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tv   BBC News with Katty and Christian  BBC News  May 24, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. there's not usually much politics in aviation. that changed when belarus forced a ryanairflight to land in minsk. the cargo they wanted was a 26—year—old dissidentjournalist. the nabbed him. but they also got a ton of international condemnation. the uk and other nations are now banning flights to and from belarus. will that be enough though to secure the release of the journalist, roman protasevich? calls to �*defund the police�* are one thing. efforts to reform the police are quite another. one year on since george floyd's death, we look at why congress has failed to pass police reform. also in the programme... keeping the peace, howeverfragile. the us secretary of state is on his way to the middle east, to try to help keep the ceasefire
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between israel and hamas intact. and, a 50—year old just won a major golf tournament. a 78—year—old is president of the united states. we'll look at how more and more of us, yes us are simply getting better with age. hello, i'm katty kay in washington, christian fraser is in london. it reads like the script from a jason bourne movie. so far it is not ending well. the protagonist, roman protesevich, a dissident journalist from belarus, was traveling by commercial airline from athens to vilnius in lithuania. he'd been traced by three belarussian agents who were travelling on the same flight. as it approached vilnius
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the ryanair pilots were told there was a bomb on board, and that a belarussian fighter jet would escort them to minsk. when it landed mr protesevich and his girlfriend were arrested and ta ken away. eu leaders said today it was a shocking act, that endangered the lives of passengers, a case of "state—sponsored piracy". tonight they are meeting in brussels to decide how best to respond. the civil aviation authority here has already told its carriers to avoid belarussian airspace and has informed minsk its national carrier belavia will not be allowed to land in the uk. meanwhile, lithuania has advised its citizens to get out of belarus. here's our europe correspondentjean mckenzie. armed police greet the arrivals on board the plane belarus is accused of hijacking. all to capture this young man, roman protasevich, a journalist and political refugee. he fled belarus two years ago, only to be forced back home yesterday under the most extraordinary circumstances by a regime he told his fellow passengers would execute him.
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one woman pleads with people to stay calm. as roman was led away, passengers say he was shaking. how scared he was? super scared. i looked at him directly into his eyes and it was very sad. his father has described his son's capture as a terrorist act. translation: we hope that he will cope. - we hope that he will stay himself, not give in to any of their tricks. we are afraid to even think about it. but it's possible he could be beaten and tortured. the chief executive of ryanair this morning spoke of his anger. this was a case of state—sponsored hijacking, state—sponsored piracy. i think it is very frightening for the crew, the passengers and they were held under armed guard and had their bags searched. roman is wanted because of running an opposition news programme.
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it is on the social media platform telegram. it is used to organise social media broadcasts and to transmit protest. the protest exploded during last summer's election when belarus's long—time leader, president lukashenko, claimed yet another disputed victory. back then we witnessed peaceful protesters being dragged off the streets of the capital. since then, hundreds ofjournalists and opposition allegations have been imprisoned. roman is the latest target. they endangered the lives of 171 passengersjust because of roman protasevich and we were sure that to fly between two un member states is safe, but it turned out that it is not. speaking in the house of commons earlier, the foreign secretary said mr lukashenko�*s government must be held accountable for its reckless behaviour. the scenario as reported is a shocking assault on civil aviation and an assault on international law.
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it represents a danger to civilian flights everywhere. europe's leaders are meeting here in brussels this evening to decide what exactly the consequences the hijacking of an eu flight should be. there has been a lot of outrage, a lot of tough talk, but now the pressure is on for them to find some tangible way to punish or weaken bela rus�*s government. already airlines have started to avoid belarus's airports and airspace, deciding detours are worth delays. jean mckenzie, bbc news. latvia has expelled all of belarus's diplomats and belarus have done the same with latvian diplomats. talis linkaits is latvia's transport minister — hejoins us now from riga. eu leaders have agreed to ban belarus airlines from their airspace and they are urging eu airlines are not to fly over belarus as well. is
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this about safety when it comes to transport? or is this about trying to pressure belarus to release the journalist? to pressure belarus to release the “ournalist? ~ journalist? good evening, ithink it is both. certainly _ journalist? good evening, ithink it is both. certainly it _ journalist? good evening, ithink it is both. certainly it is _ journalist? good evening, ithink it is both. certainly it is the - journalist? good evening, ithink it is both. certainly it is the first - is both. certainly it is the first such event in civil aviation history when a passengerjet with more than 170 passengers and 18 nationalities on board have been forced to land just because a country does not like one or two passengers. this is something that endangers the lives of the passengers and it could have happened with another airline as well. our national airline, happened with another airline as well. our nationalairline, air baltic, on sunday has decided to avoid the airspace of belarus. we
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think that this is the right and correct way to respond. £31 think that this is the right and correct way to respond. of course... and what kind _ correct way to respond. of course... and what kind of _ correct way to respond. of course... and what kind of pressure _ and what kind of pressure realistically do you think that that will put on president lukashenko? i believe of course it will take some time for lukashenko to notice that there is pressure, but such events cannot go without any response. i think the eu and all the nations have to show swift and strong response so that similar events do not happen again. response so that similar events do not happen again-— response so that similar events do not happen again. minister, you are riaht, not happen again. minister, you are right. everyone _ not happen again. minister, you are right, everyone today _ not happen again. minister, you are right, everyone today has _ not happen again. minister, you are right, everyone today has talked - right, everyone today has talked about that response and why there needs to be a response, but there is also concerned that if you impose sanctions and the sanctions are too
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tough, that we might push belarus into the warm embrace of russia. what would that mean that part of the world if there was a federal agreement between russia and belarus? i agreement between russia and belarus? ~ , ., ., , agreement between russia and belarus? ~ , . ., , belarus? i think this already has happened. _ belarus? i think this already has happened. so — belarus? i think this already has happened. so we _ belarus? i think this already has happened, so we are _ belarus? i think this already has happened, so we are not - belarus? i think this already has| happened, so we are not making belarus? i think this already has - happened, so we are not making any change in this situation. since the elections last year the lukashenko regime actually already has established the only relations they have had and these relations are with the russian federation. so i don't think we are pushing the regime any further. talk don't think we are pushing the regime any further.— don't think we are pushing the regime any further. talk to me about that airspace- — regime any further. talk to me about that airspace. belarussian _ regime any further. talk to me about that airspace. belarussian airspace i that airspace. belarussian airspace is only small. as i understand it though, important routes go over it. what sort of disruption will there be for people in europe flying to asia and china?— asia and china? certainly any closure of — asia and china? certainly any closure of the _ asia and china? certainly any closure of the airspace - asia and china? certainly any| closure of the airspace means asia and china? certainly any -
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closure of the airspace means that flights are getting a bit longer. it has to be re—routed via other nations, but this is a minor step that we can do in order to influence the situation and to make flights safer for our citizens.— safer for our citizens. minister, thank you _ safer for our citizens. minister, thank you very _ safer for our citizens. minister, thank you very much _ safer for our citizens. minister, thank you very much for - safer for our citizens. minister, | thank you very much for coming safer for our citizens. minister, - thank you very much for coming on the programme. tonight state television in belarus reported that roman protasevich is cooperating with investigators and has confessed to being behind civil disturbances. those are their words. there are concerns clearly about his welfare. just last week another political activist, vitold ashurok died in jail while serving time for his involvement in the protests. the authorities said he died of a cardiac arrest. hanna liubakova is a belarusian oppositionjournalist, a non—resident fellow at the atlantic council. i know that you know roman protasevich very well. do you know where he is and what his welfare is this evening?—
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where he is and what his welfare is this evening? well, we thought that he was held — this evening? well, we thought that he was held at _ this evening? well, we thought that he was held at the _ this evening? well, we thought that he was held at the kgb _ this evening? well, we thought that he was held at the kgb prison, - this evening? well, we thought that he was held at the kgb prison, but. he was held at the kgb prison, but he was held at the kgb prison, but he is in another prison, actually. it is a notoriously known one where some of the political prisoners are being held. it is a pre—trial detention centre in minsk, so that is where the official said that he is where the official said that he is being held. just an hour ago there was a video released by pro—government channels about roman, showing him kind of saying that, yes, he confessed that he participated, he basically organised and plotted riots. that is what he was saying. and he had to say that the security forces are treating him well, even though his forehead, if you see it closely, there are some signs that he might have been beaten. we signs that he might have been beaten. ~ ., , . , beaten. we might have some pictures of his forehead. _ beaten. we might have some pictures of his forehead. we _ beaten. we might have some pictures of his forehead. we will _ beaten. we might have some pictures of his forehead. we will see _ beaten. we might have some pictures of his forehead. we will see if - beaten. we might have some pictures of his forehead. we will see if we - of his forehead. we will see if we can zoom in on that for our viewers.
