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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 28, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: fears that there could be a delay in living lockdown in england, as cases of the indian variant double in a week. there are calls for a0 specialist surgical hubs to be set up to tackle a colossal backlog of non—urgent operations. making sure loyalty pays — should insurance firms be banned from raising prices for existing customers, whilst luring new ones with cheap deals? the regulator will decide this morning. i'll find out what could change and what it will mean for your premiums.
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mark ormrod lost his arm and both legs when he was injured in afghanistan — this morning we'll be with him as he attempts to complete an epic swim for charity. another great friends reunion could be on the cards — tottenham reach out to their former manager, mauricio pochettino, about returning as boss. and he did say once, it would be his dream to come back. good morning. a slightly cloudy day to day with some rain around, particularly toward the west. but things turning increasingly warm and sunny for the bank holiday weekend. all the details on breakfast. good morning. it's friday, 28th of may. up to three—quarters of new covid cases could be linked to the indian variant, according to the health secretary matt hancock. there are concerns the increase in infections could delay plans to lift all restrictions in england on june 21st. our correspondent, james reynolds, has the latest. in bolton, the race between the vaccine and the variant
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is fought at the pace of an average british queue. in recent weeks, up to several thousand people a day have waited patiently for their turn to be jabbed. in this town the indian variant is hitting those who haven't been vaccinated. the number of cases of the indian variant in england has more than doubled since last week, rising to almost 7000. according to the health secretary, up to three quarters of new uk covid cases could be linked to the variant. the worst affected areas in england continue to be bolton, bedford and blackburn with darwen. seven other areas in england each have more than 100 confirmed cases of the variant. the critical thing to watch is the link from the number of cases, to how many people end up in hospital. the increase in cases remains focused on hotspots, and we're doing all we can to tackle this variant wherever it flares up.
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the prime minister said we may need to wait for the lifting of all covid restrictions, but he added that there was nothing currently in the data from england to suggest that the easing couldn't go ahead as planned. the next two weeks then may be crucial. a decision is expected in mid—june. james reynolds, bbc news. matt hancock is also under growing pressure over the deaths of thousands of care home residents. the prime minister's former advisor, dominic cummings, accused him of lying early on in the pandemic about care home residents being tested for coronavirus after leaving hospital. but mr hancock says the allegations are unsubstantiated and untrue. 0ur political correspondent damian grammaticus has more details. the health secretary has been under real pressure now for two days, ever since dominic cummings�*s evidence to parliament on wednesday, when he accused the health secretary of lying on multiple occasions,
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particularly about that subject of care homes and the claim, he said, that matt hancock had made, that people being discharged from hospital were all being tested for covid before returning to care homes. matt hancock has said the claims that he lied were unsubstantiated and untrue. but what we had last night on the question time programme on bbc, was nadra ahmed, the chair of the national care association. she said the claim mr hancock had made last year that a protective ring had been placed around care homes was not true. she said it was absolute rubbish. if there had been a protective ring, she said, well then there would have been a plan in place to protect those vulnerable people. mr hancock was questioned about this, and what he said to journalists yesterday was that a testing programme was being built, he said. he admitted the capacity
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didn't exist at the start of the pandemic to test everyone, because it took time to put in place, and he said he worked hard to do this. but what all of this, i think, shows is that the fallout from dominic cummings�*s evidence, keeping pressure on matt hancock. surgeons are calling for specialist hubs to be set up in england, to help tackle what they call the "colossal backlog" of non—urgent operations that have been postponed because of the pandemic. in march, around five million patients were waiting for surgery — that's the highest number since records began. but the government says it's working "to accelerate the recovery of services". 0ur health correspondent, laura foster reports. when the pandemic began, hospital trusts had to cancel non—urgent surgery such as hip and knee replacements, so there were enough staff and resources to look after patients with covid. but since then, waiting times and lists have only grown. 14 months on from the first
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lockdown, latest figures show almost five million people are on the waiting list. more than 400,000 of them have been waiting for more than a year. well, these are the worst waiting time figures ever recorded, and we all understand that stuff had to be put on hold whilst there was the pandemic. but now the pandemic is beginning to recede, we need a serious approach to getting into this backlog. the college says the answer is to spend £1 billion over the next five years, and to carry out operations not at local hospitals, but a dedicated hubs. that way, these hubs would still function even if there was another wave of covid, or indeed another pandemic. the college argues people are willing to travel further if it means surgeries happen sooner. laura foster, bbc news. residents of glasgow are expected to find out later whether the city
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will remain in level three of scotland's covid—i9 restrictions. the city has been under strict measures for 270 days, while the rest of the scotland has seen restrictions ease in recent weeks. first minister nicola sturgeon has said there are "reasons to be optimistic" about the situation. manchester united says it's "disgusted" by the abuse some of its players received online following their europa league final loss on wednesday. marcus rashford said he had been sent at least 70 racial slurs. 0ur reporter phil mccann is outside old trafford for us this morning. this is now part of a police investigation. what do we know so far? , . . , ., . investigation. what do we know so far? . . , ., far? greater manchester police have said they are — far? greater manchester police have said they are investigating _ far? greater manchester police have said they are investigating a - far? greater manchester police have said they are investigating a numberj said they are investigating a number of racially— said they are investigating a number of racially aggravated slurs on social— of racially aggravated slurs on social media directed towards numerous manchester united players. of numerous manchester united players. of course, _ numerous manchester united players. of course, this is after the loss in
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of course, this is after the loss in the europe — of course, this is after the loss in the europa league final on wednesday night _ the europa league final on wednesday night by— the europa league final on wednesday night. by midnight on wednesday, marcus_ night. by midnight on wednesday, marcus rashford had tweeted that he had received at least 70 slurs by that point, — had received at least 70 slurs by that point, just a few hours later on social— that point, just a few hours later on social media. yesterday he tweeted — on social media. yesterday he tweeted that he couldn't accept some of the _ tweeted that he couldn't accept some of the racial taunts directed towards _ of the racial taunts directed towards him. the club said it has zero _ towards him. the club said it has zero tolerance towards any form of racism _ zero tolerance towards any form of racism. police are going through these _ racism. police are going through these posts to see if any of them could _ these posts to see if any of them could constitute a hate crime. they also said _ could constitute a hate crime. they also said those people who had been posting _ also said those people who had been posting them could face long—term implications to their personal and professional lives. that may be after _ professional lives. that may be after marcus rashford said yesterday that some _ after marcus rashford said yesterday that some of the comments seem to come _ that some of the comments seem to come from _ that some of the comments seem to come from somebody who is a teacher. their profile _ come from somebody who is a teacher. their profile on twitter made it clear— their profile on twitter made it clear they _ their profile on twitter made it clear they were a teacher. the department for education said it was looking _ department for education said it was looking into that. facebook, which also owns — looking into that. facebook, which also owns instagram, has removed a number_ also owns instagram, has removed a number of— also owns instagram, has removed a number of posts. for years that has come _ number of posts. for years that has come under—
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number of posts. for years that has come under mounting pressure to do more _ come under mounting pressure to do more about— come under mounting pressure to do more about abuse online. this club has added — more about abuse online. this club has added to that pressure this morning — has added to that pressure this morninu. ,, ., , has added to that pressure this mornin. ,, ., , , ., morning. separately, i understand marcus rashford _ morning. separately, i understand marcus rashford has _ morning. separately, i understand marcus rashford has been - morning. separately, i understandl marcus rashford has been speaking morning. separately, i understand - marcus rashford has been speaking to former us president barack 0bama. tell us more about that? yes. former us president barack 0bama. tell us more about that?— tell us more about that? yes, 'ust in case you — tell us more about that? yes, 'ust in case you thought i tell us more about that? yes, 'ust in case you thought marcus h tell us more about that? yes, just l in case you thought marcus rashford coutdrrt— in case you thought marcus rashford couldn't get any more influential, here he _ couldn't get any more influential, here he is— couldn't get any more influential, here he is talking to barack 0bama. this was— here he is talking to barack 0bama. this was a _ here he is talking to barack 0bama. this was a zoom meeting ahead of a new book— this was a zoom meeting ahead of a new book that barack 0bama is bringing — new book that barack 0bama is bringing out. it was moderated by june sarpong. a lot of these zoom meeting _ june sarpong. a lot of these zoom meeting involved the former president heaping praise on marcus rashford, _ president heaping praise on marcus rashford, who is 23 years old. marcus. — rashford, who is 23 years old. marcus. i_ rashford, who is 23 years old. marcus, i think, rashford, who is 23 years old. marcus, ithink, is rashford, who is 23 years old. marcus, i think, is way ahead of where _ marcus, i think, is way ahead of where i— marcus, i think, is way ahead of where i was _ marcus, i think, is way ahead of where i was a _ marcus, i think, is way ahead of where i was a 23. _ marcus, i think, is way ahead of where i was a 23. i— marcus, i think, is way ahead of where i was a 23. i was- marcus, i think, is way ahead of where i was a 23. i was still- marcus, i think, is way ahead of. where i was a 23. i was still trying to figure — where i was a 23. i was still trying to figure it— where i was a 23. i was still trying to figure it out _ where i was a 23. i was still trying to figure it out. he _ where i was a 23. i was still trying to figure it out.— to figure it out. me being in sorts, to figure it out. me being in sports. i — to figure it out. me being in sports. i just _ to figure it out. me being in sports, ijust knew - to figure it out. me being in sports, ijust knew my - to figure it out. me being in sports, ijust knew my life i to figure it out. me being in - sports, ijust knew my life could change very, very quickly. and if i wasn't like, mature enough, orat change very, very quickly. and if i wasn't like, mature enough, or at a certain level in my own head, it makes stuff like fame even more difficult. ~ , ., ., difficult. when you look at the histo of difficult. when you look at the history of big _ difficult. when you look at the
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history of big social— difficult. when you look at the | history of big social movements difficult. when you look at the - history of big social movements and bil history of big social movements and big social— history of big social movements and big social change, _ history of big social movements and big social change, it— history of big social movements and big social change, it is— history of big social movements and big social change, it is usually- big social change, it is usually young — big social change, it is usually young people _ big social change, it is usually young people who— big social change, it is usually young people who initiated i big social change, it is usually. young people who initiated this. big social change, it is usually- young people who initiated this. if” young people who initiated this. you give someone a helping hand young people who initiated this.“ you give someone a helping hand at a young age, they will go on to do things that even they didn't think was achievable to accomplish. that was just a short clip they are from _ that was just a short clip they are from a _ that was just a short clip they are from a much longer zoom meeting. they also— from a much longer zoom meeting. they also talked about the similarities that they have between them _ similarities that they have between them the — similarities that they have between them. the fact they were bro —— both hrought— them. the fact they were bro —— both brought up— them. the fact they were bro —— both brought up by single mothers. the fact they— brought up by single mothers. the fact they were involved in community work _ fact they were involved in community work you _ fact they were involved in community work. you heard barack 0bama saying that marcus _ work. you heard barack 0bama saying that marcus rashford is way ahead of where _ that marcus rashford is way ahead of where he _ that marcus rashford is way ahead of where he was at that age. that, of course, _ where he was at that age. that, of course, from — where he was at that age. that, of course, from a former us president. phil. _ course, from a former us president. phil. thank— course, from a former us president. phil, thank you. measuring the amount of squashed bugs on your car after a journey, may be able to help scientists better understand insect populations in the uk. a new app is asking the public to gather the information, to identify where certain species are thriving and where others are in decline. here 5 our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt.
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insect—ageddon is how the global decline in insect populations has been described by some scientists. one case in germany suggested there had been a 75% decrease in numbers over 27 years. take the humble housefly. you may not like them, but like many insects, they're one of the foundations of the whole food chain. if we lose them, we will lose lots of other species too. but there is actually very little data for many insect groups and species, even here in the uk, which is where this new app comes in. the hope is that in the hands of a small army of citizen scientists it will generate more accurate figures for insect populations. it's simple to use. you clean your number plate before you go on a journey, then when you arrive at your destination you use the app to photograph the bugs
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squashed on a section of it, using a splat—ometer grid you get when you download the app. the results may become part of the nationwide survey. justin rowlatt, bbc news. so being someone who drives quite a bit at the moment, i don't know if i could identify the bugs clearly enough on my car. my instinct is to just get to the windscreen and clean them off as quickly as possible. i don't think i would be particularly helpful. don't think i would be particularly helful. , i. don't think i would be particularly helful. , .,~ don't think i would be particularly helful. ., helpful. maybe you could take a photograph _ helpful. maybe you could take a photograph of— helpful. maybe you could take a photograph of the _ helpful. maybe you could take a photograph of the spattered - helpful. maybe you could take a - photograph of the spattered insects. and send it to someone. i’ll photograph of the spattered insects. and send it to someone.— and send it to someone. i'll send it to ou. and send it to someone. i'll send it to you- 12 — and send it to someone. i'll send it to you. 12 minutes _ and send it to someone. i'll send it to you. 12 minutes past _ and send it to someone. i'll send it to you. 12 minutes past six. - now, if you were watching yesterday you may have seen the story of 96—year old margaret angell, who waited more than 70—years for an engagement ring. her husband ceil couldn't afford one when they get engaged in the 1940s, but promised he would buy her one
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if his favourite club, leicester city, won the fa cup and last week they did. sadly, cecil died some years ago so their son mike stepped in and bought his mum the ring. yesterday on breakfast, margaret told us she wished the ring could touch the trophy. this morning we have an update for you, because leicester football club got in touch and margaret has been invited to lift the cup next week — of course, wearing the ring! in the colours of blue. that was yesterday- _ in the colours of blue. that was yesterday- so — in the colours of blue. that was yesterday. so they _ in the colours of blue. that was yesterday. so they said - in the colours of blue. that was yesterday. so they said that. in the colours of blue. that was | yesterday. so they said that was in the colours of blue. that was - yesterday. so they said that was the thing. it would complete a long tail. a very moving story. now the weather with sarah. so, tail. a very moving story. now the weatherwith sarah. so, sarah, on the roof, looking over the skyline, what is the picture? good morning. it is a fairly optimistic picture over the next few days _ optimistic picture over the next few days we _ optimistic picture over the next few days. we have seen those temperatures are creeping up. yesterday we got to 22 degrees. things— yesterday we got to 22 degrees.
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things are looking warmer than that of the _ things are looking warmer than that of the bank— things are looking warmer than that of the bank holiday weekend. today it is a _ of the bank holiday weekend. today it is a fairly— of the bank holiday weekend. today it is a fairly cloudy picture out there — it is a fairly cloudy picture out there for— it is a fairly cloudy picture out there for many of us. there will be a little _ there for many of us. there will be a little bit — there for many of us. there will be a little bit of sunshine around, particularly towards the east, but we've _ particularly towards the east, but we've also — particularly towards the east, but we've also got some rain, especially towards _ we've also got some rain, especially towards the — we've also got some rain, especially towards the west. that is because there _ towards the west. that is because there is— towards the west. that is because there is a — towards the west. that is because there is a fairly weak weather front~ — there is a fairly weak weather front~ but _ there is a fairly weak weather front. but it is bringing more cloud through— front. but it is bringing more cloud through those irish sea coast. outbreaks of rain for parts of western— outbreaks of rain for parts of western england, wales, northern ireland _ western england, wales, northern ireland and south—west scotland. generally— ireland and south—west scotland. generally drier weather further east~ _ generally drier weather further east. more cloud lingering around the east _ east. more cloud lingering around the east coast of scotland, perhaps north-east — the east coast of scotland, perhaps north—east england. some isolated showers _ north—east england. some isolated showers in — north—east england. some isolated showers in the east this afternoon. temperatures getting up to 18 or 19 degrees, — temperatures getting up to 18 or 19 degrees, coolerforthe temperatures getting up to 18 or 19 degrees, cooler for the likes of aberdeen, for instance, where you have _ aberdeen, for instance, where you have got— aberdeen, for instance, where you have got the cloud lingering close to the _ have got the cloud lingering close to the coast. as we have through the latter— to the coast. as we have through the latter part _ to the coast. as we have through the latter part of the day, some isolated _ latter part of the day, some isolated showers in the east could continue _ isolated showers in the east could continue through the evening in the east _ continue through the evening in the east the _ continue through the evening in the east. the rain in the west will tend to ease _ east. the rain in the west will tend to ease away. temperatures under the
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cloud to _ to ease away. temperatures under the cloud to microand or 11 degrees in the west. — cloud to microand or 11 degrees in the west, six or seven further east. saturday— the west, six or seven further east. saturday starts off fairly cloudy with some drizzly showers. brightening through the day. some sunny— brightening through the day. some sunny spells. in the sunshine that will kick— sunny spells. in the sunshine that will kick off — sunny spells. in the sunshine that will kick off some isolated showers. temperatures up to 21 degrees on saturday. _ temperatures up to 21 degrees on saturday. forthe temperatures up to 21 degrees on saturday. for the rest of the bank holiday— saturday. for the rest of the bank holiday weekend it is the high pressure _ holiday weekend it is the high pressure to stick with us and that nmans— pressure to stick with us and that means things will get increasingly sunny— means things will get increasingly sunny through sunday and bank holiday— sunny through sunday and bank holiday monday. we could see temperatures at 23 or 24 degrees. thank— 23 or 24 degrees. thank you. i feel like sarah, just because of the rain we have had, we should find some way of doing a big crowd to cheer at the end of the forecast. , ., ., forecast. there is a feeling about that. forecast. there is a feeling about that- let's _ forecast. there is a feeling about that. let's talk _ forecast. there is a feeling about that. let's talk to _ forecast. there is a feeling about that. let's talk to ben. _ for people renewing their insurance, one of the biggest bugbears is often — why do new customers get a better deal?
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you think surely loyalty should pay? ben, does loyalty pay? that is the big question. there is nothing _ is the big question. there is nothing worse than the idea of someone _ nothing worse than the idea of someone getting a better deal than you even— someone getting a better deal than you even know you have been loyal to a company _ you even know you have been loyal to a company for so long, you have been a company for so long, you have been a customer— a company for so long, you have been a customer of— a company for so long, you have been a customer of theirs and then it is an offer— a customer of theirs and then it is an offer that is only applicable to new customers. it's really annoying. that is— new customers. it's really annoying. that is what — new customers. it's really annoying. that is what is being looked at today — today that could be set to change. good morning, everyone. this is all about making sure what you're paying for your car or home insurance is fair. if you stick to one company and renew with them every year, you could be paying more compared to people that shop around for a new deal with a different insurer. that's because some companies creep up the price every year for existing customers. it's called price walking, or the loyalty penalty. in fact, the financial conduct authority, which regulates the insurance markets, thinks six million of us could be paying — on average — £200 a year more than we need to. we spoke to mike. he spent years running his own business and didn't have time to shop around. it was only when he retired, he found out he was paying
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a premium by staying loyal. well, looking back, running a small business like ours, it is all consuming. and you do tend to let things slide at home that you might perhaps be better paying attention to. it was only when we did retire and we had some time to consider the cost of running our house and our car etc, and i think the crunch came when i got the renewal notice for the car in february of this year, and it had gone up 20%. and one of our daughters and said, dad, you've really got to get on the internet and find yourself a better quote than that. so i did. ifind myself a better quote. in fact, the insurance company, when i challenged them, theyjust said, sorry, that the price. i said, theyjust said, sorry, that the price. isaid, i've been theyjust said, sorry, that the price. i said, i've been in business a long time. sometimes you've got to
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negotiate at least. there was no negotiation with them. so i went to another major name in insurance on the internet. didn't speak to anybody. and ended up getting the insurance for 485 quid. that anybody. and ended up getting the insurance for 485 quid.— anybody. and ended up getting the insurance for 485 quid. that idea of sho -|n~ insurance for 485 quid. that idea of shopping around — insurance for 485 quid. that idea of shopping around for _ insurance for 485 quid. that idea of shopping around for a _ insurance for 485 quid. that idea of shopping around for a better- insurance for 485 quid. that idea of shopping around for a better deal. shopping around for a better deal paid off— shopping around for a better deal paid off for him. this has been a major complaint from customers for years. until now, it's been down to customers to shop around and avoid this penalty, either by using those price comparison websites, or by giving your insurer a call and having a go at haggling. that's not always possible though. if you're elderly, on a lower income or don't have easy access to the internet, you're much less likely to be able to get the best deal. some firms have even been using measures to discourage people from shopping around and making it more difficult to cancel automatic renewal. things like keeping you on hold for long periods of time in the hope that you give up.
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so will anything change? well, today we are expecting the regulator to reveal some new rules for insurance companies that could ban this loyalty penalty. we won't know until seven, and the devil will be in the detail. it might well be that you can still get a better deal on the phone rather than online. there are also worries this could mean higher premiums for new customers. so we will know much more about that at seven _ so we will know much more about that at seven o'clock. i'll be back later with an update. it could finally be the end of that loyalty— it could finally be the end of that loyalty penalty that has annoyed people _ loyalty penalty that has annoyed people for so long.— loyalty penalty that has annoyed people for so long. busy morning. thank you- _ people for so long. busy morning. thank you. thanks, _ people for so long. busy morning. thank you. thanks, ben. - let's take a look at today's front pages. the telegraph leads on the continuing fallout from explosive claims made by the prime minister's former adviser, dominic cummings, about the government's handling of the pandemic. the paper describes how
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the health secretary is now feeling the heat. the times say hopes of ending restrictions in england next month hang in the balance. that is after cases of the indian variant doubled in the past week. find cases of the indian variant doubled in the past week.— in the past week. and it's been a lona and in the past week. and it's been a long and mate. _ in the past week. and it's been a long and mate. of— in the past week. and it's been a long and mate. of the _ in the past week. and it's been a long and mate. of the sun - in the past week. and it's been a long and mate. of the sun is - in the past week. and it's been a i long and mate. of the sun is finally back. sarah will be telling us more about that throughout the programme. the daily star is leading on the bank holiday weekend weather forecast, reporting temperatures of 27 degrees. we won't know what to do with ourselves. i 27 degrees. we won't know what to do with ourselves-— with ourselves. i know, it is going to be quite _ with ourselves. i know, it is going to be quite a _ with ourselves. i know, it is going to be quite a dramatic— with ourselves. i know, it is going to be quite a dramatic change. . with ourselves. i know, it is going to be quite a dramatic change. it| to be quite a dramatic change. it may be a convertible car in those conditions. you could gather round. if you had this rolls—royce, the
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price tag you will see at the top, £20 million, you would gather around if you had this. it is fully equipped, as you might imagine. it has two stools. it looks like they can, they drop down, folds down into quite a small space. you get of these two. i quite a small space. you get of these two-— quite a small space. you get of these two. ,, ., .. , these two. i know exactly where i can buy two _ these two. i know exactly where i can buy two stools _ these two. i know exactly where i can buy two stools like _ these two. i know exactly where i can buy two stools like that - these two. i know exactly where i can buy two stools like that for i these two. i know exactly where i l can buy two stools like that for £8. i will take you through a number of the items. there is a watch holder. a minimalist dashboard, that is how it is described. a cradle to insert a watch. it then becomes a clerk. i titanium draw. that is designed to carry the wristwatch of the passenger. another useful item. so you are wearing your waste watch, you are wearing your waste watch, you want to take it off, you got a place to put it. —— wristwatch. you have two cradles in the boot to hold
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the owner's vintage. there is an umbrella that pops out the back. hat umbrella that pops out the back. not that we umbrella that pops out the back. igrrt that we are advocating drinking and driving, of course. i think you have missed your vocation there in selling cars. because we are all sold on that, aren't we? do you want a quick quiz? i know you love a quiz. old wives tales. i'm putting my hand over this bit because that is the quiz bid. there are loads of these kind of myths, i suppose, that we have all grown up believing. they have been myth busted. here is an example. rememberyou have been myth busted. here is an example. remember you are told why would you wear a hat in the winter? because it keeps you warm. and most of the heat leaves your head. emir; of the heat leaves your head. only 1096 is lost — of the heat leaves your head. only 1096 is lost through _ of the heat leaves your head. only 1096 is lost through your _ of the heat leaves your head. only 10% is lost through your head. of the heat leaves your head. only | 1096 is lost through your head. hold on a minute. _ 1096 is lost through your head. hold on a minute, where _ 1096 is lost through your head. hold on a minute, where is _ 10% is lost through your head. hold on a minute, where is the most heat going? 50
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on a minute, where is the most heat ttoin? on a minute, where is the most heat auoin ? ., on a minute, where is the most heat uuoin? ., . ., on a minute, where is the most heat ttoin? ., . ., ., on a minute, where is the most heat auoin ? ., . ., ., ., on a minute, where is the most heat uuoin? ., . ., ., ., , going? so the great wall of china is the only man-made _ going? so the great wall of china is the only man-made structure - going? so the great wall of china is| the only man-made structure visible the only man—made structure visible from space. not true. your hair and fingernails continue to grow after you die. not true. humans only have five senses. you die. not true. humans only have five senses-— five senses. no. who is the authority — five senses. no. who is the authority debunking - five senses. no. who is the authority debunking things | five senses. no. who is the - authority debunking things that sound to me like they are true. researchers.— sound to me like they are true. researchers. ,., . ,, ' , researchers. going back 2.1... it is research. where _ researchers. going back 2.1... it is research. where is _ researchers. going back 2.1... it is research. where is it _ researchers. going back 2.1... it is research. where is it that - researchers. going back 2.1... it is research. where is it that the - researchers. going back 2.1... it is research. where is it that the heat| research. where is it that the heat most leaves your body if not from your head? if most leaves your body if not from your head?— your head? if anyone knows, bbc breakfast- — your head? if anyone knows, bbc breakfast- lt _ your head? if anyone knows, bbc breakfast. it doesn't _ your head? if anyone knows, bbc breakfast. it doesn't make - your head? if anyone knows, bbc breakfast. it doesn't make any i breakfast. it doesn't make any sense. chameleons _ breakfast. it doesn't make any sense. chameleons change - breakfast. it doesn't make any i sense. chameleons change colour breakfast. it doesn't make any - sense. chameleons change colour to blend in with — sense. chameleons change colour to blend in with their _ sense. chameleons change colour to blend in with their surroundings. - blend in with their surroundings. apparently they don't do it to blend in with their surroundings. they do it because of changes in body temperature or mood. if it because of changes in body temperature or mood.- it because of changes in body temperature or mood. if you have got our own temperature or mood. if you have got your own version _ temperature or mood. if you have got your own version with _ temperature or mood. if you have got your own version with a _ temperature or mood. if you have got your own version with a couple - temperature or mood. if you have got your own version with a couple of- your own version with a couple of deckchairs and a thing of your own, i can picture you. going out for a
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picnic. i can picture you. going out for a icnic. , , ., ., ., picnic. sometimes you have a convenient — picnic. sometimes you have a convenient shelf _ picnic. sometimes you have a convenient shelf that - picnic. sometimes you have a convenient shelf that pops . picnic. sometimes you have a - convenient shelf that pops down. cars in the 60s used to have, behind the front seat, used to have a drinks tray that came down like a wooden tray. drinks tray that came down like a wooden tray-— you ve probably heard of the munros in scotland and the lake district wainwrights. now there 5 a new hill walking challenge for those addicted to bagging britain 5 wildest summits — the peak district ethels. they're named after ethel haythornthwaite, a pioneering environmentalist who was a key figure in the preservation of the national park. judy hobson reports. the peak district is one of the country's most popular national parks. but now there is another reason to head here. just to our right, this high shelf stone, beyond that you can't actually see it, but it's bleaklow, which is obviously one of the high points of the whole park. 95 hilltops with an altitude of 400 metres, and a few significant lower ones,
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have been named the ethels after the founder of a countryside charity, ethel haythornthwaite, who sought solace in the hills after the death of her husband. so from the depths of grief she embraced the countryside, and the countryside that she went into, the moorland that she went into, hugely impacted her physical and mental well—being. it adds to the challenges, such as the scottish munros and the lakeland wainwrights, but the ethels are probably easier to achieve. we're absolutely passionate that the physical and mental well—being that ethel drew from this countryside in the 1920s and 30s, is that we kind of try and promote people to engage with the hills. it's a bit of fun. it's a free app. a lot of the hills are quite accessible. guidebook writer paul and his guide dog scout have already ticked off most of the ethels. my favourite ethel is probably bleaklow head.
