— that for most destinations, not all, it will be _ that for most destinations, not all, it will be the vaccine passport or proof— it will be the vaccine passport or proof of— it will be the vaccine passport or proof of a — it will be the vaccine passport or proof of a negative test, so you can either— proof of a negative test, so you can either prove — proof of a negative test, so you can either prove both on the way in, so the chances — either prove both on the way in, so the chances are very good at that trip will— the chances are very good at that trip will happen. the chances are very good at that trip will happen-— trip will happen. simon, another love in the _ trip will happen. simon, another love in the time _ trip will happen. simon, another love in the time of— trip will happen. simon, another love in the time of covid - trip will happen. simon, another| love in the time of covid question from laura. i live in london and my boyfriend lives in france. our there any exemptions being made for partners? any exemptions being made for artners? , any exemptions being made for aartners? , ., ., ., ., partners? they ban on international -- the ban — partners? they ban on international -- the ban on _ partners? they ban on international -- the ban on international- partners? they ban on international -- the ban on international travel. —— the ban on international travel stopped on monday and before that we had 19 weeks in which the uk said it was illegal to go abroad for leisure purposes, which includes, i'm afraid, going to see your boyfriend. that has been lifted. since then, a minister after minister, whether we are talking about scotland, wales or indeed the uk government has come out and said we really would rather
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you did not go but there is no reason why you should not go there as long as you take all the precautions. you are not breaking any rules. when you come back, you are going to have to quarantine, as things stand at the moment and you can self—isolate for ten days when you come back and you can halve that if you take another test after day five, but in terms of getting into france, they are, thankfully, opening up to date and things are getting a bit more relaxed, but of course you need to make sure that you are meeting all the requirements for france. . . you are meeting all the requirements for france. ., ., ., ., , , ., for france. laura, go and visit your boyfriend- — for france. laura, go and visit your boyfriend. lisa, _ for france. laura, go and visit your boyfriend. lisa, a _ for france. laura, go and visit your boyfriend. lisa, a question - for france. laura, go and visit your boyfriend. lisa, a question from i boyfriend. lisa, a question from raymond. i am going to spain for a week on the 8th ofjune, will i be required to take a covid test before i return to the uk? i required to take a covid test before i return to the uk?— required to take a covid test before i return to the uk? i am “oining you and i hope — i return to the uk? i am “oining you and i hope to t i return to the uk? i am “oining you and i hope to go h i return to the uk? i am “oining you and i hope to go to i i return to the uk? i am joining you and i hope to go to spain _ i return to the uk? i am joining you and i hope to go to spain on - i return to the uk? i am joining you and i hope to go to spain on the i and i hope to go to spain on the 11th and i hope to go to spain on the iith but— and i hope to go to spain on the iith but i— and i hope to go to spain on the 11th but i can't go if they don't change — 11th but i can't go if they don't change to— 11th but i can't go if they don't change to the green list and i don't think— change to the green list and i don't think spain— change to the green list and i don't think spain will be on the green
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list at _ think spain will be on the green list at that point. however, you can still go. _ list at that point. however, you can still go. but — list at that point. however, you can still go, but you will have to do the test — still go, but you will have to do the test when you get back so as it stands _ the test when you get back so as it stands with— the test when you get back so as it stands with spain, it will be amber so you _ stands with spain, it will be amber so you have — stands with spain, it will be amber so you have to do the day to test and the — so you have to do the day to test and the day eight test, so it works out quite — and the day eight test, so it works out quite expensive, but you will be able to _ out quite expensive, but you will be able to go _ out quite expensive, but you will be able to go and then you have to isolate — able to go and then you have to isolate for — able to go and then you have to isolate for ten days at home. simon, deborah says — isolate for ten days at home. simon, deborah says if _ isolate for ten days at home. simon, deborah says if you _ isolate for ten days at home. simon, deborah says if you book _ isolate for ten days at home. simon, deborah says if you book a _ isolate for ten days at home. simon, deborah says if you book a holiday i deborah says if you book a holiday abroad on flights and accommodation when the foreign office is advising against all but essential travel, will you be covered by your holiday insurance or will it become void? it all depends what you have arranged. if it's a package holiday, flights and accommodation in the same transaction, then if the foreign office says don't go, the tour operator will not operate your holiday and you will get a full refund within two weeks. if, however, it is something you have arranged yourself then your travel insurance is properly going to say, we won't cover you while you are out there because it is against foreign office advice and in terms of the booking, because you no doubt will have taken out that insurance policy in the time of covid, it may well be
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that there is a specific exemption that there is a specific exemption that saves them from paying out for a cancellation, if you are cancelling because the foreign office says don't go. it is a sort of catch—22 situation. any travel insurance you are buying or any travel product you are buying, make sure you know what happens if you are unable to take that trip. last ruestion are unable to take that trip. last question for _ are unable to take that trip. last question for lisa _ are unable to take that trip. last question for lisa from francesca. she asks, if you are only allowed to travel to an amber list country for pressing matters shouldn't people be exempt from quarantine, especially if they are paying for pcr test? yes, i think so personally and that's— yes, i think so personally and that's a — yes, i think so personally and that's a matter of personal opinion. some _ that's a matter of personal opinion. some scientists might argue with you but i some scientists might argue with you but i think— some scientists might argue with you but i think so, but at the moment there _ but i think so, but at the moment there is— but i think so, but at the moment there is no— but i think so, but at the moment there is no information about whether— there is no information about whether that will become a reality. but my— whether that will become a reality. but my personal opinion is yes, absolute — but my personal opinion is yes, absolute. �* ., _ but my personal opinion is yes, absolute. �* ., ,y ., absolute. but obviously not the case. absolute. but obviously not the case- no. _ absolute. but obviously not the case- no. rrot _ absolute. but obviously not the case. no, not at— absolute. but obviously not the case. no, not at the _ absolute. but obviously not the case. no, not at the moment. l absolute. but obviously not the i case. no, not at the moment. thank ou both case. no, not at the moment. thank you both very _ case. no, not at the moment. thank you both very much _ case. no, not at the moment. thank you both very much for— case. no, not at the moment. thank you both very much forjoining i case. no, not at the moment. thank you both very much forjoining us i you both very much forjoining us and answering your questions and thank you for sending in your
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questions at home. police in south yorkshire say questions at home. number of cannabis factories in houses and empty businesses over the past year. in parts of doncaster some criminals have been tapping into electricity supplies and causing power cuts to local homes. police say these cannabis factories are often linked to serious organised crime and modern slavery. emma glasbey was given exclusive access to a police operation in doncaster. once a bingo hall, now the centre of a police operation. south yorkshire police suspect a cannabis factory has been set up inside this site in mexborough. police! they're looking for drugs and people. police with a warrant!
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inside, there is a major cannabis operation. police with a warrant! it's still early stages in the investigation, we're still trying to work out how big the setup is, it's a bit of a maze there, but we are talking potentially between 500 and 1,000 plants set up in there, so just as a rough estimate, a mature cannabis plant, street value can be sort of £800 to £1,000, so, top end, if there are a thousand plants in there, then there could be approximately £1 million worth of drugs sold on the street. there is also evidence people have been living here. cannabis plants have been found inside, but officers will now spend some time searching through the building. they are going from room to room, checking to see if anyone is hiding inside. police soon arrest two men on suspicion of drug offences. this operation is the result of good old—fashioned police work. local neighbourhood officers spotted the road had been dug up, potentially to tap into the mains
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electricity supply, and there were suspicious changes to the building. but this is notjust about cannabis. there's a common conception among certain parts of the community that cannabis is a low level, less harmful drug, but what sits behind it are things like this, a set up that potentially lines the pockets of organised criminals to the tune of millions of pounds. there is almost always exploitation, modern slavery, and that's the thing that the general public and local communities don't necessarily see. police say there's been a big increase in these cannabis factories in south yorkshire in the past year and it can cause huge disruption to local people. across doncaster and various communities, we are seeing power outages for residential properties as a result of the electricity that's being abstracted to power these big setups. it's believed this factory was set up fairly recently. a big investment by criminals now disrupted by police. emma glasbey, bbc news, doncaster.
