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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 5, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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this is bbc news for viewers in the uk and around the globe. i'm sally bundock. our top stories. britain changes its international travel rules, making journeys to the uk easier for fully—vaccinated passengers. the government says they're following the science what we do want to do is just be able to work with the clinicians, the experts, in order tojust able to work with the clinicians, the experts, in order to just give a very close eye on this beta variant that we already know so much more about now. , , ., , that we already know so much more about "ow-— that we already know so much more about now. , , ., , , ., ., about now. pcr tests enable us to do that. the un issues a stark warning about the safety of thousands of civilians, in the afghan city of lashkar gar, as fierce fighting continues between the taliban and government forces. police investigating the online racist abuse of england footballers after the euro 2020 final,
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arrest 11 people. a major upset on day 13 of the olympics — as jamaican hansele parchment beats the american world champion to the gold in the 110 metres hurdles. and, agricultural pesticides are having a more harmful effect on bees than previously thought. good morning. fully vaccinated travellers returning to england, northern ireland or scotland from france, will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. the change is part of a series of adjustments to the traffic light system for international travel, and brings france into line with other amber list countries.
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india and the united arab emirates are among the destinations that have been moved from red to amber, while seven more countries, including germany and norway, have been added to the green list. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies. a near empty swimming pool, few tents pitched and no—one propping up the bar. this would normally be the busiest time of year at this campsite in western france, but at the moment, they're half—empty. hopefully there'll be a flurry of last—minute campers. we're hoping so, especially in september with the older couples who normally come who don't have families. i think it's too late for families to come because they will have booked elsewhere in the uk. across the channel, these british holiday—makers are staying home. with the kids and too late in summer, we've already had to change my holiday. i work for the nhs, so i've had to change my holiday that way. i couldn't quarantine when i get back, so, yeah,
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this is it for us this year. it's too risky to commit to an overseas holiday right now in my opinion. it's too much of an issue, effort to get tested. ijust feel a bit safer- in my own country, quite frankly, at the moment. even though they make those changes, they can make the changes again. there are new additions to the green list, including germany, but of the seven countries added, only two will allow in non—vaccinated vaccinated tourists without quarantine. spain is still amber, but the government is advising passengers to have the more expensive pcr test rather than the cheaper lateral flow test before they depart for the uk. what we do want to do is just be able to work with the clinicians, with the experts in spain in order to just keep a very close eye on this beta variant that we already know so much more about now, and pcr tests enable us to do that. labour have argued the government are still overcomplicating travel. having this confusion, having these changes country by country almost on a weekly basis now doesn't help the industry,
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it doesn't help passengers and it doesn't help instil confidence in the government. some countries are going from red to amber, including the uae. it means neil, who lives in dubai, will be able to see his one—year—old grandson for the first time in a year. despite the anger i feel towards the government, i can now put that behind me and we can now look forward and we can travel, so that's really good. and we can almost get our lives back to a form of normality of being able to see our friends and family. country by country, more of the world is opening up to uk travellers, but well into summer and after months of uncertainty, the question is how many will want to make the trip? caroline davies, bbc news. we shall have a lot more on that story in about 25 minutes in the business. let's get some of the day's other news. the biden administration is considering making it mandatory for all foreign visitors to the united states to be
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vaccinated against covid—i9. the country closed its borders to most international travellers during the pandemic. a wildfire that has raged for more than a week has now reached a thermal power station on turkey's aegean coast. the coal—fired facility was already evacuated and flammable and explosive materials were removed in advance of the flames. a sprinter from belarus who defied her country's attempt to send her home from the olympics, has arrived in poland. krystina timanovskaya has been granted a humanitarian visa. her husband willjoin her from ukraine, where the president has stepped up security for belarusian exiles. police in texas say a truck carrying suspected illegal migrants has crashed, killing at least ten people. local media reported that the crash took place when the van lost control on a highway in brooks county, about 150 kilometres from the us border with mexico. the driver was amongst those killed. the mexican government is suing
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major us gun companies, accusing them of failing to stop the illegal flow of weapons across the border. thousands of murders in mexico have been linked to the trafficking of arms. the un says it's deeply concerned about the safety of tens of thousands of civilians in the afghan city of lashkar gah, the capital of helmand province. taliban militants and government forces are waging an intense battle for control of the city. a un spokesman said there were reports of increased civilian casualties, and of homes and hospitals being destroyed. afghan and us air strikes on taliban positions continued throughout wednesday. mark lobel reports. several provincial capitals under taliban attack —
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insecurity is forcing many afghan residents from their homes. we see a lot of schools that are being destroyed, a lot of water plants, hospitals which are essential. we see that access to care and health care is extremely difficult. displaced in kandahar, these families were separated from loved ones in the chaos. kabul came under attack on tuesday night, first a car bomb targeting the defence minister, then deadly attackers roamed the streets. but these protesters say the taliban aren't welcome in the capital. our message was more to our troops, to stand in solidarity with our soldiers who are fighting the war, notjust for afghanistan but for the entire world, against terrorism. in step with the protesters, the afghan president branded the taliban "hypocrites" for attacking what he called "real muslims." he pledged to rapidly
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expand the number of afghan special forces fighting them. translation: there is no better. opportunity to end the 43-year war and bloodshed as foreigners have left the country. after all, it is only the efforts and swords of the afghans that keep this country together! but despite the army's efforts, the taliban has already taken swathes of the country in the past few weeks. the question is how easily they may be able to capture urban areas. there is a much wider middle—class established, the cities are much bigger and stronger within the political economy of the country, and women have really come into their own, but how much of these kinds of social and economic bulwarks will stop a kind of traditional afghan — i mean, taliban islamist takeover — and a reversion to the kind of maoist policies that they adopted