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it looks quite odd. it's in a wilderness area. it's quite isolated. it can get quite busy, but the last time i was there, there was no one around and i had fantastic views across the whole of the peak district. bleaklow, kinder scout and black hill are the highest of the ethels. the app, called ethel ready, has details of all 95 hilltops, enough to keep the keenest hill walker busy for months. there is a great tradition in the walking and mountaineering community about naming things. the first one was obviously munro. people do the wainwrights now, and it's time that the peak district had their own. and the ethels, it's a fantastic name, it's got a lot of tradition and heritage behind it and it's perfect for the peak district. judy hobson, bbc news. coming up on the programme, cricket legend david �*bumble' lloyd will chat to us about his latest book, celebrating some of the most influential and entertaining characters he's met during his 60—year career.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. london's tourist attractions are hoping for a bank holiday visitor boom this weekend. it's thought the capital's still missing around 11 million of its annual overseas tourists, so its domestic visitors who are being encouraged to come into town, including at this new hotel — a former police station — that's opened this week certainly from last week, i felt a real push again within london as indoor dining opened up again. there's a lot of birthdays, anniversaries, engagements and general celebrations that need to take place right now, so there's a lot of catching up to be done, so we're excited to be part of that. southend airport is restarting passenger flights from today. the first is due to take off
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in just a few minutes. the airport's been closed for five months because of the pandemic. there'll be twice—weekly flights to portugal, and a new private covid testing facility has been created onsite. now, although many music festivals can't go ahead this summer, here's one you canjoin in. # and boy, you know i've tried to pray. # i've bruised my knees. # i've tried to breathe you back to me. bbc radio london is hosting the airwaves festival — it's a virtual event all weekend. it features rag'n'bone man, the manic street preachers and griff — who won the brits rising star award. i've written a mix tape, which is seven songs, and that's coming onjune the 11th... and, yeah, i'm really excited to put them out. i've kind of written and produced them here in my bedroom by myself, and they feel quite personal and intimate. so i hope when i release them into the world, people like them. and then i guess, yeah, i need to get back in and write more for some kind of album that's coming soon. and you can find out more about the airwaves festival,
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the website should be on your screen — just click on london — and on bbc radio london from 10.30 this morning let's take a look at the travel situation now. first the tube — the circle line has minor delays, some trains have been cancelled. and the limehouse link tunnel has been closed, as you can see — shut in both directions — we're told for safety reasons. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a milder start to the day than we saw this time yesterday, many of our temperatures in double figures. there's also quite a bit of cloud around, as well. there's a weather front sitting right out towards the west — it's not giving us any rain, but it is throwing us plenty of cloud, so a cloudier day than we saw yesterday. there will be some breaks emerging, some spells of sunshine, particularly as we head through the afternoon. the sunny spells probably best out towards eastern areas of the capital — do watch out for the small chance of one or two showers breaking out as we head towards the end of the day. top temperatures this afternoon in the best of any sunshine could get as high as perhaps 18 to 19 degrees celsius —
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even 20 not totally out of the question. now, as we head through this evening and overnight, again, plenty of cloud around. it's a mild start to the day on saturday. on saturday, then, again, there'll be quite a bit of cloud, but also some sunny spells emerging. temperatures will start to rise once more. by the time we get to sunday a lot of sunshine. high pressure dominates as we head through next week, so, again, it's looking dry and feeling warm. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning... this is the view across plymouth sound, where later this morning former royal marine commando mark ormrod will be taking to the water for his latest charity challenge.
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it is quite remarkable. that shot you can see is from our drone. it is the team gathering to see him off as he starts his swim this morning. we will explain more a little later on but this is worth seeing. into the water a little later on. the actorjim broadbent willjoin us to chat about his latest film which tells the tale of a taxi driver who managed to pull off the first and only art heist in the national gallery's history. # the power of love. # a force from above...# as a new exhibition pays tribute to �*80s band frankie goes to hollywood, we'll speak to the group's guitarist brian nash. the indian variant could account for three quarters of all new covid cases in the uk, according to the health secretary. yesterday, the number of new infections topped 3,000 for the second day in a row.
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let's talk now to this morning's gp — drwilliam bird. good morning to you. you have been with us through many, many months of the pandemic and i'm curious now, as we enter this next stage, people are thinking about easing of restrictions, that date is looming very close. and now the indian variant is rising at quite a significant rate. can you give us an insight as to what you make of what you are seeing? i insight as to what you make of what you are seeing?— you are seeing? i was very optimistic _ you are seeing? i was very optimistic when _ you are seeing? i was very optimistic when we - you are seeing? i was very| optimistic when we started you are seeing? i was very i optimistic when we started to you are seeing? i was very - optimistic when we started to see the levels really fall at the vaccination uptake, and we looked as though everything was on track for the 21st ofjune being the real opening up but of course the indian variant, and as we know these variants will come along and this will not be the last, there will be more. each one has to be looked at individually. initially we knew nothing about the indian variant
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except what it calls in india but now we know the vaccination impact is lower. it is not bad, it's gone from about 35% at your first dose up to about 80% to 70%, whether it is the biontech or astrazeneca. it certainly is not as good as we expected with the kent variant. there is a bit of worry, it is slightly more infectious. so i think it is on a knife edge, the 21st. we have not seen any hospital admissions go of which is great, and thatis admissions go of which is great, and that is the important part but it is not as virulent as kent. it is not that bad in that respect but if it evades the vaccination a bit and also it means that if you have had coronavirus you will not be protected so much and it is slightly more infectious. it is a worry for later in the year. we know we will get a peak in august, we have always known that unlocking but the trouble
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with this variant, that peak could be a lot higher than they thought. no where near the january levels or the spring levels last year, but certainly high enough to have an impact and that is what is in the balance. i5 impact and that is what is in the balance. , ., , . balance. is a 'oy understanding... -- is at your— balance. is a joy understanding... -- is at your understanding... i balance. is a joy understanding... -- is at your understanding... we —— is at your understanding... we know we will see a spike in infections in august. can you give people a sense of what that means in practice in terms of numbers? we looked at the doubling week on week over the past week, a doubling of indian covid variant numbers. looking ahead now, pastjune, is it the understanding that there is a kind of tolerance level which we are going to have to live with?- going to have to live with? yeah, i think the number _ going to have to live with? yeah, i think the number of _ going to have to live with? yeah, i think the number of infections i going to have to live with? yeah, i think the number of infections is i think the number of infections is not quite the most important part. we know it is the number of admissions and deaths. just aren't the impact that the vaccination can have, and i won't give you exact numbers, but certainly i tell those
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in their 30s who are thinking, do i really need vaccination? i want to be effective very much, it won't affect me, and to be honest, it has all been done, we are fine... we are seeing peoplejust not all been done, we are fine... we are seeing people just not turn up to their vaccination slot is that we never had that earlier on. people are fighting for the slot and now we have people who have said they are going to come and then don't turn up. if we go from 80% of the under 50s down to 50% of the under 50s being covered, then the number of hospital admissions double and it is not the people in their 30s who will be admitted, it will be the older people who have notjust by any means being covered by the vaccination. it is really important that people get not only their first dose, but also to get covered by the second dose of vaccination to be able to make sure we really do squash this indian variant and stop it from becoming a major problem for the winter, which of course is what will be brewing if we allow it to become too much in august. as far as
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numbers, from hospital admissions it will be in the thousands of people being admitted, but, as i say, even with the worst case scenario, we are nowhere nearjanuary levels. the immediate _ nowhere nearjanuary levels. the immediate issues you face as a gp. we have had two days running, two major stories. what about the pressure on gps seeing people routinely. today, more about routine operations, the backlog. what routinely. today, more about routine operations, the backlog.— operations, the backlog. what are ou operations, the backlog. what are you seeing? _ operations, the backlog. what are you seeing? it— operations, the backlog. what are you seeing? it is _ operations, the backlog. what are you seeing? it is a _ operations, the backlog. what are you seeing? it is a bit _ operations, the backlog. what are you seeing? it is a bit worrying. i l you seeing? it is a bit worrying. i felt we would be ok this summer but the last two or three weekends when i have been on, we sought levels we would normally see at christmas. the figures came out in march, 28 million people seen by their gp in march. to put it in perspective, accident and emergency departments exceed 2 million in a month, so 28 and two million and hospitals have
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admissions of the 500,000 in a month orso admissions of the 500,000 in a month or so it doesn't need to be very much of a change in the primary care numbers to have a huge impact on accident and emergency admissions. 28 million is a record for march this weekend will be like a bank holiday in the middle of winter. one of those really difficult ones. what i am also seeing, and i have to say, sadly, twice now, i have seen people come in late in being diagnosed for their cancer which have perhaps been missed. they haven't been seen, examined, haven't wanted to come up. we are seeing this delayed diagnosis, which is worrying, and the big catch up on operations which we have to do, as well. a lot of the nhs has to do, there will be a big transformation of how primary care works and how we manage to catch up, which is probably overdue because we are going to see doctors who have decided they have had enough, gps who have taps retired early, may have been quite ill with covid and
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not able to come back, and people not able to come back, and people not coming in because the workload has been so high. we are seeing the demand pouring in and also fewer doctors than before the pandemic started. mi; doctors than before the pandemic started. y . doctors than before the pandemic started. g . , ., ., started. my final question to you, iiven started. my final question to you, given what _ started. my final question to you, given what you — started. my final question to you, given what you have _ started. my final question to you, given what you have said, - started. my final question to you, given what you have said, how. started. my final question to you, | given what you have said, how are you? i given what you have said, how are ou? . given what you have said, how are you?_ that's _ given what you have said, how are you?_ that's good! i given what you have said, how are you?_ that's good! that| given what you have said, how are l you?_ that's good! that is you? i am fine. that's good! that is what we want _ you? i am fine. that's good! that is what we want to _ you? i am fine. that's good! that is what we want to hear. _ you? i am fine. that's good! that is what we want to hear. i _ you? i am fine. that's good! that is what we want to hear. i love - you? i am fine. that's good! that is what we want to hear. i love being l you? i am fine. that's good! that is| what we want to hear. i love being a doctor, a what we want to hear. i love being a doctor. a gp. _ what we want to hear. i love being a doctor, a gp, and _ what we want to hear. i love being a doctor, a gp, and i _ what we want to hear. i love being a doctor, a gp, and i think— what we want to hear. i love being a doctor, a gp, and i think i _ what we want to hear. i love being a doctor, a gp, and i think! probablyl doctor, a gp, and i think i probably will always come from a medical family and we have gone through all of this in times before. general practice has had a real roller—coaster of highs and lows. i think it is still a fantastic profession and i think for those going into medicine, it is so much variation and great to be in a community. i'm going to keep going and i think a lot of my colleagues who are in general practice, we here at the doom and gloom but they enjoy general practice and wouldn't do it otherwise. �* ., ,
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general practice and wouldn't do it otherwise. . , ., general practice and wouldn't do it otherwise. . ., ., ,, ., otherwise. always good to talk to ou, dr otherwise. always good to talk to you, dr william _ otherwise. always good to talk to you, dr william bird. _ otherwise. always good to talk to you, dr william bird. thank- otherwise. always good to talk to you, dr william bird. thank you. | isn't there a phrase that you should never go back? it isn't there a phrase that you should never go back?— never go back? it has been said before in- _ never go back? it has been said before in. certain _ never go back? it has been said before in. certain people - never go back? it has been said before in. certain people would| never go back? it has been said i before in. certain people would love it. a lot of tottenham _ before in. certain people would love it. a lot of tottenham fans - before in. certain people would love it. a lot of tottenham fans would i it. a lot of tottenham fans would love it. it. a lot of tottenham fans would love it- we _ it. a lot of tottenham fans would love it. we have _ it. a lot of tottenham fans would love it. we have seen _ it. a lot of tottenham fans would love it. we have seen friends i it. a lot of tottenham fans would l love it. we have seen friends think tv, could bits be the one workspace say” tv, could bits be the one workspace say,, going back. he tv, could bits be the one workspace say” going back-— say,, going back. he was always loved. stranger— say,, going back. he was always loved. stranger things _ say,, going back. he was always loved. stranger things have i loved. stranger things have happened- _ it could be one of the most sensational returns in football management. tottenham are in talks with mauricio pochettino, over their manager'sjob — remember they sacked him 18 months ago. pochettino took spurs to the champions league final but he was replaced byjose mourinho six months later. he's been manager of paris saint germain since january, but missed out on the french league title this season. he has talked about the great future and already making plans for next season. when his head to be turned?
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he said last year it was his dream to return to spurs one day. watch this space. we are looking forward to the champions league final tomorrow night, with manchester city playing chelsea in porto. both teams have now arrived in the portuguese city — this is how city's staff saw off their squad from the etihad complex. they're looking to add this trophy to the premier league title and league cup they've already won this season. that is quite a send—up, isn't it? fans have also been arriving in porto — some even caught shots of the team buses making their way to their hotels yesterday. both clubs have been given just over 6,000 tickets for the final but chelsea did return some of theirs. in all there will be a crowd of around 16,000. despite the official process and the tests, it is the best feeling for fans to be away, supporting their teams again. we got a holiday quite cheap, we got apartments quite cheap but the tests have cost more than the holiday. getting here — nightmare. covid test before... it's not every day you get to see the champions league final. i
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happy to do it to see the boys bring it home. even if people don't get- to the game, there's a fan place there, and we can go to a bar, i go to a pub, we can sit in there, the vibe'll be great, _ just watching the game together. tiger woods says just walking on his own is his number one goal as he continues his recovery from a horrific car crash in february. speaking to a magazine, woods, who won the masters two years ago, wouldn't be drawn on whether he'd ever play golf again. he says he's taking it one step at a time. he suffered multiple leg injuries in the crash in los angeles. there's been quite a bit of fallout from naomi osaka's declaration that she wouldn't be doing press conferences after her matches at next week's french open, because of the effect they have on her mental health. her decision's been supporterd by many players, but now the men's world number one says osaka may have to face up to the fact, it's part of thejob. i understand the press conferences sometimes can be very unpleasant, and it's not something that you enjoy always —
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especially if you lose a match or something like this, so... but it is part of the sport and part of your life on the tour, and this is something we have to do otherwise we will get fined. well, the french tennis federation has reacted fiercely. their president said in a statement "it's a phenomenal error. what is happening here is unacceptable in my opinion. it is very damaging to the sport. she is hurting the game, she is harming tennis." we will see what happens when it starts on sunday.— starts on sunday. thank you. an ins-airin starts on sunday. thank you. an inspiring story — starts on sunday. thank you. an inspiring story coming _ starts on sunday. thank you. an inspiring story coming up - starts on sunday. thank you. an inspiring story coming up now. l former royal marine commando, mark ormrod was told he would never walk again, after losing both his legs and an arm in afghanistan. since then, he's been taking on gruelling physical challenges to raise money for charity, and here on breakfast we've been following his progress. after completing a 5k run in march, this morning he's planning let's look at some wonderful images here. we are in plymouth.
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after completing a 5k run in march, this morning he's planning to swim one kilometre, across plymouth sound. that is what you can see there. this is the launcher we are seeing from our drone in the sky. breakfast�*sjohn maguire is there this morning. things are ready to go, good morning. things are ready to go, good morning-— things are ready to go, good mornin. _ ,., ., ., , things are ready to go, good mornini. ., , ., morning. good morning. they are absolutely ready _ morning. good morning. they are absolutely ready to _ morning. good morning. they are absolutely ready to go. _ morning. good morning. they are absolutely ready to go. we - morning. good morning. they are absolutely ready to go. we are i morning. good morning. they are absolutely ready to go. we are on drakes island, so around one kilometre or so from the mainland, the coast of plymouth, firestone bay, is where he will hopefully end up. we think it will take around an hour or so. you can see and download just some final tips from sharron davies! that is who you need only challenge like this. sharon davies to give you a final few tips on how to give you a final few tips on how to make it. we have covered mark's story before, it is amazing. this is how he got this far. the blast in afghanistan in 2007 that took both of mark ormrod's legs and one of his arms,
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should also have taken his life. but the former royal marine fought back and chose a new path. the years since have seen him challenge himself in ever more awe—inspiring ways, changing people's perceptions of what's possible. in march, while training for a 5km charity run, footage of his fall and then recovery went viral. it was stark evidence of his determination. and so, on to his next everest — a one kilometre swim off the coast of plymouth. he's swum before — even competing at the invictus games. but, by his own admission, it's not his strongest discipline, and it's a very different environment. and what is frightening is that i remember how tired i was after 50 metres. now, this is a lot farther, with tides and currents and creepy crawlies underneath, and everything else that comes with system.
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——comes with sea—swimming. and so this is a new world to me. wejoined mark on his first training swim. harder than you thought? oh, yeah. i've not really swam with a current before, and the cold affected my forearm, which meant that my fingers couldn't close properly to swim. so i go in, then i grab the water. fellow plymothian, and olympic silver medalist sharon davis, has provided some much needed help and advice. mark is raising money for a cause close to his heart, reorg, a charity run by another former royal marine. it uses a brazilian martial art to help former military and emergency service personnel. throughout his challenges, mark's proved that with grit, determination and mental fortitude, the overwhelming odds can be defeated. he will need that same strength today, to defy logic once again.
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incredible. a couple of minutes away from him setting off. mark getting a last minute... tips from sharon. what do you reckon, how are you feeling? what do you reckon, how are you feelin: ? �* �* ., feeling? i'm ok. i'm all right, actually- _ feeling? i'm ok. i'm all right, actually- i— feeling? i'm ok. i'm all right, actually. ifeel— feeling? i'm ok. i'm all right, actually. i feel fully _ feeling? i'm ok. i'm all right, j actually. i feel fully prepared, feeling? i'm ok. i'm all right, i actually. ifeelfully prepared, ben actually. i feel fully prepared, ben has taken — actually. i feel fully prepared, ben has taken care of that. we have been training _ has taken care of that. we have been training in— has taken care of that. we have been training in awful conditions and, as you can _ training in awful conditions and, as you can see, — training in awful conditions and, as you can see, today could not be better — you can see, today could not be better i — you can see, today could not be better. i have a great team behind me, literally, i'm motivated, good to go— me, literally, i'm motivated, good to go and— me, literally, i'm motivated, good to go and excited.— to go and excited. using very relaxed. to go and excited. using very relaxed- l — to go and excited. using very relaxed. i was _ to go and excited. using very relaxed. i was saying - to go and excited. using very relaxed. i was saying just i to go and excited. using very| relaxed. i was saying just now to go and excited. using very i relaxed. i was saying just now to relaxed. i was saying 'ust now to sharon, relaxed. i was saying 'ust now to sharon. my * relaxed. i was saying 'ust now to sharon, my mindset i relaxed. i was saying just now to sharon, my mindset is _ relaxed. i was saying just now to sharon, my mindset isjust i relaxed. i was saying just now to sharon, my mindset isjust up i relaxed. i was saying just now to | sharon, my mindset isjust up for relaxed. i was saying just now to i sharon, my mindset isjust up for a nice enjoyable swim with my friends. ben, what— nice enjoyable swim with my friends. ben, what will be the trick to make sure he gets across safely? latte ben, what will be the trick to make sure he gets across safely? we have to be out of— sure he gets across safely? we have to be out of the _ sure he gets across safely? we have to be out of the water— sure he gets across safely? we have to be out of the water by _ sure he gets across safely? we have to be out of the water by a _ sure he gets across safely? we have to be out of the water by a am i to be out of the water by a am otherwise _ to be out of the water by a am otherwise we _ to be out of the water by a am otherwise we may _ to be out of the water by a am otherwise we may get - to be out of the water by a am otherwise we may get run i to be out of the water by a am| otherwise we may get run over to be out of the water by a am i otherwise we may get run over by a worship _ otherwise we may get run over by a worship so — otherwise we may get run over by a worship so that _ otherwise we may get run over by a worship so that is _ otherwise we may get run over by a worship so that is the _ otherwise we may get run over by a worship so that is the focus. - otherwise we may get run over by a worship so that is the focus. we i worship so that is the focus. we have _ worship so that is the focus. we have a _ worship so that is the focus. we have a safety— worship so that is the focus. we have a safety team _ worship so that is the focus. we have a safety team but - worship so that is the focus. we have a safety team but i - worship so that is the focus. we have a safety team but i have i worship so that is the focus. we i have a safety team but i have every confidence — have a safety team but i have every confidence in — have a safety team but i have every confidence in mark's _ have a safety team but i have every confidence in mark's ability- have a safety team but i have every confidence in mark's ability was i have a safety team but i have every confidence in mark's ability was notj confidence in mark's ability was not as long _ confidence in mark's ability was not as long as— confidence in mark's ability was not as long as we — confidence in mark's ability was not as long as we are _ confidence in mark's ability was not
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as long as we are guided _ confidence in mark's ability was not as long as we are guided to- confidence in mark's ability was not as long as we are guided to the i as long as we are guided to the right— as long as we are guided to the right location— as long as we are guided to the right location it _ as long as we are guided to the right location it will _ as long as we are guided to the right location it will be - as long as we are guided to the right location it will be fine. i right location it will be fine. sharon, _ right location it will be fine. sharon, you _ right location it will be fine. sharon, you have _ right location it will be fine. sharon, you have given- right location it will be fine. sharon, you have given him right location it will be fine. - sharon, you have given him training tips, i can't imagine a better person to give him advice on how to swim. so much that these guys had already done 100% of the work. so just a bit of hand positioning and getting the most out of each stroke. i am in awe of getting the most out of each stroke. i am in awe— i am in awe of what they have all done. i i am in awe of what they have all done- i hope _ i am in awe of what they have all done- i hope l — i am in awe of what they have all done. i hope i say— i am in awe of what they have all done. i hope i say that _ i am in awe of what they have all done. i hope i say that again i i am in awe of what they have all done. i hope i say that again in l done. i hope i say that again in about— done. i hope i say that again in about an — done. i hope i say that again in about an hour he will be saying it to us, _ about an hour he will be saying it to us, hopefully, a bit colder but no doubt — to us, hopefully, a bit colder but no doubt very exciting. money wise we are _ no doubt very exciting. money wise we are up— no doubt very exciting. money wise we are up to — no doubt very exciting. money wise we are up to about 282,000 this morning — we are up to about 282,000 this morning. what keeps you motivated when _ morning. what keeps you motivated when you're in the middle of these crazy— when you're in the middle of these crazy challenges?— crazy challenges? personally, the challen . e crazy challenges? personally, the challenge of— crazy challenges? personally, the challenge of it _ crazy challenges? personally, the challenge of it all, _ crazy challenges? personally, the challenge of it all, seeing - crazy challenges? personally, the challenge of it all, seeing if i i crazy challenges? personally, the challenge of it all, seeing if i canl challenge of it all, seeing if i can do it _ challenge of it all, seeing if i can do it but — challenge of it all, seeing if i can do it but the _ challenge of it all, seeing if i can do it. but the good _ challenge of it all, seeing if i can do it. but the good that- challenge of it all, seeing if i can do it. but the good that the i challenge of it all, seeing if i can. do it. but the good that the money and the _ do it. but the good that the money and the funds _ do it. but the good that the money and the funds do— do it. but the good that the money and the funds do and _ do it. but the good that the money and the funds do and what - do it. but the good that the money and the funds do and what they - do it. but the good that the money and the funds do and what they go| do it. but the good that the money. and the funds do and what they go to hell. and the funds do and what they go to helh that _ and the funds do and what they go to helh that will — and the funds do and what they go to hell. that will be _ and the funds do and what they go to hell. that will be going _ and the funds do and what they go to hell. that will be going through - and the funds do and what they go to hell. that will be going through my. hell. that will be going through my head when— hell. that will be going through my head when i— hell. that will be going through my head when i do— hell. that will be going through my head when i do that. _ hell. that will be going through my head when i do that. fill— hell. that will be going through my head when i do that.— head when i do that. all the very best, no head when i do that. all the very best. 90 for _ head when i do that. all the very best. 90 for it — head when i do that. all the very best, go for it we _ head when i do that. all the very best, go for it we let's _ head when i do that. all the very best, go for it we let's do - head when i do that. all the very best, go for it we let's do it - best, go for it we let's do it you'll see you on other side. just
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going to set the guys off now. last minute to just check the equipment. mark has a special wet suit tailor made. when we filmed him around a month ago when he did his first test win out here, as you saw in our film just now, he was wearing a normal wet suit and we found that was filling up with water, just acting like an anchorand filling up with water, just acting like an anchor and causing even more problems. once they hit the currents, that was interesting. it is very much a high tide, a spring tide this morning, which increases the distance, takes it up to about 1000 metres, one kilometre, but it also means the conditions are right, hopefully, to give him a bit of extra push, to give him more of a hand. part of the challenge will be to complete it himself, shame sharon couldn't give him a tow. a couple of
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people on the island, thank you to morgan for allowing us to come the island. johnny mercer, the local mp island. johnny mercer, the local mp is here, too, former army commander. going into the water. there you go. head underfor the first going into the water. there you go. head under for the first time. i can't stress this enough. of course, remember, the only way mark can tell himself with is with that one arm —— propelled himself. that one left arm, and you can see himself pulling himself through the water and that was one of the things sharon had been concentrating on. mark also said when it gets cold at his arm cramps, then his fingers splay and he can't get back in action, that shape of his hand that swimmers find so important. i'm going to turn my microphone down and shout. go on, mark, good luck! there they are.
