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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  May 20, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm tim willcox. ramping up the pressure on israel. joe biden tells benjamin netanyahu to ease back on the airstrikes on gaza, serious differences — but talking — the us and russia foreign ministers meet on the sidelines of the arctic council in iceland. a year on from the george floyd killing, a special report from france about racism in its police force and its effects on wider society. and we report from japan where politicians and the ioc insist the tokyo olympics are safe — but public opposition is intensifying.
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as the conflict enters its 11th day, are the hostilities between hamas and israel finally about to end? a senior hamas official is predicting a ceasefire within days. it follows us presidentjoe biden�*s call on israel for a serious de—escalation. the conflict has already cost over 200 lives, including dozens of children. mark lobel reports. more trauma and tears in a gaza hospital. behind this crowd a palestinian father killed alongside his pregnant wife and daughter after an israeli air strike hit their home as they cooked a family meal. continues to shoot down rockets fired from gaza to a near miss
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here is an israeli family fled this house moments before a rocket struck. the us president joe biden has told benjamin netanyahu he expects a significant deescalation. i do think that — significant deescalation. i do think that president - significant deescalation. i if think that president biden has been appropriate and actively engaged although today's public statement may be the first time he is making it clear he is applying some pressure, i am confident it is not the first time he has engaged with our close ally, israel, and urged a ceasefire. close ally, israel, and urged a ceasefire-— close ally, israel, and urged a ceasefire. , , ~ , ceasefire. the present minister sa s he ceasefire. the present minister says he is _ ceasefire. the present minister says he is determined - ceasefire. the present minister says he is determined to - ceasefire. the present minister says he is determined to carry l says he is determined to carry on until common security i restored israeli citizens. outlining his strategy for dealing with us to foreign ambassadors in tel aviv. the only two _ ambassadors in tel aviv. the only two ways _ ambassadors in tel aviv. the only two ways you _ ambassadors in tel aviv. the only two ways you can - ambassadors in tel aviv. iie: only two ways you can deal ambassadors in tel aviv. "iie: only two ways you can deal with them. you can either conquer them. you can either conquer them and that is always an open possibility or you can deter them and we are engaged right now in forceful deterrence but i have to say we do not rule
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out anything. i have to say we do not rule out anything-— i have to say we do not rule out anything. for a watertight ceasefire to _ out anything. for a watertight ceasefire to emerge - out anything. for a watertight ceasefire to emerge soon, - ceasefire to emerge soon, israel will want to prove it has deterred hamas from attacking israel for some time, especially after hamas launched rockets atjerusalem in solidarity with the wider palestinian cause. but for any endgame on the horizon, a political process will need to arise from the ashes. translation: arise from the ashes. tuna/mom- arise from the ashes. translation: ., ~ , ., translation: our work is now focused on _ translation: our work is now focused on stopping _ translation: our work is now focused on stopping the - translation: our work is now focused on stopping the israeli | focused on stopping the israeli aggression against our people injerusalem, the west bank and gaza. and then entering a serious political process under international backing that leads to ending israeli occupation of the lands in the state of palestine. i5 occupation of the lands in the state of palestine.— state of palestine. is the conflict enters _ state of palestine. is the conflict enters its - state of palestine. is the conflict enters its 11th . conflict enters its 11th day, it is notjust arabs in occupied lands who need reassurance, but those living within the state of israel, unexpected violence between the jewish majority and arab minority is now an open wound that needs serious attention.