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urgent action needs to be taken to make electric cars more affordable if the government is to hit its 2030 target for banning the sale of all new petrol and diesel cars. that's according to a group of mps. the public accounts committee says ministers have a �*mountain to climb' if they want to achieve the ambitious target. here s our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt. sales of electric vehicles are by far the fastest growing segment of the car market but they still only account for 11% of new car registrations. getting to 100% will be tough, mps warn today. the government plans to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2030 with hybrids prohibited from 2035. motorists won't be ready to make that change, say the mps on the public accounts committee, unless the price of electric vehicles is reduced significantly and charging infrastructure is installed much more quickly.
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as well as the cars themselves being expensive, only a handful being under £30,000, there is the cost of charging them. while electric charging is cheaper than petrol and diesel, there is a big difference between charging in public places and charging on your driveway, and lots of people don't have space to charge their vehicles at home so the infrastructure and the cost of that has got to be thought about as well, and we are concerned the government is behind the curve if it is going to hit its target. the public accounts committee says the government needs to do more to develop the skilled workforce and electric power infrastructure needed to support the transition. but the government told the bbc today it was on track to meet its target and says it is investing £2.8 billion to help the car industry and drivers make the switch to electric. justin rowlatt, bbc news. borisjohnson will be on his feet in the commons at midday for prime ministers' questions. this is the scene right now.
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we will bring you it as we always do at this time on a wednesday, so stay with us for that. let's catch up with us for that. let's catch up with the weather with matt if you've recently put temporary structures in the back gardens like awnings and gazebos, now is the time to pin them down because although you might see some sunshine today get ready for something wetter and windier as we see out the next few days. windier as we see out the next few da s. �* . . windier as we see out the next few da 5. �*, , ., ., windier as we see out the next few das. �*, ., ., ., days. it's this area of low pressure. _ days. it's this area of low pressure, unseasonably i days. it's this area of low i pressure, unseasonably deep, days. it's this area of low _ pressure, unseasonably deep, pushing its way in for thursday and friday but ahead of it we are building a ridge of high pressure and a little bump in the isobars which means wales and western parts of and have a drier day than in recent days and many will avoid the showers altogether, sunshine and showers in northern ireland but east of scotland and eastern england might be prone to heavy and thundery downpours through the second half of the day. it will feel cool again when the showers come through but with more of you drive for more it will be a pleasant day with 15 to 17
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as a high. into the evening and overnight the showers and eastern areas will fade and clear skies for areas will fade and clear skies for a time which will mean a cooler night than we have had of late and temperatures down to single figures more widely. low single figures across the eastern half of the country but notice towards the west, the breeze picking up, cloud spilling in and a damp start of the day in south—west england and parts of wales and it's because of this area of low pressure which is pushing west to east, slowly during thursday and friday, bringing outbreaks of rain, the heaviest on thursday morning in northern ireland but spreading north and east, on and off, some in the south won't see too much of the rain but across southern and western areas the winds will be picking up the greatest, certainly widespread gales across the west going into thursday afternoon and thursday evening. temperatures between 12 and 14 degrees, lower than we will see today and add on the wind and it will feel cooler. through thursday night into friday, the low pressure has a centre which will push east, bringing the stronger of the winds through this
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period on friday towards the southern half of the country and it's where we could see damage and disruption. don't forget trees are in full leaf. the heaviest rain is pushing a crossing land and wales. a bit more showery for scotland and northern ireland with some brightness but a north—easterly wind will make it feel cool and the winds and the south are west to south—westerly which could touch 50 or 60 mph in the guts. there will be some travel disruption, even a little bit of damage in places. feeling cool across the northern cooler still as we go into the weekend but still with that mixture of sunshine and showers. hopefully things will look a bit dry at next week.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. the headlines at midday... let's cross live to the house of commons for prime ministers' questions. last week an inquest found frances quinn, father hugh mullin, noel phillips, joan connelly, daniel taggart, joseph murphy, edward doherty, john laverty, joseph carr and juan are who were killed in bally murphy in august 1971 entirely innocent. in behalf of successive governments and put on the record, i would like to say sorry to their
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families for how the investigations were handled and for the pain they have enjoyed. no apology can lessen their lasting pain. i hope they may take some comfort in the answers they have secured and in knowing this has renewed the determination to ensure in future by families can find answers with less distress and delay. this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues in addition to my duties in the house and i shall have further such meetings later today. i strongly associate myself _ meetings later today. i strongly associate myself with _ meetings later today. i strongly associate myself with the i meetings later today. i strongly| associate myself with the earlier part of the comments that the prime minister made. can i raise something slightly different. it is nearly four years since the grenfell tower tragedy claimed many lives yet hundreds of thousands of families still live in unsafe, unsellable homes and many leaseholders face crippling debts through no fault of
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their own. many places in my constituency. given this was the biggest building scandal in modern uk history, why did the prime minister ordered his mps to vote down our efforts yesterday to get this candle started once and for all? i in no way underestimate the suffering of the victims, those whose homes had been prejudiced by the spectre of unsafe materials. ican i can tell and also the most dangerous cladding has already gone from all high—rise buildings and we certainly agree that leaseholders should be protected from remediation gusts and people in high—rise buildings will pay nothing to
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replace their unsafe cladding. will pay nothing to replace the unsafe cladding. mr will pay nothing to replace the unsafe cladding.— will pay nothing to replace the unsafe cladding. mr speaker, the prime minister _ unsafe cladding. mr speaker, the prime minister will _ unsafe cladding. mr speaker, the prime minister will understand i unsafe cladding. mr speaker, the i prime minister will understand that favouring, just like hillingdon, is located on the outskirts of london. and has very different needs and aspirations from those in the court area of the city. my borough prides itself as part of essex and i know his days as part of historic middlesex. whilst we need cooperation on things like transport, will he accept it is time for wholesale reform of the way london and the wider region are governed, and support my campaign to allow boroughs like havering to take back control? from the mayor and city hall interference? allowing havering and all out of london boroughs the freedom to make their own decisions that best meet the needs of local people.— own decisions that best meet the needs of local people. while, i can understand — needs of local people. while, i can understand the _ needs of local people. while, i can understand the feelings _ needs of local people. while, i can understand the feelings of - understand the feelings of frustration to the people will of
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havering that might feel about the current mayor of london who doesn't understand the needs of outer london, who is not investing in outer london in the way that a previous mayor did who set up the outer london fund and drove through many other benefits for the outer boroughs. in all candour what we need to do is work together to ensure that the glad day returns when we have a mayor that truly represents all londoners, mr speaker. represents all londoners, mr saeaker. . .. represents all londoners, mr saeaker. ., ,, ~ represents all londoners, mr saeaker. ., ~ ., speaker. thank you, mr speaker. can i welcome speaker. thank you, mr speaker. can i welcome the — speaker. thank you, mr speaker. can i welcome the prime _ speaker. thank you, mr speaker. can i welcome the prime minister's i i welcome the prime minister's comments on the ballymurphy inquest and the sentiment behind them. does the prime minister agree that the single biggest threat to hitting the june 21 date for unlocking is the risk of new variants coming into the uk? mr risk of new variants coming into the uk? ~ ,, , ., ~ risk of new variants coming into the uk? ~ . ., , ~ uk? mr speaker i certainly think that is one _ uk? mr speaker i certainly think that is one of _ uk? mr speaker i certainly think that is one of the _ uk? mr speaker i certainly think that is one of the issues - uk? mr speaker i certainly think that is one of the issues we i uk? mr speaker i certainly think| that is one of the issues we must face. perhaps it would be for the benefit of a house if i update the house on where we are because we