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last time round is hard to tell. this is a bad time. it will take more than people power to keep the taliban off the main streets, with many weeks of the country fighting season season yet to come. mark lobel, bbc news. police investigating the online racist abuse of england players following the euro 2020 final, have arrested 11 people. the uk football policing unit says it received 600 reports of offensive messages, around a third of which were judged to possibly be criminal. our news correspondent, tim muffett, has more details. the final, england versus italy, a penalty shoot—out. three england players, as i am sure we will remember, missed penalties. marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka. all three were victims of racial abuse online afterwards. the
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uk football policing unit received more than 600 reports of offensive messages. and 207, about a third, are deemed possibly criminal in nature. 3a accounts have so far been identified as being in the uk. the unit has made data requests to social media companies as part of their investigations. where they have been able to, they have passed on information to local police forces. 11 arrests have been made in the uk so far. offences ranging from malicious communications to various breaches of the communications act. the age range of those arrested ranges from 18 to 63. from young adults to older adults. and chief con is marc roberts, overseeing this investigation, has thanked facebook, and twitter for responding to the police request so quickly. he says if people think they can hide behind a social media profile to make such abhorrent comments, they need to think again. 50
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abhorrent comments, they need to think again-— think again. so that is in the uk. what about _ think again. so that is in the uk. what about outside _ think again. so that is in the uk. what about outside the - think again. so that is in the uk. what about outside the uk, - think again. so that is in the uk. what about outside the uk, any| what about outside the uk, any progress? {iii what about outside the uk, any ro . ress? ii what about outside the uk, any rouress? :: , ., progress? of the 207 posts deemed to have broken the _ progress? of the 207 posts deemed to have broken the law, _ progress? of the 207 posts deemed to have broken the law, 123 _ progress? of the 207 posts deemed to have broken the law, 123 counts - progress? of the 207 posts deemed to have broken the law, 123 counts are i have broken the law, 123 counts are believed to belong to individuals outside of the uk. details of those people are being passed on to police in the relevant countries to act upon them. there are 50 other cases in which the football policing unit is still waiting to hear back from social media companies with more details as to the identity of those responsible. the police leading the investigation have stressed how complex it can be to investigate social media abuse. there are often false names, false identities. but they have stressed they have investigators are still seeking out abusive comments in relation to this match. if they are deemed to have reached a criminal threshold, police insist that those posting them will be arrested. tim insist that those posting them will be arrested-— stay with us on bbc news. still to come: an upset at the olympics, as jamaican hansele parchment beats the american world champion to the gold
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in the 110 metre hurdles.
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this is bbc news. the latest headlines. britain changes its international travel rules, making journeys to the uk easier for fully—vaccinated passengers. the government says its following the science. the un has issued a stark warning about the safety of thousands of civilians, in the afghan city of lashkar gar, as fierce fighting continues between the taliban and government forces. malta is being urged to drop a case against three young migrants, accused of terrorism. the teenagers, two of whom were children at the time, are alleged to have hijacked a ship and forced it to take
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them to europe. they were rescued in the mediterranean in 2019 along with more than 100 others, as they fled libya. our europe correspondent, jean mackenzie, has been to meet the boys in malta, who all face life in prison. this is the first time they have spoken publicly. one is still a minor, so we're using the name given to him by court. these three young men risked their lives to make it to europe. in return, they have lost their freedom. i return, they have lost their freedom-— return, they have lost their freedom. ., ., ., ., , freedom. i am not a terrorist. i cannot be _ freedom. i am not a terrorist. i cannot be a _ freedom. i am not a terrorist. i cannot be a terrorist _ freedom. i am not a terrorist. i cannot be a terrorist and - freedom. i am not a terrorist. i cannot be a terrorist and i - freedom. i am not a terrorist. i cannot be a terrorist and i can l cannot be a terrorist and i can never be a terrorist.— cannot be a terrorist and i can never be a terrorist. they have been accused by — never be a terrorist. they have been accused by maltese _ never be a terrorist. they have been accused by maltese authorities - never be a terrorist. they have been accused by maltese authorities of. accused by maltese authorities of hijacking the ship that rescued them and 100 others at sea as they attempted the treacherous crossing from libya. this is the moment they arrived in malta. seconds later, they were handcuffed and led away.
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this is the place where they disembark is. they arrested me and took me to the prison directly from here. from here to the prison. lemina wasjust a here. from here to the prison. lemina was just a child, here. from here to the prison. lemina wasjust a child, 15. he says that firstly captain tried to take them back to libya. people and protested. and eventually, he agreed to take them to malta. he was the only person on the boat who spoke english. and he says the captain asked him to translate. um? english. and he says the captain asked him to translate. why would i hi'ack the asked him to translate. why would i hijack the ship? _ asked him to translate. why would i hijack the ship? why? _ asked him to translate. why would i hijack the ship? why? the - asked him to translate. why would i hijack the ship? why? the captain l hijack the ship? why? the captain was in full control of the ship. what's it like to live being accused of being a terrorist by the maltese government? it is of being a terrorist by the maltese government?— government? it is very, very hard for me. government? it is very, very hard for me- very. _ government? it is very, very hard for me- very. very _ government? it is very, very hard for me. very, very hard. - government? it is very, very hard for me. very, very hard. it- government? it is very, very hard for me. very, very hard. it is- for me. very, very hard. it is eating me up whenever i think that they are calling me a terrorist. what happened on board has never been proven. the authorities are