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looks easy. of course it isn't. 1000 metres, probably take just under an hour or so. as ben said, there will be a worship coming through so they need to be clear of the channel by then. if you are on the drone, mark is towards the back with the orange cap. bent to the left. another swimmer to the right with white cap. that gives you an idea of where mark is a couple of swimmers at the front will presumably get an idea of the currents and tides, to enable mark to have a safe passage. all the very best of luck to him. we will talk to you later. best of luck to him. we will talk to ou later. . ~ , ., best of luck to him. we will talk to ou later. . ~ i., best of luck to him. we will talk to ou later. . ~' ,, . best of luck to him. we will talk to ou later. . ~ i., . ., you later. thank you so much for that. i you later. thank you so much for that i am _ you later. thank you so much for that i am so _ you later. thank you so much for that. i am so impressed, - you later. thank you so much for that. i am so impressed, as - you later. thank you so much for that. i am so impressed, as we | you later. thank you so much for i that. i am so impressed, as we look out from your position, it seems just how quickly they have already left from the shore and making progress and it is amazing, given the challenges he faces. we will watch closely, it will go back with our drone shut later and watch as
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one kilometre... the incentive... ah, one kilometre... the incentive... bit worship coming through, that is enough of an incentive. john will keep us up—to—date in about an hour to see how he is getting on. it is time for the weather from sara on the roof of new broadcasting house. it looked pretty lovely in plymouth and i think most of us can be hopefulfor better and i think most of us can be hopeful for better weather on the way. hopeful for better weather on the wa . ~ . . hopeful for better weather on the wa , ~ hopeful for better weather on the wa .~ ., way. we can. good morning. fine weatherfor— way. we can. good morning. fine weather for the _ way. we can. good morning. fine weather for the swing _ way. we can. good morning. fine weather for the swing out - way. we can. good morning. fine weather for the swing out there i weather for the swing out there today — weather for the swing out there today. fine weather for many day. we have a _ today. fine weather for many day. we have a hit_ today. fine weather for many day. we have a bit of— today. fine weather for many day. we have a bit of rain in the forecast and there _ have a bit of rain in the forecast and there. things will improve through— and there. things will improve through the course of the bank holiday— through the course of the bank holiday weekend. today it is cloudy to the _ holiday weekend. today it is cloudy to the west but there will be some sunshine _ to the west but there will be some sunshine around for some eastern parts _ sunshine around for some eastern parts of— sunshine around for some eastern parts of the — sunshine around for some eastern parts of the uk in particular. that is all_ parts of the uk in particular. that is all down — parts of the uk in particular. that is all down to the fact that although high pressure will be very much _ although high pressure will be very much in _ although high pressure will be very much in charge of our weather over the next _ much in charge of our weather over the next couple of days, we do have a weather _ the next couple of days, we do have a weather front moving in from the west witt— a weather front moving in from the west will stop as it bumps into the area of— west will stop as it bumps into the area of high pressure it will tend to fizzle — area of high pressure it will tend to fizzle out over the next 24 hours or so _
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to fizzle out over the next 24 hours or so before — to fizzle out over the next 24 hours or so before that it is bringing outbreaks of patchy rain stop this morning — outbreaks of patchy rain stop this morning through the irish sea coast, parts _ morning through the irish sea coast, parts of— morning through the irish sea coast, parts of western england, wales, northerh— parts of western england, wales, northern ireland and south—west scotland — northern ireland and south—west scotland seems some patchy rain, there _ scotland seems some patchy rain, there is— scotland seems some patchy rain, there is further east most places estate _ there is further east most places estate predominantly dry, just one or two— estate predominantly dry, just one or two isolated showers for the likes— or two isolated showers for the likes of— or two isolated showers for the likes of northumberland down to norfolk — likes of northumberland down to norfolk. in this and you top temperatures get up to around 18 or 19 degrees— temperatures get up to around 18 or 19 degrees for some, but cooler across— 19 degrees for some, but cooler across parts of scotland, particularly aberdeen, with cloudy skies. _ particularly aberdeen, with cloudy skies, only about 13. in the evening, _ skies, only about 13. in the evening, one or two showers in the east tending to linger but they will fade and _ east tending to linger but they will fade and it will become drier to the west was— fade and it will become drier to the west was not perhaps a bit of drizzle — west was not perhaps a bit of drizzle left by the time we get a saturday — drizzle left by the time we get a saturday morning. under the cloud in the west— saturday morning. under the cloud in the west temperatures around ten or 11 the west temperatures around ten or ii degrees, _ the west temperatures around ten or 11 degrees, but towards the east with clearer skies, quite literally start _ with clearer skies, quite literally start around six or 7 degrees. saturday— start around six or 7 degrees. saturday dawns on a fairly murky, start _ saturday dawns on a fairly murky, start for— saturday dawns on a fairly murky, start for most but it will brighten through— start for most but it will brighten through the course of the day. sunny spetts _ through the course of the day. sunny spells developing. in the sunshine
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we could _ spells developing. in the sunshine we could see the other shark shower, particularly _ we could see the other shark shower, particularly through the spine of england. — particularly through the spine of england, the pennines, to central scottehd~ — england, the pennines, to central scotland. most places avoiding any of those _ scotland. most places avoiding any of those sharp showers. temperatures around _ of those sharp showers. temperatures around 18 _ of those sharp showers. temperatures around 18 to _ of those sharp showers. temperatures around 18 to 21 degrees. that bit warmer— around 18 to 21 degrees. that bit warmer tomorrow compared to today. high—pressure holding on into sunday~ — high—pressure holding on into sunday. another dry day, light winds and more _ sunday. another dry day, light winds and more sunshine compared to saturday — and more sunshine compared to saturday. there's temperatures will be that _ saturday. there's temperatures will be that bit _ saturday. there's temperatures will be that bit higher, around 23 degrees _ be that bit higher, around 23 degrees or so quite widely across parts _ degrees or so quite widely across parts of— degrees or so quite widely across parts of southern england, wales, parts _ parts of southern england, wales, parts of _ parts of southern england, wales, parts of scotland 21 or 22 degrees. it looks— parts of scotland 21 or 22 degrees. it looks like a high pressure is sticking — it looks like a high pressure is sticking around for the bank holiday monday— sticking around for the bank holiday monday so— sticking around for the bank holiday monday so another dry day. again, there's— monday so another dry day. again, there's temperatures around 23 degrees — there's temperatures around 23 degrees or so. the high—pressure sticks— degrees or so. the high—pressure sticks around for a few more days yet so _ sticks around for a few more days yet so we — sticks around for a few more days yet so we could see highs on tuesday after about— yet so we could see highs on tuesday after about 24 degrees. the start of meteorological sum is under way, meteorological sum is underway, tuesday— meteorological sum is underway, tuesday is— meteorological sum is under way, tuesday is the 1st ofjune, the start— tuesday is the 1st ofjune, the start of— tuesday is the 1st ofjune, the start of meteorological summer and
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the weather is turning a bit more summary— the weather is turning a bit more summary out there. i the weather is turning a bit more summary out there.— the weather is turning a bit more summary out there. i think we can actually say _ summary out there. i think we can actually say it _ summary out there. i think we can actually say it is _ summary out there. i think we can actually say it is summer - summary out there. i think we can actually say it is summer and - actually say it is summer and believe it, can't we? that actually say it is summer and believe it, can't we?- believe it, can't we? at last. double thumbs _ believe it, can't we? at last. double thumbs up, - believe it, can't we? at last. double thumbs up, i - believe it, can't we? at last. double thumbs up, i like - believe it, can't we? at last. i double thumbs up, i like that. doctor who is one of the most popular sci—fi series on our screens, and now fans will be able to adventure with their favourite time lord in a new immersive theatre experience. getting up close and personal to daleks and cybermen is all part of the fun — as wendy hurrell found out. everybody down! everybody get down! get down, get down, get down, get down! time and space has dramatically fractured inside an unassuming mews building in mayfair... that success has happened, we've made it. ..letting loose alien forces. i'm genuinely terrified. and we, the audience, must save the universe.
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here we go! 42 actors improvising with the audience... you're all going to be my apprentices! my protegees, my interns! and if you do well, you'll be going with me. how's that sound 7 yeah! of course it sounds good! right, then... ..are staged within atmospheric sets in a doctor who immersive theatre experience. fans tried it out last night at the first preview. it gives them a chance to escape, you know, leave the worries at the door, lock out the world for two hours and ten minutes and come explore, have fun, play a character. people are really willing to kind of play a part. and they, you know, they dress up in a costume, they put on an accent, they play objectives and missions. it's brilliant. it's officially licensed by bbc studios, and the writer watched 400 hours of
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doctor who on tv for research. from historical to sci—fi to the horror elements, things are earnest, but they're tongue in cheek, they're high stakes but they're accessible. it's fun for all the family, but there are moments that are so scary only behind the sofa can protect you! it's a lovely, contradictory, wonderful, crazy world that's been a gift for us to realise in the form of an immersive show. where are we sitting at the moment? we are... i've been everywhere! we are in william shakespeare's office. of course we are. so this is from the episode shakespeare's code, which is season three. a lot of it around is kind of a mixture of replications and real props and then sourced items, as well, to try and make the worlds come together. doctor who: time fracture should have opened last year. it'll have its press night onjune the 16th — an ambitious production that shows the pluck of those in the creative industries.
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wendy hurrell, bbc news. a lot of people will be very excited about that, very excited. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm sonja jessup. london 5 tourist attractions are hoping for a bank holiday visitor boom this weekend. it's thought the capital's still missing around 11 million of its annual overseas tourists, so it's domestic visitors who are being encouraged to come into town. certainly from last week, i felt a real push again within london as indoor dining opened up again. there's a lot of birthdays, anniversaries, engagements and general celebrations that need to take place right now, so there's a lot of catching up to be done, so we're excited to be part of that. southend airport is restarting passenger flights from today. the airport's been closed for five months because of the pandemic. there'll be twice weekly
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flights to portugal. the museum of london, which has been collecting items to help record what happened during the pandemic for the next generation, has acquired a special sign from london zoo. it's one thanking the nhs and was placed on the giraffe house during lockdown, so paramedics parking outside on their lunch breaks could see it. now although many music festivals can't go ahead this summer, here's one you canjoin in. bbc radio london is hosting the airwaves festival, a virtual event, all weekend. it features rag n bone man, the manic street preachers and brits rising star winner griff. i've written a mix tape, which is seven songs, and that's coming onjune the 11th... and, yeah, i'm really excited to put them out. i've kind of written and produced them here in my bedroom by myself, and they feel quite personal and intimate. so i hope when i release them into the world, people like them. and then i guess, yeah, i need to get back in and write more
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for some kind of album that's coming soon. and for more on the airwaves festival, just go to the website on your screen. and listen to bbc radio london from 1030. travel now. the circle line has minor delays, and there's no overground between clapham junction and wandsworth road due to a signal failure. and the limehouse link tunnel has been closed in both directions for safety reasons. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a milder start to the day than we saw this time yesterday, many of our temperatures in double figures. there's also quite a bit of cloud around, as well. there's a weather front sitting right out towards the west — it's not giving us any rain, but it is throwing us plenty of cloud, so a cloudier day than we saw yesterday. there will be some breaks emerging, some spells of sunshine, particularly as we head through the afternoon. the sunny spells probably best out towards eastern areas of the capital — do watch out for the small chance of one or two showers breaking out as we head towards the end of the day. top temperatures this afternoon
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in the best of any sunshine could get as high as perhaps 18 to 19 degrees celsius — even 20 not totally out of the question. now, as we head through this evening and overnight, again, plenty of cloud around. it's a mild start to the day on saturday. on saturday, then, again, there'll be quite a bit of cloud, but also some sunny spells emerging. temperatures will start to rise once more. by the time we get to sunday a lot of sunshine. high pressure dominates as we head through next week, so, again, it's looking dry and feeling warm. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on our website now though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. fears that there could be a delay in lifing lockdown in england as cases of the indian variant double in a week. there are calls for 40 specialist surgical hubs to be set up to tackle a "colossal backlog"
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of non—urgent operations. making sure loyalty pays. should insurance firms be banned from raising prices for existing customers, whilst luring new ones with cheap deals? in the next few minutes, we'll find out what could change and what it will mean for your premiums. wonderful images, these. former royal marine mark ormrod who was badly injured in afghanistan has set off on his epic swim to raise money for charity — we'll be following his progress. please come back — all is forgiven. tottenham reach out to, theirformer manager, mauricio pochettino, about returning as boss 18 months after sacking him. the sticking point though, he's only four months into his job at paris st—germain. good morning. a bank holiday weekend
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around the corner and the weather is behaving itself. it will be warming up behaving itself. it will be warming up for the next couple of days. some rain today. details in ten minutes. good morning. it's friday, 28th of may. up to three—quarters of new covid cases in the uk could be linked to the indian variant, according to the health secretary, matt hancock. there are concerns the increase in infections could delay plans to lift all restrictions in england onjune 215t. james reynolds has the latest. in bolton, the race between the vaccine and the variant is fought at the pace of an average british queue. in recent weeks, up to several thousand people a day have waited patiently for their turn to be jabbed. in this town the indian variant is hitting those who haven't been vaccinated. the number of cases of the indian variant in england has more than doubled since last week, rising to almost 7000.
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according to the health secretary, up to three quarters of new uk covid cases could be linked to the variant. the worst affected areas in england continue to be bolton, bedford and blackburn with darwen. seven other areas in england each have more than 100 confirmed cases of the variant. the critical thing to watch is the link from the number of cases, to how many people end up in hospital. the increase in cases remains focused in hotspots, and we're doing all we can to tackle this variant wherever it flares up. the prime minister said we may need to wait for the lifting of all covid restrictions, but he added that there was nothing currently in the data from england to suggest that the easing couldn't go ahead as planned. the next two weeks then may be crucial. a decision is expected in mid—june. james reynolds, bbc news. matt hancock is also under
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growing pressure over the deaths of thousands of care home residents. it comes after the prime minister's former advisor, dominic cummings, accused him of lying early in the pandemic about testing. let's get more now from our political correspondent, ben wright. morning. matt hancock was under a lot of pressure yesterday with various situations where he had to respond to questions? yes. various situations where he had to respond to questions?— respond to questions? yes, good morninu. respond to questions? yes, good morning- and _ respond to questions? yes, good morning. and he _ respond to questions? yes, good morning. and he remains- respond to questions? yes, good morning. and he remains under. morning. and he remains under pressure — morning. and he remains under pressure today. look at the front pages _ pressure today. look at the front pages. these questions have not gone away _ pages. these questions have not gone away in _ pages. these questions have not gone away in his— pages. these questions have not gone away. in his extraordinary evidence to parliament this week, dominic cummings— to parliament this week, dominic cummings had many targets, including borisjohnson, who he said was unfit to be _ borisjohnson, who he said was unfit to be prime — borisjohnson, who he said was unfit to be prime minister. but it was matt— to be prime minister. but it was matt hancock who had some of the fiercest _ matt hancock who had some of the fiercest criticism for, and made nrany— fiercest criticism for, and made many allegations about. and the most danraging. _ many allegations about. and the most damaging, i think, many allegations about. and the most damaging, ithink, was many allegations about. and the most damaging, i think, was his claim that back— damaging, i think, was his claim that back in _ damaging, i think, was his claim that back in the spring of last year. — that back in the spring of last year, matt hancock gave false assurances about the testing of patients— assurances about the testing of patients being transferred from hospitals to care homes as
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coronavirus took hold. now matt hancock — coronavirus took hold. now matt hancock appeared in the house of commons — hancock appeared in the house of commons yesterday, clearly with the hope of _ commons yesterday, clearly with the hope of shrugging this off. he said these _ hope of shrugging this off. he said these unsubstantiated allegations around _ these unsubstantiated allegations around honesty are not true. he then appeared _ around honesty are not true. he then appeared at— around honesty are not true. he then appeared at a downing street press conference later in the afternoon and said — conference later in the afternoon and said his recollection was that he had _ and said his recollection was that he had asked for testing to happen. he then _ he had asked for testing to happen. he then went away to ensure that it could _ he then went away to ensure that it could be _ he then went away to ensure that it could be delivered, to build that testing — could be delivered, to build that testing capacity. he didn't quite rebut— testing capacity. he didn't quite rebut entirely what dominic cummings had said. _ rebut entirely what dominic cummings had said, which is why i think these questions _ had said, which is why i think these questions will continue to follow him around for quite a while yet. and he _ him around for quite a while yet. and he remains under pressure. so last night— and he remains under pressure. so last night on— and he remains under pressure. so last night on question time, nadra ahmed _ last night on question time, nadra ahmed from the national care association, rejected matt hancock because _ association, rejected matt hancock because my previous claim that there was a _ because my previous claim that there was a protective shield but around care homes. she said, we put social care homes. she said, we put social care on— care homes. she said, we put social care on the — care homes. she said, we put social care on the altar to be slaughtered. there _ care on the altar to be slaughtered. there will— care on the altar to be slaughtered. there will be a public enquiry into all of— there will be a public enquiry into all of this— there will be a public enquiry into all of this next year. but that is a
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long _ all of this next year. but that is a long way— all of this next year. but that is a long way off. and until then, matt hancock, — long way off. and until then, matt hancock, borisjohnson and others will continue to come under pressure to answer— will continue to come under pressure to answer dominic cummings's allegations more fully. gk, to answer dominic cummings's allegations more fully. 0k, thank ou. surgeons are calling for specialist hubs to be set up in england, to help tackle what they call the "colossal backlog" of non—urgent operations that have been postponed because of the pandemic. in march, around five million patients were waiting for surgery — that's the highest number since records began. the government says it's working "to accelerate the recovery of services". our health correspondent, laura foster reports. when the pandemic began, hospital trusts had to cancel non—urgent surgery such as hip and knee replacements, so there were enough staff and resources to look after patients with covid. but since then, waiting times and lists have only grown. 14 months on from the first lockdown, latest figures show almost five million people are on the waiting list. more than 400,000 of them have been waiting for more than a year.
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well, these are the worst waiting time figures ever recorded, and we all understand that stuff had to be put on hold whilst there was the pandemic. but now the pandemic is beginning to recede, we need a serious approach to getting into this backlog. the college says the answer is to spend £1 billion over the next five years, and to carry out operations not at local hospitals, but a dedicated hubs. that way, these hubs would still function even if there was another wave of covid, or indeed another pandemic. the college argues people are willing to travel further if it means surgeries happen sooner. laura foster, bbc news. manchester united says it's disgusted by the abuse some of its players have received online following their loss in the europa league final earlier this week. one player, marcus rashford, said he'd been sent at least 70 racial slurs.
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our reporter phil mccann is outside old trafford for us this morning. this is now in the hands of a police investigation. tell us more?- investigation. tell us more? yeah, greater manchester _ investigation. tell us more? yeah, greater manchester police - investigation. tell us more? yeah, greater manchester police are - greater manchester police are looking — greater manchester police are looking into a number of racially aggravated social media posts directed towards a number of manchester united players. this is after that— manchester united players. this is after that europa league final loss on wednesday night. at midnight on wednesday, marcus rashford said he had received at least 70 racial slurs — had received at least 70 racial slurs on— had received at least 70 racial slurs on the social media. he said, i am _ slurs on the social media. he said, i am billed — slurs on the social media. he said, i am billed for criticism of my performance but can't accept some of the racial— performance but can't accept some of the racial taunts directed towards me. the racial taunts directed towards me the — the racial taunts directed towards me. the club has said it has a zero tolerance — me. the club has said it has a zero tolerance attitude towards any form of racism _ tolerance attitude towards any form of racism. the police are going through— of racism. the police are going through these posts to see if any of them _ through these posts to see if any of them might constitute a hate crime. they have _ them might constitute a hate crime. they have warned people who post things _ they have warned people who post things like this saying it may affect— things like this saying it may affect their personal and professional lives. that may be after _ professional lives. that may be after marcus rashford pointed out
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that some of these allegedly racially— that some of these allegedly racially aggravated comments came from somebody who appeared to be a teacher _ from somebody who appeared to be a teacher. there is social media profile — teacher. there is social media profile made clear they were a teacher — profile made clear they were a teacher. the department for education is looking into that. facebook— education is looking into that. facebook says it removed a number of these _ facebook says it removed a number of these posts _ facebook says it removed a number of these posts. this is added to the pressure — these posts. this is added to the pressure social media platforms, under~ _ under. phil, thank uned - phil, thank you. in the last few minutes, we've learned that insurance companies will be banned from offering better deals to new customers and putting up prices for existing ones. ben has got the details. it is one of those things that is very irritating. you think you are being stitched up, basically, that's where? . stitched up, basically, that's where? , ~' stitched up, basically, that's where? , ~ where? yes, you think the company will charre where? yes, you think the company will charge you _ where? yes, you think the company will charge you fairly _ where? yes, you think the company will charge you fairly as _ where? yes, you think the company will charge you fairly as a _ where? yes, you think the company will charge you fairly as a loyal - will charge you fairly as a loyal customer _ will charge you fairly as a loyal customer. but time and time again it happens _ customer. but time and time again it happens. you see those deals where they say. _ happens. you see those deals where they say, new customers only, these
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lower— they say, new customers only, these lower prices — they say, new customers only, these lower prices. what we have heard this morning from the regulator is that that — this morning from the regulator is that that practice will stop. they want _ that that practice will stop. they want to— that that practice will stop. they want to do— that that practice will stop. they want to do that byjanuary of next year _ want to do that byjanuary of next year good — want to do that byjanuary of next year. good morning. this is news that we _ year. good morning. this is news that we have had from the regulator, the financial conduct authority, telling _ the financial conduct authority, telling us — the financial conduct authority, telling us they will enter the so—called loyalty premium. if you were _ so—called loyalty premium. if you were with — so—called loyalty premium. if you were with us earlier, you know we were _ were with us earlier, you know we were talking about this. that idea that you — were talking about this. that idea that you pay more as an existing customer— that you pay more as an existing customer than perhaps somebody who is you _ customer than perhaps somebody who is you are _ customer than perhaps somebody who is you are doing. what the regulator has said _ is you are doing. what the regulator has said is— is you are doing. what the regulator has said is that they will require insurers — has said is that they will require insurers to— has said is that they will require insurers to offer renewing customers a price _ insurers to offer renewing customers a price they— insurers to offer renewing customers a price they say that is no higher than _ a price they say that is no higher than they— a price they say that is no higher than they would pay as an existing customer — than they would pay as an existing customer. so it means that firms will not _ customer. so it means that firms will not be — customer. so it means that firms will not be able to offer what they called _ will not be able to offer what they called unsustainably cheap deals 'ust called unsustainably cheap deals just to _ called unsustainably cheap deals just to get new people in because we know what— just to get new people in because we know what what often happens is that new customers are charged a low price. _ new customers are charged a low price, existing customers are charged _ price, existing customers are charged a _ price, existing customers are charged a higher price. therefore, it all balances out. they say it is unfair _ it all balances out. they say it is unfair they— it all balances out. they say it is unfair. they think ending that
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loyalty— unfair. they think ending that loyalty premium will cost {4.2 billion— loyalty premium will cost {4.2 billion over the next ten years. they— billion over the next ten years. they insist _ billion over the next ten years. they insist firms make it easier to cancel _ they insist firms make it easier to cancel. sometimes they try to stop you cancelling by key people —— where _ you cancelling by key people —— where by— you cancelling by key people —— where by keeping you on hold for a lon- where by keeping you on hold for a long time _ where by keeping you on hold for a long time on the phone, making it notoriously— long time on the phone, making it notoriously complicated to actually endure _ notoriously complicated to actually endure deal. insurers will now need to provide _ endure deal. insurers will now need to provide easier methods of counselling and allow people easier ways to _ counselling and allow people easier ways to renew policies with other providers — ways to renew policies with other providers. they are also going to ask, _ providers. they are also going to ask, and — providers. they are also going to ask, and moderate insurance firms to provide _ ask, and moderate insurance firms to provide them with a lot of data so they can — provide them with a lot of data so they can keep a very close eye on it. they can keep a very close eye on it this— they can keep a very close eye on it. this could affect 6 million people _ it. this could affect 6 million people. saving £4.2 billion over the next ten _ people. saving £4.2 billion over the next ten years. good news if you are due to _ next ten years. good news if you are due to renew — next ten years. good news if you are due to renew your home or car insurance _ due to renew your home or car insurance any time soon. but again, as always. _ insurance any time soon. but again, as always, the same advice. shop around _ as always, the same advice. shop around if— as always, the same advice. shop around if you don't like the deal that you — around if you don't like the deal that you are on.— around if you don't like the deal that you are on. yeah, hopefully it will last. thank _ that you are on. yeah, hopefully it will last. thank you. _ now time for the weather with sarah, who's on the roof of
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new broadcasting house this morning. sarah, looking at maybe add some pretty nice weather for the bank holiday weekend? it is indeed. things looking optimistic over the next couple of days _ optimistic over the next couple of days this— optimistic over the next couple of days. this morning it is a beautiful start— days. this morning it is a beautiful start to _ days. this morning it is a beautiful start to the — days. this morning it is a beautiful start to the day here in london. barely— start to the day here in london. barely a — start to the day here in london. barely a breath of wind. there is some _ barely a breath of wind. there is some milky signs and trying to break through— some milky signs and trying to break through that cloud. but already a little _ through that cloud. but already a little bit — through that cloud. but already a little bit of warmth in that some time _ little bit of warmth in that some time i— little bit of warmth in that some time. i have left my code inside for the first— time. i have left my code inside for the first time in a while. so, today then, _ the first time in a while. so, today then, we _ the first time in a while. so, today then, we are — the first time in a while. so, today then, we are looking at a lot of dry weather— then, we are looking at a lot of dry weather on — then, we are looking at a lot of dry weather on the cards but not everywhere. there is going to be some _ everywhere. there is going to be some patchy rain. particularly across— some patchy rain. particularly across the _ some patchy rain. particularly across the west. a little bit cloudier— across the west. a little bit cloudier than recent days. not quite as warm _ cloudier than recent days. not quite as warm as— cloudier than recent days. not quite as warm as it was yesterday. high pressure — as warm as it was yesterday. high pressure still dominating the weather— pressure still dominating the weather today. that is sitting out towards — weather today. that is sitting out towards the east. more rain in the west _ towards the east. more rain in the west some — towards the east. more rain in the west. some wet weather along irish sea coast, — west. some wet weather along irish sea coast, west of ingham, wales, northern— sea coast, west of ingham, wales, northern ireland and south—east scotland — northern ireland and south—east scotland. most places looking dry. isolated _ scotland. most places looking dry. isolated showers in northumberland.
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temperatures up to 18 in the warmest spots~ _ temperatures up to 18 in the warmest spots 13 _ temperatures up to 18 in the warmest spots 13 for _ temperatures up to 18 in the warmest spots. 13 for aberdeen where there is more _ spots. 13 for aberdeen where there is more cloud. this evening and overnight— is more cloud. this evening and overnight looking dry for many. showers — overnight looking dry for many. showers slowly easing. the rain in the west— showers slowly easing. the rain in the west fizzling out overnight. so perhaps _ the west fizzling out overnight. so perhaps some drizzle left first thing — perhaps some drizzle left first thing on — perhaps some drizzle left first thing on saturday. ten to 11 degrees in the _ thing on saturday. ten to 11 degrees in the west — thing on saturday. ten to 11 degrees in the west. under clear skies, six to seven _ in the west. under clear skies, six to seven towards the east. saturday starts _ to seven towards the east. saturday starts off— to seven towards the east. saturday starts off on that fairly marking out for — starts off on that fairly marking out for some. it will brighten up through— out for some. it will brighten up through the day. sunny spells from many— through the day. sunny spells from many areas. some sharp showers into parts _ many areas. some sharp showers into parts of— many areas. some sharp showers into parts of scotland. temperatures getting — parts of scotland. temperatures getting up to 21 degrees on saturday. you will be pleased to know _ saturday. you will be pleased to know that — saturday. you will be pleased to know that high pressure will hold on through— know that high pressure will hold on through the course of the weekend into the _ through the course of the weekend into the bank holiday monday as well _ into the bank holiday monday as well. things turning increasingly warm _ well. things turning increasingly warm and — well. things turning increasingly warm and also increasingly sunny. quite _ warm and also increasingly sunny. quite a _ warm and also increasingly sunny. quite a pleasant message to be able to deliver— quite a pleasant message to be able to deliver to you with the bank holiday— to deliver to you with the bank holiday weekend just around the programme —— corner. programme “ corner. a programme —— corner. a lovely— programme —— corner. a lovely want to receive. thank you.