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looked at the data again this morning. and i can tell the house that we have increasing confidence that we have increasing confidence that vaccines are effective against all variants, including the indian variant, to his point. and i want particularly in this context to thank the people of bolton, blackburn and many other places for the record numbers of vaccinations, they've been getting their first jabs and second jabs. the numbers have doubled in bolton alone and i think the people of this country can be proud of their participation. mr be proud of their participation. iji speaker, be proud of their participation. ii speaker, that be proud of their participation. iji speaker, that is be proud of their participation. ii speaker, that is a yes, i think, the risk of other variants coming through our borders is one of the biggest threats to unlocking. we are not just talking biggest threats to unlocking. we are notjust talking by biggest threats to unlocking. we are not just talking by the biggest threats to unlocking. we are notjust talking by the indian variant, we are talking about future variants. in those circumstances,
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why on monday that the prime minister choose to weaken travel restrictions by moving 170 countries or territories to the number list? we have one of the strongest border regimes anywhere in the world. laughter. there are currently 43 countries on the red list, mr speaker, but if you are coming from an amber list country, everybody should know that
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if you travel to an amber list country for any emergency or any extreme reason you have for doing so, when you come back, mr speaker, you have to pay for the tests but when you come back you have to self—isolate for ten days. we will invigilator and we are invigilator. people who failed to obey the
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quarantine can from endlessly legislating for everything and to rely on guidance and asking people to do the right thing. and it is very, very clear, mr speaker, you shouldn't go thing. and it is very, very clear, mr speaker, you shouldn't go to a number list country, we will enforce the ten day quarantine period and if you break the rules, you face very substantial fines. that you break the rules, you face very substantial fines.— substantial fines. that completely swerves the _ substantial fines. that completely swerves the question. _ substantial fines. that completely
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swerves the question. the - substantial fines. that completely swerves the question. the point i substantial fines. that completely i swerves the question. the point was if it is only in extreme circumstances, why make it easier to go? if it is extreme circumstances, why? let's test it by looking at the consequences. since the government loosened travel restrictions, 150 flights a day are going to and the list of countries and travel bookings have had increases. this isn'tjust bookings have had increases. this isn't just a bookings have had increases. this isn'tjust a coincidence, it is because of the message. so can prime minister tell the house how many people are now travelling to and from britain from amber list countries every day? i from britain from amber list countries every day?- from britain from amber list countries every day? i can tell the house there _ countries every day? i can tell the house there has _ countries every day? i can tell the house there has been _ countries every day? i can tell the house there has been a _ countries every day? i can tell the house there has been a 9596 i countries every day? i can tell the i house there has been a 95% reduction in travel of any kind to and from this country and that is what you would expect in the circumstances of this pandemic. there are 43 countries on the red list and if you come back from there you have to go
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immediately into hotel quarantine. and the reason we are able to move forward in the way we have is because we are continuing with the fastest vaccination roll—out i think just about anywhere in europe. as of today 70% of the adults in this country have been vaccinated and i think that is a fantastic achievement and enabling us to make the progress we are. that achievement and enabling us to make the progress we are.— the progress we are. that is and i don't know _ the progress we are. that is and i don't know. the _ the progress we are. that is and i don't know. the suggestion - the progress we are. that is and i don't know. the suggestion there the progress we are. that is and i - don't know. the suggestion there has been a 95% drop—off in travel to and the list countries i don't think it holds water. i am trying to understand the logic of the position. we knew new variants are the biggest risk to unlocking and the biggest risk to unlocking and the government doesn't think people should travel to amber list countries safer in extreme circumstances but the government has made it easier do so. this week,
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many people are now travelling to amber list countries but the government cannot say how many or when. we are an island nation, we have the power to stop this. why doesn't the prime minister drop the hopeless system, get control of the borders and introduce a proper system to protect us against future threats of variants of the virus? i threats of variants of the virus? i have set out this position clearly at least twice. wouldn't it be great to hear the right honourable gentleman to back me up for a change. using what are the ready possesses to convey the message to the rest of the country. when you look at the labour position on borders, it is hopelessly confused. last night i think the shadow home secretary said they wanted to cut this country are from the west of the world, part�*s all travel even
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though 75% of our medicines and 50% of our food comes from abroad and it is only recently he said quarantine was a blunt instrument and he'd rather see alternatives. mr speaker prime minister _ rather see alternatives. mr speaker prime minister is _ rather see alternatives. mr speaker prime minister is just _ rather see alternatives. mr speaker prime minister is just wrong - rather see alternatives. mr speaker prime minister isjust wrong again. | prime minister is just wrong again. we have called for a blanket hotel quarantine for months, i have raised it here three times. the government ignored it every time and look where we are now talking about the indian variant. the prime ministerformer adviser had this one right. he said the government's border policy was a joke. our border blue might have been wide open pretty much to the pandemic, there was no hotel quarantine system until february this year. flights are still coming in from india and even as the variant is spreading the prime minister decides now is the time to
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weaken the system even more. it is ridiculous. finally, mr speaker, i want to raise the appalling rising anti—semitism in the last week. on the attacks and violence we have seen. on saturday a rabbi was hospitalised after being attacked outside his synagogue. many will have seen the appalling incident in golders green and the community security trust report say 500% rise in anti—semitic incidents since the break—out of violence. i know the government is working on this and the prime minister and i have condemned the anti—semitic attacks and violence but we will all know across this house thatjewish communities remain very anxious so what masters the prime minister think can be done to provide the extra support and protection needed to jewish extra support and protection needed
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tojewish communities at this difficult time? i to jewish communities at this difficult time?— to jewish communities at this difficult time? i share his horror at the outbreak _ difficult time? i share his horror at the outbreak of _ difficult time? i share his horror at the outbreak of anti-semiticl at the outbreak of anti—semitic incidents and the government has conveyed that message loud and clear to those responsible for enforcing the law against that sort of hate crime but we will continue to support the jewish crime but we will continue to support thejewish community in any way we can. also showing as a country and society that we will call this out at every stage. we will not let it take root, not allow it to grow and fester and in welcoming his remarks i think it is one of the most important changes of attitude or u—turns i have seen from the labour party in recent times and i am delighted that he is taking that attitude now. what this country
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wants to see is a government that gets on with delivering on the people priorities, making everybody safe, and it may have been a good thing if he had voted and got his party to vote for tougher sentences against serious and violent sexual offenders to say nothing of those who commit hate crime. this offenders to say nothing of those who commit hate crime. this house is ve united who commit hate crime. this house is very united and _ who commit hate crime. this house is very united and will _ who commit hate crime. this house is very united and will remain _ who commit hate crime. this house is very united and will remain united. i very united and will remain united. because _ very united and will remain united. because we — very united and will remain united. because we do support that. let's go to mary— because we do support that. let's go to mary robinson.— to mary robinson. thank you. my second astrazeneca _ to mary robinson. thank you. my second astrazeneca jab _ to mary robinson. thank you. my| second astrazeneca jab reinforced to mary robinson. thank you. my - second astrazeneca jab reinforced my confidence not only in normal life resuming but also in the future of our life science industry. across south manchester and the cheshire life science corridor, investment in r&d will bring high skilled and well—paid jobs. well the prime minister joined well—paid jobs. well the prime ministerjoined me in recognising the work of our northern
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universities, nhs trusts and life science sector who are piloting health tech initiatives that will take us forward from jabs to jobs. i take us forward from jabs to jobs. i thank my honourable friend and is part of our friend to move from jabs, jabs, jabs tojobs, jobs, jobs, with much funding in science and innovation projects taking place thanks to her advocacy empowered. now to the leader of the snp. thank ou. can i now to the leader of the snp. thank you- can i thank— now to the leader of the snp. thank you. can i thank the _ now to the leader of the snp. thank you. can i thank the prime _ now to the leader of the snp. t�*ua�*ua; you. can i thank the prime minister for his comments on the ballymurphy inquest. as a member of scotland's community, i understand just how disastrous the brexit trade deal with australia has proposed by the tory government for the forming and crofting sectors. if proponents of the deal are true, farmers will lose