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still collecting evidence. it could be years before they face trial. 50 be years before they face trial. so far we haven't seen evidence of terrorism _ far we haven't seen evidence of terrorism. and we custom the ability of the _ terrorism. and we custom the ability of the prosecution to bring such changes — of the prosecution to bring such charges. where they are fleeing from is a hell_ charges. where they are fleeing from is a hell hole. from our clients perspectives, they did the natural thing _ perspectives, they did the natural thing anybody would have done to save themselves and the other people on board _ save themselves and the other people on board. a . , save themselves and the other people on board. ., , ., ., on board. malta is on the front line of migration _ on board. malta is on the front line of migration across _ on board. malta is on the front line of migration across the _ of migration across the mediterranean. human rights organisations say that in trying to stop boats arriving, it acted disproportionately. the archbishop of malta has intervened and urged authorities to drop the case. migration is not a crime. honestly, i don't know why the exaggeration. i don't know if it was to give an example. ihla don't know if it was to give an example-— don't know if it was to give an examle. ., ., ., ,., . ., example. no one from the police or the prosecution _ example. no one from the police or the prosecution would _ example. no one from the police or the prosecution would answer - example. no one from the police or the prosecution would answer any l example. no one from the police or| the prosecution would answer any of our questions. at the maltese foreign minister has agreed to meet
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us. is this case reallyjustified? i told you, and not in a position to id told you, and not in a position to go into— told you, and not in a position to go into the — told you, and not in a position to go into the specifics of the case. i'm go into the specifics of the case. i'm not— go into the specifics of the case. i'm not trying to simply avoid your question — i'm not trying to simply avoid your question. but i'm not trying to simply avoid your cuestion. �* , .,, ., , question. but people are telling us that these three _ question. but people are telling us that these three people _ question. but people are telling us that these three people have - question. but people are telling us that these three people have been| that these three people have been caught up in a political game, that this case is the product of politics? i this case is the product of politics?— this case is the product of olitics? ., �* ., ., politics? i don't agree with that interpretation. _ politics? i don't agree with that interpretation. these _ politics? i don't agree with that - interpretation. these self-righteous interpretation. these self— righteous people _ interpretation. these self—righteous people should try to understand what pressure _ people should try to understand what pressure we are faced with, and what it means _ pressure we are faced with, and what it means to— pressure we are faced with, and what it means to carry the responsibility on our— it means to carry the responsibility on our own— it means to carry the responsibility on our own to deal with the central mediterranean route. in on our own to deal with the central mediterranean route.— mediterranean route. in these sacs are letters of _ mediterranean route. in these sacs are letters of support. _ mediterranean route. in these sacs are letters of support. hundreds i are letters of support. hundreds arrive each week. lemina as translator reads them out. my name is nina... this— translator reads them out. my name is nina... this helps _ translator reads them out. my name is nina... this helps them _ translator reads them out. my name is nina... this helps them hope - translator reads them out. my name is nina... this helps them hope for. is nina... this helps them hope for a better future. _ is nina... this helps them hope for a better future. one _ is nina... this helps them hope for a better future. one that _ is nina... this helps them hope for a better future. one that is - is nina... this helps them hope for a better future. one that is not - a betterfuture. one that is not behind bars. jean mackenzie, bbc news, malta. day 13 of the tokyo olympics is getting under way. we already have a number of golds,
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including a big upset. hansele parchment of jamaica was fastest across the line in the 110m metres hurdles men's final. his jamaican compatriot, ronald levy, added to his countries glory with a third place finish. favourite and incumbent world champion grant holloway of the us came in second. and in team gb news, 16—year—old andrea spendolini—sirieix and lois toulson both reached the final of the women's 10 metres platform event. they will compete against the chinese competition favourites in the next few hours. our correspondent sarah mulkerrins is in tokyo, where there was some drama at the athletics stadium. there certainly was, sadly. there was a big shock in the men's110 metres final in the hurdles that you are mentioning. everybody was thinking it was going to be the american, grant holloway, who was going to race to victory. he is the
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world champion, he is running the fastest times at the moment and he looked super in qualifying. however, he had a great start but he started to slow up. it was the jamaican hansele parchment who was able to pick him on the line to the gold medal. he won bronze back in 2012 in london. and now he leaves with a gold medal. so a great surprise there. also, a bit of a shock in the qualifying for the four by 100 metres relay for men. the usa, they have been dominant in this event until about 2000 in the limbic. then they have had a series of disqualifications and mess ups really. the latest has come today. they had a dreadful second changeover of the bat on in their heat. they ended up finishing sixth. china went on to win that heat and jamaica qualified in the other heat. team gb are also threw in the men's and women's really in the four by
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100 metres. but yeah, some drama on the track. we are getting used to that now, i think. aha, the track. we are getting used to that now, i think.— the track. we are getting used to that now, i think. a great moment for indian hockey? _ that now, i think. a great moment for indian hockey? absolutely. - that now, i think. a great moment| for indian hockey? absolutely. this is a brilliant — for indian hockey? absolutely. this is a brilliant story. _ for indian hockey? absolutely. this is a brilliant story. we _ for indian hockey? absolutely. this is a brilliant story. we have - for indian hockey? absolutely. this is a brilliant story. we have had - for indian hockey? absolutely. this is a brilliant story. we have had of| is a brilliant story. we have had of the bronze medal match for the men's hockey today. it was such a dramatic game. it was india against germany. germany were leading 3—1 in the second quarter but india for the way back into it. they levelled it is up and ended up winning5—1i. that is india's first medal at an olympic games since 1980. the women's team that already missing —— made history by making it through to the semifinal, the first time they have ever done that. they lost that semifinal. so tomorrow they are in with a chance of securing a bronze medal for themselves when they take on team gb. a great day for indian hockey. on team gb. a great day for indian hocke . , , , ._ on team gb. a great day for indian hocke. , i, ., hockey. this time yesterday you and i were transfixed _ hockey. this time yesterday you and i were transfixed by _ hockey. this time yesterday you and i were transfixed by the _ hockey. this time yesterday you and i were transfixed by the skate - hockey. this time yesterday you and
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i were transfixed by the skate park l i were transfixed by the skate park and what is happening there today? it's been equally as brilliant. absolutely one of my new favourite sports. everybody has been loving it. it has been such a success. we had the winds yesterday and we have had the winds yesterday and we have had another win. australia's 18—year—old keegan palmer has taken gold in this event. he pulled off a brilliant first run, they get a three runs to pull off their best tricks and moves, he put in a great first run, he put the rest of the field under pressure and then he pulled out a sensational third run, which he scored even higher. he had a score of 95.83 on that final run. everybody else then trying to pull out of the high level skills. that brings in the danger. we saw some tumbles and skills. it was the brazilian, pedro barros, who took the silver medal. and it was a 22—year—old from america winning the bronze medal. similar scenes to the women's event yesterday. they were