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tell me a bit about conditions for journalists. he is on a terror list. i know there have been reports of torture in these prisons. what would be your concern about the way that he has been treated and interrogated?— he has been treated and interroaated? ., , he has been treated and interroaated? . , ., interrogated? certainly there have been so many _ interrogated? certainly there have been so many cases _ interrogated? certainly there have been so many cases of— interrogated? certainly there have been so many cases of people - interrogated? certainly there have i been so many cases of people being tortured, being severely beaten so that they were forced to confess in the actions that they never performed, that they never did. i can only imagine what might happen to him. when it comes to journalists, there have been almost 500 journalist who last year were beaten and this is not surprising information for anyone. also when it comes to torture there were 2000 cases of torture that have been
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collected and reported. so the conditions in prisons are really terrible. we fear that something might happen to him.— terrible. we fear that something might happen to him. hannah, you are a iirelarussian — might happen to him. hannah, you are a belarussian journalist _ might happen to him. hannah, you are a belarussian journalist and _ might happen to him. hannah, you are a belarussian journalist and the - a belarussian journalist and the government is no fan of yours. are you worried for your own safety? after what happened with rome and i think everybody can worry about their safety. think everybody can worry about theirsafety. in think everybody can worry about their safety. in the eu are obviously inside the country. so if lukashenko wants, he can definitely reach the dissidents and it is not safe for anyone, reach the dissidents and it is not safe foranyone, including, reach the dissidents and it is not safe for anyone, including, as we have seen, even for nationals, even eu citizens who were on board. i would say that one month ago he actually threatened his opponents, his rivals, that he would reach anyone, that he would find everyone,
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and this is now for him an issue of personal revenge.— and this is now for him an issue of personal revenge. what would you like the international _ personal revenge. what would you like the international community l personal revenge. what would you | like the international community to do now. ., like the international community to do now. . ., , ,, , like the international community to do now. . . , ,, , ., do now. there are many issues that have to be — do now. there are many issues that have to be done _ do now. there are many issues that have to be done at _ do now. there are many issues that have to be done at the _ do now. there are many issues that have to be done at the moment. i have to be done at the moment. obviously an international investigation into what happened with the plane, that is the priority. but also we need to remember this is not the case about aviation, one flight over belarus is one issue, but the issue is preventing the regime from continuing to do what they are doing. we have been talking about sanctions a lot, but sanctions should be more targeted and painful and should really target those who finance the regime and lukashenko himself and his finances abroad. justice should be imposed, perpetrators should be found. and also on a more political agenda there should be assistance and help for people, for the media, for civil society in belarus inside the
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country, on the ground, and that is something we should remember. we should remember that we have to support people inside the country. we will have to leave it there. we will be talking about what pressure can be put on the belarussian authorities. he must be uppermost in every�*s minds when we talk about sanctions. let s get some of the day s other news. the lead singer of the italian band which won the eurovision song contest has been cleared of drug use. the announcement follows an investigation and a negative drug test, according to the european broadcasting union. damiano david denied taking cocaine following comments on social media that he was leaning over a table during the grand final on saturday. japan has opened mass covid vaccination centres in an effort to speed up the rollout ofjabs two months before the start of the tokyo olympics. the military—run centres in the capital tokyo and osaka, will administer thousands
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of jabs each day. japan is trying to curb a surge in infections. here in the uk a prominent black lives matter activist remains in a critical condition in hospital after being shot in the head in south london. police said there is no evidence that 27 year old sasha johnson was the intended target of the shooting. although she had received death threats in the past. the investigation is continuing. quite a shocking incident over the weekend. it does bear some reflection that gun crime here in the uk is still pretty low. i was looking at the figures today. 33 people killed by a gun in the uk in 2019. we have a problem with knife crimes, of course, 116,000 people injured or killed by knives in 2020. you look at that figure at 33 in 2019 and compare it with the united states at the moment and you have
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had a horrendous weekend with shootings over there this weekend. when you look at the total number, 33 looks tiny compared to the total number of people, thousands of people who have been killed in the us since the beginning of this year in gun crimes. but it does look like this weekend, over 7000 was total for the year, but this weekend was a particularly bad weekend. what depressing about it was was bad because so many children and were killed. there was a six—year—old boy whose mother was driving him to school and there was an incident of road rage, she was on a freeway in california, in la, and a car moved her off and she heard a shot going through her back window and her little boy aidan, who was in the booster seat, six years old, took a bullet in the head and that was it, he died and he was pronounced dead when he was rushed to hospital. all because of road rage. it has been a
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terrible weekend for deaths. i think we have spoken about this before, there was a real uptick in gun sales last year. whether it was because of covid and people were getting stressed and buying guns, there was a spy after the black lives matter protests. there were more guns being bought in the country and there are a lot of guns out there. it was a very bad weekend and a six—year—old boy is dead. for those watching on bbc world news — we'll be right back. the bbc board has announced a review of the corporation's editorial and whistleblowing policies, following lord dyson's report into its 1995 interview with diana, princess of wales. in the house of commons, the media ministerjohn whittingdale told mps that the bbc was a valuable assest but said its reputation had been tarnished and that the report made for shocking reading. it details notjust an appaulling failure to uphold basics to our it details notjust an appalling
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failure to uphold basics to our journalistic standards but also in unwillingness to investigate an unwillingness to investigate complaints and discover the truth. that these failures occurred at our national broadcaster is an even greater source of shame. the new leadership at the bbc deserves credit for setting up an independent inquiry and for accepting its findings in full. however, the reputation of the bbc, its most precious asset has been badly tarnished and it is right that the bbc board and wider leadership now consider urgently how confidence and trust in the corporation can be restored. tomorrow is the one—year anniversary of the murder of george floyd. it is also the deadline president biden had set for congress to agree a major policing reform bill. that deadline will slide, though sponsors of the bill, like congresswoman karen bass,
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are optimistic lawmakers can reach a deal soon. if passed, the bill would change policing in a few significant ways. it bans chokeholds except in life threatening situations. to counter increased militarisation of the police it limits the equipment the department of defence can send to local police departments. and it also aims to end qualified immunity for prosecution for police officers. though that is the issue that appears to be holding up the lawmakers, and it's a tricky one. qualified immunity is a legal doctrine that shields police from civil lawsuits. it prevents victims and families from suing individual officers for alleged civil rights violations. republicans say its the sticking point, democrats say its a potential point of coordination. joining us to discuss is professor khalil gibran muhammad, from the harvard kennedy school, and author of the condemnation of blackness: race, crime, and the making of modern urban america. professor, thank you very much for
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joining us. can we look at the police reform bill going through congress at the moment? at what point could things get taken out of the bill that would basically make it toothless and not particularly worth having?— worth having? that is a great question- _ worth having? that is a great question. there _ worth having? that is a great question. there is _ worth having? that is a great question. there is a - worth having? that is a great question. there is a lot - worth having? that is a great question. there is a lot here | worth having? that is a great - question. there is a lot here that is minimal to what we might consider significant reform. it largely has to do with data transparency, meaning that currently police officers are not required to report uses of force in the vast majority of agencies that exist around the country, and this bill would require that in exchange for federal funding for various things like weapons and pleasing manpower. body cameras would be required in this bill as well as a universal ban onjoe cole's and various legal instruments of force that have proven time and time again to be harmful. as long as those things were made, this would be a minor significant step towards reform. , , ., , , .