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out and families will be driven off the land, and let's be very clear, if that happens, the uk tory government will be slowly responsible. just for once, prime minister, give a straight answer to the forming and crofting families. can the prime minister categorically rule out that his government is prepared to sign up to a trade deal that at any future point will guarantee tariff free access to australian lamb and beef? yes or no? i know i would like to see photos of his craft. the humble representative of the crofting community. i don't think he does justice to crofters and farmers across the country and in scotland as well because i think he grossly underestimates their
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ability to do great things with our free trade deals and export scottish beef around the world. why doesn't he believe in what the people of scotland can do? why is he so frightened of free trade? i think there is a massive opportunity for there is a massive opportunity for the whole of the uk and he should seize it and be proud of it. back the whole of the uk and he should seize it and be proud of it.- seize it and be proud of it. back to ian blackford. _ seize it and be proud of it. back to ian blackford. thank _ seize it and be proud of it. back to ian blackford. thank you. - seize it and be proud of it. back to ian blackford. thank you. that - seize it and be proud of it. back to| ian blackford. thank you. that was uuite ian blackford. thank you. that was quite chilling _ ian blackford. thank you. that was quite chilling to _ ian blackford. thank you. that was quite chilling to try _ ian blackford. thank you. that was quite chilling to try and _ ian blackford. thank you. that was quite chilling to try and treat - quite chilling to try and treat something as serious as this in the way that the government and prime minister has done is quite pathetic. the fact the prime minister couldn't give a straight answer will send a chill across the communities. the uk government led the betrayal of scottish fishing and now the tories are planning to throw our farmers and crafters under the brexit bus. the president of the national farmers' union in scotland told itv that farmers will feel seriously betrayed by these proposals. the deal would be the final nail in the
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coffin for many scottish crofters and farmers, ending a way of life that has endured for generations. i know many of the prime minister's tory colleagues privately agree with me and to pullback tory colleagues privately agree with me and to pull back from the deal. will the prime minister finally listen, think again and ditch a deal that will send our farmers down under? , ., ., , ., ., , under? first of all he is totally wron: under? first of all he is totally wrong about — under? first of all he is totally wrong about the _ under? first of all he is totally wrong about the fisheries - under? first of all he is totally - wrong about the fisheries because there are massive opportunities for fisheries for the whole of the uk as we take back control of our territorial borders. he is grossly underestimating the ability of the people of this country, the agricultural communities of the country, the forming industry to make the most of free trade. this is a country that grew successful and prosperous on free trade, exporting
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around the world. our food exports are second to none. you should be proud and celebrating and all he does is call for us to pull up the drawbridge and go back into the eu to be run by brussels. that is his manifesto and i think the people of this country have decisively rejected it. this country have decisively rejected it— this country have decisively rejected it. the ymca in my constituency _ rejected it. the ymca in my constituency undertakes - rejected it. the ymca in my - constituency undertakes fantastic work transforming the lives of young people locally and i am delighted that they have been recognised for their work through the queens award for enterprise. there is no better example of levelling up in action and i would like to invite the prime minister tojoin me in congratulating all the staff, volunteers and partners of the ymca and i look forward to showing him levelling up an action when he next visits stoke—on—trent. the new second home of the home office. j second home of the home office. i thank my honourable friend very much and she is totally right, it is part
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of our levelling up. we are determined to do this as fast as we possibly can. we are sending not just back offices but some of the most important departments of state will be running from around our great cities and towns in the whole of the uk and i believe that it will have a dramatic effect in levelling up have a dramatic effect in levelling up across the uk. i am thankfulfor her question. up across the uk. i am thankful for her question-— up across the uk. i am thankful for her question. local planning reforms introduced by — her question. local planning reforms introduced by liberal— her question. local planning reforms introduced by liberal democrat - introduced by liberal democrat ministers have seen communities across england vote for new development including new housing, community facilities whilst also protecting the environment of the countryside. why is the prime minister so determined to push through his planning reforms that will do nothing to solve the country's real housing crisis, will allow developers to ride roughshod and will mean the wrong homes being
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built in the wrong places? he is completely _ built in the wrong places? he is completely wrong _ built in the wrong places? he is completely wrong and - built in the wrong places? he is completely wrong and he - built in the wrong places? he is completely wrong and he should look at the bill when it comes forward because we want to protect the green belt and our wonderful open spaces. we understand the value of the countryside and rural britain but we also think young people have been deprived of too long to get on to the housing market, across the country, that is why we are ahead sensible advance to allow brownfield sites to go ahead. tiara sensible advance to allow brownfield sites to go ahead.— sites to go ahead. two weeks ago in aaivin the sites to go ahead. two weeks ago in giving the scottish _ sites to go ahead. two weeks ago in giving the scottish conservatives - giving the scottish conservatives the highest number of votes in the era of devolution the scottish people decided that scotland would remain at the heart of this newly reinvigorated global britain. with that in mind, would be prime minister except my invitation to my constituency to plant one of 120 cherry blossom trees donated by a
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trust to celebrate the deep and growing links between ourselves and to japan? i growing links between ourselves and to ja an? ~ , . growing links between ourselves and tojaan? ~ , . ., growing links between ourselves and tojaan? «a . ., , to japan? i think such a gesture would be a _ to japan? i think such a gesture would be a cherry _ to japan? i think such a gesture would be a cherry on _ to japan? i think such a gesture would be a cherry on the - to japan? i think such a gesture would be a cherry on the cake l to japan? i think such a gesture | would be a cherry on the cake of to japan? i think such a gesture - would be a cherry on the cake of the free trade deal we have already done. in free trade deal we have already done. ii' ' free trade deal we have already done. i:" , ., , done. in 2019, before visiting wales, done. in 2019, before visiting wales. the — done. in 2019, before visiting wales, the prime _ done. in 2019, before visiting wales, the prime minister. done. in 2019, before visiting. wales, the prime minister said done. in 2019, before visiting i wales, the prime minister said i will always back britain's great farmers. now it looks as if izzy is backing the australian farmers instead. will he keep to his word backing ourfarmers. l instead. will he keep to his word backing our farmers.— backing our farmers. i will back britain's farmers _ backing our farmers. i will back britain's farmers and _ backing our farmers. i will back britain's farmers and welsh - backing our farmers. i will back - britain's farmers and welsh farmers and exporting their fantastic lamb around the world. it is not a disgrace that not a single muscle of welsh lamb has so passed the lips of the americans in the last 20 years? what about finer? has he no ambition
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for the people of this country? i do haveis for the people of this country? i do have is that this government does. that is why we are getting on with our agenda. that is why we are getting on with our agenda-— that is why we are getting on with our agenda. that is why we are getting on with ourauenda. ., ~ ,, ~ .,~ .,, our agenda. thank you mr speaker was dubbed as the — our agenda. thank you mr speaker was dubbed as the prime _ our agenda. thank you mr speaker was dubbed as the prime minister- our agenda. thank you mr speaker was dubbed as the prime minister agree . dubbed as the prime minister agree with me that a three part on anglesey will create many skilled jobs and investment, protect our welsh language and culture and breathed fire into the nostrils of the welsh dragon? and would he accept an invitation on a tour of the island? mr accept an invitation on a tour of the island?— accept an invitation on a tour of the island? mr speaker, it says i mustn't express _ the island? mr speaker, it says i mustn't express a _ the island? mr speaker, it says i mustn't express a preference . the island? mr speaker, it says i mustn't express a preference on j the island? mr speaker, it says i - mustn't express a preference on the location of free parts but she makes an outstanding case as other and together with our welsh colleagues, i believe she is helping them to apply the inhaler to the bunged up nostrils of the welsh dragon.