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all congratulating each other after every single run, just loving the action that was taking place and the skills that their fellow competitors were able to show. it’s skills that their fellow competitors were able to show.— were able to show. it's interesting ou were able to show. it's interesting you describe _ were able to show. it's interesting you describe a _ were able to show. it's interesting you describe a 22-year-old - were able to show. it's interesting you describe a 22-year-old as - were able to show. it's interesting you describe a 22-year-old as a i you describe a 22—year—old as a youngster, when we had a 12—year—old winner yesterday getting silver! now let's talk about the heat. i know there are real problems for different athletes with regards to that. what is being done in terms of helping athletes cope with the heat? yeah, it's been very difficult here in tokyo, even in the build—up to these games the heat was a major issue. a talking point. some of the events, like the marathon, have been moved north. they walk to counteract that. we have had the women's golf take place. it was 41 degrees on the golf course yesterday. one of the caddies had to remove herself with heatstroke. there was also a request to move the women's football final tomorrow, due to take place at 11am local time, to protect the safety of the athletes. we will see if there
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is any development on that. one other piece of sports news. this year's rugby league world cup, which was due to be held in england in the autumn, is set to be postponed until 2022. an official announcement is expected later this morning. it comes after australia and new zealand both pulled out of the tournament due to safety concerns about coronavirus. thailand has banned sunscreens containing chemicals that damage coral from all of its national parks. the thai department of conservation said four ingredients commonly found in sun creams, including oxybenzone, were shown to destroy coral larvae, obstruct coral reproduction and cause reef bleaching. anyone using products that contain them can be fined up to $3,000. similar bans have been introduced by the pacific island of palau and the us state of hawaii.
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a new study has discovered that a mix of agricultural pesticides is more harmful to bees than was previously thought. the researchers from royal holloway, university of london found that a cocktail of chemicals reacted with each other to kill larger numbers of bees. precious pollinators in decline. our bees face multiple threats to their survival. from a loss of rich natural grassland to the dozens of pesticides commonly used in agriculture. this new study set out to quantify each of these threats, and to work out how they combine to affect the health of the insects. researchers developed —— examined 90 studies on the effect on bees... they worked out that combinations of several chemicals killed many more bees than expected. this is because the researchers say pesticides interact. each chemical enhances the
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damage caused by another. what interact. each chemical enhances the damage caused by another.— damage caused by another. what we found is really _ damage caused by another. what we found is really important _ damage caused by another. what we found is really important when - damage caused by another. what we found is really important when you i found is really important when you consider how agrochemicals are sold. commercialformulas are consider how agrochemicals are sold. commercial formulas are sold to farmers and they often contain agrochemicals, pesticide, fungicide, and what our research showed is that these chemicals can interact and significantly increase the potential harm, intentionally impact on bee mortality. harm, intentionally impact on bee mortali . , , ., ., mortality. scientists say regulation needs to be _ mortality. scientists say regulation needs to be updated _ mortality. scientists say regulation needs to be updated to _ mortality. scientists say regulation needs to be updated to factor - mortality. scientists say regulation needs to be updated to factor in i needs to be updated to factor in this chemical interaction. and to avoid harmful cocktails of pesticides that pose a threat to be pollinating insects that we rely on. victoria gill, bbc news. let's tell you about barack obama. he has had to scale back its plans for a big birthday party and made a rise in covid infections across the us. the former president, who is turning 60, had planned a major celebration this weekend, but he faced criticism for throwing
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a massive bash as the delta variant is surging. there you have it. even barack obama is invited. i am back with the top business stories next. hello. our temperatures so far this week have dropped into the low 20s. in greece, a severe extreme heat wave is continuing. there are wildfires, temperatures per day have topped out at 47 degrees. this is an overnight temperature, into the mid 30s. there is a bit of relief on the way towards the south—east of europe in the coming days as temperatures will come down. ours are about to go down too. low pressure coming into the uk. heavy downpours are about to become more widespread again. this is how we start off on thursday morning. already some showers affecting northern ireland and western scotland. it will turn wetter through northern ireland in the morning. but across the western
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side of the uk, though you may start dry, roman moving through the day. that will extend eastwards to those areas still having sunny spells even into the afternoon. behind this main band of rain, brightening up in northern ireland. here, some slow—moving thundery dancers bring flooding and disruption into the afternoon and evening. temperatures across eastern parts rising into the low 20s. all areas seem freshening winds gusting 30 to a0 mph. windiest around irish sea coast, blowing and plenty of showers as we go on through thursday night into friday morning. longerspells through thursday night into friday morning. longer spells of rain in scotland and temperatures this friday starting the mid teens. low pressure right across us on friday. they will be further heavy showers around through the central belt, southern scotland, northern ireland, northern ireland, north wales, parts of the midlands. this is the risk —— where there is the risk of slow—moving, prolonged even torrential downpours. the risk of flooding and disruption. maybe not too many showers across parts of
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southern england, but that could change on saturday with a set of weather fronts coming our way from the south piping up the downpours in southern parts of the uk. elsewhere it is a similar story. heavy infantry downpours. it is worth bearing in mind they will also be some sunny spells. not white all the time. there will be brighter and drier moments in between these downpours. in many places temperatures down into the teens. showery on sunday and monday. by tuesday, the low pressure system is out of the way. it will turn drier for a time before another low moves in next week.
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this is bbc news broadcasting to the uk and around the globe. i'm sally bundock. hope for holiday firms as the uk eases travel restrictions with france coming off the quarantine list from sunday. time to taper? top fed officials hint that support for the us economy could be wound down sooner than expected. huawei standoff. final arguments are heard in a canadian court — as the us tries to extradite the tech giant's chief financial officer. plus, soaring screen time. how the pandemic has changed our media habits.
