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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 1, 2021 12:00pm-12:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. up into the dismount _ with the pirouette, max whitlock! another gold for team gb as max whitlock retains his olympic pommel horse title in tokyo. and in the bmx freestyle — charlotte worthington wins the event's first ever gold with a stunning second run. young people in england are to be offered covid jab incentives — such as discounts for takeaway food and taxi journys — in a bid to boost vaccine uptake.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. team gb have two more gold medals on day 9 the tokyo olympics, with success in gymnastics and bmx. in the past hour, max whitlock has retained his olympic title, with gold in the pommel horse final. he now becomes the most successful gymnast ever in the event — and it brings his overall tally of olympic medals to three golds and three bronze. well, in the bmx freestyle charlotte worthington recovered from a fall in herfirst run to claim a remarkable victory and she becomes the first woman to complete a 360 degree backflip in competition. duncan brooks took bronze in the men's event — britain have now won a medal
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in all four bmx events. and, there was further success in the swimming, with silver in the men's medley relay. britain have now won a record eight medals in the pool. with four medals, duncan scott become britain's most successful athlete at an olympic game. so, let's hear more about team gb�*s medal—winning performances in the bmx events. earlier, my colleague lucy hockings spoke to mandy young who set up adrenaline alley skate park in corby, where charlotte worthington and declan brooks both trained. she said she never expected this success. we've known all along they've got the potential but to get the gold and, obviously, the bronze the way they did was phenomenal, absolutely phenomenal.
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so, paint us a picture of you watching the event and your reaction. myself and my husband were obviously keeping our eyes open and we just watched charlotte's first run and we were like, "what's going to happen here?" but obviously when she pulled off that well first and finished her run we were just ecstatic, running around, crying, tears running down my husband's face. we just couldn't believe it. we knew charlotte had the potential for a medal but to get it the way she did blew us all away. it was so emotional. what did you think it will mean to charlotte to win gold? oh, sky's the limit for charlotte. she's such wonderful person and she's worked so hard for this. the future is so bright for her and she's just going to go onwards and upwards. it's incredible for her. my son had quite a difficult time
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in his youth with a brain tumour and at the age of 18 he was attacked because he was on a skateboard so myself and my son started the parkjust to find a safe environment for all the young people locally but had i known what i was going to create then maybe i'd have thought differently about it, but it's been such a journey and such an incredible, rewarding journey and it's now my son's legacy so to see these guys at the olympics winning these medals, you know, it's's so emotionalfor me because it's my son's legacy as well, and to create this legacy and continue changing life the way it has is just overwhelming and amazing. viewers on bbc one will be joining us for a full round—up of the day's headlines in a few moments. do stay with us here on bbc news as we bring you plenty more from the olympics and the rest of the day's news.
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equally good. well, 2.30, proving too much for our contender. welcome to viewers on bbc two. watching on day nine of the tokyo olympics, if you're continuing to watch on bbc one, please go over to bbc two, right now.
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good afternoon. it's proving to be another triumphant day for british athletes at the tokyo olympics. in the last hour, the gymnast max whitlock has won gold on the pommel horse, retaining his title. earlier, charlotte worthington also took gold in the women's bmx freestyle. and the british swimmers took silver in the 4x100 men's medley relay. here's our sports correspondent andy swiss — his report contains flashing images. they say who dares wins, and in charlotte worthington, britain has the most glorious proof. the bmx
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freestyle event is about audacious tricks, and worthington had been working on one no woman had done before, at 360 degrees backflip. but on her first before, at 360 degrees backflip. but on herfirst run, it left her on the floor. with only a second room to come, it was all or nothing. would she risk it again?— she risk it again? well, 'ust watch this. i she risk it again? well, 'ust watch this. mink— she risk it again? well, 'ust watch this. i think she's _ she risk it again? well, 'ust watch this. i think she's going- she risk it again? well, just watch this. i think she's going for- she risk it again? well, just watch this. i think she's going for it. - this. i think she's going for it. she has got it!— this. i think she's going for it. she has got it! that was 'ust the start. as the h she has got it! that was just the start. as the 25-year-old - she has got it! that was just the i start. as the 25-year-old produced start. as the 25—year—old produced the performance of her life, bravery and brilliance in equal measure. after an agonising wait, just look at the score. after an agonising wait, 'ust look at the s_ after an agonising wait, just look at the score. 2135! worthington into at the score. 97.5! worthington into the lead, at the score. 97.5! worthington into the lead. and _ at the score. 97.5! worthington into the lead, and when _ at the score. s�*tfiiii worthington into the lead, and when the hot favourite hannah roberts couldn't complete her wrong, the celebrations could begin. the 25—year—old used to be a chef in a mexican restaurant, now she had served up an olympic fairy tale. it's kind of unreal. i'm waiting to wake up now. i have been dreaming