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reform. reminders in the years since georae reform. reminders in the years since george floyd — reform. reminders in the years since george floyd was _ reform. reminders in the years since george floyd was killed _ reform. reminders in the years since george floyd was killed in _ george floyd was killed in minneapolis have we seen any meaningful reform by individual police departments, even if not yet at the federal level? we police departments, even if not yet at the federal level?— at the federal level? we have seen chances at the federal level? we have seen changes happening _ at the federal level? we have seen changes happening in _ at the federal level? we have seen changes happening in a _ at the federal level? we have seen changes happening in a number- at the federal level? we have seen changes happening in a number of| changes happening in a number of agencies around the country. they remain the minority. some of those changes include removal of traffic violation enforcement from policing, essentially to decriminalise traffic violations for the time being. some of it has been to increase the use of it has been to increase the use of social workers or community health workers for various mental health workers for various mental health or drug—related crises. that can run the gamut of police initiated, or 911 dispatchers riding those calls to those service providers by passing the place altogether. we have seen increased funding from the biden administration for public health intervention in community violence. this is a proven and effective way of preventing gun violence before it
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happens. we of preventing gun violence before it ha ens. ~ ., of preventing gun violence before it ha ens. ~ . ., ., of preventing gun violence before it ha- -ens. ~ ., ., ., ., ., of preventing gun violence before it hauens. ., ., ., ., ., , happens. we have had a lot of people on the programme — happens. we have had a lot of people on the programme this _ happens. we have had a lot of people on the programme this last _ happens. we have had a lot of people on the programme this last year, - on the programme this last year, particularly african americans, who talk about the root of the problem and they point to aid them and us style of policing, that policing in america is not about policing for all. do you see it that way? is there anything that you can ever do with reform that gets to the root problem? i with reform that gets to the root roblem? ., , ., ., problem? i do see it that way. i am an historian — problem? i do see it that way. i am an historian of— problem? i do see it that way. i am an historian of policing _ problem? i do see it that way. i am an historian of policing and - problem? i do see it that way. i am an historian of policing and i - an historian of policing and i understand that practice and policies that are in place today, while they have changed over a decade, they do share something in common, which is that they allow maximum discretion for law enforcement to treat members of low income communities, overwhelmingly black and brown, as would be suspects. when you have a system like that, you are bound to see the abuse of that discretion and the abuse of that discretion and the abuse of that discretion and the abuse of that discretion coupled with the abuse of force is why we are having this conversation in the first place. there is the
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possibility for change and those things look like more stringent accountability, as well as subpoena power for citizen review boards, accountability, as well as subpoena powerfor citizen review boards, the very things a lot of union police agencies in the united states are fighting tooth and nail to keep out of reform today. the fighting tooth and nail to keep out of reform today.— of reform today. the president is invitin: of reform today. the president is inviting the _ of reform today. the president is inviting the family _ of reform today. the president is inviting the family of _ of reform today. the president is inviting the family of george - of reform today. the president is l inviting the family of george floyd to the white house tomorrow to mark the anniversary. there is no bill on his desk to sign. he does have the pulpit. has he spoken loudly enough? that is a good question. i think thatjoe biden has said more in the office of the presidency to critique both white supremacy and the relationship of white supremacy to our pleasing problem than any president in history. to that he should be credited and particularly the members of his administration. but he is going to hit a point when the rubber meets the road and that is will he spend his political
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capital to ensure that we get the hard—wired changes that the federal government can support but not entirely control? we have a system where 18,000 entirely control? we have a system where18,000 agencies are primarily controlled by local and state authorities.— controlled by local and state authorities. ., , ., ., controlled by local and state authorities. ., ., authorities. really good to have you on the programme. _ authorities. really good to have you on the programme. thank— authorities. really good to have you on the programme. thank you. - authorities. really good to have you on the programme. thank you. the | authorities. really good to have you - on the programme. thank you. the one thing it has done, and we will talk about it tomorrow because it is the anniversary tomorrow, is it shone a light on those who did not get justice. we have talked about so many of them over the last year and to me that is the most shocking thing, how many of them there are even after george floyd. it is thing, how many of them there are even after george floyd.— even after george floyd. it is still ha enin: even after george floyd. it is still happening at _ even after george floyd. it is still happening at the _ even after george floyd. it is still happening at the moment - even after george floyd. it is still happening at the moment and - even after george floyd. it is still happening at the moment and it | even after george floyd. it is still| happening at the moment and it is making people much more aware of just how often this happens, not just how often this happens, not just trial around derek chauvin, but theissue just trial around derek chauvin, but the issue of cameras and people are filming much more, the public are stepping up, as we saw in the george floyd case, are stepping up and they are not afraid to show those videos. that is having a big effect on policing.