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we start with the travel industry. it's been welcoming changes to the uk's covid travel rules — which come into force on sunday. as you have been hearing, france — a major destination for british tourists — is to be brought into line with other amber list countries. those coming from france to england, scotland and northern ireland will no longer need to quarantine — if they are fully vaccinated. seven europen countries including austria and germany willjoin the �*green' list. and india and the united arab emirates are among those moving from �*red' to �*amber�*. dfds which operates ferries between the uk and france is among the companies welcoming the changes. in terms of the amber plus rules we saw an immediate dip down in future bookings as people were only booking for the next few days, those who he had to travel and that was very disappointing because we had seen a
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surge in bookings when travel looked like it would be open. in terms of demand, we know it's there because we know how many people visit the website and are looking for prices and we expect it will pick up sharply and people will have more confidence in booking and travel and enjoying the holiday. stephanie boyle is from the flight booking site skyscanner. i asked her if the move would make a real difference to the travel industry. i real difference to the travel indust . ~ , ., real difference to the travel indust . ~ ., ., industry. i think so. have we saw a 4596 jump jump of traffic to the site. we know thatis jump of traffic to the site. we know that is very representative in time that is very representative in time thatis that is very representative in time that is in addition to the green list or make travel a little bit more easy. it is frustrating it is coming so late in the summer season, however, we have noted that people are pretty spontaneous in their booking and at the moment in the uk travellers are looking to book something within the next 27 days, something within the next 27 days, so there may be a few people out there still looking to understand where they can go and are obviously
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quite excited about the fact that france has been taken of the amber plus list, which means they can avoid quarantine on return so it is avoid quarantine on return so it is a big step in the right direction. many in the travel industry disappointed that the testing system has not been changed at all or made it easier. for example, those who want to go to a green list country, in terms of tests before and when you return to the uk, it's expensive and complicated, isn't it?— and complicated, isn't it? that's definitely what _ and complicated, isn't it? that's definitely what we _ and complicated, isn't it? that's definitely what we are _ and complicated, isn't it? that's definitely what we are hearing. l and complicated, isn't it? that's - definitely what we are hearing. when we asked travellers which measures would make them feel more confident about travelling, cheaper and easier testing options tends to come up pretty frequently as one of the first or second option is that they think would be the best. it is difficult for people to understand that we are moving into a different way of travelling. we have to acknowledge that that is the reality. however, there are lots of websites out there and lots of information for anybody who wants to understand where they can compare prices for testing and compare
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different options for testing, so while it is not ideal, i don't think it's a barrier to travel and i think most people would welcome the opportunity to travel and are happy to get tested if they can then avoid quarantine on return. but that's another reason why more countries moving to the green list would be advantageous for the travel industry. advantageous for the travel indust . �* , ., �* ., ., industry. but if you're moving to the ureen industry. but if you're moving to the green list, _ industry. but if you're moving to the green list, you _ industry. but if you're moving to the green list, you still- industry. but if you're moving to the green list, you still have - industry. but if you're moving to the green list, you still have to i the green list, you still have to pay for the tests and if you are a family of four, that could double the cost of your holiday, which i think is a significant barrier. what are the current trends to travel in europe? what are you seeing at the moment? we europe? what are you seeing at the moment? ~ . , europe? what are you seeing at the moment? ~ ., , ., ., ., moment? we are seeing a lot of --eole moment? we are seeing a lot of people looking _ moment? we are seeing a lot of people looking at _ moment? we are seeing a lot of people looking at the _ moment? we are seeing a lot of people looking at the traditional| people looking at the traditional popular destinations for uk travellers so very much looking at spain, greece and obviously france, but we are also seeing people looking further afield into october. while testing is definitely a barrier, it's not putting people off. they are looking perhaps to have a big trip in the course of the
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next few months and looking even as far as bali and the united states, so there's a lot of optimism about travel returning and reopening and it is not a complete move towards the right direction but definitely heading in the right space and definitely i think we are seeing that more people are coming to our site to check for information to look at whether or not what requirements are in place, what documentation they will need and we have a number of tools to help people understand that and to look at where they can find that information, including a map updated with all of the current restrictions so that people know what is required when they arrive in the destinations and what they need to do when they come back. but we are seeing a lot of interest and huge amounts of demand. everybody has already reported this, but the pent demand within the travel industry is enormous and people are willing to change their plans if they can actually get on a plane again travelling. —— and get travelling.
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let's move to the us now because the federal reserve could be set to start removing its support for the economy sooner than expected. in a speech on wednesday — the fed's number two in charge — vice chair richard clarida — said interest rates could start rising in 2023. and he was joined by two other top officials in signalling that the central bank might soon start winding down the amount of cash it's pumping into the bond markets. that hit shares on wall street. samira hussain in new york has more. the comments by the vice chair of the federal reserve, that the current pace of the economic recovery could mean interest rates will start going up by 2023 is noteworthy, especially when you couple it with comments made earlier by two other central bank policymakers, that they would like to see the federal reserve start reducing its massive bond buying programme. it is a sign that the fed could be looking at using its monetary policy much sooner than it,
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and frankly many others, had originally thought. of course, all of this depends on incoming economic data in the next few weeks, including labour reports, inflation readings and, of course, consumer sentiment. and it also really depends on the virus. the delta variant of covid—19 is quickly spreading in many parts of the us, and that could derail the country's current economic recovery. if your screen time has shot up in the past year, you are not alone. uk adults spent a third of their waking hours in 2020 watching tv and online video — according to an annual survey by media regulator ofcom. it says subscription services such as netflix were the big beneficiaries as repeated lockdowns left millions at home looking for entertainment. here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones.