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about this for four years and it feels like i'm still dreaming so i'm waiting to wake up.— feels like i'm still dreaming so i'm waiting to wake up. worthington then turned cheerleader, _ waiting to wake up. worthington then turned cheerleader, cut _ waiting to wake up. worthington then turned cheerleader, cut her— turned cheerleader, cut her team—mate declan brooks match her? not quite got the bronze was still some performance. for these games britain haven't had a single medal in bmx, in tokyo they have won one in bmx, in tokyo they have won one in every event. and would there be more success in the gymnastics? max whitlock came fifth in qualifying for the pommel horse final but he's the reigning champion and he showed precisely why. a brilliant display from max whitlock and a score to match. it from max whitlock and a score to match. , ., from max whitlock and a score to match. , . m, from max whitlock and a score to match. , . _. ., ' if; match. it is a huge scar of 15.583. as the first _ match. it is a huge scar of 15.583. as the first to _ match. it is a huge scar of 15.583. as the first to go, _ match. it is a huge scar of 15.583. as the first to go, max _ match. it is a huge scar of 15.583. as the first to go, max whitlock i match. it is a huge scar of 15.583. l as the first to go, max whitlock had now to wait. could anyone beat him? as his last rival folded, the answer was no. whitlock champion once more, one of britain's's olympic greats
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with yet another gold. meanwhile there was an eighth medal for britain swimmers, the silver in the 4x100 medley relay, a successful end to their best ever games. andy swiss, bbc news. our sports editor dan roan is at the athletics track in tokyo where the semi—finals of the men's 100 metres have been taking place. and dan, exciting news from there too? absolutely right, yes, because the men's 100 absolutely right, yes, because the men's100 metres final is always one of the most eagerly anticipated events. it will take place at about 13:50pm your time. not since the sydney games 2000 has team gb had a finalist in this event, but it is going to happen this evening because zharnel hughes sensationally has made it through. he won his semifinal, as you can see now, in a time of 9.98 seconds, the first time
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he has run under ten seconds this year. and just as significant perhaps is the fact that one of the favourites of the united states trailed in third place and didn't make it through to the final. so thatis make it through to the final. so that is exciting for team gb. a word of caution, hughes was the joint lowest to make it through to the final, but anything can happen. it would be one of the most significant moments in the history of british track and field if he were to do it, but it's almost the first time since 1984 that britain has had a representative in both the men's and the women's100 metres final. dan roan in tokyo. _ the women's100 metres final. dan roan in tokyo, thank you very much. young people in england are to be offered incentives, including discounts from uber and deliveroo, to get their covid—19 vaccinations. ministers are hoping there will be further offers involving cafes and restaurants in the coming weeks to try to improve uptake of the jabs. simonjones
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reports. a day out with a difference. a pop—up vaccination centre was set up last week at the thorpe park theme park in surrey, part of a drive to get more younger people vaccinated. hi, guys, we're doing covid vaccines today. just over two thirds of adults aged 18 to 29 in england have received their first dose — that is a lower uptake than in the wider population. overall, 88% of people across the uk have had a firstjab. now there will be new incentives. uber is to give discounted trips to young adults who get vaccinated. the ride hailing app bolt will be offering free ride credits to vaccination centres. deliveroo is set to offer vouchers to young people who getjabbed, though how exactly these schemes will work is yet to be revealed. but it is a carrot and stick approach. ministers have warned they will introduce covid passports in certain places from september, meaning those who haven't been vaccinated won't be able
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to get into nightclubs. asking festival—goers to show proof of their covid status is being used at this weekend's camp bestival music event in dorset. we have got very stringent measures here, you know, double vaccination proof or lateral flow negative tests for people over the age of 11. more sanitation, really great compostable toilets with a lot more air space in them, things being wiped down, hand sanitiser. the uk isn't the first to try new incentives. the governor of newjersey launched shot and a beer in may, offering a free drink to those over 21 getting vaccinated. and in colorado, some vaccination sites are giving out $100 supermarket gift cards to the jabbed. if i can get it, you all can get it. i am a cancer survivor. i recommend you all to have it.