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here in washington the press corps have seen some tangible evidence today that we're making progress against the pandemic. this is a selfie from the white house briefing room which, for the first time in more than a year, is at 50% capacity. that's 2a seats out of a possible 48. look at that picture. the bosses are like that. look at that, in the ring, an unmistakable figure of our anthony. it ring, an unmistakable figure of our anthon . ., , , ring, an unmistakable figure of our anthon . . , , ., ., ring, an unmistakable figure of our anthon. , ., ., anthony. it has been over a year since that _ anthony. it has been over a year since that room _ anthony. it has been over a year since that room was _ anthony. it has been over a year since that room was that - anthony. it has been over a year l since that room was that crowded. you almost have to go all the way back to super tuesday. i5 you almost have to go all the way back to super tuesday. is it you almost have to go all the way back to super tuesday.— back to super tuesday. is it that lona ? back to super tuesday. is it that long? and _ back to super tuesday. is it that long? and here _ back to super tuesday. is it that long? and here he _ back to super tuesday. is it that long? and here he is— back to super tuesday. is it that long? and here he is again - back to super tuesday. is it that long? and here he is again in i back to super tuesday. is it that l long? and here he is again in the briefin: long? and here he is again in the briefing room _ long? and here he is again in the briefing room itself. _ long? and here he is again in the briefing room itself. i _ long? and here he is again in the briefing room itself. i am - long? and here he is again in the briefing room itself. i am not - briefing room itself. iam not saying that you are the reason that very few people have been allowed in. you turn up, you go into the briefing room, you leave, and the place empties out for a year. i am not saying it is cause and effect.
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look how big i am. look how far i am. look at that, a year ago. we will discuss _ am. look at that, a year ago. we will discuss it, _ am. look at that, a year ago. - will discuss it, ok, but not now. let's start with a little bit of good news, the weather towards the end of this week bucks the trend for what we have seen so far this month. and things are looking a good deal drier. we got high pressure on the weather chart and because it's to the east of us we will also be drawing in something a little bit warmer. temperatures across the uk a bit more typical of where they should be at the end of may. bear that in mind if you do get caught by some of the downpours that will be around again on tuesday. slightly different areas and that does mean for some of us where it is but on monday it will be drier. at the moment still got some
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of the downpours around from earlier on and through the night for the operas of rain passed in scotland, especially but clear skies to the south and west we will see some of the lowest temperatures into the morning. a chilly start for some of you but a brighter start across southern counties of england, wales and into northern ireland. so plenty of cloud in scotland and other england and its ear with the focus of showers before coming heavy and thundery and a few showers the restaurant in scotland a much brighter and milder day that we saw through monday. that's even with a northerly wind. bit of a breeze coming from the north and northwest of that we will finish the days down here without breaks of longest rolls of rain spending towards the channel islands into the evening. fading off into northern france for the night into wednesday. stills to the east of us
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in a cool breeze blowing down eastern parts of scotland is here with her would be the focus for the heaviest of the afternoon showers. it will climb a bit further as we head further into thursday, area of high pressure trying to build but not strong enough to keep this weather front at bay. that will bring some spells of rain into ireland and turning away in northern ireland through the day with some heavy rain and gusty winds. the rain in western fringes but much of scotland will stay dry and temperatures a bit more widely into the upper teens. getting closer to where we should be and that trend continues as we go through friday and into the bank holiday weekend. not completely dry but there will be a lot more in the way of dry weather around and as i said it will certainly feel a little bit warmer than it has done so far.
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you re watching bbc news with me katty kay in washington, christian fraser is in london. our top stories... the uk and other nations are banning flights to and from belarus, after the country's government forced a ryanair flight to land in minsk. they arrested a 26—year—old journalist. a video has emerged of roman protasevich, in which he admits to organising mass disorder. his supporters say the confession was coerced. also in the programme... trying to keep the peace. the us secretary of state is on his way to the middle east, to try to help keep the ceasefire between israel and hamas intact. and, victory at any age tastes as sweet. phil mickelson is the latest to join the ranks of older athletes at the top of their game. we'll look at how they do it.
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27 eu leaders have been holding a round table meeting tonight in brussels to discuss their response to the state hijacking of the ryan air flight over belarus. the new measures may target those individuals involved in the forced landing of the plane, as well as sanctions on the belarusian aviation sector. earlier the eu commission president ursula von der lyon told reporters a three—billion—euro investment package for belarus will remain on hold and will be frozen until the country becomes democratic. it is tricky however. how do you punish a country like belarus, without forcing it into the warm embrace of the russians? we are joined by the conservative mp tom tugenhadt, chair of the foreign affairs select committee. that is really the concern that if
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you push too hard you push minsk and belarus further towards moscow. i have to say it's quite difficult to imagine — have to say it's quite difficult to imagine how much father you can push them _ imagine how much father you can push them its— imagine how much father you can push them. it's already a satellite of russia — them. it's already a satellite of russia. and lukashenko is only in power— russia. and lukashenko is only in power because putin keeps her there is a puppet — power because putin keeps her there is a puppet. i'm not sure a kick to start_ is a puppet. i'm not sure a kick to start seriously. on the ground it's already— start seriously. on the ground it's already happened.— start seriously. on the ground it's already happened. obviously, there's been a lot of— already happened. obviously, there's been a lot of talk _ already happened. obviously, there's been a lot of talk about _ already happened. obviously, there's been a lot of talk about putting - been a lot of talk about putting pressure on lukashenko evidence the election. there've been sections and withholding money. it doesn't seem as though it's losing his grip on power in fact quite the reverse. he's been there for 26 years. so he doesn't _ he's been there for 26 years. so he doesn't have — he's been there for 26 years. so he doesn't have a whole power through a mixture _ doesn't have a whole power through a mixture of— doesn't have a whole power through a mixture of brutality and corruption. and he _ mixture of brutality and corruption. and he started very effectively. the reality— and he started very effectively. the reality is _ and he started very effectively. the reality is we have and push the right— reality is we have and push the right triggers. if we actually want to take _ right triggers. if we actually want to take action there are two things we must _ to take action there are two things we must do. the first is we must expose _ we must do. the first is we must expose the — we must do. the first is we must expose the level of corruption. we must _ expose the level of corruption. we must be _ expose the level of corruption. we must be having news outlets like yours _ must be having news outlets like yours reporting that he's got $100 million _ yours reporting that he's got $100 million here and hundred million dollars— million here and hundred million dollars bear and various bank