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like many of us, the oakley family spent much of 2020 glued to screens, but not necessarily all together. mum and dad were in front of the main telly, their son spent a lot of time gaming, chatting to friends and watching youtube videos but it is streaming services not broadcast tv which were big for all of them. increasingly it'sjust which were big for all of them. increasingly it's just news and current— increasingly it's just news and current affairs, really, is what we are watching on broadcast. otherwise it is streaming- _ are watching on broadcast. otherwise it is streaming. almost _ are watching on broadcast. otherwise it is streaming. almost everything i it is streaming. almost everything else is streamed _ another. do you watch any television? _ another. do you watch any television? almost - another. do you watch any television? almost no. - another. do you watch anyj television? almost no. i'm another. do you watch any - television? almost no. i'm normally watchin: television? almost no. i'm normally watching youtube _ television? almost no. i'm normally watching youtube or— television? almost no. i'm normally watching youtube or netflix. - television? almost no. i'm normally. watching youtube or netflix. ofcom's annual snapshot _ watching youtube or netflix. ofcom's annual snapshot of _ watching youtube or netflix. ofcom's annual snapshot of media _ watching youtube or netflix. ofcom's annual snapshot of media habits - annual snapshot of media habits should be spent an average of five hours and a0 minutes a day watching tv or online video in 2020, up a7 minutes on the year before. much of the increase is due to the fact that the increase is due to the fact that the time watching subscription streaming services almost doubled to one hour and five minutes per day. the biggest player, netflix, is now
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in more than half of all uk homes. with hit series like bridgeton, netflix now has more subscribers than sky, virgin and the other uk pay—tv providers put together. we pay-tv providers put together. we are pay—tv providers put together. we are seeing that younger people are migrating _ are seeing that younger people are migrating from traditional tv to really— migrating from traditional tv to really engage in streaming services where _ really engage in streaming services where they can watch what they want, when they _ where they can watch what they want, when they want on their own device, whether— when they want on their own device, whether that is netflix or youtube but we _ whether that is netflix or youtube but we are — whether that is netflix or youtube but we are now seeing older audiences catching up on turning to the streaming services. 30 audiences catching up on turning to the streaming services.— audiences catching up on turning to the streaming services. so 2020 was the streaming services. so 2020 was the ear the streaming services. so 2020 was the year britain _ the streaming services. so 2020 was the year britain became _ the streaming services. so 2020 was the year britain became a _ the streaming services. so 2020 was the year britain became a streaming | the year britain became a streaming nation with traditional broadcast tv something for older people and set to decline. but is this a permanent change, and will be want to continue to pay for the likes of netflix, amazon prime, now tv, disney bus, or will we stop switching some of them off? we will we stop switching some of them off? ~ . will we stop switching some of them off? . ., ., will we stop switching some of them off? ~ ., ., ., ., will we stop switching some of them off? . ., ., ., ., ., off? we have a total of six streaming _ off? we have a total of six streaming services - off? we have a total of six - streaming services subscribed to at one point — streaming services subscribed to at one point. that has now slimmed down to four— one point. that has now slimmed down to four at _ one point. that has now slimmed down to four at the _
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one point. that has now slimmed down to four at the moment, and one point. that has now slimmed down to fourat the moment, and i one point. that has now slimmed down to four at the moment, and i think another— to four at the moment, and i think another one — to four at the moment, and i think another one will be dropping off soon _ another one will be dropping off soon. , ,., ., another one will be dropping off soon. , , ~~ another one will be dropping off soon. , “ . soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech tent od soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech tent pod one — soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech tent pod one other— soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech tent pod one other change _ soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech tent pod one other change in - soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech tent pod one other change in media i tent pod one other change in media habits, more than half of uk homes now have a smart speaker. an internet connection and not an aerial or satellite dishes becoming the key way we all get to entertainment. to asia now — and the standoff between china and the us over a top executive of huawei. meng wanzhou is the tech giant's chief financial officer and daughter of its founder. the us wants her to stand trial for breaking its sanctions on iran. the case is reaching a crucial stage. nick marsh in singapore says the trial has far reaching implications. we are going to have to wait a few more months until we get a verdict on the case but i think everybody knows this is about much more than just the fate. it symptomatic of the
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broader tussle between beijing and washington when it comes to draining technology, the mistrust that has been building, the tit for tat measures we've seen put in place but ever since this case happened, big technology companies like huawei and other companies in china have been put on all kinds of blacklists which prevent them from doing business in the united states and from huawei's point of view, the chief area of concern was always 5g because huawei was one of the big leaders in developing 5g technology but the security concerns from washington have essentially cut off huawei from key suppliers in the us and you just have to look at what happened last week when huawei released a new handset without any 5g capability. that is a big dealfor a company like huawei and if you want to get an idea of the damage this is doing, you just have to look at the results of the last quarter when it comes to handset sales, huawei, for the first time in seven years slipped out of
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the top five sellers in china. we are talking about one of the giants of the industry, so really incredible stuff and you have to say, with regards to this case, regardless of the verdict that we hear, the damage, you would argue, has already been done to some extent to huawei. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: sustainable shopping. should products be rated according to their environmental impact? we'll hear from a new company thats's trying to do just that. let's have some more news from the uk. this year's rugby league world cup, which was due to be held in england in the autumn, is set to be postponed until 2022. an official announcement is expected later this morning. it comes after australia and new zealand both pulled out of the tournament due to safety concerns about coronavirus. the new chief executive of nhs
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england has said that one in five patients admitted to hospital with covid in england are now aged 18 to 30. this is considerably higher than the peak last winter. amanda pritchard has urged young people in their late teens and twenties to come forward and get their covid jabs. it is still really important that for those people who have not yet taken the opportunity to come forward, or they know someone who hasn't, this is the time. and the reason it is so important is we have, as of today, over 5000 people really unwell in hospital. one in five, 20%, our young people. so in the 18 to 30 category, and that compares with one in 20 at the peak in january compares with one in 20 at the peak injanuary time. ten men and one woman have been arrested in the ongoing investigation into racist abuse against black england footballers, following the euro 2020 final.