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joining me now is james zogby — founder of the arab american institute and a member of the executive committee of the democratic party's national committee in the us. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. how much pressure is biden really putting on benjamin netanyahu? he call for an immediate ceasefire, did he? he call for an immediate ceasefire, did he? ., ceasefire, did he? he did not. and i think — ceasefire, did he? he did not. and | think the _ ceasefire, did he? he did not. and i think the pressure - ceasefire, did he? he did not. and i think the pressure is - ceasefire, did he? he did not. j and i think the pressure is not enough and they will continue to be pressure on president biden to put more pressure as long as benjamin netanyahu does not end this rather savage bombing. and i think that it is important that the us put pressure not only in order to stop the bombing but to create an american role in the post conflict situation. the extent to which we are seen as the reason why this ended, to that extent we will have leveraging israel, support and leveraged
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with the palestinians in the broader arab world. if this ends when netanyahu says he wants it to end without that kind of pressure, the us will be a bystander.— be a bystander. how much influence _ be a bystander. how much influence does _ be a bystander. how much influence does joe - be a bystander. how much influence does joe biden l be a bystander. how much i influence does joe biden have influence doesjoe biden have on benjamin netanyahu? it is a different relationship from that of his predecessor, isn't it? it that of his predecessor, isn't it? , �* , it? it is. but i remember president _ it? it is. but i remember president reagan - it? it is. but i remember. president reagan situation, confrontation after the massacres in lebanon. reagan had his arms folded and looking sternly and that was enough. the message was sent, the president is mad and he wants it end and it ended. america has a decisive role to play here. when the us sniffs, israel catches a cold and joe biden has to take advantage of that leverage he has with israel. a , that leverage he has with israel. , , . israel. many people have suggested that _ israel. many people have suggested that the - israel. many people have - suggested that the demographic within the democratic party is
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changing and might that lead to a recalibration of the relationship tween joe a recalibration of the relationship tweenjoe biden and israel now? he relationship tween joe biden and israel now?— relationship tween joe biden and israel now? he is feeling the wind blowing _ and israel now? he is feeling the wind blowing from - and israel now? he is feeling the wind blowing from a - the wind blowing from a progressive direction. he has deferred to progressives on a range of economic and social issues. this is a last stand in his relationship with israel and foreign policy operating according to older instinct with a nested but clearly you are right. we saw a protestant split over the years but that part is an split within the democratic party became a demographic split with black latino and asian voters, young voters in particular and educated women having radically different views on israel, palestinians and american policy towards israel than the rest of the democratic party and, certainly, from the rest of the republican party. it is almost like, i call it a gay
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marriage split, it is the same kind of two—thirds one third versus one third to third demographic split. in versus one third to third demographic split.- versus one third to third demographic split. in a way isn't that — demographic split. in a way isn't that what _ demographic split. in a way isn't that what so _ demographic split. in a way isn't that what so many - isn't that what so many american presidents have done before? they let israel go as far as they need to to sort out the military aspects, in terms of destroying hamas tunnels and then they put pressure on. or, has there been genuinely quiet diplomacy thatjoe biden says he has been putting into this whole conflict in the last 11 days and if so, what are the results of the quiet diplomacy being? the first time i went to see somebody at the state department, the assistant secretary, 1976. he department, the assistant secretary, 1976.— department, the assistant secretary, 1976. he told me it was about _ secretary, 1976. he told me it was about house _ secretary, 1976. he told me it was about house demolitions| secretary, 1976. he told me it. was about house demolitions and he said we have speaking with them about. israel pockets those. they need public pressure to move. and in the times when public pressured has been used with reagan and
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gerald ford, with george hw bush and even with bill clinton in some subtle ways of applying direct pressure, israel changed course. we defeated israeli prime minister �*s with pressure. we have to do it again if we want to get movement because israel has become emboldened by a sense of impunity, as netanyahu says, i know how to run america. they will say this and i will do this and congress will be with me. the changing congress the attitudes of progressives in congress is significant and it is putting pressure not only on the president but look at the statements from speaker policy and chuck schumer and people who have been significantly strong supporters of israel, they are now speaking a different language because they feel the wind blowing from the progressive side of the party as i said, all those demographic groups that form the base vote of the party. in the base vote of the party. in the 45 years i have been doing this work i have never seen
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that kind of pressure now becoming actualised and challenging the establishment to change direction.— challenging the establishment to change direction. thank you very much _ to change direction. thank you very much for— to change direction. thank you very much forjoining - to change direction. thank you very much forjoining us - to change direction. thank you very much forjoining us here | very much forjoining us here on bbc news. meeting in iceland — the us secretary of state, antony blinken, and the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov, have sought to ease tensions in their first meeting since president biden took office. they have said that despite their many differences, the two countries should work together on some issues. it's the most senior in—person contact yet between the biden administration and the kremlin. let's get the latest from our correspondent will grant in washington. the relationship would not have gone much frosty other than it was up until only a few months ago that president biden said he thought vladimir putin was a killer. i, he thought vladimir putin was a killer. . ., , ., killer. yeah. it does not get much frosty _ killer. yeah. it does not get much frosty other _ killer. yeah. it does not get much frosty other than - killer. yeah. it does not get| much frosty other than that. and i think that was at initial low point, perhaps president