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the hope is people won'tjust grab a vaccine but a bargain too. simon jones, bbc news. companies still running with reduced staff because of the pandemic will have to pay 20% of workers' wages from today, as the government's furlough scheme continues to wind down. it'll stop completely at the end of september. our business correspondent katy austin reports. it's been credited with preventing unemployment rising sharply. now we're in the final two months of thejob retention scheme. the economy has been reopening, but nearly two million people were still furloughed at the end ofjune. receptionist ruby, who is 65... hi, ruby. hiya. ..has been on full or part—time furlough since march last year. she's grateful for it, but the future is unclear. i think there's every possibility that come october 1st, when the furlough scheme ends completely, then yes, i will possibly have to start looking for anotherjob. she can't afford to retire yet, so that's a worry. i don't think a lot of employers
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are happy to employ you if you're over 65. the highest rates of people on furlough used to be among the under 25s. but in the most recent data, we've seen that it's over—60s who are now more likely to be furloughed. and that's concerning because we're likely to see a rise in unemployment when thejob retention scheme ends in the autumn, and any workers who are kind of left on furlough are more likely to become unemployed. in its final stage, the scheme is changing. previously the government paid 80% of wages for hours not worked. in july that contribution fell to 70%, with the employer picking up 10%. from today, the government will pay 60% and the employer 20%, until furlough stops at the end of september. the british chambers of commerce estimates a fifth of firms still using it are considering redundancies as the cost to them increases. it's a concern for businesses which are still struggling, like travel agents.
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there are still lots of destinations we can't sell. it's come to a point where the money is going to run out. and obviously with the furlough scheme, we've been able to keep the staff on, or we've kept 50% of the staff on, and it'sjust going tojust drain the money even faster. furlough will soon become a thing of the past. that means tough decisions for some firms. in a statement, the government told us it's helping people of all ages find the skills they need to get back into work. katy austin, bbc news. in afghanistan, taliban militants have fired rockets at kandahar airport as they continue their offensive against government forces. fighting is raging around the three major cities of herat, lashkar gar and kandahar in the south and west of the country. the taliban have made rapid gains since it was announced that almost all foreign troops would leave by september. thousands of people have fled their homes in southern turkey, where wildfires are now threatening hotels and homes. at least six people have died,
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and hundreds have been injured. parts of the tourist city of bodrum have been evacuated. that's all for now. you can follow all the latest from the olympics, and the day's other stories, on the bbc news channel. the next news on bbc one is at six o'clock. bye for now. this is the you're watching the bbc news with lukwesa burak. what an olympics it's been for team gb in the swimming pool, with eight medals — a record for britain in a single games. lucy hockings has been speaking to former gb swimmerjazz carlin, who won two silvers in the pool at the rio olympics. oh, it's been absolutely fantastic
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and i can't say i've had too much sleep this week, as we've had to get up in the middle of the night. the finals have been starting in the uk at 2:30 in the morning, so i can't say i've had much sleep but i've just been blown away by the success of the swimmers, how they've performed against the best in the world and coming away with so many medals and, yeah, there's so much more to come. so, it was a brilliant weekend — i've absolutely loved it. jazz, there's obviously such incredible individual talent in the pool but what else do you put team gb�*s success down to? i definitely think it's helped over the past few olympics with us bringing back medals, all the way back from 2008 with becky adlington. and each games, the momentum seems to be building and i definitely think gb are now not satisfied with just making a final or going to the olympics — they want to be on that podium. even seeing duncan scott become the most successful swimmer
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with the amount of medals he's achieved in the pool ever. so it's been great to watch and you just see the disappointment — even duncan scott was disappointed to get the silver and not come away with the gold. so it feels like the bar is higher, they're aiming higher and they're not satisfied withjust, kind of, turning up to the olympics and making finals — they want to be on that podium. so it's been great to watch and i'vejust been so impressed. scott, of course, the first athlete in any sport to win four medals for team gb, so he's a standout story, but what other stories have touched you or have you been particularly impressed by? yeah, i think, from a gb perspective, it's always great to see team—mates, obviously, get on the podium, and my former swimming coach david mcnulty came away with his first ever gold medal. i managed to bring two home for him in 2016 and he's come away with a lot of medals.