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accounts _ dollars bear and various bank accounts around the world. the other thing _ accounts around the world. the other thing we _ accounts around the world. the other thing we got to do is switch off the taps _ thing we got to do is switch off the taps that — thing we got to do is switch off the taps. that means freezing the amount energy— taps. that means freezing the amount energy pipeline and because it's being _ energy pipeline and because it's being built at the moment stopping the north— being built at the moment stopping the north stream to pipeline which is merely— the north stream to pipeline which is merely a way of allowing russia to along _ is merely a way of allowing russia to along eastern europe. 30 is merely a way of allowing russia to along eastern europe.- is merely a way of allowing russia to along eastern europe. so what is the im act to along eastern europe. so what is the impact then _ to along eastern europe. so what is the impact then of _ to along eastern europe. so what is the impact then of banning - to along eastern europe. so what is the impact then of banning flights l the impact then of banning flights from both the eu and uk into belarus and belarussian flights out again? the first purpose of that is to protect — the first purpose of that is to protect their citizens. when i get the letter— protect their citizens. when i get the letter together yesterday with senator _ the letter together yesterday with senator bob mendez of the united states— senator bob mendez of the united states and germany and france and lithuania, _ states and germany and france and lithuania, latvia, france, italyi can keep — lithuania, latvia, france, italyi can keep going. all the chairs of foreign — can keep going. all the chairs of foreign affairs committees of various— foreign affairs committees of various parliaments. it was because we want _ various parliaments. it was because we want to— various parliaments. it was because we want to protect our citizens. it's we want to protect our citizens. it's clearly _ we want to protect our citizens. it's clearly a very, very dangerous thing _ it's clearly a very, very dangerous thing to— it's clearly a very, very dangerous thing to do— it's clearly a very, very dangerous thing to do now to overflight belarus _ thing to do now to overflight belarus was up even if you haven't offended _ belarus was up even if you haven't offended the belarussian leader or chris hasn't assessed two offended the belarussian leader today it's
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possible — the belarussian leader today it's possible the person in the seat next to last _ possible the person in the seat next to last if _ possible the person in the seat next to last. if he's willing to scramble fighter— to last. if he's willing to scramble fighterjust to interest step the aircraft — fighterjust to interest step the aircraft you are on —— intercept then— aircraft you are on —— intercept then he — aircraft you are on —— intercept then he is— aircraft you are on —— intercept then he is you are in danger. putin shot— then he is you are in danger. putin shot down— then he is you are in danger. putin shot down a — then he is you are in danger. putin shot down a malaysian civilian airliner — shot down a malaysian civilian airliner seven years ago killing hundreds— airliner seven years ago killing hundreds of civilians including hundreds of civilians including hundreds of civilians including hundreds of dutch citizens. this is in an— hundreds of dutch citizens. this is in an empty— hundreds of dutch citizens. this is in an empty threat this is a very real threat— in an empty threat this is a very real threat for all of us. meanwhile mr putin and _ real threat for all of us. meanwhile mr putin and mr— real threat for all of us. meanwhile mr putin and mr lukashenko - real threat for all of us. meanwhile mr putin and mr lukashenko are i real threat for all of us. meanwhile i mr putin and mr lukashenko are still in power. what you think realistically that chances are that there will be a coordinated response from the european union, the united kingdom and the united states? that would actually have any meaningful reaction in being sort moscow? i think it could. a portion of belarussian trade is arm of the european — belarussian trade is arm of the european union. as of the european union _ european union. as of the european union does — european union. as of the european union does have strong influence. a lot of— union does have strong influence. a lot of the _ union does have strong influence. a lot of the dissidents and the lithuanian people are hosting them very generously to give them a platform — very generously to give them a platform to one day one hopes liberate — platform to one day one hopes liberate their own country. i think
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there _ liberate their own country. i think there are — liberate their own country. i think there are many things that we can do. there are many things that we can do the _ there are many things that we can do. the prime thing we got to do is expose _ do. the prime thing we got to do is expose the — do. the prime thing we got to do is expose the corruption and switch off the taps _ expose the corruption and switch off the taps. we can do that. all of that is— the taps. we can do that. all of that is within our power. it's a matter— that is within our power. it's a matter of— that is within our power. it's a matter of choice of whether we do it or not _ matter of choice of whether we do it or not. , ., , , , matter of choice of whether we do it ornot. , ., _ ,., matter of choice of whether we do it ornot. , ., _ .., or not. obviously, there is an echo with the ball _ or not. obviously, there is an echo with the ball only _ or not. obviously, there is an echo with the ball only in _ or not. obviously, there is an echo with the ball only in russia. - or not. obviously, there is an echo with the ball only in russia. and i with the ball only in russia. and his big danger that come tomorrow the world moves on and we turn our attention away and i wonder how you send the message that they are responsible for his safety. does it need to be more explicit? is the message from the eu leaders that goes out tonight need to be more explicit? i goes out tonight need to be more exlicit? ~' ., , ., explicit? ithink it does. iwould like to see _ explicit? ithink it does. iwould like to see charges _ explicit? ithink it does. iwould like to see charges being - explicit? i think it does. i would i like to see charges being brought explicit? i think it does. i would - like to see charges being brought in the international court ofjustice against — the international court ofjustice against the governor, holding him responsible for take two state terror — responsible for take two state terror which is all the signatories to the _ terror which is all the signatories to the letter declared head happen, a form _ to the letter declared head happen, a form of— to the letter declared head happen, a form of piracy that a gamma hijacking — a form of piracy that a gamma hijacking is now kidnapping. and indeed _ hijacking is now kidnapping. and indeed has become a form of hostage
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puppetry— indeed has become a form of hostage puppetry with him being used to effectively denounce himself. i think— effectively denounce himself. i think there is more that we can do and i_ think there is more that we can do and i would — think there is more that we can do and i would like to see the governments turning to the international court ofjustice and international court of justice and making — international court of justice and making it — international court ofjustice and making it up absolutely clear to mr lukashenko that he is personally responsible for the threat of violence _ responsible for the threat of violence for this aircraft and in direct— violence for this aircraft and in direct violation of the chicago agreement on civil aviation. and that he — agreement on civil aviation. and that he is— agreement on civil aviation. and that he is personally liable for the protection — that he is personally liable for the protection and while being for him. in protection and while being for him. in the _ protection and while being for him. in the same — protection and while being for him. in the same way that mr putin is personally— in the same way that mr putin is personally liable for alexa no von lee personally liable for alexa no von lee who _ personally liable for alexa no von lee who was poisoned under pollutants orders and is now been charged _ pollutants orders and is now been charged and imprisoned for the two surviving _ charged and imprisoned for the two surviving in — charged and imprisoned for the two surviving in his assassination attempt _ surviving in his assassination attempt for the president of russia. thank you very much for joining forjoining us. president biden has announced that the us secretary of state, antony blinken, is heading to the middle east to build on the ceasefire between the israelis and hamas and to lay the groundwork for an
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eventual resumption of peace talks. his visit comes as both sides count the cost of the recent conflicts which claimed the lives of more than 250 people. which claimed the lives of more than 250 --eole. m, which claimed the lives of more than 250 --eole. n,, ., which claimed the lives of more than 250 people-— 250 people. most of them were in gaza. a young man and seven children were killed. theirfamilies blame it is really strike but that he is greatly say the likelihood was that they were killed by a policy of rocket. i morning, his report does contain extremely distressing images. it’s extremely distressing images. it's not big enough to have a proper name. luckily this place is called the end of mass oedema street. it could be idyllic. but this is gaza around 800 metres from the boundary wire with israel. around the 10th of may the first day of the war at around 630 in the evening it turned into a small corner of hell. you can hear the shot as he says god is
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greatest. and then children, children. then motter and massacre, a new massacre. —— martyr. he lays his dead seven—year—old son next to the body of his other boy who was 11. in all seven children and a young man of 21 were killed. this is yusuf like all the bereaved parents he said the dead were martyrs for jerusalem killed by israel. he accepted condolences the traditional way. his brother still wounded and hospital had three killed. mohammed, use of surviving son said nothing and just listen.