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despite the heaping on the scottish national party, at the elections, the snp was returned to government with twice the number of ns mps, securing 48% of the vote, 49% of the seats of the proportional system and with 51% of voters backing parties that support an independence referendum in the current term for study of the prime minister genuinely believes the criticisms of the scottish government have any merit whatsoever, why does he consider the scottish national party thatis consider the scottish national party that is —— that did so well compared to his own party. l that is -- that did so well compared to his own party-— to his own party. i totally re'ect what he says. fl to his own party. i totally re'ect what he says. i i to his own party. i totally re'ect what he says. i noticed �* to his own party. i totally re'ect what he says. i noticed the h to his own party. i totally reject - what he says. i noticed the scottish national party did less well than they did previously under alex salmond. i hate to point that out but that is the reality. i think the reason for that is the people of
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scotland notwithstanding the nationalist approach, the people of scotland have been very disappointed by the actual record of the scottish government in fighting crime, improving education and making scotland a great place to live and invest and that is the failing of which is government is being held to account. b. which is government is being held to account. �* ., which is government is being held to account. . . ., which is government is being held to account. . ., ,, , account. a large part of salisbury plain files on _ account. a large part of salisbury plain files on my _ account. a large part of salisbury plain files on my constituency - account. a large part of salisbury| plain files on my constituency and account. a large part of salisbury l plain files on my constituency and i have the honour to represent a lot of serving soldiers and veterans and theirfamilies, so there of serving soldiers and veterans and their families, so there are feelings running high about the treatment of a british army veteran of the conflict in northern ireland. can he assure me legislation will be brought forward in the session to protect veterans from further prosecutions are to make investigations unless compelling new evidence is brought forward? the house would _ evidence is brought forward? the house would have understood from my opening apology how difficult and complex and how fraught these issues are, but we are committed to
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introduce legislation in this session to address the legacy of the troubles in northern ireland and in introducing a fair package for veterans and to protect them from unfair vexatious litigation when no new evidence has been brought forward. ., ., , , forward. there were no new measures in the queen's — forward. there were no new measures in the queen's speech _ forward. there were no new measures in the queen's speech to _ forward. there were no new measures in the queen's speech to tackle - in the queen's speech to tackle youth unemployment, over 500,000 unemployed young people, the flagship unemployment scheme is nowhere near sufficient, only helping one in 25 young people. i have already requested a meeting with minister address local concerns. could i ask the pie minister what exactly he is going to do to address this and to safeguard the future. it would have been £2 billion into the kick—start
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programme for the young and investing massively in the restart programme for those longer out of work. , , , , , programme for those longer out of work. , , ,, , ., ~ ., ., work. the businesses i talk to are currently facing _ work. the businesses i talk to are currently facing shortages - work. the businesses i talk to are currently facing shortages of - currently facing shortages of workers in many sectors and we will workers in many sectors and we will work flat out to ensure we get those who want jobs work flat out to ensure we get those who wantjobs to those who need workers as well. can who want jobs to those who need workers as well.— workers as well. can i thank the prime minister _ workers as well. can i thank the prime minister for _ workers as well. can i thank the prime minister for the - workers as well. can i thank the prime minister for the support | workers as well. can i thank the - prime minister for the support shown for coming forward from offshore transmission grid which will help us to export our offshore wind into the continent. it is very important to our communities but there is a question over timing, so given he has already set out a very ambitious and clear timetable to increasing offshore wind generation, will he now come out with an equally ambitious timetable for delivering an offshore grid. he ambitious timetable for delivering an offshore grid.— an offshore grid. he is spot-on on the need for _ an offshore grid. he is spot-on on the need for an _ an offshore grid. he is spot-on on the need for an offshore - an offshore grid. he is spot-on on the need for an offshore grid - an offshore grid. he is spot-on on the need for an offshore grid as i the need for an offshore grid as well as building the fantastic
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windmills. it is essential we bring the energy i'm sure in a way that had minimal disruption for local communities and enables us to maximise efficiency.— communities and enables us to maximise efficiency. what is the prime minister _ maximise efficiency. what is the prime minister think _ maximise efficiency. what is the prime minister think when - maximise efficiency. what is the prime minister think when he i maximise efficiency. what is the i prime minister think when he hears jenny mcgee, the nurse who saves his life, say of nhs staff, we are not getting the respect and now pay we deserve. i'mjust getting the respect and now pay we deserve. i'm just sick of it so i have handed in my resignation. surely he must even stop and think what can be learned from mistakes of the past year? whatjenny calls the indecisiveness and mixed messages of his government. whether you think again about giving nurses more than insulting 1% pay rise? l again about giving nurses more than insulting 1% pay rise?— insulting 1% pay rise? i think the whole house _ insulting 1% pay rise? i think the whole house acknowledges i insulting 1% pay rise? i think the whole house acknowledges ouri whole house acknowledges our collected debt and i have class
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acknowledge my personal debt and thatis acknowledge my personal debt and that is why have all the professions in this country in very tough times, we have asked the public sector pay review board to look at an increase in pay for nurses, but in the meantime we have increased starting salaries for nurses by 12.8%, we have put a bursary and, we have the start that as well as £3000 of extra help. to all nurses, i know what a tough year they have had, i know how hard it has been on the front line coping with this pandemic, we have done what i think is the most important thing of all, recruiting many more nurses. there are now about 11,000 more nurses in the nhs today than there were this time that it might last year and even more in training and we are on target to reach our target of 50,000 more nurses in the nhs.— nurses in the nhs. patients in encland nurses in the nhs. patients in england have _ nurses in the nhs. patients in england have unfettered i nurses in the nhs. patients in | england have unfettered access
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nurses in the nhs. patients in i england have unfettered access to specialist hospital care anywhere in england including within world leading centres of excellence. but my constituents in north wales have no such automatic choice, with access dependent on restrictive contracts or individual funding requests. so will my right honourable friend do all he can to ensure that health care features prominently in the uk levelling up agenda? prominently in the uk levelling up arenda? , ., ., ~ , agenda? yes, and i thank my honourable _ agenda? yes, and i thank my honourable friend _ agenda? yes, and i thank my honourable friend for - agenda? yes, and i thank my honourable friend for his i agenda? yes, and i thank my l honourable friend for his point, agenda? yes, and i thank my i honourable friend for his point, and he knows a great deal about the subject. we worked very hard with the welsh government throughout the pandemic, supporting them with £8.6 billion of additional funding through the barnett formula, but clearly we need to learn the lessons together as we bounce forward from this pandemic. it is together as we bounce forward from this pandemic-— this pandemic. it is now 664 days since the prime _ this pandemic. it is now 664 days since the prime minister - this pandemic. it is now 664 days since the prime minister said i this pandemic. it is now 664 days since the prime minister said he i this pandemic. it is now 664 days i since the prime minister said he had a plan for social care, but the department of health and social care are advertising at the moment for social care policy advisers to develop proposals for reform. why do
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that if there is a plan already? every day more people lose their life savings to play huge social care costs and we cannot get a straight answer as to whether the government has a plan to fix social care, never mind out what it actually is, so just tell us, care, never mind out what it actually is, sojust tell us, prime minister, do you have a plan, yes or no? , , . , minister, do you have a plan, yes or no? , , ., , ., , ., no? yes is the answer. the labour partyjunked _ no? yes is the answer. the labour partyjunked it. — no? yes is the answer. the labour partyjunked it, and _ no? yes is the answer. the labour partyjunked it, and this _ no? yes is the answer. the labour partyjunked it, and this is - partyjunked it, and this is something that the decades politicians have failed to address, 1999 the labour party failed to address the plan. they had 13 years in government, i think it was 13, 13 unlucky years for this country and they didn't do it and this government is going to tackle it. this government is going to finally address the issue of social care and if they want to support it with their customary doughty resolve, if