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marcus rashford, bukayo saka and jadon sancho were racially targeted online after they missed penalties during the match last month. this is bbc news, the latest headlines. britain changes its international travel rules — making journeys to the uk easier for fully—vaccinated passengers. the government says its following the science. the un has issued a stark warning about the safety of thousands of civilians, in the afghan city of lashkar gar — as fierce fighting continues between the taliban and government forces. let's go to australia now — where extended covid lockdowns in sydney and the surrounding regions are causing immense economic damage. new south wales state, of which sydney is the capital city, represents around a third of the nation's economic activity — and experts are predicting a significant hit to australia's economic growth in the current quarter. phil mercer reports from sydney.
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here it is hard to find in sydney's lockdown, but businesses are doing what they can to keep going. although the bar at the brewery has been forced to close, it has been converted into a temporary covid safe drive through.— safe drive through. normally we have a --eole in safe drive through. normally we have a people in here. _ safe drive through. normally we have a people in here, all— safe drive through. normally we have a people in here, all drinking - safe drive through. normally we have a people in here, all drinking pints i a people in here, all drinking pints and having lunch and dinner and there would be a line three deep at there would be a line three deep at the bar. we might have five cars lined up on the street and it looks amazing, but that is like five people as opposed to 120 going through, so we are down 65% revenue. industrial estates are mostly many shops are shut is suspended. there are disaster support payments will businesses that need all the help
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they can get. the businesses that need all the help they can get-— they can get. the key is, and we've been speaking _ they can get. the key is, and we've been speaking to _ they can get. the key is, and we've been speaking to government - they can get. the key is, and we've| been speaking to government about this, that _ been speaking to government about this, that the payment has to be very quick. — this, that the payment has to be very quick, so government has to communicate very strongly with small business _ communicate very strongly with small business and they have to let them know _ business and they have to let them know that — business and they have to let them know that there is going to be money coming _ know that there is going to be money coming and _ know that there is going to be money coming and it will help them. we've all learned — coming and it will help them. we've all learned resilience throughout the last— all learned resilience throughout the last year and a half but adaptability is crucial as well. each — adaptability is crucial as well. each week, the lockdown in new south wales is costing the australian economy up to $600 million, and there is the impact of coronavirus restrictions in other states. before the pandemic, this was a country that went three decades without a recession. it is now at risk of having two in just over a year. this having two in 'ust over a year. this is what we — having two in just over a year. this is what we used _ having two in just over a year. this is what we used to _ having two injust over a year. try 3 is what we used to give to our guests. is what we used to give to our ruests. ., ., ., guests. international border closures are _ guests. international border closures are keeping - guests. international border closures are keeping away l guests. international border l closures are keeping away the tourists who used to rent francisco's bikes. he has changed his business model to become a repair shop. his business model to become a repair shop-— repair shop. covid is not going anywhere- _ repair shop. covid is not going anywhere- i— repair shop. covid is not going anywhere. i don't _
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repair shop. covid is not going anywhere. i don't think - repair shop. covid is not going l anywhere. i don't think tourism repair shop. covid is not going i anywhere. i don't think tourism is going to be back this summer, so we are in survival mode. right now, it's the only thing we can do. this is my business. i want to say this. it's literally my baby.— it's literally my baby. covid-19 is aaain it's literally my baby. covid-19 is again testing _ it's literally my baby. covid-19 is again testing the _ it's literally my baby. covid-19 is again testing the fortitude i it's literally my baby. covid-19 is again testing the fortitude of i it's literally my baby. covid-19 is again testing the fortitude of the australian economy, which did fight back from previous blows inflicted by the pandemic, but once more, businesses are having to adapt to survive. as november's global climate summit approaches, we are hearing more and more about the importance of sustainability to combat global warming — whether that's for transport, travel, food or clothes. for many consumers shopping sustainably is a key way to support that — but how do you know that what you are buying is ethical? a new online shopping platform — netherlands—based dayrize— rates all products on a sustainablity basis.
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eva gladek is co—founder of dayrize and explains how it works. we've developed a proprietary system for assessing all products individually on the various dimensions of sustainability that are critical, so everything from climate impact, we actually calculate the carbon footprint of products and look at water stress impacts on how circular a product is in terms of its design and also all sorts of social and human rights issues under the livelihood and well—being dimension we bring this all together in a single score from zero to 100 to make it easy to understand for an average consumer what the sustainability performance of a product is. bud what the sustainability performance of a product is— of a product is. and the higher the score, of a product is. and the higher the score. the — of a product is. and the higher the score, the better _ of a product is. and the higher the score, the better the _ of a product is. and the higher the score, the better the product i of a product is. and the higher the score, the better the product in i score, the better the product in terms of sustainability. if it gets a high school, that means it's doing well. .,. , a high school, that means it's doing well. .. , ., well. exactly. the idea if it were to net a well. exactly. the idea if it were to get a perfect _ well. exactly. the idea if it were to get a perfect dayrize - well. exactly. the idea if it were to get a perfect dayrize score i well. exactly. the idea if it were to get a perfect dayrize score ofj to get a perfect dayrize score of 100, that means it is a product that
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is completely circular and trim and contributes no impact to the planet or compensates for all of it, so it's difficult to get a score of 100. ., ., 4' it's difficult to get a score of 100. ., ., ~ ., it's difficult to get a score of 100. ., ,, 100. looking at the website you can aet 100. looking at the website you can get anything — 100. looking at the website you can get anything from — 100. looking at the website you can get anything from washing - get anything from washing detergent to furniture to clothes, to beauty products and there is a huge range of things available but what i noticed is there a premium if you want to shop sustainably, you have to pay for that. it's a lot more expensive to buy your washing up liquid from you than it is in the supermarket down the road. galic that's actually not necessarily the case. dayrize hasjust that's actually not necessarily the case. dayrize has just recently launched in the uk, so the uk is the first market and we've spent the last year recruiting brands from across the uk and developing the technology over the last year and a half to do the scoring and currently there are over 200 brands on the platform but we are recruiting more