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but to see him get his first ever gold medal with tom dean in the 200m freestyle was definitely a really proud moment for me, seeing my former coach come away with a gold medal. yeah, he's had a great week of athletes there and it's just down to the great support staff that have really supported these athletes over the past year—and—a—half, over the past four years. it's been incredible because it has been such a challenging year for everyone, and in particular those athletes that have had to adapt their training. a lot of the pools were closed for months, so they've had to really adapt to make the best of the situation and it doesn't seem to have taken a toll on them at this olympics. rockets have been fired at kandahar airport as the taliban continues its offensive against the afghan government. two of the missiles hit the runway and the airport has now been closed to all flights. the militants are trying
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to seize three major cities in the south and west. they've entered parts of herat, lashkar gah, and kandahar, afghanistan's second biggest city. i've been speaking to our correspondent in kabul, secunder kermani. well, we saw heavy fighting overnight, particularly in lashkar gah, capital of helmand province. both afghan and american air strikes being used against the taliban positions inside the city. you'll remember that yesterday the taliban had advanced at one point to around, we're told, 300 metres from the governor's compound right in the centre of lashkar gah before being pushed back. special forces were flown in. the government says that dozens of taliban fighters have been killed, but fighting has been continuing this morning, and, as you say, clashes have also been taking place in recent days elsewhere in the country too, notably around the cities of herat in the west and kandahar in the south. kandahar airport, three rockets were launched, hitting the runway last night — that's led to the closure of the airport today.
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when it comes to herat, well, the government say extra reinforcements have now arrived in the city. taliban forces are not inside herat, but they were fighting on the outskirts and clashes are continuing there, but those reinforcements are making government forces sound a bit more optimistic there. i think the most concerning place remains lashkar gah at the moment. and, secunder, i presume, as the fighting continues, people continue to flee? yeah, tens of thousands of ordinary afghans have had to flee their homes in recent weeks. they're caught in the middle of this awfulfighting. we've had new statistics out from the afghanistan independent human rights commission about civilian casualties — more than 1,600 people killed in just the first six months of this year alone, and there are real concerns that the fighting is only going to get worse because the international military mission here formally comes to an end by september, and many fear that with, you know, the taliban looking emboldened, peace talks between the insurgents and the afghan government not making
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any real progress, well, the taliban are going to continue trying to push in on afghan cities. they've already captured around half of all territory in the country — that's in more rural areas as well as a number of border crossings. they've never yet managed to take hold and retain hold of a major afghan city. it seems that's what they are trying to do, whilst afghan forces do their best to prevent them from taking that territory. tourists have been evacuated from beaches in south—western turkey, where raging wildfires are now threatening hotels and homes. firefighters have been struggling since wednesday, to contain dozens of fires around several popular tourist towns — which have now killed at least six people and injured another 200. sophia tran—thomson reports. known for its blue skies and sunshine, turkey's south coast is normally teeming with tourists at this time of year,
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but since the fires broke out on wednesday, many of the region's resorts have been evacuated. president erdogan, who visited evacuees on saturday, declared all affected regions disaster areas. and after investigators suggested the fires could have been sparked deliberately, he warned any possible arsonists they would be punished. translation: if you rip our heart out, - i swear we will rip your heart out. if we find such a connection — there are already some indications — we will do whatever it takes. wildfires are common in southern turkey in the hot summer months, but local authorities say the latest fires have covered a much larger area than usual. turkey doesn't have its own firefighting aircraft, so reinforcements have been sent from ukraine, russia, azerbaijan and iran.
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but with the fires spread so widely across the south coast, it will be some time until they're brought under control. sophia tran—thomson, bbc news. large cruise ships have been banned from the centre of venice, after years of environmental protests. vessels of more than 25,000 tonnes will no longer be allowed to dock in the lagoon. campaigners and residents say the ships pollute the air and water — and cause erosion. mark lowen reports. it's been venice's david versus goliath. for years, protests by locals in their small boats against the mammoth cruise liners clogging its waterways. critics say they pollute, damage venice's ecosystem and erode foundations with their large waves. finally, victory. from today, any ship over 25,000 tonnes is now banned
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from the city's central canal. they brought significant amount of fear and hopelessness because every time we saw one of these ships, you know, coming towards us in piazza san marco, it just brought to the front of our minds just how little everybody cares about venice as world heritage and, you know, about environmental and socialjustice in general. the cruise ships have been seen as symptoms of venice's over—tourism. hordes of day—trippers not the model of sustainable tourism many here want. and they've contributed to the flooding that's long plagued venice.