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their homes were a shell during 11 days of war. by then the community had fled. israel says it has no record of a strike at the time of that first attack. it says it's
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assessment is that a palestinian rocket aimed at israel dropped short of its target. the family showed as shrapnel they said was from the bomb. independent experts to see these photos say they are fragments of airdropped precision munitions not palestinian rockets. the two sides will not agree. another family and the village is morning a son. abraham has a a over 60 and his father says israel broke their hearts and made them hate their lives when they took his boy. the eldest son mohammed show me their homes. ibrahim was working to
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pay for him to study. the women were in the garden never leaving abrahams mother alone with her grief. more people arrived to offer condolences. palestinians don't believe israel's insistence that it works hard not to kill civilians. warning them to get out before some raise like the ones that destroyed this path. as in the previous rounds of fighting between israel and hamas
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the cease—fire is a pause. the conflict is notjust unresolved it is not even frozen. so conflict is notjust unresolved it is not even frozen.— conflict is notjust unresolved it is not even frozen. so many children in gaza, i is not even frozen. so many children in gaza. i can _ is not even frozen. so many children in gaza, i can tell— is not even frozen. so many children in gaza, i can tell you, _ is not even frozen. so many children in gaza, i can tell you, i've - is not even frozen. so many children in gaza, i can tell you, i've been - in gaza, i can tell you, i've been there. such a young community and so terrible to see those devastations when the bombs lead land in such crowded neighborhoods. such crowded neighborhoods. let's cross to jerusalem now and speak to our colleague laura trevelyan. they look at anthony blinking come into the malaise in the malaise and asked, what can he do? it’s into the malaise in the malaise and asked, what can he do?— asked, what can he do? it's a very aood asked, what can he do? it's a very good question- — asked, what can he do? it's a very good question. and _ asked, what can he do? it's a very good question. and definitely - asked, what can he do? it's a very good question. and definitely in i good question. and definitely in washington where caddy is expectations are being downplayed. the idea _ expectations are being downplayed. the idea senior officials say in washington this is about trying to stabilise — washington this is about trying to stabilise and underpin the cease—fire. no grand plan to restart
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talks towards the two state solution other— talks towards the two state solution other than _ talks towards the two state solution other than theory that is still the -oal other than theory that is still the goal of— other than theory that is still the goal of the biden administration. this is— goal of the biden administration. this is about upholding the cease—fire, getting aid into gaza. by cease—fire, getting aid into gaza. by the _ cease—fire, getting aid into gaza. by the way, the way, the situation is so _ by the way, the way, the situation is so fragile — by the way, the way, the situation is so fragile that injerusalem today— is so fragile that injerusalem today two israelis were stabbed, the suspect— today two israelis were stabbed, the suspect was immediately killed by the police. there is such intercommunal tension on the streets after that— intercommunal tension on the streets after that it _ intercommunal tension on the streets after that 11 day conflict. hamas may have — after that 11 day conflict. hamas may have stopped firing rockets, the israeli _ may have stopped firing rockets, the israeli air— may have stopped firing rockets, the israeli air force. dropping balls but tensions are running so high now between _ but tensions are running so high now between dues and between arrows. in this basic— between dues and between arrows. in this basic question of how you share disputed _ this basic question of how you share disputed terror brought to the territory— disputed terror brought to the territory is utterly unresolved. you show pictures _ territory is utterly unresolved. m. show pictures like that and naturally as her tear up the fabric of israeli society as well. you look at the polls and the first polls out tuesday and israeli public think it didn't go far enough, it wasn't long enough, it didn't do enough damage. interesting isn't it because
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benjamin netanyahu is very much a nationalist — benjamin netanyahu is very much a nationalist israeli leader. he is currently— nationalist israeli leader. he is currently fighting for his political future _ currently fighting for his political future. the opposition have a month in which _ future. the opposition have a month in which you — future. the opposition have a month in which you form a coalition against _ in which you form a coalition against them. the deadline runs out next week — against them. the deadline runs out next week. the theory was that this campaign _ next week. the theory was that this campaign would have really shored up his position _ campaign would have really shored up his position. the fact is, the mayors— his position. the fact is, the mayors of— his position. the fact is, the mayors of the southern israeli towns who are _ mayors of the southern israeli towns who are right there in the firing line. _ who are right there in the firing line. they— who are right there in the firing line, they feel that in effect he surrendered to hamas by stopping this campaign. yes, this is left israelis — this campaign. yes, this is left israelis dissatisfied but it's empowered hamas. and for the biden administration which wants to reconstruct gaza using the palestinian authority and not hamas, this is— palestinian authority and not hamas, this is very— palestinian authority and not hamas, this is very difficult to see how that would happen in practice when hamas— that would happen in practice when hamas is— that would happen in practice when hamas is empowered at the palestinians weak to nonexistent and gaza _ palestinians weak to nonexistent and gaza at— palestinians weak to nonexistent and gaza. at the biden administration can't _ gaza. at the biden administration can't work— gaza. at the biden administration can't work directly with hamas because — can't work directly with hamas because they don't talk to them and they don't— because they don't talk to them and they don't want the aid to be followed _ they don't want the aid to be followed so hamas make more rockets. it's a followed so hamas make more rockets. it's a reat— followed so hamas make more rockets. it's a real conundrum. laura, we saw
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the important role that egypt played in bringing this current cease—fire into being. it's interesting that tony blanket is going to go notjust tojerusalem and also the west bank is also good to go to cairo and jordan as well and meet with leaders there. it is washington, the white house thinking let's try ambling in king abdullah president cc and hope that they can outsource the at least near term of middle east stability to those two neighbours? remember president biden _ to those two neighbours? remember president biden used _ to those two neighbours? remember president biden used to _ to those two neighbours? remember president biden used to call - to those two neighbours? remember president biden used to call him - president biden used to call him trump's — president biden used to call him trump's favourite dictator. it is the biden— trump's favourite dictator. it is the biden administration tries to steer— the biden administration tries to steer things back to the more usual let's have _ steer things back to the more usual let's have a — steer things back to the more usual let's have a two state solution, even _ let's have a two state solution, even though that seems tricky, the egyptians— even though that seems tricky, the egyptians are gay because they're the only— egyptians are gay because they're the only people that can talk to israel— the only people that can talk to israel and hamas. they broke at the cease-fire. — israel and hamas. they broke at the cease—fire, it's that the egyptians that are _ cease—fire, it's that the egyptians that are doing the legwork now. they were in— that are doing the legwork now. they were in gaza two days ago, west bank today~ _ were in gaza two days ago, west bank today. they're the ones trying to work _ today. they're the ones trying to work out — today. they're the ones trying to work out the details and who's
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agreed — work out the details and who's agreed but for what. the jordanians are key _ agreed but for what. the jordanians are key. because they control the al-agsa _ are key. because they control the al—aqsa mosques compound which is in these _ al—aqsa mosques compound which is in these disputed territory right in these disputed territory right in the heart — these disputed territory right in the heart of it. dues say it's on the heart of it. dues say it's on the side — the heart of it. dues say it's on the side of— the heart of it. dues say it's on the side of the temple mount, their most _ the side of the temple mount, their most holy— the side of the temple mount, their most holy site. the al—aqsa mosque is the _ most holy site. the al—aqsa mosque is the third _ most holy site. the al—aqsa mosque is the third holiest and it's there recently— is the third holiest and it's there recently there have been clashes with palestinians feeling that the israelis _ with palestinians feeling that the israelis are encroaching way too much _ israelis are encroaching way too much on — israelis are encroaching way too much on it— israelis are encroaching way too much on it allowing visitors in there — much on it allowing visitors in there from israel. you are not allowed — there from israel. you are not allowed to— there from israel. you are not allowed to pray there is a due but there _ allowed to pray there is a due but there are — allowed to pray there is a due but there are more more visits by orthodox— there are more more visits by orthodox dues which is causing all of the _ orthodox dues which is causing all of the center. i think you're exactly— of the center. i think you're exactly right. if the jordanian, some — exactly right. if the jordanian, some creative solution can be found for the _ some creative solution can be found for the al—aqsa mosque, the egyptians can they work out the detail— egyptians can they work out the detail of— egyptians can they work out the detail of the seas file while the americans bring in the cash for gaza, _ americans bring in the cash for gaza, this _ americans bring in the cash for gaza, this i _ americans bring in the cash for gaza, this i think it's a theory behind — gaza, this i think it's a theory behind secretary blinken visit. thank— behind secretary blinken visit. thank you for your coverage of the last few days. stay with us on bbc news, still to come...