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biden setting out a stool after president trump was seen as so close to moscow, so close to president putin in person that make personally. and this clearly is an effort to rebuild from that point on some level. at the two nations need to together on a variety of issues and i think this was an opportunity on the sidelines of this arctic council summit to actually have a little face—to—face contact. the secretary of state, antony blinken said that what the biden administration wanted was a predictable and stable relationship. both men then went on to set outjust how difficult that would be but this was perhaps a first step on the path. this was perhaps a first step on the path-— is often their position publicly? america is still very exercised about the hacking and nordstrom two, crimea, the death of the script files. you
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name it. has either side change? —— skripals. i name it. has either side change? -- skripals. ithink the nord — change? -- skripals. ithink the nord stream _ change? -- skripals. ithink the nord stream two, - change? -- skripals. ithink the nord stream two, the i the nord stream two, the pipeline to supply russian national gas supplies to germany, huge and vital piece of infrastructure for both germany and for russia and it is at a very developed stage of development. the state department, after this meeting did announce restrictions there will be waived so on the company that is making the pipeline, on its ceo, on a number of senior figures, the sanctions they will be waived and i think that is some form of olive branch at the very least. you will likely end up having a lot of analogical situation ships building the pipeline still have sanctions on them while the company behind the project does not but, nevertheless, ithink behind the project does not but, nevertheless, i think it is seen as a step in the right direction by moscow. mil
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is seen as a step in the right direction by moscow.- direction by moscow. all of this suggested _ direction by moscow. all of this suggested perhaps - direction by moscow. all of. this suggested perhaps there will be some presidential summit in the next few months. thank you very much. let's get some of the day's other news. the us house of representives has voted to go ahead with a bipartisan commission to investigate the siege of the capitol building by donald trump supporters in january. the commission would be charged with examining security and intelligence failures surrounding the riot in which trump's supporters interrupted the formal congressional certification ofjoe biden's election victory after an incendiary speech by his predecessor. five people died in the violence. the health authorities in malawi have destroyed more than 19,000 expired doses of the astrazeneca covid—19 vaccine. malawi is the first african country to publicly destroy expired vaccines. authorities there say the move is intended to convince the population that alljabs they're being offered are safe and in—date. brazil's environment minister — who is in charge of conserving the amazon rainforest — is at the centre of a police
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investigation into an illegal timber trafficking ring. ricardo salles has presided over a wave of deforestation in the amazon since taking office in 2019. a supreme courtjudge has authorised access to his bank and tax records as part of the probe. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: we report from japan where politicians and the ioc insist the tokyo olympics are safe, but public opposition is intensifying. this morning, an indian air force plane carrying mr gandhi's body landed in delhi. the president of india walked to the plane to solemnly witness mr gandhi's final return from the political battlefield. ireland has voted overwhelmingly in favour of gay marriage. in doing so, it's become the first country in the world
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to approve the change in the national referendum. it was a remarkable climax to what was surely the most extraordinary funeral ever given to a pop singer. it's been a peaceful funeral demonstration so far! - but suddenly, the police - are tear—gassing the crowd — we don't yet know why! the pre—launch ritual is well—established here. helen was said to be in good spirits, butjust a little apprehensive. in the last hour, east timor has become the world's newest nation. it was a bloody birth for a poor country, and the challenges ahead are daunting. but for now, at least, it is time to celebrate. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: ramping up the pressure
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on israel, joe biden tells benjamin netanyahu to ease back on the air strikes on gaza. serious differences but talking, the us and russia foreign ministers meet on the sidelines of the arctic council in iceland. it is one year since the killing of george floyd, the african—american man who died after a white police officer, derek chauvin, knelt on his neck for more than nine minutes. the murder captured on camera, shocked the world, prompting millions to take part in global demonstrations against police brutality. for the second of our special reports on the impact of his death, clive myrie has been to france, a country where the police are often accused of violence and racism, to find what the reaction has been of the french government and the effects on wider society. a warning, you may find some of the images in his report distressing. spring sunshine bathes a land ill at ease. beneath the tranquillity
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swirls a tempest on race. all these people should be wearing masks due to covid, even outdoors. the fine — 135 euros. but the police turn a blind eye. sirens yet not too far away, different tactics. for not wearing masks. one bystander reassures and complies. but our presence angers the police. one of our team is told by a female officer to "go bleep herself." this officer tells us we're not allowed to film, but that's not true. angry, they disappear. it was hoped winds of change would blow when george floyd died.