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throughout the programme this morning we are following a remarkable man doing a remarkable thing. earlier on the programme we watched former royal marine commando mark ormrod set off on his charity swim challenge. mark lost both legs and an arm in an explosion in afghanistan in 2007. today this is what he is doing. he has done some remarkable things. john maguire has been watching, we watched him set off this morning. he is powering through. john, how is he doing? he is powering through. john, how is he doinu ? . is powering through. john, how is he doinu ? , ., . , , doing? he is doing incredibly well. we think they _ doing? he is doing incredibly well. we think they are _ doing? he is doing incredibly well. we think they are just _ doing? he is doing incredibly well. we think they are just over- doing? he is doing incredibly well. | we think they are just over halfway. well ahead — we think they are just over halfway. well ahead of schedule. we thought it was— well ahead of schedule. we thought it was going to take an hour. that is marked — it was going to take an hour. that is marked at _ it was going to take an hour. that is marked at the back. a distinctive swimming — is marked at the back. a distinctive swimming style. you canjust see his left arm _ swimming style. you canjust see his left arm going up and out of the water _ left arm going up and out of the water. when he comes out of the water, _ water. when he comes out of the water, obviously, he has to lift himself— water, obviously, he has to lift himself up— water, obviously, he has to lift himself up more than a normal swimmer— himself up more than a normal swimmer would. you can see him
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bounce _ swimmer would. you can see him bounce up— swimmer would. you can see him bounce up with the orange cap. we have managed to pull sharron davies out of— have managed to pull sharron davies out of the _ have managed to pull sharron davies out of the gang. you have been helping — out of the gang. you have been helping mark a little bit. how out of the gang. you have been helping mark a little bit. how is he caettin helping mark a little bit. how is he getting on? _ helping mark a little bit. how is he getting on? he _ helping mark a little bit. how is he getting on? he is _ helping mark a little bit. how is he getting on? he is doing _ helping mark a little bit. how is he getting on? he is doing amazing. i helping mark a little bit. how is he l getting on? he is doing amazing. he .ot getting on? he is doing amazing. he got hit _ getting on? he is doing amazing. he got hit with— getting on? he is doing amazing. he got hit with a — getting on? he is doing amazing. he got hit with a big _ getting on? he is doing amazing. he got hit with a big jellyfish _ getting on? he is doing amazing. he got hit with a big jellyfish in - getting on? he is doing amazing. he got hit with a big jellyfish in the - got hit with a big jellyfish in the face about— got hit with a big jellyfish in the face about 100 _ got hit with a big jellyfish in the face about 100 yards _ got hit with a big jellyfish in the face about 100 yards out. - got hit with a big jellyfish in the face about 100 yards out. thati face about 100 yards out. that spooked — face about 100 yards out. that spooked him~ _ face about 100 yards out. that spooked him. he _ face about 100 yards out. that spooked him. he is— face about 100 yards out. that spooked him. he is quite - face about 100 yards out. that. spooked him. he is quite cheerful out there — spooked him. he is quite cheerful out there i— spooked him. he is quite cheerful out there. i am _ spooked him. he is quite cheerful out there. i am cheating - spooked him. he is quite cheerful out there. i am cheating by- spooked him. he is quite cheerful. out there. i am cheating by keeping my face _ out there. i am cheating by keeping my face and — out there. i am cheating by keeping my face and hands _ out there. i am cheating by keeping my face and hands out _ out there. i am cheating by keeping my face and hands out of— out there. i am cheating by keeping my face and hands out of the - out there. i am cheating by keeping| my face and hands out of the water. that is _ my face and hands out of the water. that is working _ my face and hands out of the water. that is working for _ my face and hands out of the water. that is working for me. _ my face and hands out of the water. that is working for me. he - my face and hands out of the water. that is working for me.— that is working for me. he hasn't had a rest _ that is working for me. he hasn't had a rest yet? _ that is working for me. he hasn't had a rest yet? he _ that is working for me. he hasn't had a rest yet? he does - that is working for me. he hasn't had a rest yet? he does a - that is working for me. he hasn't had a rest yet? he does a few . had a rest yet? he does a few strokes and _ had a rest yet? he does a few strokes and then _ had a rest yet? he does a few strokes and then he _ had a rest yet? he does a few strokes and then he stops. i had a rest yet? he does a few strokes and then he stops. as had a rest yet? he does a few i strokes and then he stops. as a breather — strokes and then he stops. as a breather. because _ strokes and then he stops. as a breather. because he _ strokes and then he stops. as a breather. because he only- strokes and then he stops. as a breather. because he only has. strokes and then he stops. as a i breather. because he only has one limb, _ breather. because he only has one limb, the — breather. because he only has one limb, the moment— breather. because he only has one limb, the moment he— breather. because he only has one limb, the moment he stops- breather. because he only has one limb, the moment he stops losing| limb, the moment he stops losing that. _ limb, the moment he stops losing that, he _ limb, the moment he stops losing that, he starts— limb, the moment he stops losing that, he starts to _ limb, the moment he stops losing that, he starts to sing. _ limb, the moment he stops losing that, he starts to sing. he - limb, the moment he stops losing that, he starts to sing. he needs. limb, the moment he stops losingi that, he starts to sing. he needs to keep— that, he starts to sing. he needs to keep his _ that, he starts to sing. he needs to keep his momentum _ that, he starts to sing. he needs to keep his momentum going. - that, he starts to sing. he needs to keep his momentum going. he - that, he starts to sing. he needs to keep his momentum going. he is. that, he starts to sing. he needs to - keep his momentum going. he is doing brilliant~ _ keep his momentum going. he is doing brilliant. hehr— keep his momentum going. he is doing brilliant. ., . . , brilliant. how have the currents been? you _ brilliant. how have the currents been? you can't _ brilliant. how have the currents been? you can't swim - brilliant. how have the currents been? you can't swim in - brilliant. how have the currents been? you can't swim in a - brilliant. how have the currents i been? you can't swim in a straight line? no, been? you can't swim in a straight line? no. we _ been? you can't swim in a straight line? no, we are _ been? you can't swim in a straight line? no, we are being _ been? you can't swim in a straight line? no, we are being pulled - been? you can't swim in a straightl line? no, we are being pulled down been? you can't swim in a straight i line? no, we are being pulled down a little bit _ line? no, we are being pulled down a little bit we — line? no, we are being pulled down a little bit. we are _ line? no, we are being pulled down a little bit. we are aware _ line? no, we are being pulled down a little bit. we are aware of _ line? no, we are being pulled down a little bit. we are aware of that. - line? no, we are being pulled down a little bit. we are aware of that. it - little bit. we are aware of that. it is a nice — little bit. we are aware of that. it is a nice day— little bit. we are aware of that. it is a nice day today. _ little bit. we are aware of that. it is a nice day today. the _ little bit. we are aware of that. it is a nice day today. the water- little bit. we are aware of that. it is a nice day today. the water is i is a nice day today. the water is pretty— is a nice day today. the water is pretty flat~ _ is a nice day today. the water is pretty flat~ it _ is a nice day today. the water is pretty flat. it is _ is a nice day today. the water is pretty flat. it is chilly. _ is a nice day today. the water is pretty flat. it is chilly. apart - pretty flat. it is chilly. apart from — pretty flat. it is chilly. apart from that, _ pretty flat. it is chilly. apart from that, not _ pretty flat. it is chilly. apart from that, not too - pretty flat. it is chilly. apart from that, not too bad. - pretty flat. it is chilly. apart from that, not too bad. itritlttzl pretty flat. it is chilly. apart from that, not too bad. we will let ou to. from that, not too bad. we will let you go- thank _ from that, not too bad. we will let you go- thank you. _ from that, not too bad. we will let
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you go. thank you, sharon. - from that, not too bad. we will let you go. thank you, sharon. good l you go. thank you, sharon. good luck _ you go. thank you, sharon. good luck. looking back over into the main _ luck. looking back over into the main group _ luck. looking back over into the main group there, they do seem to be doing _ main group there, they do seem to be doing really— main group there, they do seem to be doing really well. spread out across — doing really well. spread out across a— doing really well. spread out across. a couple of those swimmers on the _ across. a couple of those swimmers on the extremities there checking things— on the extremities there checking things are — on the extremities there checking things are ok, perhaps giving some advice _ things are ok, perhaps giving some advice on _ things are ok, perhaps giving some advice on exactly where to swim. just amazing to think that with just one limb— just amazing to think that with just one limb you can swim a kilometre through— one limb you can swim a kilometre through open water. join us later and we _ through open water. join us later and we will— through open water. join us later and we will see him come out of the water _ water. thank you so water. — thank you so much. all of this of course is for charity. he has set a target of 400,000. he is at £289,677. he is doing it live on this programme. from experience, charlie, we know that breakfast viewers do get on—board with challenges, don't they? all for a good cause. that is what mark is doing this morning.
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yeah, and as sharon was just explaining, in amongst the challenges, which are very obvious for mark given what is injuries, he has to swim with just one arm, as john was saying. if he stops moving forward he sinks. he has a sport team around him. —— support. they have to be out by eight o'clock. the jellyfish in the face.— jellyfish in the face. what do you do? scream! _ jellyfish in the face. what do you do? scream! 1— jellyfish in the face. what do you do? scream! ithink— jellyfish in the face. what do you do? scream! i think you - jellyfish in the face. what do you do? scream! i think you do - jellyfish in the face. what do you do? scream! i think you do that| jellyfish in the face. what do you i do? scream! i think you do that and keep going- — do? scream! i think you do that and keep going- we _ do? scream! i think you do that and keep going. we will— do? scream! i think you do that and keep going. we will keep _ do? scream! i think you do that and keep going. we will keep tabs i do? scream! i think you do that and keep going. we will keep tabs on i keep going. we will keep tabs on that throughout the morning. {toad that throughout the morning. good morninu. calls for all those eligible to come forward for their coronavirus vaccine have been stepped up by ministers, after cases of the indian variant doubled in england in the last week. one of the areas which has seen an increase in infections linked to the variant is hounslow in west london. we're joined now by the council's director of public health, kelly o'neill.
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good morning to you. thank you for joining us. tell me what is going on and what your role is now where you are? , ., ., ., and what your role is now where you are? ,., ., ., ., ,., and what your role is now where you are? ., ., and what your role is now where you are? . ., ., ,., ,., ., are? good morning to you both. how do ou are? good morning to you both. how do you follow— are? good morning to you both. how do you follow the _ are? good morning to you both. how do you follow the last _ are? good morning to you both. how do you follow the last story? - are? good morning to you both. how do you follow the last story? we i do you follow the last story? we don't do you follow the last story? , don't expect you to do that. do you follow the last story? we i don't expect you to do that. well! let me paint _ don't expect you to do that. well! let me paint a — don't expect you to do that. well! let me paint a picture _ don't expect you to do that. well! let me paint a picture for - don't expect you to do that. well! let me paint a picture for you i don't expect you to do that. well! let me paint a picture for you in l let me paint a picture for you in hounslow — let me paint a picture for you in hounslow. yes, we have seen an increase — hounslow. yes, we have seen an increase in— hounslow. yes, we have seen an increase in the number of places which _ increase in the number of places which have — increase in the number of places which have been attributed to this strain _ which have been attributed to this strain it — which have been attributed to this strain. it was first identified in india — strain. it was first identified in india as — strain. it was first identified in india as a _ strain. it was first identified in india. as a result, we are in sort ofa— india. as a result, we are in sort of a storage _ india. as a result, we are in sort of a storage position of increased testing _ of a storage position of increased testing and increase vaccination. this is— testing and increase vaccination. this is a — testing and increase vaccination. this is a huge opportunity for our borough — this is a huge opportunity for our borough. 0n the ground there has been _ borough. 0n the ground there has been a _ borough. 0n the ground there has been a concerted one hounslow effort of nhs, _ been a concerted one hounslow effort of nhs, voluntary sector, local authority. _ of nhs, voluntary sector, local authority, big organisations working together— authority, big organisations working together with our residents, to
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really— together with our residents, to really step up on the number of pcr tests that _ really step up on the number of pcr tests that we are doing, gauging with local— tests that we are doing, gauging with local communities and the big ticket _ with local communities and the big ticket item, the number of vaccinations we've got on the ground — vaccinations we've got on the ground i— vaccinations we've got on the ground. i am so uplifted as of yesterday. yesterday we had a massive — yesterday. yesterday we had a massive vaccination centre at one of our seek— massive vaccination centre at one of our seek temples. 1300 people came through _ our seek temples. 1300 people came through. all ages across all communities. and it wasjust so uplifting — communities. and it wasjust so uplifting. we are repeating that today— uplifting. we are repeating that today at — uplifting. we are repeating that today at a mosque and an education centre _ today at a mosque and an education centre tomorrow. and on monday, a massive _ centre tomorrow. and on monday, a massive - _ centre tomorrow. and on monday, a massive - it's— centre tomorrow. and on monday, a massive — it's the biggest vaccination centre in the country, we will— vaccination centre in the country, we will be — vaccination centre in the country, we will be vaccinating 15,000 people at twickenham stadium. so it's a really— at twickenham stadium. so it's a really exciting time. and i think people — really exciting time. and i think people have really stepped up to the mark _ people have really stepped up to the mark. . . . people have really stepped up to the mark. . , , ., ~ people have really stepped up to the mark. , . ,, . mark. there has been talk about reluctance _ mark. there has been talk about reluctance to _ mark. there has been talk about reluctance to come _ mark. there has been talk about reluctance to come forward. i mark. there has been talk about reluctance to come forward. you mention of these numbers, 1300 at the temple, 16,000 is the hope
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tomorrow. how many was your target? the target is to fill every single one of— the target is to fill every single one of those spaces in the first instance — one of those spaces in the first instance. we have had a body good uptake _ instance. we have had a body good uptake of— instance. we have had a body good uptake of vaccination across the board _ uptake of vaccination across the board here in hounslow. but it masks that in— board here in hounslow. but it masks that in some — board here in hounslow. but it masks that in some communities uptake has been less _ that in some communities uptake has been less. there are about one in ten people — been less. there are about one in ten people who have been eligible for a vaccination who have not been vaccinated — for a vaccination who have not been vaccinated so far. but within certain — vaccinated so far. but within certain communities that reduces to about— certain communities that reduces to about one _ certain communities that reduces to about one in five. if yesterday is anything — about one in five. if yesterday is anything to go by, we have reached out into— anything to go by, we have reached out into those communities and the communities have mobilised themselves to come forward. sol communities have mobilised themselves to come forward. so i am expecting _ themselves to come forward. so i am expecting to — themselves to come forward. so i am expecting to see before the end of the week, — expecting to see before the end of the week, a massive change in our data that _ the week, a massive change in our data that demonstrates that people who should have been vaccination previously — who should have been vaccination previously are now coming forward. so what _ previously are now coming forward. so what has — previously are now coming forward. so what has changed in terms of accessing them? if the government message has not got through, has it had to be much more at a grassroots
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level? ., ., , , had to be much more at a grassroots level? ,, , , level? 0h, goodness, yes. historically, _ level? 0h, goodness, yes. historically, health - level? 0h, goodness, yes. i historically, health services, and pretty— historically, health services, and pretty much all services, are tailored _ pretty much all services, are tailored to apply to everybody. but what we _ tailored to apply to everybody. but what we have found is that if you reach _ what we have found is that if you reach into — what we have found is that if you reach into communities and ask them what would _ reach into communities and ask them what would make them come forward to be vaccinated, or access health service, — be vaccinated, or access health service, they will tell us. what they— service, they will tell us. what they told — service, they will tell us. what they told us is, do it on a one—to—one basis, come and talk to us, we _ one—to—one basis, come and talk to us, we will— one—to—one basis, come and talk to us, we will tell us, and if you answer— us, we will tell us, and if you answer our— us, we will tell us, and if you answer our questions we will respond _ answer our questions we will respond. that is what we are seeing on the _ respond. that is what we are seeing on the ground. thus respond. that is what we are seeing on the ground-— on the ground. as director of public health for hounslow, _ on the ground. as director of public health for hounslow, tell _ on the ground. as director of public health for hounslow, tell me - on the ground. as director of public health for hounslow, tell me these | health for hounslow, tell me these things. as the messaging always been clear to you, particularly in light of the increase in cases of the indian variant?— of the increase in cases of the indian variant? ., . , �* . , indian variant? no, it hasn't always been. i indian variant? no, it hasn't always been- i think _ indian variant? no, it hasn't always been. i think throughout _ indian variant? no, it hasn't always been. i think throughout the - been. i think throughout the pandemic there has been a mismatch between _ pandemic there has been a mismatch between central government and local delivery _ between central government and local delivery. and i think that has started —
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delivery. and i think that has started to effectively change. communication has got better. we had a little _ communication has got better. we had a little bit _ communication has got better. we had a little bit of a disruption this week— a little bit of a disruption this week in— a little bit of a disruption this week in terms of messaging. that was about whether — week in terms of messaging. that was about whether or _ week in terms of messaging. that was about whether or not _ week in terms of messaging. that was about whether or not people _ week in terms of messaging. that was about whether or not people should i about whether or not people should enter or leave the area?— enter or leave the area? yeah. i think it's — enter or leave the area? yeah. i think it's fair — enter or leave the area? yeah. i think it's fair to _ enter or leave the area? yeah. i think it's fair to say _ enter or leave the area? yeah. i think it's fair to say that - enter or leave the area? yeah. i think it's fair to say that we i think it's fair to say that we hadn't _ think it's fair to say that we hadn't seen that message. it wasn't communicated to us. and we had a conversation with a government official — conversation with a government official. they listened and they responded. that was tuesday. we need to get— responded. that was tuesday. we need to get past— responded. that was tuesday. we need to get past that. on the horizon now is getting _ to get past that. on the horizon now is getting these vaccination spaces filled. _ is getting these vaccination spaces filled, getting our community mobilised to fill them. because actually. — mobilised to fill them. because actually, this is a huge opportunity to really— actually, this is a huge opportunity to really deliver the vaccination programme at pace. and to really deliver the vaccination programme at pace.— to really deliver the vaccination programme at pace. to really deliver the vaccination rouramme at ace. �* ., ,., ~' programme at pace. and now you think the messaging — programme at pace. and now you think the messaging is _ programme at pace. and now you think the messaging is more _ programme at pace. and now you think the messaging is more clear _ programme at pace. and now you think the messaging is more clear and - programme at pace. and now you think the messaging is more clear and has i the messaging is more clear and has been communicated, are you getting what you need? that been communicated, are you getting what you need?— been communicated, are you getting what you need? at the moment, yes. i think there is — what you need? at the moment, yes. i think there is always _ what you need? at the moment, yes. i think there is always room _ what you need? at the moment, yes. i think there is always room for- think there is always room for improvement. i think the engagement that we _ improvement. i think the engagement that we are _ improvement. i think the engagement that we are having with our community groups allows us to think,
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what is _ community groups allows us to think, what is next? historically, these are groups — what is next? historically, these are groups that we have labelled hard to _ are groups that we have labelled hard to reach. i think in truth they have _ hard to reach. i think in truth they have been— hard to reach. i think in truth they have been hardly reached. all of this activity around the vaccination programme has allowed us to stop and think and _ programme has allowed us to stop and think and talk to these communities. so i would _ think and talk to these communities. so i would hope that moving forward we start _ so i would hope that moving forward we start to _ so i would hope that moving forward we start to look at how we deliver services _ we start to look at how we deliver services in — we start to look at how we deliver services in a — we start to look at how we deliver services in a more effective way that meets the needs of our communities rather than the historical— communities rather than the historical where they have been delivered — historical where they have been delivered to apply to everybody. should _ delivered to apply to everybody. should you have the power to lock down local areas, even schools in your area, down local areas, even schools in yourarea, and down local areas, even schools in your area, and do you, down local areas, even schools in yourarea, and do you, and down local areas, even schools in your area, and do you, and would you? your area, and do you, and would ou? ~ . . your area, and do you, and would ou? you? well... let me stand back and sa that you? well... let me stand back and say that local _ you? well... let me stand back and say that local lockdown _ you? well... let me stand back and say that local lockdown does - you? well... let me stand back and say that local lockdown does not i say that local lockdown does not apply _ say that local lockdown does not apply. i — say that local lockdown does not apply. i think they would need to be conversations with national government. if we saw a risk that would _ government. if we saw a risk that would leave some of our population
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unprotected. what we have taken is a very case—by—case approach, that where _ very case—by—case approach, that where we — very case—by—case approach, that where we have had outbreaks, for example _ where we have had outbreaks, for example in— where we have had outbreaks, for example in schools, we have worked with head _ example in schools, we have worked with head teachers to ensure that you groups and classes have isolated at home _ you groups and classes have isolated at home. but actually, i think that any suggestion of lockdown is a long way away~ _ any suggestion of lockdown is a long way away. it would damage us economically and socially. and actually. — economically and socially. and actually, it would end up with us losing _ actually, it would end up with us losing confidence with our communities. and we are nowhere near that. . , . communities. and we are nowhere near that. . , , ., . ,, ., that. really interesting to talk to ou. kell that. really interesting to talk to you. kelly o'neill, _ that. really interesting to talk to you. kelly o'neill, director- that. really interesting to talk to you. kelly o'neill, director of. you. kelly o'neill, director of public health at hounslow council, thank you. public health at hounslow council, thank ou. . .. public health at hounslow council, thank ou. . ,, ,., from the lst ofjune, anyone driving into parts of birmingham city centre will have to pay a minimum £8 daily charge. it's part of the city's clean air zone to tackle high levels of pollution, but it's not been welcomed by everyone — as phil mackie reports. birmingham from above. and everything you can see would be part
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of the city's clean air zone. that is from the beginning of next month. older or more polluting vehicles will be charged to enter. it will cost £8 per day for cars and vans, £50 for coaches and lorries. if your vehicle was bought before september 2015, you will probably be charged. this marks the boundary of the clean air zone. that; this marks the boundary of the clean air zone. �* . ., this marks the boundary of the clean air zone. ~ , ., ., ,., this marks the boundary of the clean airzone. a ., ., y., , . this marks the boundary of the clean airzone. a ., , . ., air zone. as long as you stand on that side. — air zone. as long as you stand on that side, you're _ air zone. as long as you stand on that side, you're 0k. _ air zone. as long as you stand on that side, you're ok. if— air zone. as long as you stand on that side, you're ok. if you - air zone. as long as you stand on that side, you're ok. if you come | that side, you're ok. if you come into the city centre you will be liable for up to £8 a day if your vehicle is too old. lucy wood has severe asthma. she has been better during the pandemic because there has been less traffic. i am during the pandemic because there has been less traffic.— has been less traffic. i am hoping it's a real success, _ has been less traffic. i am hoping it's a real success, so _ has been less traffic. i am hoping it's a real success, so they - has been less traffic. i am hoping it's a real success, so they will i it's a real success, so they will widen it and do more campaigns. we do a lot of cycling. we only have one car. my husband cycles. we cycled to school today. we want to try our best as a family to
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contribute the best we can. but she is in a minority- _ contribute the best we can. but she is in a minority. most— contribute the best we can. but she is in a minority. most people - contribute the best we can. but she is in a minority. most people are i is in a minority. most people are against the clean air zone. this florist thinks it's a good idea in principle but after losing most of the regular business during the pandemic she will have to replace her two delivery vans which are too old. ~ . ., ., ., her two delivery vans which are too old. ~ . ., . , , old. we have two good vehicles but we have to — old. we have two good vehicles but we have to get _ old. we have two good vehicles but we have to get rid _ old. we have two good vehicles but we have to get rid of _ old. we have two good vehicles but we have to get rid of them. - old. we have two good vehicles but we have to get rid of them. that i old. we have two good vehicles but we have to get rid of them. that is| we have to get rid of them. that is 35, maybe — we have to get rid of them. that is 35, maybe £40,000 cost. at the moment, — 35, maybe £40,000 cost. at the moment, just after the pandemic, we cannot— moment, just after the pandemic, we cannot afford it.— cannot afford it. another potential -roblem cannot afford it. another potential roblem is cannot afford it. another potential problem is the _ cannot afford it. another potential problem is the way _ cannot afford it. another potential problem is the way people - cannot afford it. another potential problem is the way people a i cannot afford it. another potential. problem is the way people a choice. fees will run from midnight to midnight, so if you want to come into the city for a night out, you may have to pay twice. the night—time economy is really suffering. there is a fear people will be put off from coming out. tbs, will be put off from coming out. lot of our staff and students would do dry. they drive older cars. we have entertainment on, djs and live musicians, and they couldn't use public transport.— public transport. there are exemptions. _ public transport. there are exemptions. if— public transport. there are exemptions. if you - public transport. there are exemptions. if you earn i public transport. there are i exemptions. if you earn less than £30,000 per year, you won't have to
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p37- £30,000 per year, you won't have to pay. there is a scheme for people trading in older vehicles. tote pay. there is a scheme for people trading in older vehicles.- pay. there is a scheme for people trading in older vehicles. we have a ublic trading in older vehicles. we have a public health _ trading in older vehicles. we have a public health crisis _ trading in older vehicles. we have a public health crisis where _ trading in older vehicles. we have a public health crisis where hundreds| public health crisis where hundreds of people _ public health crisis where hundreds of people are dying prematurely because — of people are dying prematurely because of illegal and unsafe levels of air— because of illegal and unsafe levels of air quality. we have to introduce this to _ of air quality. we have to introduce this to save — of air quality. we have to introduce this to save those lives.— this to save those lives. there is a lot of opposition _ this to save those lives. there is a lot of opposition to _ this to save those lives. there is a lot of opposition to this _ this to save those lives. there is a lot of opposition to this in - lot of opposition to this in birmingham. what do you say to people who object to it? i get birmingham. what do you say to people who object to it? people who ob'ect to it? i get that. 7596 of the people who object to it? i get that. 7596 of the people _ people who object to it? i get that. 7596 of the people that _ people who object to it? i get that. 7596 of the people that were i people who object to it? i get that. l 7596 of the people that were driving 75% of the people that were driving to the _ 75% of the people that were driving to the clean air zone today would not be _ to the clean air zone today would not be impacted at all. they to the clean air zone today would not be impacted at all.— not be impacted at all. they are drivin: not be impacted at all. they are driving compliant _ not be impacted at all. they are driving compliant vehicles. - not be impacted at all. they are i driving compliant vehicles. traffic is back to 90% of pre—pandemic levels in the city. it is hoped the clean air zone will mean it is never as bad as it was before. phil mackie, bbc news, birmingham. from those gorgeous pictures they are to a rather fascinating view. a story we have been following this morning of my comrade. yes. story we have been following this morning of my comrade. yes, these are the pictures. _ morning of my comrade. yes, these are the pictures. just _ morning of my comrade. yes, these are the pictures. just off _ morning of my comrade. yes, these are the pictures. just off the - morning of my comrade. yes, these are the pictures. just off the coast l are the pictures. just off the coast of plymouth. —— mark ormerod. mark
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is a former royal marine. you may have seen him before and breakfast. we talk to him quite a bit. he lost both legs and an arm in an explosion in afghanistan in 2007. he has been doing a series of challenges. this is the latest one, swimming one kilometre. he only has propulsion via one arm. we saw him take off about 20 minutes ago. he is in the water now. he has a team to support him. i'm not sure whether you can work out which one he is. i am told he is in the orange cap. this is from our drone shot. we know so far that there is a warship due to come through quite shortly. he has already had a jellyfish in the face. other than that, it is all going swimmingly. well done, mike. john maguire is down there. he will be chatting to when he finishes. not much doubt that he will finish will stop enjoy that. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning, i'm sonja jessup. london's tourist attractions are hoping for a bank holiday visitor boom this weekend. it's thought the capital's still missing around 11 million of its annual overseas tourists — so it's domestic visitors who are being encouraged to come into town. certainly from last week, i felt a real push again within london as indoor dining opened up again. there's a lot of birthdays, anniversaries, engagements and general celebrations that need to take place right now, so there's a lot of catching up to be done, so we're excited to be part of that. southend airport is restarting passenger flights from today. the airport's been closed for five months because of the pandemic. there'll be twice—weekly flights to portugal. the museum of london — which has been collecting items to help record what happened during the pandemic for the next generation — has acquired a special sign from london zoo. it's one thanking the nhs, and was placed on the giraffe house during lockdown so paramedics parking outside on their lunch breaks could see it.
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now, although many music festivals can't go ahead this summer, here's one you canjoin in. # and boy, you know i've tried to pray. # i've bruised my knees. # i've tried to breathe you back to me. radio london is hosting the airwaves festival — a virtual event — all weekend. it features rag'n�*bone man, the manic street preachers and brits rising star winner griff. i've written a mix tape, which is seven songs, and that's coming on june the 11th. .. and, yeah, i'm really excited to put them out. i've kind of written and produced them here in my bedroom by myself, and they feel quite personal and intimate. so i hope when i release them into the world, people like them. and then i guess, yeah, i need to get back in and write more for some kind of album that's coming soon. and for more on the airwaves festival, just go to the website on your screen — and listen to bbc radio london from 10.30. travel now... the circle line has minor delays and there's no overground between clapham junction and wandsworth road due
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to a signal failure. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a milder start to the day than we saw this time yesterday, many of our temperatures in double figures. there's also quite a bit of cloud around, as well. there's a weather front sitting right out towards the west — it's not giving us any rain, but it is throwing us plenty of cloud, so a cloudier day than we saw yesterday. there will be some breaks emerging, some spells of sunshine, particularly as we head through the afternoon. the sunny spells probably best out towards eastern areas of the capital — do watch out for the small chance of one or two showers breaking out as we head towards the end of the day. top temperatures this afternoon in the best of any sunshine could get as high as perhaps 18 to 19 degrees celsius — even 20 not totally out of the question. now, as we head through this evening and overnight, again, plenty of cloud around. it's a mild start to the day on saturday.
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on saturday, then, again, there'll be quite a bit of cloud, but also some sunny spells emerging. temperatures will start to rise once more. by the time we get to sunday a lot of sunshine. high pressure dominates as we head through next week, so, again, it's looking dry and feeling warm. i'm back in an hour. plenty more on our website. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. let's charlie stayt and naga munchetty. bring you up—to main let's bring you up—to—date with the main stories this morning. up to three—quarters of new covid cases could be linked to the indian variant — that's according to the health secretary, matt hancock. there are concerns the increase in infections could delay plans to lift all restrictions in england on june 21st. cases of the variant in england have doubled to almost 7,000 in the last week.