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they say youth is wasted on the young. well, it seems the older among us are doing just fine. how golfer phil mickelson and others are turning back the clock. a vigil has taken place for a prominent black lives matter activist who's in a critical condition after being shot in the head in south london. 27—year—old sasha johnson had been attending a gathering when the shooting happened in the early hours of sunday morning police said there is no evidence that she was the intended target of the shooting. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. as they gathered together, praying and reflecting on the shocking events of the weekend, their message was clear. today, friends and family held a vigil for mother of two sasha johnson, the latest victim of a gun attack in south london, in a critical
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condition in hospital. the 27—year—old black lives matter campaigner had been at a party in peckham when she was shot in the head in the early hours of sunday morning. the political party she's a member of, the taking the initiative party, said she'd received a number of death threats in the past. but police say there is no evidence that she was the target of the shooting. thank you all for coming today. i appreciate it. sasha johnson is a tireless antiracism activist. she organised the black lives matter protest in oxford last summer and has spoken about living in a more equal society, where her sons would be accepted. friends say she is never afraid to call out injustice. i've seen her, because i worked alongside her as a youth worker in wolvercote and the way that she just interacts, when you see her in her youth work,
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young people cleave to her, she is like a magnet. so, yeah, yeah. tonight, she remains in hospital after undergoing successful surgery, with her parents by her side. adina campbell, bbc news. on sunday, at a mere 50 years of age, phil mickelson won his sixth major, the us pga championship, and in doing so he became the oldest major winner of all time. it takes me about five holes to warm up on a saturday and i am a7, so there was this perceived wisdom out there that an athlete's powerfades, drains away, as they get older, not that i am an athlete. but this win, phil mickelson's towering performance on sunday, has given us all reason to hope. he has freed us all from the shackles of old age.
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some of us... so what are the secrets to staying in your prime? is it a disciplined diet, a steely mentality, freak genetics? to discuss it we're joined by dr michael lardon, he is a sports psychiatrist who has worked with phil mickelson in the past and who helped win the british open in 2013. thank you very much forjoining us. he stormed the field, 50 years of age, i'm a little over 50, christians a little under 15 were both looking at them thinking, how did he do it? itrefoil both looking at them thinking, how did he do it?— did he do it? well phil is amazing. he actually — did he do it? well phil is amazing. he actually hits _ did he do it? well phil is amazing. he actually hits the _ did he do it? well phil is amazing. he actually hits the ball— did he do it? well phil is amazing. he actually hits the ball further. he actually hits the ball further now that — he actually hits the ball further now that he did maybe even 20 years a-o. now that he did maybe even 20 years ago~ but— now that he did maybe even 20 years ago but we — now that he did maybe even 20 years ago. but we sort of think of it like the tom _ ago. but we sort of think of it like the tom brady, he's a famous american _ the tom brady, he's a famous american quarterback that as we live longer, _ american quarterback that as we live longer, we _ american quarterback that as we live longer, we get smarter and phil watches — longer, we get smarter and phil watches his diet, he does a lot of mindfulness, his training is excellent. and he has an ability to
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be childlike and passionate with what _ be childlike and passionate with what he — be childlike and passionate with what he does so he's raise the bar as he _ what he does so he's raise the bar as he goes— what he does so he's raise the bar as he goes it doesn't really see a ban _ as he goes it doesn't really see a ban in_ as he goes it doesn't really see a ban in that — as he goes it doesn't really see a bar. in that and 50, i have to play in the _ bar. in that and 50, i have to play in the signator. he 51 and here will be 51_ in the signator. he 51 and here will be 51 shortly and he can win eight major— be 51 shortly and he can win eight major with— be 51 shortly and he can win eight major with all the young guys. so it really— major with all the young guys. so it really is _ major with all the young guys. so it really is phenomenal and it's inspiring _ really is phenomenal and it's inspiring to all of us. obviously, he's an exception _ inspiring to all of us. obviously, he's an exception and _ inspiring to all of us. obviously, he's an exception and in - inspiring to all of us. obviously, - he's an exception and in exceptional athlete. but is there a sense when you talk about diet and mindfulness. is there a sense that what making strides in our physical body so that actually were going to see more older athletes winning championships? brute older athletes winning championships? older athletes winning cham--ionshis? ~ . ., older athletes winning cham--ionshis? ~ ., . , championships? we are and let me see that the au championships? we are and let me see that the guy say — championships? we are and let me see that the guy say the — championships? we are and let me see that the guy say the mind _ championships? we are and let me see that the guy say the mind and - championships? we are and let me see that the guy say the mind and the - that the guy say the mind and the body— that the guy say the mind and the body they— that the guy say the mind and the body they are intertwined. those things _ body they are intertwined. those things really go together. and when you learn— things really go together. and when you learn to meditate, be mindful you learn to meditate, be mindful you experience less stress, less anxiety— you experience less stress, less anxiety and that lit leads to better longevity — anxiety and that lit leads to better longevity. better physical overall
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condition. we say the 50 is the new 40, condition. we say the 50 is the new 40. right? — condition. we say the 50 is the new 40, right? so with phil he is really demonstrating that's possible. and it's more _ demonstrating that's possible. and it's more than the magic that he has but obviously that is in an important piece of it. but there are a lot of— important piece of it. but there are a lot of great players that come in their— a lot of great players that come in their late — a lot of great players that come in their late 40s they sort of peter l. here _ their late 40s they sort of peter l. here is _ their late 40s they sort of peter l. here is something really a shining li-ht here is something really a shining light for— here is something really a shining light for many of us and many great athletes _ light for many of us and many great athletes as— light for many of us and many great athletes as they age. he light for many of us and many great athletes as they age.— athletes as they age. he was asked in a recent interview _ athletes as they age. he was asked in a recent interview whether - athletes as they age. he was asked in a recent interview whether it - in a recent interview whether it gets easier as you get older. he said you gets easier when you get older because you care less. i imagine with him as he is success it does get easier. i wonder watching his interview last night whether there's been a psychological breakthrough for him that he can still win a major at that age. is that a significant breakthrough? when he says he cares less i think you have — when he says he cares less i think you have to— when he says he cares less i think you have to really be careful as to what _ you have to really be careful as to what he _ you have to really be careful as to what he cares less about. he cares