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12 months ago, so much seemed possible. tens of thousands marched here, joining millions in global protests... chanting. ..over a death that resonated, especially in black and arab communities of france, where other men have died in police custody. yet a year later, more, not fewer, laws are being introduced that could insulate violent officers from prosecution. nothing. he's not doing anything... shahin hazamy chronicles french police brutality. look, look. he's punching him in the face. two punching in the face, yes. two police officers? yes, yes. his footage of the violence, he posts on instagram, but it's a risky business. in this video, his friend has been stopped by police and an officer sees shahin filming.
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shouting a terrible indictment of modern france. there is no video of the last moments of adama traore, who died running from the police after failing to show his identity card in 2016. who died in police custody in 2016. his sister assa says the evidence is clear — the police beat and killed him, despite a court ruling that her brother died of natural causes. she retraces what she believes were his final steps. that's where he was
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beaten, just in there? yes. and down the street, the police station where adama was pronounced dead. if anyone can build a prosecution case against the police for brutality, it's arie alimi. a human rights lawyer, he represents several people allegedly attacked by officers. should i be worried walking down a parisian street at night because i'm black? oui. i should be worried? the fact that this man, music producer michel zecler, is black, say his lawyers,
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wasn't lost on the officers who beat him in his own recording studio. a security camera captured every punch and kick after he was stopped by police for not wearing a mask outside his front door. president macron tweeted: but great faith was placed in emmanuel macron on his election in 2017, that he had a plan to help tackle racism in france. now, however, say his critics, he's attempting to curry favour with voters on the right before elections next year by introducing security laws which include the arrest of anyone filming the police and maliciously making the images public. it's all an attempt, they say, to cling onto power. it's often those who are black or arab in france who have no power and are 20 times more likely to be stopped by police than anyone who's white.
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the ministry of interior didn't want to comment on the issues raised in our report, but the police told us they're not racist and point to increases in violent crime and drugs offences as proof of the difficultjob they do. however, there is an acknowledgement about the deficit of trust between young people and the police. this generation for us, actually, is lost. we think we lost a generation, but we want to fight for the next generation of people. france simply cannot turn its back on any of its citizens. to do so would doom notjust perhaps this generation, but also the next. clive myrie, bbc news, paris. you are watching bbc news. the international olympic committee president thomas bach
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has insisted the olympic games can go ahead safely. opposition to the games though, is intensifying. never before has the summer olympics face such overwhelming opposition from the people of the host nation. as japan's covid pandemic continues to get worse, the opposition is growing louder and more prominent. this double—page spread has appeared in several newspapers. it's an old photo from world war ii of japanese children training to fight the americans with bamboo spears. except now the enemy is covid. "no vaccines, no drugs, are we supposed to fight the virus with bamboo spears?"