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let's speak to the business secretary. i wonder if you could pick up on a note, we were talking to kelly o'neill, the director of public health in hounslow, as you know is one of the problem areas in terms of the indian variant particularly. she was saying that at twickenham stadium there would be hopefully 15,000 people vaccinated injust stadium there would be hopefully 15,000 people vaccinated in just the one location as part of their drive. there is clearly a massive impetus going into these places and that was an example of it, which is one of the things to celebrate at the moment. ~ , a, , , ., the things to celebrate at the moment. ~ ,,., , , ., ., ., moment. absolutely. it is a good thin that moment. absolutely. it is a good thing that lots _ moment. absolutely. it is a good thing that lots and _ moment. absolutely. it is a good thing that lots and lots _ moment. absolutely. it is a good thing that lots and lots of - moment. absolutely. it is a good | thing that lots and lots of people, millions in fact, have been vaccinated and thousands more are going to get vaccinated in the next few days and weeks. i think it is a really, really successful outcome of a great tribute to the nhs, to people who are embracing the prospect of being vaccinated and protecting other people. figs
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prospect of being vaccinated and protecting other people.- prospect of being vaccinated and protecting other people. as we quite riuhtl protecting other people. as we quite rightly should _ protecting other people. as we quite rightly should praise _ protecting other people. as we quite rightly should praise those _ protecting other people. as we quite rightly should praise those who - protecting other people. as we quite rightly should praise those who are l rightly should praise those who are doing it on the ground and the upscaling of those vaccinations in those areas, in the same breath we are talking about the rise in the indian variant, particularly in england, and that worrying rise, doubling injust england, and that worrying rise, doubling in just a week. england, and that worrying rise, doubling injust a week. can england, and that worrying rise, doubling in just a week. can you give us a sense of the correlation between the rise in those infection numbers and thejune 2i relaxation date? figs numbers and the june 21 relaxation date? �* , , ., numbers and the june 21 relaxation date? a ~' ., numbers and the june 21 relaxation date? a ~ ., ., , date? as you know we have been lookin: at date? as you know we have been looking at data _ date? as you know we have been looking at data on _ date? as you know we have been looking at data on a _ date? as you know we have been looking at data on a daily - date? as you know we have been looking at data on a daily basis i looking at data on a daily basis almost minute by minute and we where very clear as we set out at the beginning, when the road map was announced, we have been very clear that we would be looking at the scientific data before we rush to any conclusions, and we have said that, as far as i can see, there is nothing in the data that will delay the date, but we are always reviewing the data and we will come to a final conclusion on whether to
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reopen on the 21st ofjune onjune the 14th. reopen on the 21st ofjune on june the 14th. ., , ., �* , , , the 14th. kwasi kwarteng, business secreta , the 14th. kwasi kwarteng, business secretary, thank _ the 14th. kwasi kwarteng, business secretary, thank you _ the 14th. kwasi kwarteng, business secretary, thank you very _ the 14th. kwasi kwarteng, business secretary, thank you very much - the 14th. kwasi kwarteng, business secretary, thank you very much for| secretary, thank you very much for your time this morning. we've been with former royal marine and triple amputee mark ormrod all morning as he attempts a gruelling open—water swim to raise money for charity. john maguire has been following him. we are back on the mainland at firestone bay and he is about 20 seconds away. this man is made of iron, i can tell you. absolutely extraordinary. made it across. sharon davies, swimming with him, told us he got hit in the face with a jellyfish. cheering you can hear the crowd, cheering as he comes up, socially distance, of course. you made it. just! just! how was it? . course. you made it. just! just! how wasit? . , course. you made it. just! just! how wasit? ., , ., . was it? that last bit was rough. we
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not was it? that last bit was rough. we got causht. — was it? that last bit was rough. we got caught, drifted _ was it? that last bit was rough. we got caught, drifted off— was it? that last bit was rough. we got caught, drifted off because - was it? that last bit was rough. we got caught, drifted off because of l got caught, drifted off because of the current and tide. but... we made it, the current and tide. but... we made it. so_ the current and tide. but... we made it, so happy— the current and tide. but... we made it, so happy days. i can't speak, my 'aw it, so happy days. i can't speak, my jaw is _ it, so happy days. i can't speak, my jaw is too _ it, so happy days. i can't speak, my jaw is too cold to stop you are doing — jaw is too cold to stop you are doing a — jaw is too cold to stop you are doing a greatjob. it was never going — doing a greatjob. it was never going to — doing a greatjob. it was never going to be easy. you have had a couple _ going to be easy. you have had a couple of — going to be easy. you have had a couple of tough training days. how was it_ couple of tough training days. how was it compared to before? it is the hardest we — was it compared to before? it is the hardest we have _ was it compared to before? it is the hardest we have done _ was it compared to before? it is the hardest we have done so _ was it compared to before? it is the hardest we have done so far - was it compared to before? it is the hardest we have done so far but - was it compared to before? it is the hardest we have done so far but i i hardest we have done so far but i had a lot more motivation than in the training swim because this is the training swim because this is the day we were training for. sorry, i can't talk very well. you the day we were training for. sorry, i can't talk very well.— i can't talk very well. you are doinu a i can't talk very well. you are doing a great _ i can't talk very well. you are doing a great job, _ i can't talk very well. you are doing a great job, don't - i can't talk very well. you are l doing a great job, don't worry. i can't talk very well. you are - doing a great job, don't worry. it doing a greatjob, don't worry. it was awesome. look at the team we have, we were always going to do it. i'm just glad we have. you have, we were always going to do it. i'm just glad we have.— i'm 'ust glad we have. you had a fair i'm just glad we have. you had a fair bit of — i'm just glad we have. you had a fair bit of support _ i'm just glad we have. you had a fair bit of support in _ i'm just glad we have. you had a fair bit of support in the - i'm just glad we have. you had a fair bit of support in the water. i'm just glad we have. you had a l fair bit of support in the water but what keeps you going? your mental strength is what defines you, what
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kept you going in the swim? just thinkin: kept you going in the swim? just thinking of _ kept you going in the swim? jut thinking of why we are doing it. you get in your own little world, swimming, you get into a bit of a rhythm, you know? will block everything out and i was just thinking of hopefully getting to my cart later, turning my phone on, checking justgiving page and having close to half £1 million. we checking justgiving page and having close to half £1 million.— close to half £1 million. we hope so. no close to half £1 million. we hope so- no we _ close to half £1 million. we hope so. no we will— close to half £1 million. we hope so. no we will see _ close to half £1 million. we hope so. no we will see but _ close to half £1 million. we hope so. no we will see but i - close to half £1 million. we hope so. no we will see but i want - close to half £1 million. we hope so. no we will see but i want a l so. no we will see but i want a drink first. you have been with him all the way, trade him for the run. trading for the run, the swim, he is a good mate of yours. what do you make of it? words cannot describe. i am proud of him. he gets me up in the morning, gets me out in the sea and gets me train. ajoy to know gets me out in the sea and gets me train. a joy to know someone that just pushes forward with life, really good.
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just pushes forward with life, really good-— just pushes forward with life, reall aood. . ., , really good. what you don't realise is that it is — really good. what you don't realise is that it is not _ really good. what you don't realise is that it is not a _ really good. what you don't realise is that it is not a straight _ really good. what you don't realise is that it is not a straight line - is that it is not a straight line sport. there is a lot of going up and down. we sport. there is a lot of going up and down-— sport. there is a lot of going up and down. ~ ., ., , ., ., and down. we thought it was going to be at slack tide _ and down. we thought it was going to be at slack tide but _ and down. we thought it was going to be at slack tide but we _ and down. we thought it was going to be at slack tide but we got _ and down. we thought it was going to be at slack tide but we got caught - be at slack tide but we got caught in a rip and pulled to the far end, but we got back through the current and on tuesday we had a really strong current so it was good practice. strong current so it was good ractice. ,, ., ., ., . ., practice. sharon, hello, welcome back to dry _ practice. sharon, hello, welcome back to dry land, _ practice. sharon, hello, welcome back to dry land, how— practice. sharon, hello, welcome back to dry land, how was - practice. sharon, hello, welcome back to dry land, how was it? - back to dry land, how was it? fantastic, such a privilege to be part of this. just incredible, an incredible team because this guy has worked with him nonstop. i know this isn't the last thing they will do. they have their sights on all sorts of crazy things. it shows what you can do when there are no limits. 5am can do when there are no limits. sam sherrin: is can do when there are no limits. sam sherring is from _ can do when there are no limits. sam sherring is from reorg, the charity that mark is raising money for. where does the money go and what sort of difference will it make? at, sort of difference will it make? a huge difference. it will change lives, — huge difference. it will change lives, this will go to military,
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emergency service, fire, police, men: _ emergency service, fire, police, men, women. change their lives by introducing — men, women. change their lives by introducing them to jujitsu and the lifestyle _ introducing them to jujitsu and the lifestyle around it. i cannot explain _ lifestyle around it. i cannot explain how proud i am at this man, unbelievable, so proud watching what he is doing _ unbelievable, so proud watching what he is doing for the reorg community and the _ he is doing for the reorg community and the people it will help. unbelievable.— and the people it will help. unbelievable. ., , ., ~ and the people it will help. unbelievable. ., , ., unbelievable. fabulous, thank you so much. unbelievable. fabulous, thank you so much- johnny — unbelievable. fabulous, thank you so much. johnny mercer, _ unbelievable. fabulous, thank you so much. johnny mercer, mp, _ unbelievable. fabulous, thank you so much. johnny mercer, mp, how- unbelievable. fabulous, thank you so much. johnny mercer, mp, how are i much. johnny mercer, mp, how are you? much. johnny mercer, mp, how are ou? ., , �* , you? freezing, really cold. it's areat. you? freezing, really cold. it's great- it's— you? freezing, really cold. it's great. it's amazing, _ you? freezing, really cold. it's great. it's amazing, you - you? freezing, really cold. it's great. it's amazing, you just . you? freezing, really cold. it's. great. it's amazing, you just have to look at people like this and it inspires you to get on with life. one arm, going through the water, raising money for charity, 12 years on from afghan, their spirit keeps going and i am in absolute awe of what he does.— what he does. thanks very much. another couple _ what he does. thanks very much. another couple of _ what he does. thanks very much. another couple of chaps, - what he does. thanks very much. another couple of chaps, a - what he does. thanks very much. | another couple of chaps, a couple what he does. thanks very much. i another couple of chaps, a couple of words with mark. the difficult time, we can't ask people to turn up and support you but if you'd have stock now they did! whether people you
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could hear in the water? j got now they did! whether people you could hear in the water? i got stuck in the tide and _ could hear in the water? i got stuck in the tide and i _ could hear in the water? i got stuck in the tide and i saw— could hear in the water? i got stuck in the tide and i saw them - could hear in the water? i got stuck in the tide and i saw them all- could hear in the water? i got stuck in the tide and i saw them all when| in the tide and i saw them all when i looked up and that they be the last boost and that helps towards the end. did last boost and that helps towards the end. , , ., last boost and that helps towards the end. , y., ., ., last boost and that helps towards the end. , ,. . . , last boost and that helps towards the end. , ., ., , the end. did you manage... did you have problems _ the end. did you manage... did you have problems with _ the end. did you manage... did you have problems with your _ the end. did you manage... did you have problems with your hand - have problems with your hand cramping up? it is much better with the glove on but still cold, you know? cold fx it but still cold, you know? cold fx it but once you get in a rhythm and tell yourself to relax, you're all right. i got hit in face with a jellyfish point which freaked me out because i am not used to it. only a little one. all in all, couldn't have been better.— little one. all in all, couldn't have been better. i'm have been better. what is next? i'm auoin to have been better. what is next? i'm going to warm _ have been better. what is next? i'm going to warm up— have been better. what is next? i'm going to warm up next! _ have been better. what is next? i'm going to warm up next! then, - have been better. what is next? i'm going to warm up next! then, what| have been better. what is next? i'ml going to warm up next! then, what is next? cycle- — going to warm up next! then, what is next? cycle- he _ going to warm up next! then, what is next? cycle. he always _ going to warm up next! then, what is next? cycle. he always seems - going to warm up next! then, what is next? cycle. he always seems to - next? cycle. he always seems to foruet his next? cycle. he always seems to forget his t-shirt _ next? cycle. he always seems to forget his t-shirt when _ next? cycle. he always seems to forget his t-shirt when we - next? cycle. he always seems to forget his t-shirt when we do - forget his t—shirt when we do interviews so we are going to buy him a t—shirt! i think one of your
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bike rides. him a t-shirt! i think one of your bike rides-— bike rides. tell us about that. across the — bike rides. tell us about that. across the moors, _ bike rides. tell us about that. across the moors, back - bike rides. tell us about that. across the moors, back to - bike rides. tell us about that. - across the moors, back to plymouth, about _ across the moors, back to plymouth, about 120, _ across the moors, back to plymouth, about 120, 100 50 miles. start putting — about 120, 100 50 miles. start putting him through his paces as of next week, — putting him through his paces as of next week, training starts. that was a phenomenal— next week, training starts. that was a phenomenal effort, _ next week, training starts. that was a phenomenal effort, inspirational, | a phenomenal effort, inspirational, i know people at home will have loved what you do that this morning. congratulations on behalf of everybody watching.- congratulations on behalf of everybody watching. well everybody watching. thank you. well done, we everybody watching. thank you. well done. we will — everybody watching. thank you. well done, we will see _ everybody watching. thank you. well done, we will see you _ everybody watching. thank you. well done, we will see you on _ everybody watching. thank you. well done, we will see you on the - everybody watching. thank you. well done, we will see you on the bike. i done, we will see you on the bike. well done, thank you so much. to you. terrific scene down there, we are looking from the drone above you and quite a few people gathered on the front to celebrate and show their respect. what is seen and a remarkable man. it took about... £15 remarkable man. it took about... 45; minutes? remarkable man. it took about... 45 minutes? 45 — remarkable man. it took about... 45 minutes? 45 minutes _ remarkable man. it took about... 45 minutes? 45 minutes or _ remarkable man. it took about... 45 minutes? 45 minutes or so. - remarkable man. it took about... 45 minutes? 45 minutes or so. be - remarkable man. it took about... 45 minutes? 45 minutes or so. be set | remarkable man. it took about... 45. minutes? 45 minutes or so. be set up 'ust before minutes? 45 minutes or so. be set up just before 7am. _ minutes? 45 minutes or so. be set up just before 7am, maybe _ minutes? 45 minutes or so. be set up just before 7am, maybe even - minutes? 45 minutes or so. be set up just before 7am, maybe even less. i minutes? 45 minutes or so. be set upj just before 7am, maybe even less. he allowed himself one hour but obviously didn't need it and people have been supporting him. he has a
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justgiving page and the target was... look at that, already up more than £50,000 in the last time we looked. we love great sporting achievements, don't we? ~ ,,., , we love great sporting achievements, don't we?_ pure _ don't we? absolutely. pure determination. _ don't we? absolutely. pure determination. the - don't we? absolutely. pure determination. the sea - don't we? absolutely. pure determination. the sea is l don't we? absolutely. pure - determination. the sea is colder than normal _ determination. the sea is colder than normal at _ determination. the sea is colder than normal at this _ determination. the sea is colder than normal at this time - determination. the sea is colder than normal at this time of - determination. the sea is colder| than normal at this time of year. just warming up his hand and your. and well done for negotiating the tide. very impressive. could it be? you wouldn't have seen this coming a few months ago. on paper it would seem like the most romantic of sporting reunions. tottenham have contacted mauricio pochettino over their manager's job — just 18 months after they sacked him. pochettino took spurs to the champions league final two years ago and fans loved him, and he loved the club — saying last year
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it was his dream to return one day. the problem, though, is he is currently manager of paris saint—germain — he only took over injanuary, and, despite missing out on the french league title this season, talked about a great future there just the other day. but will his head he turned? tiger woods says just walking on his own is his number one goal as he continues his recovery from a horrific car crash in february. speaking to a magazine, woods, who won the masters two years ago, wouldn't be drawn on whether he'd ever play golf again. he says he's taking it one step at a time. he suffered multiple leg injuries in the crash in los angeles. there was an absolute thrashing in rugby league last night, as warrington were ruthless at salford. they ran in 10 tries, with toby king playing with the exhuberance that a new contract can give you. he scored two of those in the 62—18 win. admittedly salford lost their discpline with two players sent to the sin bin in the second half. "we were stone cold, they were white hot," said the salford head coach.
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he's arguably one of the most famous voices in british sport, but cricket commentator david "bumble" lloyd is also a former england player, england coach and an umpire. he's now written a book about some of the most influential and entertaining characters that he's met over his 60—year career. he's with me now. great to see you, great to speak to you. you must be absolutely buzzing! yesterday, sunshine, bands, and rates at old trafford. your lancashire giving my yorkshire are pasting in the roses match! lancashire did really well. it was fantastic. — lancashire did really well. it was fantastic. a _ lancashire did really well. it was fantastic, a joy to get back and about— fantastic, a joy to get back and about 4000 spectators in, socially distance _ about 4000 spectators in, socially distance up because, as we always say, the _ distance up because, as we always say, the sun— distance up because, as we always say, the sun shone, a lovely pitch and i'm _ say, the sun shone, a lovely pitch and i'm looking forward to getting back there today.— and i'm looking forward to getting back there today. hopefully setting the scene for _ back there today. hopefully setting the scene for the _ back there today. hopefully setting the scene for the summer. - back there today. hopefully setting the scene for the summer. your i the scene for the summer. your latest book you have dedicated to bob willis, your great friend. you
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shed so many moments, some hilarious. which were the standout favourites for you?_ favourites for you? favourite was when we went — favourites for you? favourite was when we went on _ favourites for you? favourite was when we went on a _ favourites for you? favourite was when we went on a steam - favourites for you? favourite was when we went on a steam train i favourites for you? favourite was i when we went on a steam train and walking _ when we went on a steam train and walking holiday in north wales. we lost him _ walking holiday in north wales. we lost him in — walking holiday in north wales. we lost him in a field of cows. if you work— lost him in a field of cows. if you work with— lost him in a field of cows. if you work with bob goes at such a pace, and i_ work with bob goes at such a pace, and i had _ work with bob goes at such a pace, and i had to— work with bob goes at such a pace, and i had to trot. anyway, he disappeared through a field of cows and we _ disappeared through a field of cows and we lost it for a good ten minutes, _ and we lost it for a good ten minutes, 15 minutes, but we were on a steam _ minutes, 15 minutes, but we were on a steam trains and just having a glass— a steam trains and just having a glass of— a steam trains and just having a glass of wine here and there. wonderful! hejust glass of wine here and there. wonderful! he just got lost in the field or was he trying to herd the cows or something? he field or was he trying to herd the cows or something?— field or was he trying to herd the cows or something? he had 'ust gone the wron: cows or something? he had 'ust gone the wrong way. i cows or something? he had 'ust gone the wrong way. we h cows or something? he had 'ust gone the wrong way. we had _ cows or something? he had 'ust gone the wrong way. we had an _ cows or something? he had just gone the wrong way. we had an ordnance. the wrong way. we had an ordnance survey— the wrong way. we had an ordnance survey nrap. — the wrong way. we had an ordnance survey map, as you do, it was like last _ survey map, as you do, it was like last 0t— survey map, as you do, it was like last of the — survey map, as you do, it was like last of the summer wine and he just disappeared. myself and paul allott were looking at the map and he was going _ were looking at the map and he was going the _ were looking at the map and he was going the wrong way. paul allott said let — going the wrong way. paul allott said let him go he will come back, and he _ said let him go he will come back, and he came back in about 15 minutes _ and he came back in about 15 minutes. and he came back in about 15 minutes-— and he came back in about 15 minutes. , ., , ., minutes. the stories in your book go back from when _
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minutes. the stories in your book go back from when you _ minutes. the stories in your book go back from when you were _ minutes. the stories in your book go back from when you were 12 - minutes. the stories in your book go back from when you were 12 right - back from when you were 12 right through to your playing days and in the commentary box. so many characters to fit in, i don't know how you did it. whether standout and the most influential new? influential would be those at 12 years _ influential would be those at 12 years of— influential would be those at 12 years of age at accrington cricket club, _ years of age at accrington cricket club, who — years of age at accrington cricket club, who i— years of age at accrington cricket club, who i owe everything to for a career— club, who i owe everything to for a career that— club, who i owe everything to for a career that has been brilliant. i am still doing — career that has been brilliant. i am still doing it, iam career that has been brilliant. i am still doing it, i am 74 and still in the commentary box and i still get that buzz— the commentary box and i still get that buzz but it is interesting characters that you have met along the way _ characters that you have met along the way and some of them quite hilarious — the way and some of them quite hilarious when you come through to the present— hilarious when you come through to the present day players and i think the present day players and i think the england team are absolutely magnificent, a great bunch of lads. wonderfully led byjoe root, but along _ wonderfully led byjoe root, but along the way, inevitably you come up along the way, inevitably you come up against — along the way, inevitably you come up against people like botham. he has been _ up against people like botham. he has been a — up against people like botham. he has been a sir, a mrand now he is a lawyer! _ has been a sir, a mrand now he is a lawyer! then— has been a sir, a mrand now he is a lawyer! then there is geoffrey
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boycott — lawyer! then there is geoffrey boycott. you can't write a book without — boycott. you can't write a book without geoffrey boycott, wonderful commentator and stories abound about him. everyone has a story about him. do you _ him. everyone has a story about him. do you think— him. everyone has a story about him. do you think it is harder for that game a's true character to be themselves these days and be as extravagant? do we still have big characters or is it hard in the days of social media with the scrutineering?_ of social media with the scrutineering? of social media with the scrutineerin: ? ., ., ., scrutineering? you have it. social media and _ scrutineering? you have it. social media and cameras _ scrutineering? you have it. social media and cameras all— scrutineering? you have it. social media and cameras all over - scrutineering? you have it. social media and cameras all over the i scrutineering? you have it. social- media and cameras all over the place snapping _ media and cameras all over the place snapping you when you don't know. i am sure _ snapping you when you don't know. i am sure there are still characters in the _ am sure there are still characters in the game, there were characters when _ in the game, there were characters when i _ in the game, there were characters when i was — in the game, there were characters when i was playing. you look at ben stokes. _ when i was playing. you look at ben stokes. i_ when i was playing. you look at ben stokes, i play golf with him a few times— stokes, i play golf with him a few times and — stokes, i play golf with him a few times and people know that when he comes— times and people know that when he comes back, there is one in a riverm — comes back, there is one in a river... ~ ., , comes back, there is one in a river... ., , comes back, there is one in a i river. . ._ well, comes back, there is one in a - river. . ._ well, he river... who wins usually? well, he hits it is a — river... who wins usually? well, he hits it is a long _ river... who wins usually? well, he hits it is a long way _ river... who wins usually? well, he hits it is a long way but _ hits it is a long way but unfortunately he can never find it!
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so advantage bumble. the game is changing time, you have said that. do you think the shorter format is for the good, we have the 100 starting for example, in just over 50 days a. j starting for example, in 'ust over 50 da s a. ., ~' 50 days a. i do, i think the administrators _ 50 days a. i do, i think the administrators have - 50 days a. i do, i think the administrators have to - 50 days a. i do, i think the - administrators have to balance everything very carefully but just from _ everything very carefully but just from what i have seen in 60 odd years. _ from what i have seen in 60 odd years. i— from what i have seen in 60 odd years, i think the players now, the game _ years, i think the players now, the game has — years, i think the players now, the game has never been more vibrant in my opinion _ game has never been more vibrant in my opinion than it is now. the players — my opinion than it is now. the players are _ my opinion than it is now. the players are out of sight they are fit, strong, hitting the balla players are out of sight they are fit, strong, hitting the ball a long way, _ fit, strong, hitting the ball a long way, bowling quickly. fielding skills— way, bowling quickly. fielding skills i— way, bowling quickly. fielding skills i fantastic so i think it is brilliant — skills i fantastic so i think it is brilliant that we have semi—different formats. there is something for everyone, the test match— something for everyone, the test match aficionados and we have rock and wit _ match aficionados and we have rock and roll. brilliant to commentate on, and roll. brilliant to commentate on. you — and roll. brilliant to commentate on, you only need one side. talking u . on, you only need one side. talking u- the on, you only need one side. talking up the test. — on, you only need one side. talking up the test, england _ on, you only need one side. talking up the test, england start - on, you only need one side. talking up the test, england start their- up the test, england start their next test against new zealand only six months away from the ashes. how
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do you see england's progress at the moment? j do you see england's progress at the moment? ~ , , moment? i think they will be fine. if ou talk moment? i think they will be fine. if you talk about _ moment? i think they will be fine. if you talk about the _ moment? i think they will be fine. if you talk about the ashes - moment? i think they will be fine. if you talk about the ashes you - moment? i think they will be fine. i if you talk about the ashes you need a battery— if you talk about the ashes you need a battery of— if you talk about the ashes you need a battery of fast bowlers and i think— a battery of fast bowlers and i think we — a battery of fast bowlers and i think we have a good squad of quick bowlers— think we have a good squad of quick bowlers and you need them, you need told bowlers in australia. the batting — told bowlers in australia. the batting should take care of itself. if i batting should take care of itself. if i was _ batting should take care of itself. if i was a — batting should take care of itself. if i was a betting man and i had two bob despair, i would say england have _ bob despair, i would say england have every chance in australia this time _ have every chance in australia this time around. they start against new zealand _ time around. they start against new zealand at— time around. they start against new zealand at lord's. an time around. they start against new zealand at lord's.— zealand at lord's. an absolute pleasure- _ zealand at lord's. an absolute pleasure. good _ zealand at lord's. an absolute pleasure. good luck— zealand at lord's. an absolute pleasure. good luck to - zealand at lord's. an absolute pleasure. good luck to your i pleasure. good luck to your lancashire against my yorkshire. for those who don't know, your nickname bumble, how did it come about we are going back to the 1960s. michael bentine had a programme called the bumblies and apparently if i go profile they reckon i look like him so it has always been bumble. i am slightly to younger to remember that. thank you so much indeed.
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and bumble's book is called simply the best: the great characters of cricket from the don to the ben. i had better let you go to get ready for another day at blankenship — yorkshire, the roses i'm going to the osteopath first, i will see you later —— lancashire and yorkshire. it makes me realise, if you're not massive into a sports, cricket, whatever, you get someone who talks about it like that, talks about the characters, you are drawn in. that is why the — characters, you are drawn in. trust is why the commentaries are so wonderful. the coverage. it is the story is about getting lost in the field of cows, the savages, the funny moments. just... ben stokes losing his golf clubs up trees. j losing his golf clubs up trees. i can relate to ben stokes. very frustrating game. havejust can relate to ben stokes. very frustrating game. have just loves p0p frustrating game. have just loves pop the bumblies. he looks nothing like one from the site. they were
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these conically shaped characters and they sat there with their legs apart and big black pants but they have noses that kind of... they were quite pretreated, shall we say? he doesn't look like one, though. better nickname than mine. thank you ve much. here on breakfast we've been following the story of park lane stables who needed to raise a million pounds, orface closure. after a huge fundraising effort, the horse riding charity reached their goal. but, just a few months later it seems they'll need to find a new home after all. fiona lamdin has the story. i heard the news today that you're having to close. that's awful. packing up after 12 years, something they hoped they'd never have to do. but in a few days' time, natalie and her team will say goodbye to park lane stables. devastated, to be honest. we're absolutely heartbroken.
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we don't know what else to do, because we've done everything we possibly can. and we've sort of hit a dead end. earlier this year, the landlord wanted to sell the stables, so the charity set about raising his estimated sale price of £1 million so they could stay. we first met natalie and her team 14 weeks ago, when they had just days to raise the money. 350 disabled people are relying on us, so i absolutely have to do it for them. what a difference 24 hours makes. well over £1 million was given, and so everyone assumed the stables would finally be theirs. but in a twist that no—one saw coming, in the end, the final price could not be agreed. the landlord has told us...
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we don't know what the final chapter is, but we are carrying on. this is absolutely not the end. we started this for the people that need us, and we will absolutely carry on for them. my only priority is doing what we do for the people that need us. they have found a temporary home a few miles away, so the horses and the children can continue to ride. but this was not the ending anyone was expecting or hoping for. fiona lamdin, bbc news. knowing those women, and we have interviewed them over the last few months and the owner has spent a lot of time with them, as well, they are
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very determined and they will make sure they continue with that. we will see sure they continue with that. , will see what happens. sure they continue with that. we will see what happens. good - sure they continue with that. we i will see what happens. good luck. sara is on the _ will see what happens. good luck. sara is on the roof _ will see what happens. good luck. sara is on the roof of _ will see what happens. good luck. sara is on the roof of new- sara is on the roof of new broadcasting house in london this morning and just look at that, the sun is shining as if on cue. yes. sun is shining as if on cue. yes, the sun has _ sun is shining as if on cue. yes, the sun has broken _ sun is shining as if on cue. yes, the sun has broken through - sun is shining as if on cue. use: the sun has broken through the crowd here in london and this time of year it really has some strength to the sun. as we head through the weekend we are expecting some really high levels of uv at times so be prepared for that, levels of uv at times so be prepared forthat, particularly levels of uv at times so be prepared for that, particularly sunday and monday. today is a cloud day than yesterday so not quite as one. yesterday we saw temperatures up to 21 degrees, a bit cooler today. patchy rain around for some, particularly to the west. that is because we have a weather front moving in from the west bumping into high pressure but certainly some patchy rain around irish sea coasts, is about the west of england, wales, northern ireland and south—west scotland. it is, most places look dry with sunny spells developing,
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but one or two showers around particular in the far east. northumberland, down to norfolk. temperatures getting up to around 18 or19 temperatures getting up to around 18 or 19 degrees in the warmest bus, a bit cooler to aberdeen where we have more cloud just drifting around the east coast of scotland, only about 13 degrees. one or two of those sharp showers in the east could linger for sharp showers in the east could lingerfor a time into the sharp showers in the east could linger for a time into the evening but they will fade away quite quickly overnight and the rain in the west tend to peter out, as well. just the odd spot of result left around the western coasts as we head through the course of tonight. under the cloud, temperatures around ten or ii the cloud, temperatures around ten or 11 degrees in the west. under clear skies in the east, six or seven first thing saturday morning. saturday dawns on a bit of a cloudy knows, maybe for some, saturday dawns on a bit of a cloudy knows, maybe forsome, it saturday dawns on a bit of a cloudy knows, maybe for some, it will brighten up fairly quickly through the day so a drier day for western areas compared to today and a bit more sunshine in the east. just one or two sharp showers are spiked up during the afternoon for the midlands, the pennines, parts of scotland. temperatures between about
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18 to 21 degrees on saturday so it should feel pleasant with light winds around in those sunny spells. high pressure very much holding on into sunday. in fact a sunday probably quite widespread blue skies and sunshine as most places staying dry through the day, that's just an isolated afternoon shower. temperatures up to about 23 degrees in the warmest bus, even across parts of scotland we are looking at 21 or 22 degrees but be prepared for those very high levels of uv for some of us as well. high pressure holes on into bank holiday monday so the fine, settled weather continues, increasingly warm, increasingly sunny. many people are and how to like, for a few more days, those dry, settled conditions should hold on. we are heading towards the a met on. we are heading towards the a met on tuesday and at long last we have some summary whether to be enjoyed out there. some summary whether to be en'oyed out there. ., , ., , ,., some summary whether to be en'oyed out there. ., , ., , ., ~ out there. lovely to see you, thank out there. lovely to see you, thank ou ve out there. lovely to see you, thank you very much- _ out there. lovely to see you, thank you very much- i— out there. lovely to see you, thank you very much. i am _ out there. lovely to see you, thank you very much. i am so _ out there. lovely to see you, thank you very much. i am so excited -
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out there. lovely to see you, thank i you very much. i am so excited about the sun. scientists have created an artificial intelligence screening tool which can detect signs of coronavirus, by the sound of someone's cough. researchers, led by the university of essex say the programme was 98% accurate in spotting those who had the infection. our science correspondent, richard westcott has more. coughing one key to controlling covid is a quick test to see who's got it. this is the sound of our non—positive covid individual. cough. and that's where this coughing comes in. this is the sound of someone who has got covid. drier cough. scientists in essex have analysed more than 8,000 coughs from hospitals around the world and designed a computer programme that can tell who's got the virus.