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less about — what he cares less about. he cares less about where he is on the rating list and _ less about where he is on the rating list and how— less about where he is on the rating list and how people perceive them. he is— list and how people perceive them. he is an _ list and how people perceive them. he is an iconic player, made lots of money— he is an iconic player, made lots of money but — he is an iconic player, made lots of money but he cares a great deal, even _ money but he cares a great deal, even more — money but he cares a great deal, even more so now than before about each and _ even more so now than before about each and every day how he takes care of himself _ each and every day how he takes care of himself. so he sort of caring about— of himself. so he sort of caring about different things that do allow him to— about different things that do allow him to perform better. what was part of your— him to perform better. what was part of your question? i�*m him to perform better. what was part of your question?— of your question? i'm sorry. i wonder if— of your question? i'm sorry. i wonder if there _ of your question? i'm sorry. i wonder if there is _ of your question? i'm sorry. i wonder if there is a _ of your question? i'm sorry. i - wonder if there is a psychological breakthrough as well. he goes to the us open and amongst time he's won that course in california a couple of times, he's been set six times in the us open. a bit of a hoodoo there. i wonder if what happened last night that convinces him that he can actually go out and win another major at this age. phil he can actually go out and win another major at this age. another ma'or at this age. phil is the -e another ma'or at this age. phil is the type of— another major at this age. phil is the type of individual— another major at this age. phil is the type of individual that - another major at this age. phil is the type of individual that has i another major at this age. phil is | the type of individual that has not played _ the type of individual that has not played that well of late. it most athletes — played that well of late. it most athletes with a go boy, i'm on the way out —
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athletes with a go boy, i'm on the way out he — athletes with a go boy, i'm on the way out. he never thinks in that way _ way out. he never thinks in that way in — way out. he never thinks in that way in part— way out. he never thinks in that way. in part because he's never on the way— way. in part because he's never on the way out, — way. in part because he's never on the way out, he always sees himself getting _ the way out, he always sees himself getting better. and so coming into the us— getting better. and so coming into the us open that's a different beast for him _ the us open that's a different beast for him a _ the us open that's a different beast for him a little bit because he hasn't — for him a little bit because he hasn't one as you said second place six times _ hasn't one as you said second place six times i— hasn't one as you said second place six times. i think the most important thing for him to do is really— important thing for him to do is really deal with now and stay focused _ really deal with now and stay focused on the day—to—day, today, let's not _ focused on the day—to—day, today, let's not make the us open bigger than it— let's not make the us open bigger than it is— let's not make the us open bigger than it is although it will give him the grand — than it is although it will give him the grand slam. and he can do it. thank— the grand slam. and he can do it. thank you — the grand slam. and he can do it. thank you very much forjoining us. it was a fantastic. 50 is a new 40 which means that 56 is the new 46 which means that 56 is the new 46 which means that 56 is the new 46 which means arm a year younger than you are. which means arm a year younger than ou are. ., �* , which means arm a year younger than ou are. ., h which means arm a year younger than ouare. . h . ., you are. that's called creative mathematics. _ you are. that's called creative mathematics. you _ you are. that's called creative mathematics. you wouldn't i you are. that's called creative | mathematics. you wouldn't be you are. that's called creative - mathematics. you wouldn't be able to mark the golf cart that's for sure. maybe i'll get you to fill in my scorecard and maybe i can win a major as well. h0 scorecard and maybe i can win a major as well.— scorecard and maybe i can win a major as well. no because maybe it
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only happens _ major as well. no because maybe it only happens in _ major as well. no because maybe it only happens in america, _ major as well. no because maybe it only happens in america, right? - major as well. no because maybe it only happens in america, right? it i only happens in america, right? it doesn't happen in the uk. you haven't lost as many there. i got ten years because you know... so clearly. hello. let's be honest, weatherfor the week has not made the best of viewing this month so far. if you are fed up of the rain and there has been plenty of it and the need of something a little bit sunnier and a little bit warmer, a little bit more like this there is a touch more optimism in the forecast tonight. but it does come with a few caveats. ok, we've got high—pressure building across. that replaces the area of low pressure which is dominated so far. and it will keep things relatively dry. but as you see there still a chance of the few spots of rain around what you'll also notice across the board after chilli month so far temperatures getting closer to where it should be in may. a drier and warmer story on the way later in the week. so bear that in mind as we take on what's can happen over the next few days. area of low pressure to the east of us for
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tuesday that's what brought the downpours on monday, the persistent rain in scotland. the persistent rain is gone but still plenty of showers across scotland and later into northern england, north midlands and part of linkage and east midlands where we could catch the odd rumble of thunder. brightening up across northern ireland feeling warmer across scotland later. northern ireland wales thomas by and large having a drier and warmer day that we saw on monday. but towards cornwall more persistent rain to end the day. it could affect evan as well and then spread towards the channel islands in the evening before clearing author tuesday night into wednesday into northern france and belgium. low pressure is still sitting to the east of us. that does being a chilly wind down eastern parts of scotland, in eastern england through wednesday. it's here where we are more likely to see the downpours, some of those in the afternoon could be thundery. across southern and western areas varying amounts of clouds, sunny spells on shower but most places will be dry. we have got some pretty strong sunshine over there it is may after all. we could say temperatures in
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the mid teens more widely across western areas. in truth there is a a ridge of high pressure tries to build across. it's not strong enough at this stage to stop weather fronts pushy and across ireland bringing more persistent rain to northern ireland later in the day and maybe across some very far western fringes of britain. much of scotland, england and wales will have a predominantly dry day after around 18 or 19 degrees in some spots of the country. it will feel much water do not want of them has. high pressure then builds a cross and that really stops too much in the way rain things are drive through the day but the weather front is stuck there and that does mean there will be varying amounts of cloud, a few show started around on friday not a completely dry day and not a completely sunny day. best of the sunshine made out towards the west of ireland and southeast england. as we go through into the start of the weekend that high—pressure start to build a bit more. centred over to the west of scandinavia where all the west of scandinavia where all the fringe is still with the remnants of that weather front that we had through thursday which could
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be the focus of moisture to be just out a few showers and for the increased amount of sunshine pushing into the ease later in the day and temperatures starting to climb a bit more wide again. could see 20 degrees in a few more spots. later in the reagan high pressure becomes entered towards us all. we could in his bank holiday monday see some spots of rain pushed across the northern half of the country for the book overall in the next half of the week the id is high pressure north high—pressure cell. there is a small chance the computer models showing the flip but at the moment it does look into next week compared to may so far it will feel warmer than it has done recently as we separate the juno cores. dries conditions in the south but the best of the sunshine still the chance that we could see wind and rain at times across some northern areas. that's how it's working. bye for now.
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tonight at ten, belarus is accused of state—sponsored hijacking, following the forced re—routing of a ryanair flight. the plane was on its way from athens to vilnius when it was diverted to minsk because the belarus authorities wanted to detain one of the passengers. the journalist roman protasevich is a well—known critic of the regime in belarus. his arrest was witnessed by other passengers. super scared. i looked at him directly into his eyes and it was very sad. tonight eu leaders are discussing a flight ban on the national airline of belarus along with other sanctions, as the uk added its voice. the scenario as reported is a shocking assault on civil aviation and an assault on international law.
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we'll have the latest on the growing international condemnation

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