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the head of japanese online retailer, rakuten, is also making headlines. he described holding the olympics now as a suicide mission. even those who have signed up as olympic volunteers are saying it is time to stop. definitely so. i don't hear people saying we should have the event, i never hear about it. they're just all hoping they will cancel the event. i think that's the public main opinion. while the virus is now well into its fourth wave here injapan, it has barely begun vaccinations. so far just 3% received a single shot. this is the city of nagoya, in centraljapan. i've come here because this city has just been placed under a state of emergency because of rapidly rising covid infections. i've also come because medical workers here are up in arms that they are being requested to volunteer at the olympic games in tokyo, when they are desperately needed in hospitals here. this young nurse who doesn't want to show her face has watched the covid unit in her hospital
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filled to capacity. translation: we already don't have enough staff in hospital- beds for covid patients. people are already dying at home because they can't get into the hospital. they want 500 nurses to volunteer for olympics. that means more covid patients won't get the care they need. far to the north of the amid the rice fields of nigata, a small town of kamo, has been preparing to host the russian gymnastics team. some of the gymnasts are trying out the new equipment, specially installed for the russians. he tells me the town spent over a $500,000 us on all of this. because of covid, the russian team will now never use it. long—timejapan resident and sports promoter thinks there is one very obvious solution. to delay the olympics again. whenever you asked the people
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in charge, "why would you not consider 2022?" there's really no answer. there is only very direct and firm, "we do not organise in 2022, it's now or never." i argue for the exact opposite, because i think that everybody involved here is better off with an organisation in 2022. it may already be too late for another delay, it looks like the olympics will either go ahead or be cancelled. but for these young gymnasts in kamo, the excitement they once had a welcoming the world to japan this summer is already a fading memory. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in nigata, japan. it looked like something from a hollywood film, but a high—speed police chase in florida that was caught on camera was all too real. the chase started after a suspected burglary and police pursued them along the highway with a number of other police cars joining the pursuit.
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wow. right. everyone survived. despite a smash up. you're watching bbc news. hello there. wednesday was another unsettled day. the majority of the showers that formed were across eastern areas through the afternoon, so we had some of these thunderclouds going across the skyline in cambridgeshire. further west, though, wales and western england, well, it was a largely fine afternoon with some long spells of sunshine at last. but it's not going to stay that way. on the satellite picture, we've already got our next weather system. it's been moving quite quickly across the atlantic, but it's going to put its brakes on and become really quite slow—moving as the low spins its way across the united kingdom. so, we've got rain and strong winds to come for the next couple of days. now, that rain is already
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beginning to arrive across westernmost areas, and that process will continue for the next few hours. whereas across eastern areas, it stays drier. a dry start to thursday morning and not particularly cold. the winds picking up across the south—west, though, quite quickly in the morning. bright start across eastern areas, and to be honest, there probably won't be that much in the way of rain across the south—east. northern scotland not faring too bad either. but, otherwise, a lot of rain to come across western areas, with some strong winds blowing into the coast of wales in particular. gusts here around 50—60mph. winds that strong will likely bring down a few tree branches. there could be some localised transport disruption. the low pressure's still there on friday. heavier rain this time going in across into the south—east of england through the afternoon. and the strongest winds going through the english channel. again, we could see some localised disruption, but the majority of the rain will start to spin away from northern ireland. here we'll see some brighter weather pushing in, but probably with a few showers as well. what about the weekend? well, the rain clears, showers follow to saturday. and then we've got another dollop of rain for sunday. so, there's no end in sight, really, to this unsettled run of weather.
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marginally, saturday looks like being the better of the two days of the weekend, although rain never too far away from the south—east of england. and there will be some heavy showers around as well. still, there will be some areas that get through the gaps between those showers and stay dry with some sunshine. temperatures continue to be pretty disappointing. sunday starts off on a promising note across the east, but we do have this band of rain that's going to be pushing in from the west as the day goes by. so, many of us will see some rain at times, and those temperatures still pretty rubbish for may. what about next week? well, the rain clears, but showers follow. yes, monday and tuesday looking pretty unsettled.
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but for now, at least, it is time to celebrate. this is bbc news,
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the headlines: israel and palestinian militants are under mounting pressure to cease ten days of cross—border attacks. the us president, joe biden, has told the israeli prime minister, that he expects to see a significant de—escalation. mr netanyahu says he'll continue military operations. in iceland — a thawing in relations between the us and russia. us secretary of state antony blinken in his first meeting with russian foreign minister sergei lavrov, says it's "no secret that we have our differences" but the �*world would be safer if the two countries' leaders worked together�*. the international olympic committee president insists the tokyo olympic games can go ahead safely. but opposition to the games is intensifying with japan facing a growing numbers of coronavirus cases and a slow—moving vaccination programme.
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here in the uk — prime minister borisjohnson

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