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it's very difficult, almost impossible for human hearing to be able to distinguish when someone is a negative or positive. what these computers and machine learning can do is to scan the whole frequency spectrum of the audio and pick of many differences that combine to allow us to differentiate between someone that has covid and someone who has not covid. you can imagine this is the way it might work. so you would have a qr code outside in perhaps an office building ora pub. you scan it and the website comes up and then you open the website. and cough into it, and it tells you potentially, if you've got covid — if it comes up as a positive, then you would go off and have, say, a pcr test to make sure. doctors in mexico are already using the app in remote places where they can't get swab tests.
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they found that in controlled conditions it could be 90% accurate. this is a boy who did not have covid. cough. today it's covid but you could potentially use apps to spot all kinds of problems. i think this is a first step. that shows that in the future we could use our mobile phones to do many more things to just communicate and just call our families and friends, we could use it for detecting different conditions and health states. that sounded like a dog! it is a fascinating _ that sounded like a dog! it is a fascinating story. _ that sounded like a dog! it is a fascinating story. brilliant - that sounded like a dog! it is a i fascinating story. brilliant science --oular fascinating story. brilliant science popular listening _ fascinating story. brilliant science popular listening to _ fascinating story. brilliant science popular listening to people - popular listening to people coughing. if it helps, of course. if you don't have access to pcr tests it is invaluable. so much coming up in the programme. j’m it is invaluable. so much coming up in the programme.— in the programme. i'm tackling social injustice, _ in the programme. i'm tackling social injustice, like _
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in the programme. i'm tackling social injustice, like robin - in the programme. i'm tackling i social injustice, like robin hood. you are an idiot. as yellow the taxpayer— you are an idiot. as yellow the taxpayer pay for that, they could have _ taxpayer pay for that, they could have given thousands to pensioners. the marvellous general bend will join us. fascinating new film —— check broadbent. the new film, and man, he stole a patient pay painting. jn man, he stole a patient pay aintinu. ., ., man, he stole a patient pay painting-— man, he stole a patient pay ..aintin _ ., ., ., , man, he stole a patient pay aintinu. ., ., ., , ., painting. in order to get money to rive to painting. in order to get money to give to good _ painting. in order to get money to give to good causes. _ painting. in order to get money to give to good causes. jim - painting. in order to get money to i give to good causes. jim broadbent, people love him. give to good causes. jim broadbent, people love him-— give to good causes. jim broadbent, people love him. favourite character of his? probably _ people love him. favourite character of his? probably from _ people love him. favourite character of his? probably from all— people love him. favourite character of his? probably from all the - people love him. favourite character of his? probably from all the mike i of his? probably from all the mike leiah film of his? probably from all the mike leigh film is. _ of his? probably from all the mike leigh film is, he _ of his? probably from all the mike leigh film is, he has _ of his? probably from all the mike leigh film is, he has been - of his? probably from all the mike leigh film is, he has been in - of his? probably from all the mike leigh film is, he has been in love | leigh film is, he has been in love is. and of course he isn't blackadder, made cameo appearances. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... fears that there could be a delay in lifing lockdown in england as cases of the indian variant double in a week. there are calls for 40 specialist surgical hubs to be set up to tackle a "colossal backlog" of non—urgent operations. banning the loyalty penalty — insurance firms will now have to offer existing customers the same deals they use to win new ones. it could save millions of us up to £200 a year.
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another great friends reunion could be on the cards. tottenham reach out to their former be on the cards. tottenham reach out to theirformer manager be on the cards. tottenham reach out to their former manager about returning as boss. and he did say onceit returning as boss. and he did say once it would be his dream to come back one day. good morning. it's friday, 28th of may. up to three—quarters of new covid cases in the uk could be linked to the indian variant, according to the health secretary matt hancock. there are concerns the increase in infections could delay plans to lift all restrictions in england onjune 21st. let's speak now to our political correspondent, ben wright. good morning. we have the two things getting closer all the time. we have the june 21 getting closer all the time. we have thejune 21 date around which the government is planning to lift restrictions, and simultaneously, we are looking at what are genuinely concerning rises in the indian variant? ~ . , , concerning rises in the indian variant? . , , ., variant? we are, yes. good morning. the indian variant _
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variant? we are, yes. good morning. the indian variant of— variant? we are, yes. good morning. the indian variant of covid _ variant? we are, yes. good morning. the indian variant of covid is - the indian variant of covid is clearly — the indian variant of covid is clearly surging in some parts of the country _ clearly surging in some parts of the country. but hospitalisations remain very flat _ country. but hospitalisations remain very flat. and that is the link that ministers — very flat. and that is the link that ministers and scientists working with the — ministers and scientists working with the government were looking at very closely. the correlation between _ very closely. the correlation between the two. there is an uptake in infections. the variant is clearly— in infections. the variant is clearly becoming the dominant one and now— clearly becoming the dominant one and now in— clearly becoming the dominant one and now in the uk. but it isn't producing _ and now in the uk. but it isn't producing a similar rise in people going _ producing a similar rise in people going to — producing a similar rise in people going to hospital. the data clearly is quite _ going to hospital. the data clearly is quite mixed. and the decision about— is quite mixed. and the decision about lifting restrictions fully in england — about lifting restrictions fully in england onjune 21, clearly hangs in the balance. borisjohnson said so yesterday — the balance. borisjohnson said so yesterday. he said, we need to wait a little _ yesterday. he said, we need to wait a little bit _ yesterday. he said, we need to wait a little bit longer to know whether that final — a little bit longer to know whether that final lifting in the government's road map can happen. speaking _ government's road map can happen. speaking to— government's road map can happen. speaking to breakfast this morning, the business secretary kwasi kwarteng, said it was too soon to say whether restrictions would lift onjune _ say whether restrictions would lift onjune 21~— onjune 21. we- onjune 21. we will be looking at the onunej 21.— we will be looking at the scientific data before — we will be looking at the scientific data before we _ we will be looking at the scientific data before we rush _ we will be looking at the scientific data before we rush to _ we will be looking at the scientific data before we rush to any - data before we rush to any conclusions. _ data before we rush to any conclusions. and - data before we rush to any conclusions. and we - data before we rush to any conclusions. and we havel
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data before we rush to any - conclusions. and we have said that as far— conclusions. and we have said that as far as— conclusions. and we have said that as far as i— conclusions. and we have said that as far as i can _ conclusions. and we have said that as far as i can see, _ conclusions. and we have said that as far as i can see, there _ conclusions. and we have said that as far as i can see, there is - as far as i can see, there is nothing _ as far as i can see, there is nothing on _ as far as i can see, there is nothing on the _ as far as i can see, there is nothing on the data - as far as i can see, there is nothing on the data that i as far as i can see, there is| nothing on the data that will as far as i can see, there is - nothing on the data that will delay the date, — nothing on the data that will delay the date, but _ nothing on the data that will delay the date, but we _ nothing on the data that will delay the date, but we have _ nothing on the data that will delay the date, but we have said - nothing on the data that will delay the date, but we have said we - nothing on the data that will delay the date, but we have said we are| the date, but we have said we are always _ the date, but we have said we are always reviewing _ the date, but we have said we are always reviewing the _ the date, but we have said we are always reviewing the data - the date, but we have said we are always reviewing the data and - the date, but we have said we are always reviewing the data and we | always reviewing the data and we will can _ always reviewing the data and we will can -- — always reviewing the data and we will can —— come _ always reviewing the data and we will can —— come to _ always reviewing the data and we will can —— come to a _ always reviewing the data and we will can —— come to a final- will can —— come to a final conclusion— will can —— come to a final conclusion on— will can —— come to a final conclusion on whether- will can —— come to a final conclusion on whether to| will can —— come to a final- conclusion on whether to reopen on the 21st _ conclusion on whether to reopen on the 21st of— conclusion on whether to reopen on the 21st ofjune. — conclusion on whether to reopen on the 21st ofjune, and _ conclusion on whether to reopen on the 21st ofjune, and june _ conclusion on whether to reopen on the 21st ofjune, and june the - conclusion on whether to reopen on the 21st ofjune, and june the 14th. | the 21st ofjune, and june the 14th. matt hancock, _ the 21st ofjune, and june the 14th. matt hancock, the _ the 21st ofjune, and june the 14th. matt hancock, the health- the 21st ofjune, and june the 14th. i matt hancock, the health secretary, also said _ matt hancock, the health secretary, also said in— matt hancock, the health secretary, also said in the commons yesterday it was— also said in the commons yesterday it was too— also said in the commons yesterday it was too early to say what would happen _ it was too early to say what would happen. we know the four tests the government will look at. how well the vaccine — government will look at. how well the vaccine roll—out is going, the impact _ the vaccine roll—out is going, the impact of— the vaccine roll—out is going, the impact of the variant hospitalisation and infection rates. we will— hospitalisation and infection rates. we will have to wait another couple of weeks _ we will have to wait another couple of weeks before we know. you mentioned _ of weeks before we know. you mentioned matt _ of weeks before we know. ym. mentioned matt hancock. this is one of the phrase is often used possibly by yourself certainly by the newspapers about increasing pressure on a minister. this is the phrase that has been used, increasing pressure on matt hancock, specifically to do with a very emotive issue around those patients who were discharged from hospital but not tested before they were allowed back into care homes. a
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moment in time. talk us through where we are with this now, the pressure on matt hancock? welcome of course this follows _ pressure on matt hancock? welcome of course this follows dominic— course this follows dominic cummings's explosive testimony to a house _ cummings's explosive testimony to a house of— cummings's explosive testimony to a house of commons committee earlier this week _ house of commons committee earlier this week. mr cummings had many targets— this week. mr cummings had many targets in— this week. mr cummings had many targets in his demolition of the government's covid strategy, a strategy— government's covid strategy, a strategy he was at the heart for many _ strategy he was at the heart for many months. we had strong words for the minister~ _ many months. we had strong words for the minister. but it was matt hancock, _ the minister. but it was matt hancock, the health secretary, who received _ hancock, the health secretary, who received some of the fiercest criticism~ _ received some of the fiercest criticism. mr cummings said there were _ criticism. mr cummings said there were 15_ criticism. mr cummings said there were 15 to — criticism. mr cummings said there were 15 to 20 occasions he felt mr hancock _ were 15 to 20 occasions he felt mr hancock should have been sacked. he accused _ hancock should have been sacked. he accused him, using parliamentary privilege. — accused him, using parliamentary privilege, of lying on multiple occasions, the most damaging charge that mr— occasions, the most damaging charge that mr cummings made was that matt hancock— that mr cummings made was that matt hancock told the prime minister in the cabinet room that all people moving — the cabinet room that all people moving from hospitals to care homes, back in— moving from hospitals to care homes, back in the _ moving from hospitals to care homes, back in the spring of last year as covid _ back in the spring of last year as covid was — back in the spring of last year as covid was tightening its grip, would be tested — covid was tightening its grip, would be tested. now in the house of commons — be tested. now in the house of commons yesterday, in the morning, matt hancock said of these
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unsubstantiated allegations around honesty _ unsubstantiated allegations around honesty are not true. he clearly went— honesty are not true. he clearly went into — honesty are not true. he clearly went into yesterday hoping to rebut it all and _ went into yesterday hoping to rebut it all and move on. but he had a difficult — it all and move on. but he had a difficult press conference where he was pressed repeatedly about that specific _ was pressed repeatedly about that specific allegation that dominic cummings made. and matt hancock said that he _ cummings made. and matt hancock said that he was— cummings made. and matt hancock said that he was committed to introducing testing _ that he was committed to introducing testing for— that he was committed to introducing testing for patients moving from hospitals — testing for patients moving from hospitals to care homes, but it took time to— hospitals to care homes, but it took time to get— hospitals to care homes, but it took time to get that testing up and running — time to get that testing up and running. that was his recollection. this will— running. that was his recollection. this will be — running. that was his recollection. this will be discussed further in due course. he was nodding head to the public— due course. he was nodding head to the public enquiry that will happen next year~ — the public enquiry that will happen next year. the fact he could not comprehensively and categorically deny that specific allegation does leave _ deny that specific allegation does leave him in some difficulty, which is why— leave him in some difficulty, which is why the — leave him in some difficulty, which is why the front pages are really tough _ is why the front pages are really tough for— is why the front pages are really tough for him this morning. he has .ot tough for him this morning. he has got criticism — tough for him this morning. he has got criticism from people including nadra _ got criticism from people including nadra ahmed of the national care association. she picked up on a quote _ association. she picked up on a quote that— association. she picked up on a quote that matt hancock looked set made _ quote that matt hancock looked set made last year where he said a protective _ made last year where he said a protective ring had been put around care homes. secret —— she said yesterday— care homes. secret —— she said yesterday that it was clearly
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nonsense. matt hancock hopes this will fade _ nonsense. matt hancock hopes this will fade as a story and people will move _ will fade as a story and people will move on— will fade as a story and people will move on as — will fade as a story and people will move on as we focus on the variants and the _ move on as we focus on the variants and the vaccines and the possible final lifting of restrictions. but these — final lifting of restrictions. but these important questions about how these important questions about how the government conducted itself during _ the government conducted itself during the early months of the crisis — during the early months of the crisis in — during the early months of the crisis in particular, will continue to dog — crisis in particular, will continue to dog matt hancock, borisjohnson and others, i think, for some time to come — and others, i think, for some time to come. . ~ and others, i think, for some time to come. ., ,, ,., surgeons are calling for specialist hubs to be set up in england, to help tackle what they call the "colossal backlog" of non—urgent operations that have been postponed because of the pandemic. in march, around five million patients were waiting for surgery — that's the highest number since records began. the government says it's working "to accelerate the recovery of services". our health correspondent, laura foster, reports. when the pandemic began, hospital trusts had to cancel nonurgent surgery such as hip and knee replacements, so there were enough staff and resources to look after patients with covid.
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but since then, waiting times and lists have only grown. 14 months on from the first lockdown, latest figures show almost five million people are on the waiting list. more than 400,000 of them have been waiting for more than a year. well, these are the worst waiting time figures ever recorded, and we all understand that stuff had to be put on hold whilst there was the pandemic. but now the pandemic is beginning to recede, we need a serious approach to getting into this backlog. the college says the answer is to spend £1 billion over the next five years, and to carry out operations not at local hospitals, but at dedicated hubs. that way, these hubs would still function even if there was another wave of covid, or indeed another pandemic. the college argues people are willing to travel further if it means surgeries happen sooner. lauren foster, bbc news.
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residents of glasgow are expected to find out later whether the city will remain in level three of scotland's covid—19 restrictions. the city has been under strict measures for 270 days, while the rest of scotland has seen restrictions ease in recent weeks. first minister nicola sturgeon has said there are "reasons to be optimistic" about the situation. the former us president barack obama has praised the anti—poverty campaigning of england and manchester united footballer, marcus rashford. mr obama joined the 23—year—old in an online zoom meeting, where the pair discussed shared experiences, including being raised by single mothers, their involvement in community projects, and a love of books. marcus, i think, is way ahead of where i was at 23. - i was still trying to figure it out. for me being in sports, ijust knew my life could change very, very quickly. and if i wasn't like, mature enough, or at a certain level in my own head,
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it makes stuff like fame even more difficult. when you look at the history of big social movements and _ i big social change, it is usuallyl young people who initiated this. if you give someone a helping hand at a young age, they will go on to do things that even they didn't think was achievable to accomplish. that is quite something to watch. a reminder he is only 23 years old. the impact he is having an affair where he is communicating and getting things done, quite remarkable.— getting things done, quite remarkable. ., ., remarkable. making an important im act. remarkable. making an important impact- ten _ remarkable. making an important impact. ten minutes _ remarkable. making an important impact. ten minutes past - remarkable. making an important impact. ten minutes past eight. i measuring the amount of squashed bugs on your car after a journey, may be able to help scientists better understand insect populations in the uk. a new app is asking the public to gather the information, to identify where certain species are thriving and where others are in decline. here s our chief environment
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correspondent, justin rowlatt. insect—ageddon is how the global decline in insect populations has been described by some scientists. one case in germany suggested there had been a 75% decrease in numbers over 27 years. take the humble housefly. you may not like them, but like many insects, they're one of the foundations of the whole food chain. if we lose them, we will lose lots of other species too. but there is actually very little data for many insect groups and species, even here in the uk, which is where this new app comes in. the hope is that in the hands of a small army of citizen scientists it will generate more accurate figures for insect populations. it's simple to use. you clean your number plate before you go on a journey, then when you arrive at your destination you use the app to photograph the bugs squashed on a section of it, using a
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splat—ometer grid you get when you download the app. the results may become part of the nationwide survey. justin rowlatt, bbc news. i have a question. i have been thinking about this all morning. it has fascinated me. i saw the grid you use for your number plate. if, like me, most of your driving is motorway driving, and you want to get in a national picture of which areas the bugs aren't thriving or increasing, that's not very helpful, isn't it? �* , increasing, that's not very helpful, isn't it? , increasing, that's not very helpful, isn'tit? , ~ ., isn't it? because you don't know where the _ isn't it? because you don't know where the bug is _ isn't it? because you don't know where the bug is from _ isn't it? because you don't know where the bug is from because i isn't it? because you don't know i where the bug is from because you have been on the long journey? exactly. jt have been on the long 'ourney? exactl . ., , .,~ , have been on the long 'ourney? exactl. ., , ,, , exactly. it only makes sense if you drive in a certain _ exactly. it only makes sense if you drive in a certain area. _ exactly. it only makes sense if you drive in a certain area. secondly, i drive in a certain area. secondly, the faster— drive in a certain area. secondly, the faster you — drive in a certain area. secondly, the faster you go, _ drive in a certain area. secondly, the faster you go, the _ drive in a certain area. secondly, the faster you go, the more - drive in a certain area. secondly, | the faster you go, the more bugs drive in a certain area. secondly, - the faster you go, the more bugs you get on your car. if you are doing normal driving in your local place, the bugs don't tend to hit the car
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and die as much. j the bugs don't tend to hit the car and die as much.— the bugs don't tend to hit the car and die as much. i don't think it's about the speed. _ and die as much. i don't think it's about the speed. it _ and die as much. i don't think it's about the speed. it is _ and die as much. i don't think it's about the speed. it is basically i about the speed. it is basically whether the bugs are in the air, thatis whether the bugs are in the air, that is the significant factor as to whether you hit them. if you go fast and there are no bugs in the air, does it make a difference? that and there are no bugs in the air, does it make a difference? that is a different argument. _ does it make a difference? that is a different argument. sarah - does it make a difference? that is a different argument. sarah knows i does it make a difference? that is a| different argument. sarah knows the answer. she is on the roof of broadcasting house. hopefully there are no flies up there. no flies, no wind. it is a gorgeous morning _ no flies, no wind. it is a gorgeous morning on— no flies, no wind. it is a gorgeous morning on the roof of bbc broadcasting house in london. quite a bit of— broadcasting house in london. quite a bit of cloud first thing. the sun has got — a bit of cloud first thing. the sun has got some strength. it is breaking _ has got some strength. it is breaking through that cloud. through the weekend, enjoy the sunshine but it is going _ the weekend, enjoy the sunshine but it is going to be pretty strong. watch — it is going to be pretty strong. watch out for those high levels of uv in _ watch out for those high levels of uv in the — watch out for those high levels of uv in the forecast. an optimistic forecast — uv in the forecast. an optimistic forecast over the next few days for the bank— forecast over the next few days for the bank holiday weekend. turning warmer— the bank holiday weekend. turning warmer and also sunnier as well. today— warmer and also sunnier as well. today it — warmer and also sunnier as well. today it is — warmer and also sunnier as well. today it is a _ warmer and also sunnier as well. today it is a fairly cloudy day compared to yesterday. we have got some _ compared to yesterday. we have got some rain— compared to yesterday. we have got some rain around. particularly towards — some rain around. particularly towards the west. many places in the
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east will— towards the west. many places in the east will stay dry. not quite as warm — east will stay dry. not quite as warm as — east will stay dry. not quite as warm as it— east will stay dry. not quite as warm as it was yesterday. patchy rain around — warm as it was yesterday. patchy rain around through the irish sea coasts— rain around through the irish sea coasts affecting parts of wales, western — coasts affecting parts of wales, western england, south—west scotland and northern ireland. most other places— and northern ireland. most other places further east are going to be staying _ places further east are going to be staying dry. there will be a few hit and miss— staying dry. there will be a few hit and miss isolated showers later. that is _ and miss isolated showers later. that is silly for northumberland down _ that is silly for northumberland down towards norfolk. some sunny spells _ down towards norfolk. some sunny spells for— down towards norfolk. some sunny spells for many. temperatures 18 and 19 spells for many. temperatures i8 and 19 degrees— spells for many. temperatures i8 and 19 degrees and the warm response. cloud _ 19 degrees and the warm response. cloud hanging around the coast of scotland — cloud hanging around the coast of scotland. this evening and overnight we will— scotland. this evening and overnight we will keep those isolated showers in the _ we will keep those isolated showers in the east — we will keep those isolated showers in the east. they should fade away. the rain _ in the east. they should fade away. the rain becomes light and drizzly in the _ the rain becomes light and drizzly in the west. temperatures around about— in the west. temperatures around about ten— in the west. temperatures around about ten to ii in the west. temperatures around about ten to 11 degrees. more like six to— about ten to 11 degrees. more like six to 9— about ten to 11 degrees. more like six to 9 degrees in the east. a murky— six to 9 degrees in the east. a murky and _ six to 9 degrees in the east. a murky and cloudy start to saturday for some — murky and cloudy start to saturday for some. in a silly a few drizzly showers~ — for some. in a silly a few drizzly showers. they should fade. some sunshine — showers. they should fade. some sunshine developing. temperatures up to 18 to— sunshine developing. temperatures up
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to 18 to 21_ sunshine developing. temperatures up to 18 to 21 degrees on saturday. watch _ to 18 to 21 degrees on saturday. watch out — to 18 to 21 degrees on saturday. watch out for the odd isolated sharp shower. _ watch out for the odd isolated sharp shower, especially through parts of the midlands, the pennines and central— the midlands, the pennines and central scotland. those high levels of uv _ central scotland. those high levels of uv continue into sunday and bank holiday— of uv continue into sunday and bank holiday monday. high pressure is holding _ holiday monday. high pressure is holding on. eventually we look towards — holding on. eventually we look towards the start of meteorological summer~ _ towards the start of meteorological summer. things at last turning warmer— summer. things at last turning warmer and summer. things at last turning warmerand drier. thank— warmerand drier. thank you. it looks lovely looking over london. thank you. quarter past eight. we've been hearing this morning that up to three—quarters of new coronavirus cases in the uk could now be linked to the indian variant, according to the health secretary matt hancock. so how concerned should we be, and what impact could it have on the further relaxation of restrictions? lets speak now to epidemiologist, dr mike tildesley, who joins us from coventry. a regularface on a regular face on this a regularface on this programme. good morning. how are you doing? hat good morning. how are you doing? not too bad, thank you. how are you? very—
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too bad, thank you. how are you? very well. — too bad, thank you. how are you? very well, thank you. interesting to hear about what is happening with the indian variant. what have you observed and what consequences do you think we should be drawing, obviously as we move towards that june 21 date? obviously as we move towards that june 21 date?— obviously as we move towards that june 21 date? 0k. the first thing to observe is. — june 21 date? 0k. the first thing to observe is. it's— june 21 date? 0k. the first thing to observe is, it's not _ june 21 date? 0k. the first thing to observe is, it's not unexpected i observe is, it's not unexpected firstly— observe is, it's not unexpected firstly that these variants do emerge _ firstly that these variants do emerge. it is also not unexpected if we do _ emerge. it is also not unexpected if we do see _ emerge. it is also not unexpected if we do see one that is a little bit easily— we do see one that is a little bit easily passed from person to person, that we _ easily passed from person to person, that we might start to see it becoming more dominant. that is probably— becoming more dominant. that is probably not surprising. the key thing _ probably not surprising. the key thing we — probably not surprising. the key thing we need to try to understand is how— thing we need to try to understand is how much more easily does a transfer— is how much more easily does a transfer from person to person. there _ transfer from person to person. there is— transfer from person to person. there is still —— some uncertainty over— there is still —— some uncertainty over how— there is still —— some uncertainty over how transmissible it is. it seems — over how transmissible it is. it seems like _ over how transmissible it is. it seems like the vaccine has worked pretty— seems like the vaccine has worked pretty well, particularly after a second — pretty well, particularly after a second dose. we really need to encourage as many people as possible to -o encourage as many people as possible to go back— encourage as many people as possible to go back for their second dose, and also — to go back for their second dose, and also for— to go back for their second dose, and also for younger people to go for their— and also for younger people to go for their first dose when offered. 0bviously— for their first dose when offered. obviously the worry is that because it is more _ obviously the worry is that because it is more transmissible, then there
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is the _ it is more transmissible, then there is the potential for a further wave of infections and potentially, hospital— of infections and potentially, hospital admissions to start to rise again _ hospital admissions to start to rise again we — hospital admissions to start to rise again. we really need to gather as much _ again. we really need to gather as much evidence as we can over the next _ much evidence as we can over the next week— much evidence as we can over the next week or two to understand what is going _ next week or two to understand what is going on— next week or two to understand what is going on with his new variant, how— is going on with his new variant, how much— is going on with his new variant, how much more it is spreading, and then try— how much more it is spreading, and then try to— how much more it is spreading, and then try to predict what might happen— then try to predict what might happen should have thisjune 21 relaxation go ahead. happen should have this june 21 relaxation go ahead.— happen should have this june 21 relaxation go ahead. what, in your mind, is relaxation go ahead. what, in your mind. is the _ relaxation go ahead. what, in your mind, is the most _ relaxation go ahead. what, in your mind, is the most concerning i relaxation go ahead. what, in your mind, is the most concerning part| relaxation go ahead. what, in your. mind, is the most concerning part of the lifting of all restrictions on june 21? what in your mind should be scaled back, stepped back from, if, bearin scaled back, stepped back from, if, bear in mind, we knew variants are coming, bear in mind we are dealing with the indian variant at the moment? t0 with the indian variant at the moment?— with the indian variant at the moment? ., , �*, ., , moment? to be honest, it's really difficult to pinpoint _ moment? to be honest, it's really difficult to pinpoint one _ moment? to be honest, it's really difficult to pinpoint one exact i difficult to pinpoint one exact thing~ — difficult to pinpoint one exact thing. what we really look at when we are _ thing. what we really look at when we are analysing the data and using our models — we are analysing the data and using our models to predict what might happen. — our models to predict what might happen. is— our models to predict what might happen, is the impact on all of those — happen, is the impact on all of those restrictions being lifted together. we are looking at kind of a sort _ together. we are looking at kind of
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a sort of _ together. we are looking at kind of a sort of strength of restrictions lifting. — a sort of strength of restrictions lifting. if— a sort of strength of restrictions lifting, if you like. we take all the data. _ lifting, if you like. we take all the data, we fit to the data we see and we _ the data, we fit to the data we see and we project forward. we say, if you lived — and we project forward. we say, if you lived the restrictions this is what _ you lived the restrictions this is what you — you lived the restrictions this is what you might see. we are looking at trends~ _ what you might see. we are looking at trends. the important thing to bear— at trends. the important thing to bear in _ at trends. the important thing to bear in mind as we would expect with these _ bear in mind as we would expect with these restrictions being lifted at some _ these restrictions being lifted at some point of the r number would go above _ some point of the r number would go above one _ some point of the r number would go above one. it looks like that is probably— above one. it looks like that is probably what is happening now given that we _ probably what is happening now given that we are _ probably what is happening now given that we are starting to see cases going _ that we are starting to see cases going up — that we are starting to see cases going up. but the important thing for us _ going up. but the important thing for us is _ going up. but the important thing for us is given we now have the vaccines. — for us is given we now have the vaccines, we are in a very different place _ vaccines, we are in a very different place from — vaccines, we are in a very different place from say in october, when we were _ place from say in october, when we were starting to see cases rising in a concerning way, because hopefully the vaccines can help us along the way _ the vaccines can help us along the way if— the vaccines can help us along the way if we — the vaccines can help us along the way. if we kick the can down the road _ way. if we kick the can down the road a _ way. if we kick the can down the road a little bit, we can allow the vaccines — road a little bit, we can allow the vaccines to — road a little bit, we can allow the vaccines to help us and hopefully allow _ vaccines to help us and hopefully allow us — vaccines to help us and hopefully allow us all to lift restrictions. can i— allow us all to lift restrictions. can i ask— allow us all to lift restrictions. can i ask what is probably a stupid question? at what point do we know that the r number will never rise above one, when we are all