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they want to support it without wiggling and wobbling from one week to the next about what their policy is, without changing like weathervanes, if they want to support it and back it, then i am all ears, mr speaker. throughout this week, _ all ears, mr speaker. throughout this week, businesses _ all ears, mr speaker. throughout this week, businesses across i all ears, mr speaker. throughout this week, businesses across the | this week, businesses across the country have reopened their doors to customers inside, so will the prime ministerjoin me in wishing them the best of luck as they get back on their feet and does best of luck as they get back on theirfeet and does he best of luck as they get back on their feet and does he agree with me that if we are to support local businesses in the long term, we need to create the environment and the opportunities they need to succeed, and that includes schemes like the levelling up fund and the lifetime skill is guaranteed.— skill is guaranteed. yes, mr speaker. — skill is guaranteed. yes, mr speaker, that _ skill is guaranteed. yes, mr speaker, that is _ skill is guaranteed. yes, mr speaker, that is why - skill is guaranteed. yes, mr speaker, that is why we i skill is guaranteed. yes, mr speaker, that is why we are j speaker, that is why we are investing £3.6 million from the getting building fund for the development of pioneer place and burnley will benefit from the high street task force but what what
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towns across the country need more than anything else is passionate leadership, such as my honourable friend shows in championing the locality and getting the right investment in. the prime minister will be aware of the plan proposal to close them a nice factory in glasgow is east end putting 470 jobs at risk. ihill glasgow is east end putting 470 'obs at risk. ~ ~ , at risk. will the prime minister 'oin me at risk. will the prime minister join me in _ at risk. will the prime minister join me in engaging _ at risk. will the prime minister join me in engaging with i at risk. will the prime minister join me in engaging with the i at risk. will the prime minister. join me in engaging with the ceo at risk. will the prime minister- join me in engaging with the ceo and call upon him to rethink these plans which would definitely unleash economic armageddon on a very fragile part of the local economy. yes, mcvities have been a prime part of the scottish economy since the 18005, and i know that people at the factory that, their relatives will be very concerned about what is happening and i thank him for raising it. i know that conversations are now going on to see what we can do, and i think it is the turkish company that now owns
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mcvities, and i know my noble friend the secretary of state for scotland is meeting an honourable four member to discuss the situation. i am is meeting an honourable four member to discuss the situation.— to discuss the situation. i am now suspending _ to discuss the situation. i am now suspending the — to discuss the situation. i am now suspending the house _ to discuss the situation. i am now suspending the house for- to discuss the situation. i am now suspending the house for three i suspending the house for three minutes— suspending the house for three minutes to enable necessary arrangements for the next business. 0rder~ _ arrangements for the next business. 0rder~ we _ arrangements for the next business. order. ~ , . ~ order. we will be back in the commons — order. we will be back in the commons after _ order. we will be back in the commons after those - order. we will be back in the commons after those three l order. we will be back in the - commons after those three minutes, because there's going to be an urgent question to the foreign secretary on the situation in israel and gaza. and a question about what the uk government is doing to support efforts for there to be a ceasefire. just to pick up on a couple of the main points from prime minister's questions, the prime minister's questions, the prime minister started out by saying they were looking at the latest data and he said there is increasing confidence that the vaccines are effective against all variants of covid including the indian parent —— indian variantand covid including the indian parent —— indian variant and it could be read as increasing confidence in the road map but because data will be monitored as the government decides what to do about the lifting of
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restrictions on the 21st ofjune, and again, he said about travel to amber list countries, that there should be no travel to amber list countries except for an extreme reason, not for a holiday. obviously there has been some confusion about that from different ministers saying different things about travel to amber list countries and we will go back to the commons in a few moments, but let's talk about that decision on whether final lockdown restrictions will be lifted in england on the 21st ofjune. it does remain in the balance because of the concerns over the spread of the indian variant. latest figures show there were more than 2,300 confirmed cases of the new strain in at least 86 local authorities across the uk. bolton, where the outbreak is most severe, has seen cases double in the last week. most, though not all, are of the indian variant. as we've been reporting surge testing is underway there, as well as in other hotspots, including bedford and glasgow. nuneaton is the latest area where extra testing is being deployed. where that leaves the full unlocking of restrictions is still under
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review, with a decision expected within days. the transmissibility advantage of the b.1.617.2 variant first identified in india might be a little lower than first feared, but vaccines might be less effective at limiting its spread. that's according to professor neil ferguson, an epidemiologist at imperial college london. a glimmer of hope from the recent data that the, whilst the variant still does appear to have a significant growth advantage, the magnitude seems to have dropped a little bit with the most recent data. the curves are flatting a little, but it will take more time. it is something that is being studied very carefully. we don't really have enough data to really distinguish between the vaccines. first of all, i should say
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there is a good deal of confidence that the data is being gathered that vaccines will protect against severe disease, and the effect of the indian variant will be fairly marginal. so vaccines protect individuals. we are slightly concerned that there may be an impact on the ability to prevent infection and therefore prevent transmission in the community. eu ambassadors have backed plans to reopen europe's borders to holiday—makers who have received both doses of an eu approved vaccine. they say they will expand the list of countries people can visit but no decision has been made on whether to add to the uk to that list. at this point, the safe list will be updated and people from countries on the safe list that will be allowed to
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visit even if they have not been vaccinated. the uk does have a low enough infection rate to be put on the list but it is not guaranteed. that's the latest from europe. let's go back to the commons, and the question on the middle east. i wish to ask the secretary of state for commonwealth affairs if he will make a statement on the uk government effort to secure a ceasefire in israel and gaza?— effort to secure a ceasefire in israel and gaza? . . . , . , . israel and gaza? since i was last at the dispatch _ israel and gaza? since i was last at the dispatch box _ israel and gaza? since i was last at the dispatch box on _ israel and gaza? since i was last at the dispatch box on the _ israel and gaza? since i was last at the dispatch box on the 13th - israel and gaza? since i was last at the dispatch box on the 13th of- israel and gaza? since i was last atj the dispatch box on the 13th of may we have sadly seen further violence and more civilian deaths. i am sure the house willjoin me in offering condolences to all families of those civilians who have been killed or injured across israel and the occupied palestinian territories. with your permission, i will set out to the house the work that the government is doing, along with others, to bring about a peaceful resolution. we are urging the parties to work with mediators towards an immediate ceasefire to prevent further loss of life and a
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worsening humanitarian situation. we are supporting the united nations, egyptians and qatari efforts to that end and we will work closely with the us. we are also prioritising our own diplomatic efforts through both bilateral and multilateral channels. the foreign secretary and i, with the support of our diplomats on the ground, have been working to progress the conditions needed for an immediate ceasefire. the foreign secretary has spoken in recent days with the israeli foreign minister and the palestinian prime minister, where he reinforced our clear message of de—escalation and the desire to work together to end the violence. i delivered similar messages to the israeli ambassador and the palestinian head of mission in london and we've also engaged regional partners at ministerial level and the foreign secretary spoke with the foreign minister of jordan on the 17th of may and i spokejust this morning jordan on the 17th of may and i spoke just this morning with a number of ambassadors from arab states to reiterate the need for an