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the high tide in 2019, the worst in 50 years, inundating st mark's square and devastating homes and businesses. a new port in the nearby city of marghera will be fast—tracked for the cruise liners, but those depending on the industry are worried. translation: such a decision taken so quickly without - planning is absurd. in our opinion, it is evil and a crime against the workers. �*la serenissima' venice was called — the most serene. but its beauty is fragile. the battle over who can drift through the city of water might now help preserve this jewel of civilisation. mark lowen, bbc news, rome. joining us now is filippo olivetti — managing director of the bassini group, which provides tourism and port services in italy. thank you forjoining us. your reaction first of this?- thank you forjoining us. your reaction first of this? thank you and aood reaction first of this? thank you and good afternoon _ reaction first of this? thank you and good afternoon to - reaction first of this? thank you
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and good afternoon to you. - reaction first of this? thank you and good afternoon to you. i. reaction first of this? thank you | and good afternoon to you. i can reaction first of this? thank you - and good afternoon to you. i can say that there are three main elements that there are three main elements that make this decision a paradox. the first one is the deadline of august the 1st, today. remember that the decree was issued only onjuly the decree was issued only onjuly the 14th. and this deadline really creates a very strong inconvenience to cruise lines and their passengers, who are practically forced to use nearby ports such as trieste or ravenna and you have to consider at present there are no concrete alternative solutions. the second elementjust to be more clear is the introduction of a further and totally unexpected reduction in tonnage which sets the maximum size of cruise ships to 25,000 tonnes. this measure means basically erasing
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1600 years of history of a city that made its fortune on its port and on maritime traffic. but made its fortune on its port and on maritime traffic.— maritime traffic. but surely, when ou no maritime traffic. but surely, when you go back _ maritime traffic. but surely, when you go back in _ maritime traffic. but surely, when you go back in time _ maritime traffic. but surely, when you go back in time like _ maritime traffic. but surely, when you go back in time like that - maritime traffic. but surely, when you go back in time like that and i you go back in time like that and you go back in time like that and you make that comparison, we are talking about different times, different scales for example? when we look at the vessels that are going into the lagoon it is unsustainable. ~ , ~ going into the lagoon it is unsustainable. , ~ ., unsustainable. absolutely. we have alwa s unsustainable. absolutely. we have always agreed. _ unsustainable. absolutely. we have always agreed. i — unsustainable. absolutely. we have always agreed, i mean, _ unsustainable. absolutely. we have always agreed, i mean, when - unsustainable. absolutely. we have always agreed, i mean, when i- unsustainable. absolutely. we have always agreed, i mean, when i say| always agreed, i mean, when i say way, i'm talking about the whole community, the local community, i am talking about the cruise line is that since the very first moment agreed on the visual impact of the big cruise ships transiting in front of san marco and the importance to find a real alternative solution but we would have expected the local authorities and the italian government to have found a practical alternative before switching the light. i alternative before switching the liuht. ., , , �* .,
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light. i mean, this isn't long-term in terms of _ light. i mean, this isn't long-term in terms of the _ light. i mean, this isn't long-term in terms of the re-routing. - light. i mean, this isn't long-term in terms of the re-routing. there l light. i mean, this isn't long-terml in terms of the re-routing. there is in terms of the re—routing. there is a mag ever ports, i believe, is being redeveloped so that passengers can disembark at that point and i understand that smaller boats can still come into the lagoon. wasn't also the threat of losing that unesco title that comes with benefits something that had to be considered for them this?- considered for them this? yeah, i mean, considered for them this? yeah, i mean. for — considered for them this? yeah, i mean, for sure _ considered for them this? yeah, i mean, for sure the _ considered for them this? yeah, i mean, for sure the unesco - considered for them this? yeah, i j mean, for sure the unesco played considered for them this? yeah, i l mean, for sure the unesco played a role and camino, it is staving this decision but, again, you know, it came in the government, the italian government came in with a decree that entered immediately into force without giving an alternative because mag ever, which is cited in the deeply —— margera. —— cited in the deeply —— margera. —— cited in the decree. it is not fit to operate
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a cruise ship at the moment. thank ou so a cruise ship at the moment. thank you so much _ a cruise ship at the moment. thank you so much for— a cruise ship at the moment. thank you so much for your _ a cruise ship at the moment. thank you so much for your time. - a cruise ship at the moment. thank you so much for your time. you - a cruise ship at the moment. thank you so much for your time. you are j you so much for your time. you are watching bbc news. now, whether time. hello there. not a bad afternoon. we've got plenty of dry weather today, with some good spells of sunshine but this weak weather front across the south will bring further showers and, again, some of them could be quite heavy. we've got a run of northerly winds as well across much of the country, so that will make it feel rather cool for early august, particularly around some north sea coasts. variable cloud in the north, otherwise, but sunny spells. most of the showers will be across southern england. then again, some could be heavy and thundery. top temperatures range from around 14 to 20 degrees in the south. as we head on into monday, we've still got this ridge of high pressure, which will bring quite a bit of sunshine around but there'll still be some showers too, particularly northern ireland and then england and wales
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into the afternoon. again, some of them could be heavy and thundery.

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