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vaccinated?— vaccinated? well, i mean, essentially _ vaccinated? well, i mean, essentially what _ vaccinated? well, i mean, essentially what we - vaccinated? well, i mean, essentially what we start i vaccinated? well, i mean, l essentially what we start to vaccinated? well, i mean, - essentially what we start to see... really. _ essentially what we start to see... really, viruses are pretty straight forward _ really, viruses are pretty straight forward in — really, viruses are pretty straight forward in terms of how they spread. if forward in terms of how they spread. if the _ forward in terms of how they spread. if the r _ forward in terms of how they spread. if the r number is greater than one, you will— if the r number is greater than one, you will see — if the r number is greater than one, you will see cases rising. if it is less— you will see cases rising. if it is less than— you will see cases rising. if it is less than one, you will see cases go down _ less than one, you will see cases go down again — less than one, you will see cases go down again. if you test them like flu, down again. if you test them like flu. what — down again. if you test them like flu, what we tend to have with louise — flu, what we tend to have with louise you _ flu, what we tend to have with louise you get these waves of infection _ louise you get these waves of infection. the r number goes above one and _ infection. the r number goes above one and you — infection. the r number goes above one and you tend to get waves of infection— one and you tend to get waves of infection in— one and you tend to get waves of infection in the autumn time and then— infection in the autumn time and then generally that sort of dies out towards _ then generally that sort of dies out towards the summer. what we may get with covid _ towards the summer. what we may get with covid is— towards the summer. what we may get with covid is these kinds of seasonal— with covid is these kinds of seasonal variations in the years to come _ seasonal variations in the years to come. hopefully when the vaccine campaigns were, the r number eventually goes below one and it starts _ eventually goes below one and it starts to — eventually goes below one and it starts to die out. you may get further— starts to die out. you may get further waves of infection coming in. possibly, we are not really ready— in. possibly, we are not really ready to — in. possibly, we are not really ready to fully have this discussion yet, ready to fully have this discussion yet. but _ ready to fully have this discussion yet, but possibly seasonal vaccination campaigns is what we may need in _ vaccination campaigns is what we may need in years to come to protect the vulnerable — need in years to come to protect the vulnerable. ~ ., , need in years to come to protect the vulnerable-— vulnerable. when i was asking you about which _ vulnerable. when i was asking you about which restrictions _ vulnerable. when i was asking you about which restrictions might i vulnerable. when i was asking you about which restrictions might be, | about which restrictions might he, could be about which restrictions might he, could he stepped back from if there
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were concerns, and i understand you won't go into specific restrictions, there are things like all legal limits on contact reviewed, nightclubs reopening, restrictions on larger events restricted, one of the things you will be very aware of is the hospitality industry and how it has struggled. it is very keen to move forward and drop those restrictions. there is often that argument, isn't there, why on earth can we go to the supermarket, shop around, he can we go to the supermarket, shop around, be around people we don't know, not in our household, not always socially distancing, and you can go to a pub?— can go to a pub? yeah, and this is difficult. can go to a pub? yeah, and this is difficult- it — can go to a pub? yeah, and this is difficult. it doesn't _ can go to a pub? yeah, and this is difficult. it doesn't actually - can go to a pub? yeah, and this is difficult. it doesn't actually come i difficult. it doesn't actually come down _ difficult. it doesn't actually come down to— difficult. it doesn't actually come down to risk with these situations. it down to risk with these situations. it comes— down to risk with these situations. it comes down to necessity. i remember having this debate 12 months — remember having this debate 12 months ago about schools versus pubs~ _ months ago about schools versus pubs. someone i was talking to was getting _ pubs. someone i was talking to was getting very upset that schools were open and _ getting very upset that schools were open and pubs warrant. and i was saying _ open and pubs warrant. and i was saying that — open and pubs warrant. and i was saying that schools are safer than pubs~ _
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saying that schools are safer than pubs~ it _ saying that schools are safer than pubs~ it is — saying that schools are safer than pubs~ it is a — saying that schools are safer than pubs. it is a necessity for children to go— pubs. it is a necessity for children to go to _ pubs. it is a necessity for children to go to school. really above anything _ to go to school. really above anything else. that is the key thing~ — anything else. that is the key thing. and obviously it is a necessity that we go to the supermarket and we buy our food. when _ supermarket and we buy our food. when it _ supermarket and we buy our food. when it comes to hospitality, of course _ when it comes to hospitality, of course it's— when it comes to hospitality, of course it's really, really important that we _ course it's really, really important that we try— course it's really, really important that we try to get those open as soon _ that we try to get those open as soon as— that we try to get those open as soon as possible, but we also need to do— soon as possible, but we also need to do it _ soon as possible, but we also need to do it safely, which is why some of these _ to do it safely, which is why some of these necessary things have been prioritised. — of these necessary things have been prioritised, even if you might argue they might — prioritised, even if you might argue they might be slightly more risky because — they might be slightly more risky because it is really, really important to keep them open. gk. because it is really, really important to keep them open. ok. so basicall , important to keep them open. ok. so basically. we — important to keep them open. ok. so basically. we are _ important to keep them open. ok. so basically, we are not _ important to keep them open. ok. so basically, we are not really _ basically, we are not really comparing apples with apples when it comes to pubs and supermarkets? h0. comes to pubs and supermarkets? no, absolutely not. i personally think we have — absolutely not. i personally think we have to do everything we can to support— we have to do everything we can to support hospitality as well. we have been going through this for a really lon- been going through this for a really long time — been going through this for a really long time. lockdown is damaging. covid _ long time. lockdown is damaging. covid is _ long time. lockdown is damaging. covid is extremely damaging. it affects — covid is extremely damaging. it affects lives. in the longer term lockdown — affects lives. in the longer term lockdown is damaging if people start to lose _ lockdown is damaging if people start to lose their livelihoods. we need
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to lose their livelihoods. we need to recognise that. that is why i really — to recognise that. that is why i really hope we can lift restrictions sooner— really hope we can lift restrictions sooner rather than later, and hopefully— sooner rather than later, and hopefully not go back into them is going _ hopefully not go back into them is going the — hopefully not go back into them is going the autumn.— hopefully not go back into them is going the autumn. mike, thank you for answering _ going the autumn. mike, thank you for answering those _ going the autumn. mike, thank you for answering those questions. i going the autumn. mike, thank you| for answering those questions. glad you are well as well. see for answering those questions. glad you are well as well.— you are well as well. see you soon. someone else _ you are well as well. see you soon. someone else who _ you are well as well. see you soon. someone else who will _ you are well as well. see you soon. someone else who will be - you are well as well. see you soon. someone else who will be thinking | someone else who will be thinking pretty closely about those restrictions being lifted, john lingard, a landlord, he is in bury. i don't know if you could hear a scientist talking through some of the rationale behind some of the restrictions. do you want to take us through how it is working? is it you and your brother have three pubs? i is it working out under the current restrictions? 0k. under the current restrictions? 0k. under the current restrictions, _ current restrictions? 0k. under the current restrictions, most - current restrictions? 0k. under the current restrictions, most of - current restrictions? 0k. under the current restrictions, most of our i current restrictions, most of our venues — current restrictions, most of our venues have only recently opened last week — venues have only recently opened last week. capacity is down to 50% because _ last week. capacity is down to 50% because of— last week. capacity is down to 50% because of social distancing. staffing _ because of social distancing. staffing costs are up because of the
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management of the covid guidelines. making _ management of the covid guidelines. making sure people are safe. all that coming together. we are currently _ that coming together. we are currently suffering, if i'm honest. we have — currently suffering, if i'm honest. we have had 12 months of being closed — we have had 12 months of being closed. we have onlyjust opened. consumer— closed. we have onlyjust opened. consumer confidence is still very low _ consumer confidence is still very low and — consumer confidence is still very low and i— consumer confidence is still very low. and i think the politicians that keep _ low. and i think the politicians that keep on saying they are still not sure. — that keep on saying they are still not sure, they are still not sure, it is— not sure, they are still not sure, it is damaging consumer confidence. it is reducing. that impacts us. john. _ it is reducing. that impacts us. john. you — it is reducing. that impacts us. john, you will be well aware, and we have spoken to many in the industry, how hard you are trying to keep within the guidelines, keep people safe and, you know, that is a given. can you make money, as in profit, under the restrictions you are working on, at 50% capacity? can you actually make money? ho.
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working on, at 5096 capacity? can you actually make money?— working on, at 5096 capacity? can you actually make money? no. no. so, we ut our actually make money? no. no. so, we put our models — actually make money? no. no. so, we put our models together— actually make money? no. no. so, we put our models together for _ actually make money? no. no. so, we put our models together for at - actually make money? no. no. so, we put our models together for at least i put our models together for at least five weeks _ put our models together for at least five weeks of insider trading expecting to lose money. really to try to _ expecting to lose money. really to try to start — expecting to lose money. really to try to start rebuilding our reputation, bring back our customers. any extension on those restrictions— customers. any extension on those restrictions will impact us severely. restrictions will impact us severely-— restrictions will impact us severely. restrictions will impact us severel. ~ ., ., ., severely. ok. i know what you are referrin: severely. ok. i know what you are referring to- _ severely. ok. i know what you are referring to. you _ severely. ok. i know what you are referring to. you are _ severely. ok. i know what you are referring to. you are referring i severely. ok. i know what you are referring to. you are referring to i referring to. you are referring to june the 21st. clearly you have factored that in. you've got a date and a time when you think things will be different. if not, then what? ~ ~ ., ., ., , what? well, you know, unfortunately, unuke what? well, you know, unfortunately, unlike some — what? well, you know, unfortunately, unlike some of— what? well, you know, unfortunately, unlike some of the _ what? well, you know, unfortunately, unlike some of the big _ what? well, you know, unfortunately, unlike some of the big chains - what? well, you know, unfortunately, unlike some of the big chains that i unlike some of the big chains that have _ unlike some of the big chains that have got— unlike some of the big chains that have got big financial backers, we are two— have got big financial backers, we are two independent brothers. we have had — are two independent brothers. we have had very difficult decisions to make _ have had very difficult decisions to make it _ have had very difficult decisions to make. it has impacted our staff, our
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workforce _ make. it has impacted our staff, our workforce. also, our families. we have _ workforce. also, our families. we have had — workforce. also, our families. we have had to — workforce. also, our families. we have had to reach out to wider families— have had to reach out to wider families to help us survive. that is a challenge — families to help us survive. that is a challenge. it is a challenge for our people. we have brought people back _ our people. we have brought people back what — our people. we have brought people back. what happens in a few weeks, when _ back. what happens in a few weeks, when the _ back. what happens in a few weeks, when the restrictions continue and we need _ when the restrictions continue and we need to— when the restrictions continue and we need to reduce costs? people's livelihoods — we need to reduce costs? people's livelihoods will be affected. the reali of livelihoods will be affected. the reality of what _ livelihoods will be affected. tue: reality of what you are facing will not escape people looking on. can i give you this opportunity to big up the pub? what is the special today? are you doing food? what is the special? are you doing food? what is the secial? ., , ., . special? yeah. so i see clarence we have not special? yeah. so i see clarence we have got a — special? yeah. so i see clarence we have got a home-made _ special? yeah. so i see clarence we have got a home-made steak- special? yeah. so i see clarence we have got a home-made steak and i have got a home—made steak and mushroom — have got a home—made steak and mushroom pie, mashed potato and greens _ mushroom pie, mashed potato and greens. very popular. and we've also not greens. very popular. and we've also got some _ greens. very popular. and we've also got some of— greens. very popular. and we've also got some of our classics, the burger and fish _ got some of our classics, the burger and fish and — got some of our classics, the burger and fish and chips are always popular— and fish and chips are always popular here. but yes, please come
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alonq _ popular here. but yes, please come alonq do _ popular here. but yes, please come alonu. ~ ., ., along. do you know what, john? i wish ou along. do you know what, john? i wish you well- — along. do you know what, john? i wish you well. we _ along. do you know what, john? i wish you well. we will _ along. do you know what, john? i wish you well. we will keep i along. do you know what, john? i wish you well. we will keep in - along. do you know what, john? i. wish you well. we will keep in touch and maybe onjune 21 we will catch up and maybe onjune 21 we will catch up again and see how things are panning out for you. but good luck and thank you for talking to us today. thank you.— today. thank you. that's the reali , today. thank you. that's the reality. isn't _ today. thank you. that's the reality, isn't it? _ today. thank you. that's the reality, isn't it? we - today. thank you. that's the reality, isn't it? we can - today. thank you. that's the reality, isn't it? we can talk| today. thank you. that's the - reality, isn't it? we can talk about all the sides, —— science, but the reality is that people are struggling when it comes to the economy. desperate to open safely. that is why in a way, asjohn put it very well, discussions they have is a business around thejune 21 date are not academic. these are just very simple equations around caching, money spent and how they can make a profit. we will see more of that in the coming weeks. 50 can make a profit. we will see more of that in the coming weeks. so many can sympathise- _ coming up in the next hour... # the power of love, a force from
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above. such a beautiful song. it's coming in half an hour. a new exhibition pays tribute to the 80s band frankie goes to hollywood. we are going to talk to brian nash. i think i had brian nash. i thinki had forgotten about that video. _ time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. london's tourist attractions are hoping for a bank holiday visitor boom this weekend. it's thought the capital's still missing around 11 million of its annual overseas tourists — so it's domestic visitors who are being encouraged to come into town. certainly from last week, i felt a real push again within london as indoor dining opened up again. there's a lot of birthdays, anniversaries, engagements and general celebrations that need to take place right now, so there's a lot of catching up to be done, so we're excited to be part of that. a murder investigation�*s underway after man was shot dead
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in turnpike lane in north london last night. police were called after a gunshot was heard, and found the man who's believed to be in his twenties. southend airport is restarting passenger flights from today. it's been closed for five months because of the pandemic. there'll be twice—weekly flights to portugal. now, although many music festivals can't go ahead this summer — here's one you canjoin in. # and boy, you know i've tried to pray. # i've bruised my knees. # i've tried to breathe you back to me. bbc radio london is hosting the airwaves festival — a virtual event — all weekend. it features rag'n�*bone man, the manic street preachers and brits rising star winner griff. i've written a mix tape, which is seven songs, and that's coming onjune the 11th... and, yeah, i'm really excited to put them out. i've kind of written and produced them here in my bedroom by myself, and they feel quite personal and intimate. so i hope when i release them into the world, people like them. and then i guess, yeah, i need to get back in and write more
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for some kind of album that's coming soon. travel now... on the tube, we have minor delays on the circle line and severe delays on the hammersmith and city line, and there's no overground between clapham junction and wandsworth road due to a signal failure. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a milder start to the day than we saw this time yesterday, many of our temperatures in double figures. there's also quite a bit of cloud around, as well. there's a weather front sitting right out towards the west — it's not giving us any rain, but it is throwing us plenty of cloud, so a cloudier day than we saw yesterday. there will be some breaks emerging, some spells of sunshine, particularly as we head through the afternoon. the sunny spells probably best out towards eastern areas of the capital — do watch out for the small chance of one or two showers breaking out
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as we head towards the end of the day. top temperatures this afternoon in the best of any sunshine could get as high as perhaps 18 to 19 degrees celsius — even 20 not totally out of the question. now, as we head through this evening and overnight, again, plenty of cloud around. it's a mild start to the day on saturday. on saturday, then, again, there'll be quite a bit of cloud, but also some sunny spells emerging. temperatures will start to rise once more. by the time we get to sunday a lot of sunshine. high pressure dominates as we head through next week, so, again, it's looking dry and feeling warm. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on our website. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. morning live is back and coming up straight after breakfast on bbc one. janette and gethin can tell us what they have in store.
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good morning to you both. good morninu. good morning to you both. good morning. janette _ good morning to you both. good morning. janette manrara - good morning to you both. good morning. janette manrara and i good morning to you both. good - morning. janette manrara and gethin, onl full morning. janette manrara and gethin, only full names _ morning. janette manrara and gethin, only full names for _ morning. janette manrara and gethin, only full names for the _ morning. janette manrara and gethin, only full names for the special - only full names for the special ones. i only full names for the special ones. . , , ., . ones. i am 'ust getting my voice back. ones. i am just getting my voice back- coming — ones. i am just getting my voice back. coming up _ ones. i am just getting my voice back. coming up on _ ones. i am just getting my voice back. coming up on the - ones. i am just getting my voice - back. coming up on the programme toda the pandemic's caused a huge disruption to gp appointments — there's now a rise in the number of patients needing care, but 31 million fewer consultations taking place than normal. have you been trying to see your doctor? how easy has it been to get an appointment? we'd love to hear from you on this, so get in touch and let us know. plus a staggering 41,000 botox injections are given _ to under—18s each year — something dr tijon esho| wants to see banned. he explains why he's calling for a change to the rules - on cosmetic treatments for teens, and how he was even— begged by a 14—year—old - who was desperate for botox. remarkable, that, isn't it? also today, wildlife expert chris packham hasjoined forces with world—famous photographer
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rankin to find the next big name in british photography. hear how it could be you! plus he'll have tips that could help you capture a photo worthy of an award. and the garden rescue . team has a new member. lee burkhill — aka the garden ninja |— will be revealing how you can get a designer garden on a budget this summer — however big. or small your outdoor space. plus with, retailers struggling to meet the demand for outdoor furniture, jacqui joseph shows us how we can quickly transform old pallets into fabulous patio seating. and janette's got a fun strictly fitness work—out to kick start the bank holiday weekend. we have a feel good friday strictly fitness _ we have a feel good friday strictly fitness work—out. _ we have a feel good friday strictly fitness work—out. wait _ we have a feel good friday strictly fitness work—out. wait until - we have a feel good friday strictly fitness work—out. wait until you . fitness work—out. wait until you hear— fitness work—out. wait until you hear the — fitness work—out. wait until you hear the song _ fitness work—out. wait until you hear the song we _ fitness work—out. wait until you hear the song we are _ fitness work—out. wait until you hear the song we are doing - fitness work—out. wait until you hear the song we are doing it. fitness work—out. wait until you| hear the song we are doing it to! see you at 9:15! the sun shines coming out, it is going to be fabulous.— going to be fabulous. manrara. sounds like _ going to be fabulous. manrara. sounds like a _
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going to be fabulous. manrara. sounds like a detective... - going to be fabulous. manrara. i sounds like a detective... gethin would be the bumbling one. i know still listening _ would be the bumbling one. i know still listening and? _ would be the bumbling one. i know still listening and? definitely. - still listening and? definitely. ben is looking _ still listening and? definitely. ben is looking into _ still listening and? definitely. ben is looking into a - still listening and? definitely. ben is looking into a subject | still listening and? definitely. - ben is looking into a subject matter that people get really irritated about. you are looking into loyalty in insurance. you are loyal to them for years, they don't know how you think they treat you well and they treat you not well as new customers sometimes. how do we see "new customers only"? the regulator this morning has set no more. it is all about making sure we pay the right price insurance, whether it is car or home insurance. the regulator says new customers get the best deals. those who stay loyal get charged more. so from january next year, it will be banned. all customers will pay the same. it's thought about six million of us were paying £200 a year more on average than we needed to. we spoke to mike, who found he was paying much more because he'd stayed loyal to the company that
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insured his car. one of our daughters and said, dad, you've really got to get on the internet and find yourself a better quote than that. so i did. ifind myself a better quote. in fact, the insurance company, when i challenged them, theyjust said, sorry, that the price. i thought, i've been in business a long time. sometimes you've got to negotiate at least. there was no negotiation with them. so i went to another major name in insurance on the internet. didn't speak to anybody. and ended up getting the insurance for a85 quid. shop around and save a bit of money. so what does today's announcement mean for you? alex neill is from the consumer rights group, resolver. nice to see you. lows of questions have come out of this announcement this morning selects for them. the first question is, when will these changes come into force? it is probably only likely to affect us
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when we come to renew? that's right. most peeple — when we come to renew? that's right. most peeple will _ when we come to renew? that's right. most people will be _ when we come to renew? that's right. most people will be feeling _ when we come to renew? that's right. most people will be feeling the - most people will be feeling the impact of this price walking as it has been called by the regulator, when it suddenly creeps up. in year two, when they stay with their existing provider. if you are renewing your insurance on the 1st of january next year, you should see that you don't pay a different price to if you were to get a brand—new quotation. in the longer term, the regulator is saying that this impact, this policy, you will see the benefit over five to ten years and they are talking about somewhere around £4 billion.— around £4 billion. some people may think this ruling _ around £4 billion. some people may think this ruling may _ around £4 billion. some people may think this ruling may think _ around £4 billion. some people may think this ruling may think they - think this ruling may think they don't have to shop around, that their current provider will always give them the best price. that their current provider will always give them the best price.- give them the best price. that is not necessarily _ give them the best price. that is not necessarily the _ give them the best price. that is not necessarily the case, - give them the best price. that is not necessarily the case, is - give them the best price. that is not necessarily the case, is it? l give them the best price. that is i not necessarily the case, is it? no, and it is one viewers should watch out for because what they are really saying is that you will get a fair price from your provider, which means you will get the best price they can give you whether you are
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new or existing, but that does not mean it is the best price on the market and it should not be confused... see what is happening in the energy market, with a price cap. providers are free to charge whatever they like. providers are free to charge whateverthey like. if providers are free to charge whatever they like. if they decide they don't want your business or they don't want your business or they will rate you hire for some reason, that'sjust they will rate you hire for some reason, that's just may not be the most competitive price, so shopping around is still definitely worth doing. around is still definitely worth doinu. ., ., , around is still definitely worth doinu. ., ., , doing. the model has always been that in the past _ doing. the model has always been that in the past they _ doing. the model has always been that in the past they offer - doing. the model has always been that in the past they offer cheaper| that in the past they offer cheaper deals to new customers, try to existing ones a bit more and it all sort of balances out in their financial terms. sort of balances out in their financialterms. does sort of balances out in their financial terms. does this ruling today mean that new customers will end up paying more? hot today mean that new customers will end up paying more? not necessarily. i think there — end up paying more? not necessarily. i think there will _ end up paying more? not necessarily. i think there will be _ end up paying more? not necessarily. i think there will be some _ i think there will be some adjustments made and what the regulator seems to say, which i think is pretty shocking, is what was happening was it wasn't that everybody got the very best deal when they got a new quotation. it was that it was targeted at those people that they thought then it would not switch in those years two,
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three, four. and in those cases those are more vulnerable customers, older or less well off. we will see some adjustments around the margins but fundamentally getting a new customer has a ways been competitive so that should keep some good prices therefore all consumers. find so that should keep some good prices therefore all consumers.— therefore all consumers. and that retention of _ therefore all consumers. and that retention of customer _ therefore all consumers. and that retention of customer issue - therefore all consumers. and that retention of customer issue is - therefore all consumers. and that retention of customer issue is a l retention of customer issue is a good one. in the past they got those new customers by offering cheaper prices. if they can't do that does that mean they will improve their service or the product, rather than just always going for the cheapest, will shop around based on how good a firm is? i will shop around based on how good a firm is? ., , will shop around based on how good a firm is? .,, ~ firm is? i hope so. i think the thing with _ firm is? i hope so. i think the thing with insurers _ firm is? i hope so. i think the thing with insurers is - firm is? i hope so. i think the | thing with insurers is age-old, firm is? i hope so. i think the - thing with insurers is age-old, you thing with insurers is age—old, you don't know what you have bought until you need to use it and then you are in trouble if you have gone for a really cheap price that has poor cover or a poor claims coverage, for example. for me, what will be important is around these measures, how do you also get insurers and, critically, price comparison sites to focus on quality
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of the product you buy?— of the product you buy? always the bi est of the product you buy? always the biggest issue- _ of the product you buy? always the biggest issue. really _ of the product you buy? always the biggest issue. really good - of the product you buy? always the biggest issue. really good to - of the product you buy? always the biggest issue. really good to talk l biggest issue. really good to talk to you this morning, alex neill from resolver. the regulator also saying they will keep a really close eye on this but as alex touched on it is hard to police because we know how difficult it can be to switch to make sure you have the right cover, you are paying the right excess. you have all your valuables and things covered so lots of big questions but nonetheless going some way to save people a bit of money when it comes to home or car insurance. it is to home or car insurance. it is important. — to home or car insurance. it is important, especially - to home or car insurance. it is important, especially in - to home or car insurance. if 3 important, especially in these times. thanks. it has been a real honour for us. around half six this morning, real honour to catch up with mark ormrod. you may remember the name because he is this extraordinary man, a former royal marine who lost both legs and one arm in an explosion in afghanistan in 2007. since then he has set himself the most extraordinary challenges to achieve.
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. extraordinary for people even if they hadn't _ . extraordinary for people even if they hadn't lost _ . extraordinary for people even if they hadn't lost three _ . extraordinary for people even if they hadn't lost three limbs. - . extraordinary for people even if they hadn't lost three limbs. to i . extraordinary for people even if i they hadn't lost three limbs. to day john maguire will take us through all this because he has been spending time with him this morning and followed him just today, on his epicjourney. ifigure and followed him just today, on his epicjourney. i figure you would and followed him just today, on his epicjourney. ifigure you would get the sense that this is a man who is so determined and is so down to earth, isn't he?— earth, isn't he? yes, absolutely extraordinary. _ earth, isn't he? yes, absolutely extraordinary. sometimes - earth, isn't he? yes, absolutely extraordinary. sometimes we i extraordinary. sometimes we struggle, we get caught up in hyperbole, which are the best ways to use, _ hyperbole, which are the best ways to use, which adjectives to use. humble — to use, which adjectives to use. humble is— to use, which adjectives to use. humble is very much one. inspiring the obvious— humble is very much one. inspiring the obvious other one. that is drakes— the obvious other one. that is drakes island, about one kilometre swim _ drakes island, about one kilometre swim awax — drakes island, about one kilometre swim away. swimming in the open sea, very different _ swim away. swimming in the open sea, very different beasts and this morning _ very different beasts and this morning mark overcame that natural physical— morning mark overcame that natural physical obstacles with what he has .ot physical obstacles with what he has got up _ physical obstacles with what he has got up here, the top two inches as they say— got up here, the top two inches as they say in— got up here, the top two inches as they say in sport. the iron will
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once _ they say in sport. the iron will once again _ they say in sport. the iron will once again to complete the swim from drake's _ once again to complete the swim from drake's island back here onto dry land at _ drake's island back here onto dry land at plymouth sound, the coast of plymouth _ land at plymouth sound, the coast of plymouth. this is how he did it. today could not be better. i have a great team behind me, iam motivated, good to go and excited. getting into the water, there you 90, getting into the water, there you go, head underforthe getting into the water, there you go, head underfor the first getting into the water, there you go, head under for the first time. the only way mark can propel himself forward is with that one arm, that one left arm.