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immediate ceasefire and underline our shared goals of a peaceful two state solution. we are playing a leadership role in the un security council where we are calling for measures by all sides to reduce further violence and we will participate in the emergency un general assembly session later this week. the uk unequivocally condemns the firing of rockets atjerusalem and other locations within israel. we strongly condemn these acts of terrorism by hamas and other terrorist groups who must permanently end their incitement and rocket fire against israel. there is no justification for the targeting of civilians. israel has a legitimate right to self—defence and to defend its citizens from attack. in doing so, it is vital that all actions are proportionate, in line with international humanitarian law and make every effort to avoid civilian casualties. we are aware of medical institutions, number of schools and many homes in gaza that
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have been destroyed or seriously damaged and we are concerned that buildings, housing, media and humanitarian organisations such as the qatari red crescent have been destroyed. we call on israel to adhere to the principles of necessity and proportionality when defending its legitimate security interests. we are also concerned by reports that hamas is once again using civilian infrastructure and populations as a cover for its military operations. humanitarian access is essential and we urge all parties to allow the unimpeded entry of vital humanitarian supplies. hamas and other terrorist groups must cease their mortar attacks on these crossings. we urge all parties to work together to reduce tensions in the west bank including east jerusalem. the uk is clear that the historic status quo injerusalem must be respected. violence against peaceful worshippers of any faith is unacceptable. the uk position on
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demolitions and settlements is clear and long—standing. we oppose these activities. we urge the activity —— the government of israel to cease its policies related to settlement expansion immediately and instead work towards a two state solution. the uk will continue our intensive diplomatic efforts in the region focused on securing a ceasefire and creating the conditions for sustainable peace. can creating the conditions for sustainable peace.- creating the conditions for sustainable peace. can i remind eo - le sustainable peace. can i remind people we _ sustainable peace. can i remind people we have _ sustainable peace. can i remind people we have set _ sustainable peace. can i remind people we have set times. i sustainable peace. can i remind people we have set times. the | people we have set times. the minister for _ people we have set times. the minister for the _ people we have set times. tue minister for the middle people we have set times. tte minister for the middle east, people we have set times. t'te minister for the middle east, james cleverly, and if you want to carry on watching what is happening in parliament you can watch it on the bbc parliament channel. the rate of inflation more than doubled last month, to 1.5%, as a rise in energy and clothing costs drove prices higher. but the figure is partly explained by the big fall in prices last year, as the pandemic took hold. our economics correspondent, andy verity, is here. he has been looking at how the 1.5% compares with what it has been.
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that's right. well if you look at this chart ? 1.5 per cent is more than double what it was last month ? but its only back where it was in march last year. back in 2017 for example it was twice as high. if you ask what 5 fuelling inflation? you've already answered your own question. last year lockdowns meant far fewer goods and people moving around and oil and gas companies were producing far more fuel than the world needed, so the price plummeted. a year on from that, economies around the world are re—opening and the oil price has bounced back — along with other commodities like metals. because of that, manufacturers have to pay more for raw materials ? also known as input prices — which are up by nearly 10 per cent on a year ago. but the bank of england has been anxious to calm fears that that could lead to an early rise in interest rates to stop inflation getting out of control. you do hear stories about rising
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prices _ you do hear stories about rising prices but — you do hear stories about rising prices but we are not yet seeing strong _ prices but we are not yet seeing strong evidence that that is passing on to— strong evidence that that is passing on to consumer prices but i can assure — on to consumer prices but i can assure you _ on to consumer prices but i can assure you we will be watching this extremely— assure you we will be watching this extremely carefully. and we will take action when we think it is appropriate to do so, no question about— appropriate to do so, no question about that — with the government, small businesses and poorer households deep in debt, a rise in interest rates would make it harder to afford their repayments. but many economists think that won t happen any time soon. the markets are starting to expected interest _ the markets are starting to expected interest rate rise by the end of next _ interest rate rise by the end of next year. _ interest rate rise by the end of next year, and if you think about it, next year, and if you think about it. the _ next year, and if you think about it. the bank— next year, and if you think about it, the bank of england cut rates in march _ it, the bank of england cut rates in march 2020 we were in an emergency situation _ march 2020 we were in an emergency situation in _ march 2020 we were in an emergency situation in the markets were seizing — situation in the markets were seizing up and we were at the beginning of the pandemic and nobody knew what— beginning of the pandemic and nobody knew what was going to happen, so do we still— knew what was going to happen, so do we still need rates to be at that emergency level is the question the bank of— emergency level is the question the bank of england will be asking itself, — bank of england will be asking itself, and do we need rates to be a higher— itself, and do we need rates to be a higher to _ itself, and do we need rates to be a higher to contain inflation? even
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with inflation at this level, its serious for more than 7 million people of working age who receive benefits. because their payments since april have been uprated based on inflation back in september? they re only rising by half a percentage point. so prices are once again rising faster than their payments ? making millions of the poorest people in the country worse off. thank you, andy. forensic teams have arrived at a cafe in gloucester, where excavations are beginning in the search for a suspected victim of the serial killer, fred west. 15—year—old mary bastholm worked at the �*clean plate' cafe before she went missing in 1968. mary's parents died without finding out what happened to their daughter. after more than a week of initial searches at this cafe right in the centre of gloucester here, police now say they have enough evidence to begin excavating the cellar here, which they will start to do later on today, we are told. and that really focuses on three new discoveries. number one is the piece of blue
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cloth which has been photographed in the corner of that cellar. and we know when mary disappeared from here back in 1968, she was wearing a blue coat and carrying a blue bag. number two is what they called yesterday structural anomalies, essentially voids in the floor and walls of the cellar that they want to investigate. number three is a dog that they took down a few days ago, trained to sniff out remains, which did have a reaction down in the cellar there, we are told. now, they've been in touch with mary's family throughout this process. they've told them that they can't guarantee, of course, that they will find mary's remains down there. but what they will do is definitively answer that question one way or another as to whether she was buried here after she disappeared in 1968. last seen not very far away at all from where we are standing right now on a very cold january night back in 1968, vanishing from a bus stop here in gloucester and then never seen again. but it was really more than 20 years later when fred west's crimes came to light that people started to put two and two together and wonder whether he may have been responsible for her disappearance. at that time, there wasn't really
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enough evidence to warrant a search of the cafe here, but police now say they do now have that and will start excavating today. but that won't be a quick process, of course. it is underground and a fairly small space. but they will have forensic archaeologists on site here today to at least begin that process that they say could take several weeks and finally the possibility of answering that question of exactly what happened to mary when she disappeared here in gloucester more than 50 years ago. the state attorney general�*s office in new york has said its investigation into donald trump's business — the trump organisation — is now a criminal probe and not purely a civil matter. the company has been under investigation for over two years by the manhattan district attorney. our washington correspondent will grant sent us this update. this essentially is a look at the operations and the situation behind the scenes of the trump organisation, and the question of whether or not they have artificially inflated the value of their assets in order to obtain
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loans and tax breaks as a result, therefore misleading investors along the way. an important charge, and it has taken two years to get to this point and it is clear now that letitia james, the new york state attorney general, has decided there clearly is enough to move this from a civil investigation to a criminal one. as you mentioned as well, president trump is already under investigation for his tax affairs by the manhattan district attorney, and taken together that is an extremely sticky and difficult legal imbroglio he finds himself in both as an individual and for his organisation. now, the investigation has been going on since 2019, particularly after his personal lawyer, michael cohen, spoke about the allegation of this inflationary tactic to bump up the value of his properties, allegedly.