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back here with mark and his family. becky, ev, mason. mark, did you at any stage everything you are not going to make it? has any stage everything you are not going to make it?— any stage everything you are not going to make it? as soon as i got in the water! _ in the water! laughter no, and i don't mean that to sound arrogant, i mean that's because of the team i have around me. amazing coaching, support, all around us but are notjust the people in the water, the people that were here lining the streets, in the boats, yourself, everyone. you know? i think when you make something about more than yourself it gives you that extra motivation to push when things gets difficult was that we did drift way off course and have to fight against the courage to get back on it. funnily enough, the direction that made me swim in a that when i came up to brief i could actually see everybody for the first time on the shore line and that was a big boost and helped me fight for current and get the last 200 metres. we can't be encouraging crowds, but
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you could hear them, you have a sense they were here to support you. absolutely. they were all the way down from this car park down to here, it was filled. down the water. it was amazing. here, it was filled. down the water. it was amazing-— it was amazing. brilliant. another ureat it was amazing. brilliant. another great suoport _ it was amazing. brilliant. another great support comes _ it was amazing. brilliant. another great support comes from - it was amazing. brilliant. another great support comes from the i it was amazing. brilliant. another - great support comes from the family, of course. becky, i know you don't like talking to us but give us away. what about when he comes home and says, i got this idea i'm going to do x, white, z, what do you say? keep it clean! do x, white, 2, what do you say? keep it clean!— do x, white, 2, what do you say? keep it clean! someone asked me, what will he _ keep it clean! someone asked me, what will he do _ keep it clean! someone asked me, what will he do next? _ keep it clean! someone asked me, what will he do next? i _ keep it clean! someone asked me, what will he do next? i said - keep it clean! someone asked me, what will he do next? i said i - keep it clean! someone asked me, what will he do next? i said i don't| what will he do next? i said i don't want to know _ what will he do next? i said i don't want to know because _ what will he do next? i said i don't want to know because i _ what will he do next? i said i don't want to know because i dread - what will he do next? i said i don't want to know because i dread to l want to know because i dread to think _ want to know because i dread to think it — want to know because i dread to think. it will be something crazy, as per— think. it will be something crazy, as per normal. but, yeah, just keep pushing _ as per normal. but, yeah, just keep pushing himself. who; as per normal. but, yeah, 'ust keep pushing himselffi as per normal. but, yeah, 'ust keep pushing himself. why do you think he does it? because _ pushing himself. why do you think he does it? because he's _ pushing himself. why do you think he does it? because he's stupid. - does it? because he's stupid. laughter — laughter because he raises money! he laughter because he raises mone ! ., , because he raises money! he does, evie, because he raises money! he does, evie. quite — because he raises money! he does, evie. quite right- — because he raises money! he does, evie, quite right. we _ because he raises money! he does, evie, quite right. we have - because he raises money! he does, evie, quite right. we have seen - because he raises money! he does, | evie, quite right. we have seen you, he has a gym set up in the garage, we have seen you help in training. what do you think of what he has
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achieved with his run, his cycling, his swimming? has achieved with his run, his cycling, his swimming?— achieved with his run, his cycling, his swimming? achieved with his run, his cycling, his swimmin- ? ., ., ., m his swimming? has he done a good? he done aood his swimming? has he done a good? he done good at — his swimming? has he done a good? he done good at everything! _ his swimming? has he done a good? he done good at everything! absolutely - done good at everything! absolutely riuht. done good at everything! absolutely right- mason. _ done good at everything! absolutely right. mason, are _ done good at everything! absolutely right. mason, are you _ done good at everything! absolutely right. mason, are you a _ done good at everything! absolutely right. mason, are you a good - right. mason, are you a good swimmer?— right. mason, are you a good swimmer? . ., , ., ., swimmer? yeah... that you are good, mind ou, swimmer? yeah... that you are good, mind you. mate? _ swimmer? yeah... that you are good, mind you, mate? what _ swimmer? yeah... that you are good, mind you, mate? what do _ swimmer? yeah... that you are good, mind you, mate? what do you - swimmer? yeah... that you are good, mind you, mate? what do you think. swimmer? yeah... that you are good, j mind you, mate? what do you think of our dad mind you, mate? what do you think of your dad swimming _ mind you, mate? what do you think of your dad swimming scientific. - mind you, mate? what do you think of your dad swimming scientific. thank i your dad swimming scientific. thank ou, your dad swimming scientific. thank you. mate- — your dad swimming scientific. thank you. mate- you— your dad swimming scientific. thank you, mate. you swim _ your dad swimming scientific. thank you, mate. you swim in _ your dad swimming scientific. thank you, mate. you swim in the - your dad swimming scientific. thank you, mate. you swim in the sea - your dad swimming scientific. thank you, mate. you swim in the sea so l you, mate. you swim in the sea so ou you, mate. you swim in the sea so you know — you, mate. you swim in the sea so you know how _ you, mate. you swim in the sea so you know how different _ you, mate. you swim in the sea so you know how different it - you, mate. you swim in the sea so you know how different it is - you, mate. you swim in the sea so you know how different it is to - you, mate. you swim in the sea so you know how different it is to the | you know how different it is to the pool? taste you know how different it is to the ool? ~ ., you know how different it is to the ool? . ., ., you know how different it is to the ool? ~ ., ., ., ., ., pool? we are going to do in the half term, pool? we are going to do in the half term. subject _ pool? we are going to do in the half term, subject swimming. _ pool? we are going to do in the half term, subject swimming. that - term, subject swimming. that technique _ term, subject swimming. that technique is — term, subject swimming. that technique is amazing, - term, subject swimming. that technique is amazing, just one arm, have you ever tried to do that with just one arm?— just one arm? yes, it is really hirh. just one arm? yes, it is really high- isn't _ just one arm? yes, it is really high. isn't it? _ just one arm? yes, it is really high. isn't it? mark, - just one arm? yes, it is really high. isn't it? mark, we - just one arm? yes, it is really l high. isn't it? mark, we chatted with ou high. isn't it? mark, we chatted with you when _ high. isn't it? mark, we chatted with you when you _ high. isn't it? mark, we chatted with you when you came - high. isn't it? mark, we chatted with you when you came out i high. isn't it? mark, we chatted with you when you came out of| high. isn't it? mark, we chatted i with you when you came out of the water out what is next. i dread to ask, really. sometimes i think you make it up and then make it happen. what is next?— what is next? first of all, ben makes all _ what is next? first of all, ben makes all this _ what is next? first of all, ben makes all this up! _ what is next? first of all, ben makes all this up! my - what is next? first of all, ben makes all this up! my coach. i what is next? first of all, ben l makes all this up! my coach. he what is next? first of all, ben - makes all this up! my coach. he has strongly suggested a 100 mile bike
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ride from north devon, finishing backin ride from north devon, finishing back in plymouth, but hopefully, you know, conditions permitting, we can bring a load of people with us on that. people that want to push themselves a little bit, get involved, join a different kind of community, and we can show them what it is like to bond through shared hardship because it will be a difficult ride as people struggle but that is where those connections are made and that is what it is all about. ., ., ., , ., , about. proving not only to yourself but to others _ about. proving not only to yourself but to others almost _ about. proving not only to yourself but to others almost what - about. proving not only to yourself but to others almost what seems l but to others almost what seems impossible is possible, write? exactly, especially if you have the support around you.— exactly, especially if you have the support around you. yeah, what was our total support around you. yeah, what was your total comic _ support around you. yeah, what was your total comic you _ support around you. yeah, what was your total comic you are _ support around you. yeah, what was your total comic you are justgiving l your total comic you are justgiving total for it every before you start this morning?— total for it every before you start this morning?_ pretty i total for it every before you start - this morning?_ pretty good, this morning? 279,000. pretty good, uuite this morning? 279,000. pretty good, quite impressive. _ this morning? 279,000. pretty good, quite impressive. do _ this morning? 279,000. pretty good, quite impressive. do you _ this morning? 279,000. pretty good, quite impressive. do you want - this morning? 279,000. pretty good, quite impressive. do you want to - quite impressive. do you want to know what it is now? i quite impressive. do you want to know what it is now?— quite impressive. do you want to know what it is now? i would love to know. know what it is now? i would love to know- any — know what it is now? i would love to know. any guesses? _ know what it is now? i would love to know. any guesses? not _ know what it is now? i would love to know. any guesses? not a - know what it is now? i would love to know. any guesses? not a clue. - know what it is now? i would love to know. any guesses? not a clue. do| know. any guesses? not a clue. do ou think know. any guesses? not a clue. do you think it — know. any guesses? not a clue. do you think it has _ know. any guesses? not a clue. do you think it has gone _ know. any guesses? not a clue. do you think it has gone over - know. any guesses? not a clue. do| you think it has gone over 300,000 yet?
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you think it has gone over 300,000 et? ., you think it has gone over 300,000 yet? hie. come on! where has the yet? no. come on! where has the confidence,? i— yet? no. come on! where has the confidence,? ithink— yet? no. come on! where has the confidence,? i think it _ yet? no. come on! where has the confidence,? i think it might - yet? no. come on! where has the confidence,? i think it might be i confidence,? i think it might be around 400,000. _ confidence,? i think it might be around 400,000. we - confidence,? i think it might be around 400,000. we are - confidence,? i think it might be around 400,000. we are not l confidence,? i think it might be. around 400,000. we are not far confidence,? i think it might be - around 400,000. we are not far off. 373,000. £373,000! _ around 400,000. we are not far off. 373,000. £373,000! that— around 400,000. we are not far off. 373,000. £373,000! that is - around 400,000. we are not far off. i 373,000. £373,000! that is £100,000. it robabl 373,000. £373,000! that is £100,000. it probably felt _ 373,000. £373,000! that is £100,000. it probably felt like _ 373,000. £373,000! that is £100,000. it probably felt like that _ 373,000. £373,000! that is £100,000. it probably felt like that when _ 373,000. £373,000! that is £100,000. it probably felt like that when you - it probably felt like that when you are stroking across the water. it was rough, coming across. thinking about that total going up with every stroke, it pushed me on, you know? reorg, the charity that helps former servicemen and women and emergency services. congratulations, well done to the whole family and your support crew, thank you, brilliant outfits, great to see. we'll see you on the next one,! to you, well done to mark and his family and all the team. i’m and his family and all the team. i'm 'ust and his family and all the team. i�*rn just thinking, and maybe you can ask mark, wouldn't it be nice as part of your support if you had gone in the water, as well? i wonder it might
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have thought that would have been a goodidea have thought that would have been a good idea because you could have done that. , , ., done that. looked! is this not good enouah done that. looked! is this not good enough for — done that. looked! is this not good enough for you? — done that. looked! is this not good enough for you? i _ done that. looked! is this not good enough for you? i won't _ done that. looked! is this not good enough for you? i won't show- done that. looked! is this not good enough for you? i won't show you i done that. looked! is this not good i enough for you? i won't show you the seat of my trousers, either. that's got a soaking, as well.— got a soaking, as well. they go, well done. _ got a soaking, as well. they go, well done, pass _ got a soaking, as well. they go, well done, pass on _ got a soaking, as well. they go, well done, pass on our- well done, pass on our congratulations it has been an honour watching what has been going on this morning. he plays the achievements down but it is amazing, so thank you. achievements down but it is amazing, so thank you-— so thank you. what i love is that one of the _ so thank you. what i love is that one of the things _ so thank you. what i love is that one of the things he's _ so thank you. what i love is that one of the things he's looking i forward to, pizza! always a good thing when you can look forward to a good pizza for dinner. iii thing when you can look forward to a good pizza for dinner.— good pizza for dinner. if you missed it earl , good pizza for dinner. if you missed it early. when _ good pizza for dinner. if you missed it early, when you _ good pizza for dinner. if you missed it early, when you out _ good pizza for dinner. if you missed it early, when you out of _ good pizza for dinner. if you missed it early, when you out of the - good pizza for dinner. if you missed it early, when you out of the water, he said his jaw... such was the cold, he couldn't work his jaw. doesn't need to worry about that, none of us do for the next few days, i think, mostly... none of us do for the next few days, ithink, mostly... i none of us do for the next few days, i think, mostly... i am none of us do for the next few days, ithink, mostly... iam putting none of us do for the next few days, i think, mostly... i am putting all these caveats in. sarah knows! there is sunshine for some of us, all of us at some point, is that there?
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absolutely. we can pretty much guarantees and sunshine for all of us at _ guarantees and sunshine for all of us at some — guarantees and sunshine for all of us at some point over the next couple — us at some point over the next couple of— us at some point over the next couple of days and we have been waiting _ couple of days and we have been waiting so — couple of days and we have been waiting so patiently for a really lon- waiting so patiently for a really long time because april was a really cold month, may has been not only cool but _ cold month, may has been not only cool but also wet, as well. as we head _ cool but also wet, as well. as we head for — cool but also wet, as well. as we head for the last few days of may to the 1st— head for the last few days of may to the 1st of _ head for the last few days of may to the 1st ofjune, the start—up geological survey, things eventually end up— geological survey, things eventually end up warming up and drying up, as welt _ end up warming up and drying up, as welt it— end up warming up and drying up, as welt it won't— end up warming up and drying up, as well. it won't be dry across the board, — well. it won't be dry across the board, particularly today because today— board, particularly today because today we — board, particularly today because today we have more cloud than there was yesterday the cloud brings outbreaks of rain around, particularly towards the west. further— particularly towards the west. further east you should say predominantly dry with some sunshine out there. _ predominantly dry with some sunshine out there, as well. a weather moving its way _ out there, as well. a weather moving its way in _ out there, as well. a weather moving its way in from the west, bumping into a _ its way in from the west, bumping into a big — its way in from the west, bumping into a big area of high pressure towards — into a big area of high pressure towards the east and, as it does so, it will— towards the east and, as it does so, it will fizzle — towards the east and, as it does so, it will fizzle out over the next 24 hours _ it will fizzle out over the next 24 hours or— it will fizzle out over the next 24 hours or so _ it will fizzle out over the next 24 hours or so. if it is a patchy rain for western— hours or so. if it is a patchy rain for western parts of england, wales, northern— for western parts of england, wales, northern ireland and south—west scotland — northern ireland and south—west scotland. further east, most places will stay— scotland. further east, most places will stay dry but one or two showers for the _ will stay dry but one or two showers for the likes— will stay dry but one or two showers
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for the likes of northumberland, down _ for the likes of northumberland, down towards norfolk, as well. temperatures doing reasonably well today stop 18, 90, possibly 21 or two spots — today stop 18, 90, possibly 21 or two spots but not quite as yesterday and a _ two spots but not quite as yesterday and a bit _ two spots but not quite as yesterday and a bit cooler under the cloud in the west— and a bit cooler under the cloud in the west and the first of eastern scotland. — the west and the first of eastern scotland, with a bit of low cloud lingering — scotland, with a bit of low cloud lingering. into this evening and overnight— lingering. into this evening and overnight we keep one or two of the isolated _ overnight we keep one or two of the isolated showers possibly in the east for — isolated showers possibly in the east for a — isolated showers possibly in the east for a time, they should fade and most — east for a time, they should fade and most of the wet weather in the west also— and most of the wet weather in the west also fizzling out overnight. under— west also fizzling out overnight. under the cloud in the west, temperatures facing tomorrow down to ten or— temperatures facing tomorrow down to ten or it _ temperatures facing tomorrow down to ten or 11 degrees, whereas under the clear skies— ten or 11 degrees, whereas under the clear skies in— ten or 11 degrees, whereas under the clear skies in the east, typically about— clear skies in the east, typically about six— clear skies in the east, typically about six to 9 degrees first thing tomorrow— about six to 9 degrees first thing tomorrow morning. saturday may well don on— tomorrow morning. saturday may well don on a _ tomorrow morning. saturday may well don on a cloudy, making note but bare _ don on a cloudy, making note but bare with— don on a cloudy, making note but bare with the weather because it is improving — bare with the weather because it is improving for the weekend. sunny spells _ improving for the weekend. sunny spells developing pretty widely, the cloud in— spells developing pretty widely, the cloud in the west breaking up tomorrow, a brighter day compared to today _ tomorrow, a brighter day compared to today. during the afternoon just one or two _ today. during the afternoon just one or two isolated shack showers plain of england — or two isolated shack showers plain of england into central scotland. most _ of england into central scotland. most places avoiding them and temperatures up to between about 18
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to 21 degrees quite widely. if it's cooler— to 21 degrees quite widely. if it's cooler for— to 21 degrees quite widely. if it's cooler for the north of scotland, additionally for the northern isles, but by— additionally for the northern isles, but by sunday high pressure is well and truly— but by sunday high pressure is well and truly in — but by sunday high pressure is well and truly in charge. fine, dry day, pretty— and truly in charge. fine, dry day, pretty much— and truly in charge. fine, dry day, pretty much across the board with li-ht pretty much across the board with light winds, but do watch out for some _ light winds, but do watch out for some very— light winds, but do watch out for some very high levels of uv. some really— some very high levels of uv. some really strong sunshine this time of year~ _ really strong sunshine this time of year. temperatures up to around 23 degrees — year. temperatures up to around 23 degrees on _ year. temperatures up to around 23 degrees on sunday. high pressure sits with _ degrees on sunday. high pressure sits with us into the all—important bank— sits with us into the all—important bank holiday monday. it looks like another _ bank holiday monday. it looks like another dry, reasonably warm day and some _ another dry, reasonably warm day and some of— another dry, reasonably warm day and some of us— another dry, reasonably warm day and some of us are on half term next week, _ some of us are on half term next week, it — some of us are on half term next week, it looks like that's generally dry settled theme should continue for a dry settled theme should continue fora few— dry settled theme should continue for a few more days. we have been waiting _ for a few more days. we have been waiting for— for a few more days. we have been waiting for it, it's here at last. something a bit warmer and more settled _ something a bit warmer and more settled to— something a bit warmer and more settled to end the month. a something a bit warmer and more settled to end the month.- something a bit warmer and more settled to end the month. a good day to be sarah today _ settled to end the month. a good day to be sarah today because _ settled to end the month. a good day to be sarah today because nobody i to be sarah today because nobody will not listen or enjoy what she is delivering. thank you so much, enjoy the sunshine.
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we will be speaking to the act to jim broadbent, one of those actors you always look forward to. his latest role tells the remarkable story of the first and only art heist from the national gallery in london. we've got the first look here on bbc breakfast. we're convinced it has been stolen by a highly professional international criminal gang. almost certainly a trained commando. he coughs. you all right? bit of biscuit. one problem. what's that? your mother. i can explain. i'm shaking. it's the shock. shock? yes, i'm shocked — there's a stolen masterpiece in my wardrobe! what's he actually asking for? £140,000. for what? charity. good grief! i'm tackling social injustice. i'm like robin hood! you're an idiot. the taxpayer paid for that.
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they could have given thousands to war widows and pensioners. l it's for the greater good of mankind. mankind? what about your own kind?! how long will you get? i don't know. ten years? you could have told me — we could have dealt with it together. you married young. i had to marry. had to marry? it was love. laughter. looks good, doesn't it? kempton bunton is played by the actor jim broadbent, whojoins us now. good morning to you! what a delight it is having you stop how are you? very well, how are you?_ it is having you stop how are you? i very well, how are you?_ how very well, how are you? sorry? how are ou? very well, how are you? sorry? how are you? i'm — very well, how are you? sorry? how are you? i'm very — very well, how are you? sorry? how are you? i'm very well, _ very well, how are you? sorry? how are you? i'm very well, thank - very well, how are you? sorry? how are you? i'm very well, thank you. l are you? i'm very well, thank you. excellent- — are you? i'm very well, thank you. excellent. us _ are you? i'm very well, thank you. excellent. us about _ are you? i'm very well, thank you. excellent. us about what - are you? i'm very well, thank you. excellent. us about what attracted you to the duke and there is a message behind it, this robin hood message.
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message behind it, this robin hood messaie. . message behind it, this robin hood messaie. , ., .,, message. there is a robin hood messaie message. there is a robin hood message and — message. there is a robin hood message and what _ message. there is a robin hood message and what attracted - message. there is a robin hood message and what attracted me j message. there is a robin hood i message and what attracted me to message. there is a robin hood - message and what attracted me to it was a wonderful script, very funny and moving and it is very rare to get a script that is instantly so appealing and so special. i have no doubts at all.— doubts at all. when something like that happens. _ doubts at all. when something like that happens, how _ doubts at all. when something like that happens, how did _ doubts at all. when something like that happens, how did that - doubts at all. when something like | that happens, how did that happen, with this script? and what did you do in terms of making sure you were involved? i’m do in terms of making sure you were involved? �* ., , , involved? i'm not quite sure but i think the writers _ involved? i'm not quite sure but i think the writers had _ involved? i'm not quite sure but i think the writers had me - involved? i'm not quite sure but i think the writers had me in - involved? i'm not quite sure but i think the writers had me in mind| think the writers had me in mind from quite early on and they have said there is a vague physical resemblance between me and kempton bunton, which helps in the first place to put me in the frame. and thenit place to put me in the frame. and then it wasjust place to put me in the frame. and then it was just the usual process of agents and deals and people coming through. with roger and michelle directing, it was an easy
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decision to make —— with roger michell directing. apart from having to take on a geordie accent, which i haven't done, that was the challenge. that was exciting. charlie here. an extraordinary story, this. i don't know if you have heard the story before you took on the role but in essence, so people understand, kempton bunton stole a painting from the national gallery but it was not for personal gain. he then tried to extort money, effectively, for what he thought was robin hood reasons.— robin hood reasons. yeah. the aintina robin hood reasons. yeah. the painting has — robin hood reasons. yeah. the painting has just _ robin hood reasons. yeah. the painting hasjust been - robin hood reasons. yeah. the painting hasjust been bought i robin hood reasons. yeah. the| painting hasjust been bought by robin hood reasons. yeah. the - painting hasjust been bought by the painting has just been bought by the nation for £140,000, which is a vast amount of money at that time for the portrait of wellington and kempton found that unacceptable that that amount of money was being spent on a
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painting and could have been spent elsewhere so he took it and held it to ransom and wrote letters to the newspapers and as you saw in the trailer, they thought it must have been a gang of sophisticated italian art thieves or trained sas thieves, but no, it was kempton who did it. there is a message to the film, i suppose, which comes out in the trial, which is that he believes we are all in it together, and the well—being of one depends on the well—being of one depends on the well—being of one depends on the well—being of all. it is a very strong and loving message which is very appropriate for these times. i very appropriate for these times. i am mindful of not giving away too much of a story but the story is out there because it is true. it presented a challenge for the legal system because of his motivations, as it it perfect personal gain or not? . ., as it it perfect personal gain or not? . . ,., ., not? he said he claimed he borrowed it, he borrowed _ not? he said he claimed he borrowed it, he borrowed the _ not? he said he claimed he borrowed
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it, he borrowed the painting - not? he said he claimed he borrowed it, he borrowed the painting and - it, he borrowed the painting and give it back. in giving it back, he didn't give back the frame. he had taken it out of the frame and the frame was lost so he was tried for stealing the frame in the end rather than the painting. the law changed to stop people just borrowing paintings from the national gallery whenever they want it. here! paintings from the national gallery whenever they want it. how important is it to ou whenever they want it. how important is it to you to — whenever they want it. how important is it to you to be _ whenever they want it. how important is it to you to be part _ whenever they want it. how important is it to you to be part of— whenever they want it. how important is it to you to be part of the _ is it to you to be part of the films, particularly in this day and age, which refer to social injustice?— age, which refer to social injustice? age, which refer to social in'ustice? ~ , ., , injustice? when they give a film is beautifully written _ injustice? when they give a film is beautifully written as _ injustice? when they give a film is beautifully written as this, - injustice? when they give a film is beautifully written as this, when i injustice? when they give a film is beautifully written as this, when it comes it is really important. it helps us all and helps everyone and it... sometimes those films can be a
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bit heavy—handed and a bit sort of declamatory and put you off the message they are trying to have a but this is such a delicious and support script. ham but this is such a delicious and support script-— support script. am i right in thinkina support script. am i right in thinking you _ support script. am i right in thinking you had _ support script. am i right in thinking you had a - support script. am i right in i thinking you had a celebration support script. am i right in - thinking you had a celebration this week? . ., ., thinking you had a celebration this week? , . ., , ._ week? yes, i had a birthday! 72... which is--- — week? yes, i had a birthday! 72... which is--- l— week? yes, i had a birthday! 72... which is... i am _ week? yes, i had a birthday! 72... which is... i am old _ week? yes, i had a birthday! 72... which is... i am old enough - week? yes, i had a birthday! 72... which is... i am old enough to - which is... i am old enough to remember the actual story, i suppose, but i don't remember it. in 1961 i was not really reading the newspapers as i should have been, probably, but... it was a very famous story at the time and even featured in the first james bond film, dr no, the portrait was hanging on dr no's wall and james bond walks up and has a little double—take and doesn't say anything but, oh, it must have been stolen by
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this master criminal. i but, oh, it must have been stolen by this master criminal.— this master criminal. i see what you did there, this master criminal. i see what you did there. you _ this master criminal. i see what you did there, you very _ this master criminal. i see what you did there, you very quickly - this master criminal. i see what you did there, you very quickly got - this master criminal. i see what you did there, you very quickly got us i did there, you very quickly got us back to the film once again, away from the birthday thing. can ijust say to you... sometimes it is embarrassing when people pay you a compliment live on tv but i think you are one of those actors, british actors, who are like, when people see your name on a film, it is like a kind of endorsement of the quality of the product. i am not sure there are many actors who have that kind of thing going along with them. do you know what i'm talking about or is this all very embarrassing i think probably you missed out on quite a few think probably you missed out on uuite a fe . think probably you missed out on quite a few— quite a few films! he wouldn't categorise _ quite a few films! he wouldn't categorise me _ quite a few films! he wouldn't categorise me like _ quite a few films! he wouldn't categorise me like that. - quite a few films! he wouldn't categorise me like that. i- quite a few films! he wouldn't| categorise me like that. i have always been quite picky. i don't do everything that comes along, i tend to do things that really appealed to me and hopefully they will appeal to others. i me and hopefully they will appeal to others. , ., ., , ., others. i tell you what else would be an endorsement, _ others. i tell you what else would be an endorsement, helen - others. i tell you what else would i be an endorsement, helen mirren. what was it like working with her? how wonderful! as you can see from
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the trailer, she is absolutely perfect. not as glamorous as she often is, but as beautiful as ever and a wonderful performance and she is absolutely... had and a wonderful performance and she is absolutely. . .— is absolutely... had you worked to . ether is absolutely... had you worked together before? _ is absolutely... had you worked together before? we _ is absolutely... had you worked together before? we have - is absolutely... had you worked together before? we have both| is absolutely... had you worked - together before? we have both been in a film but — together before? we have both been in a film but hadn't _ together before? we have both been in a film but hadn't really _ together before? we have both been in a film but hadn't really worked - in a film but hadn't really worked together. in a film but hadn't really worked touether. ~ ., ., i. in a film but hadn't really worked touether. ~ ., ., ,, ~' in a film but hadn't really worked touether. ~ ., ., ~ , together. who do you think perhaps was more intimidated, _ together. who do you think perhaps was more intimidated, new - together. who do you think perhaps was more intimidated, new or - together. who do you think perhaps was more intimidated, new or her? | was more intimidated, new or her? oh, i'm sure i was! she wouldn't be intimidated by a character acting like myself. i wasn't intimidated by her, really. she is so instantly lovely and there was no problem there. �* . . lovely and there was no problem there. �* , , ., , lovely and there was no problem there. �*, , ., ,~ , there. it's been lovely catching up with ou, there. it's been lovely catching up with you. happy — there. it's been lovely catching up with you, happy birthday - there. it's been lovely catching up with you, happy birthday from - with you, happy birthday from earlier in the week. moved on very quickly from that but i hope it was a nice lockdown birthday, went ok? yeah, it was lovely. i had a day in
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norfolk and a walk in a bit of good weather and it was great to. great, lo . ical, weather and it was great to. great, logical. lovely _ weather and it was great to. great, logical, lovely to _ weather and it was great to. great, logical, lovely to catch _ weather and it was great to. great, logical, lovely to catch up - weather and it was great to. great, logical, lovely to catch up with - logical, lovely to catch up with you. the duke is released in cinemas on the 3rd of september.
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good morning, it's friday. welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the headlines: surgeons call for dozens of new hospital hubs in england to tackle what's being called a "colossal backlog" of non—urgent operations. lockdown and the indian variant — people are urged to get a jab, as cases of the variant nearly double in a week, as ministers continue to assess a further easing of restrictions. there's nothing in the data that will delay the date, but we've said we're always reviewing the data and we'll come to a final conclusion on whether to reopen on the 21st ofjune, on june the 14th. the health secretary is under pressure, as care home leaders dismiss as "absolute rubbish" the claim there was a protective shield around homes in the pandemic. was your relative discharged
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from hospital to a care home last march or april?

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