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it is worth underscoring that president trump, former president trump, has always denied any wrongdoing and suggested any investigation into him is a witchhunt and that journalists asking about his tax affairs were peddling fake news and so on, and although we are yet to receive a response from either him or his organisation, i think we can safely say it will be in that area that he responds. but, yes, this is largely about the operations of his organisation before he was president but it has been undertaken while he was president too. eight fire engines responded to reports of a car on fire outside the house of mr law well in the early hours of the morning. the club said the family were extremely safe —— shaken but all say.
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police in south yorkshire say they ve been finding an increasing number of cannabis factories in houses and empty businesses over the past year. in parts of doncaster some criminals have been tapping into electricity supplies and causing power cuts to local homes. police say these cannabis factories are often linked to serious organised crime and modern slavery. emma glasbey was given exclusive access to a police operation in doncaster. once a bingo hall, now the centre of a police operation. south yorkshire police suspect a cannabis factory has been set up inside this site in mexborough. police! they're looking for drugs and people. police with a warrant! inside, there is a major cannabis operation. police with a warrant! it's still early stages
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in the investigation, we're still trying to work out how big the setup is, it's a bit of a maze there, but we are talking potentially between 500 and 1,000 plants set up in there, so just as a rough estimate, a mature cannabis plant, street value can be sort of £800 to £1,000, so, top end, if there are a thousand plants in there, then there could be approximately £1 million worth of drugs sold on the street. there is also evidence people have been living here. cannabis plants have been found inside, but officers will now spend some time searching through the building. they are going from room to room, checking to see if anyone is hiding inside. police soon arrest two men on suspicion of drug offences. this operation is the result of good old—fashioned police work. local neighbourhood officers spotted the road had been dug up, potentially to tap into the mains electricity supply, and there were suspicious changes to the building. but this is notjust about cannabis.
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there's a common conception among certain parts of the community that cannabis is a low level, less harmful drug, but what sits behind it are things like this, a set up that potentially lines the pockets of organised criminals to the tune of millions of pounds. there is almost always exploitation, modern slavery, and that's the thing that the general public and local communities don't necessarily see. police say there's been a big increase in these cannabis factories in south yorkshire in the past year and it can cause huge disruption to local people. across doncaster and various communities, we are seeing power outages for residential properties as a result of the electricity that's being abstracted to power these big setups. it's believed this factory was set up fairly recently. a big investment by criminals now disrupted by police. emma glasbey, bbc news, doncaster.
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urgent action needs to be taken to make electric cars more affordable if the government is to hit its 2030 target for banning the sale of all new petrol and diesel cars. that's according to a group of mps. the public accounts committee says ministers have a �*mountain to climb' if they want to achieve the ambitious target. here 5 our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt. sales of electric vehicles are by far the fastest growing segment of the car market but they still only account for 11% of new car registrations. getting to 100% will be tough, mps warn today. the government plans to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2030 with hybrids prohibited from 2035. motorists won't be ready to make that change, say the mp5 on the public accounts committee, unless the price of electric vehicles is reduced significantly and charging infrastructure is installed much more quickly. as well as cars themselves being expensive, only a handful being under £30,000, there is the cost of charging them. while electric charging is cheaper than petrol and diesel,
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there is a big difference between charging in public places and charging on your driveway, and lots of people don't have space to charge their vehicles at home so the infrastructure and the cost of that has got to be thought about as well, and we are concerned the government is behind the curve if it is going to hit its target. the public accounts committee says the government needs to do more to develop the skilled workforce and electric power infrastructure needed to support the transition. but the government told the bbc today it was on track to meet its target and says it is investing £2.8 billion to help the car industry and drivers make the switch to electric. justin rowlatt, bbc news. once again another day of sunny spells and scattered showers but they should be fewer showers than
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they should be fewer showers than the last few days and it has been a glorious start for many. just take a look at argyll and bute today. early morning rain left puddles on the rooftop in central london, but the sunshine did come out and some of the rain was quite heavy for the early morning rush hour, which has been slipping away quite nicely. you can see the clear skies following behind with a few isolated showers developing across central scotland into north—west england and north—west wales, but as we go into the afternoon showers should push east and western areas will quiet down with a little more sunshine coming through as a ridge of high pressure briefly builds. temperatures should sit between ten and 18 degrees which is where we pretty much should be for this time of year. the showers will fade away and we will keep the clear skies, albeit briefly, before cloud and rain pushes in from the south—west. a significant area of low pressure to come into thursday. those temperatures will hold up and we will see them around four to 8 degrees first thing on thursday morning but the low pressure could
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cause issues, not necessarily to do with the intensity and longevity of the rain but to do with the strength of the win, vertically on the southern flank of that low. there will be some heavy rain in northern ireland pushing into southern scotland and northern england as we go through the day. not too heavy through thursday across central and southern england and wales, but look at this, gust of wind widely in excess of 40 miles an hour, maybe 50 or 60 miles an hour on exposed south—west coast. with the cloud, wind and rain, those temperatures are down a good three or 4 degrees in many places, ten up to 15 degrees. the low pressure continues to drift eastward through thursday night into friday, anchoring itself to the north of england so the strongest winds will be to the south of that and will be channelling in the rain across wales, central and southern england and the gusty list of the winds here, quite widely 40 or 50 miles an hour and of the winds here, quite widely 40 or50 miles an hourand may of the winds here, quite widely 40 or 50 miles an hour and may be stronger, so for those temporary gazebos in your garden worth bearing in mind that they are anchored down firmly. in terms of the feel of the
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weather through friday afternoon we are looking at around eight to 14 degrees as the hive. at the start of the weekend, quieter, a brief lull in the story before more wet and windy weather arrives on sunday.
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1:00 pm
good afternoon. the prime minister defends government advice on travelling abroad. but the labour leader sir keir starmer says the government's lost "control of its borders". we'll bring you the latest. also this lunchtime: police searching for a suspected victim of serial killer fred west have begun drilling at a cafe in gloucester. the family of a 24—year—old woman from london who was murdered in pakistan call for her killers to be brought tojustice. new york's prosecutor has launched a criminal inquiry into donald trump's property company. and fans celebrate the return of the eurovision song contest. and coming up on the bbc news channel: scotland manager steve clarke makes his 26—man squad announcement ahead of the euros. it will be scotland men's first major tournament in 23 years.

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