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and as we get more brands on there you will see that the price points of the different products will even out. i have a personal anecdote from a couple of weeks ago when i went to look for washing—up liquid, for dishwasher tablets at the supermarket and there were five different products with sustainability credentials of some sort and they had varying price points. some of them were extremely cheap and others were extremely expensive but the main thing that struck me is that even as a sustainability expert i could not make a rapid decision on which of these were betterfor the these were better for the environment. but you can make a quick choice on what is cheapest and the generic brands in the supermarket are by a long shot way cheaper than what you are offering and the sustainability options on the same shelf of the supermarket. you have admit this is not necessarily a negative, if we want to shop in an ethical way, we do have to spend more money. that is the reality, isn't it?—
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the reality, isn't it? what i'm sa in: the reality, isn't it? what i'm saying is _ the reality, isn't it? what i'm saying is that _ the reality, isn't it? what i'm saying is that it's _ the reality, isn't it? what i'm saying is that it's not - the reality, isn't it? what i'm saying is that it's not always | the reality, isn't it? what i'm i saying is that it's not always the case that more sustainable and ethical things cost more. sometimes, for example, not having additional material in a product is going to result in it being more sustainable and also less costly. aha, result in it being more sustainable and also less costly.— and also less costly. a quick look at the financial _ and also less costly. a quick look at the financial markets - and also less costly. a quick look at the financial markets and i at the financial markets and in asia, another mixed picture but japan bucking the trend and higher by half a percent and that's a look at the financial markets. in england nearly 90 percent of the adult population has had their first dose of the coronavirus vaccine — many of them delivered at large venues like the one set up at ashton gate stadium in bristol. with such a high rate of take—up these huge centres are now being wound down — in this case — to make way for the football which starts at the weekend, as the bbc�*s robin markwell reports. full time at ashton gate for
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vaccination. callum and ellie are among the last to get theirjobs here. it among the last to get their “obs here. �* ., ., , �* here. it didn't hurt at all. didn't feel a thing- — here. it didn't hurt at all. didn't feel a thing. it _ here. it didn't hurt at all. didn't feel a thing. it was _ here. it didn't hurt at all. didn't feel a thing. it was fine. i'm i here. it didn't hurt at all. didn't| feel a thing. it was fine. i'm not treat feel a thing. it was fine. i'm not great with _ feel a thing. it was fine. i'm not great with needles _ feel a thing. it was fine. i'm not great with needles but - feel a thing. it was fine. i'm not great with needles but i - feel a thing. it was fine. i'm not great with needles but i looked | feel a thing. it was fine. i'm not i great with needles but i looked the other way— great with needles but i looked the other way and it was just a scratch. it other way and it was just a scratch. it was _ other way and it was just a scratch. it was january when the prime minister came to open the west's biggest vaccination hub and since then almost a quarter of a million jobs have gone into arms at the stadium. tara has been wielding the needle from the start and has seen her clientele get younger and younger. it her clientele get younger and ounuer. . , her clientele get younger and ounuer, .,, ., , her clientele get younger and ounuer. ., , . her clientele get younger and ounuer. ., ,~ , , younger. it was really cute because we had a lot _ younger. it was really cute because we had a lot of— younger. it was really cute because we had a lot of the _ younger. it was really cute because we had a lot of the older _ younger. it was really cute because | we had a lot of the older generation and for many of them it was the first time they'd been out in ages, so they were coming in fully gland up so they were coming in fully gland up and very smartly dressed and the time per patient was a lot longer because we had long chats with them whereas now, especially for the younger generation, they want to get in and out i wouldn't say they are less bothered but more concerned about getting to the pub afterwards. but the football and rugby season is back in, with crowds due back on saturday. city at home to blackpool.
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so it is time for vaccination to stop and sport to start. it couldn't no on stop and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever— stop and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever and _ stop and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever and it's _ stop and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever and it's an - stop and sport to start. it couldn't| go on forever and it's an important milestone that things are slowly going back to normal. we at ashton gate and bristol city and bristol bears wanted to get back to normal and we want to get crowds back in the seat and get live entertainment back and today being the last day is another milestone in the return to normality in bristol. but another milestone in the return to normality in bristol.— normality in bristol. but nhs bosses know the pandemic _ normality in bristol. but nhs bosses know the pandemic is _ normality in bristol. but nhs bosses know the pandemic is far _ normality in bristol. but nhs bosses know the pandemic is far from i normality in bristol. but nhs bosses know the pandemic is far from over. | know the pandemic is far from over. we've still got a long way to go, so the younger population are coming forward _ the younger population are coming forward slower than the older population were, and of course, there's— population were, and of course, there's still a lot of second vaccinations to get through when the ei-ht vaccinations to get through when the eight week interval for the second vaccination comes along and we are hearing _ vaccination comes along and we are hearing all— vaccination comes along and we are hearing all the time about new cohorts — hearing all the time about new cohorts of younger people being offered — cohorts of younger people being offered vaccination, sol cohorts of younger people being offered vaccination, so i think we are in— offered vaccination, so i think we are in some _ offered vaccination, so i think we are in some time yet.— offered vaccination, so i think we are in some time yet. fittingly, the last to be vaccinated _ are in some time yet. fittingly, the last to be vaccinated here - are in some time yet. fittingly, the last to be vaccinated here will i are in some time yet. fittingly, the last to be vaccinated here will be i last to be vaccinated here will be amongst the first to use it as a stadium. the bristol bears rugby team have been offered the last appointment of the day for their
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second jobs. a suitable end to a remarkable chapter in the history of ashton gate. the australian swimming leged ian thorpe has been speaking to the bbc about the trend we've seen in this olympics of athletes opening up about emotions and mental health. here are his views. i think what it is and what _ here are his views. i think what it is and what the _ here are his views. i think what it is and what the powerful - here are his views. i think what it| is and what the powerful message that does come from some of these very high—profile athletes around the world that have struggled with different mental illness or mental challenges that they have faced in their careers, and how they overcome them, and i guess it removes that false perception that all athletes are superheroes and they do not have vulnerability and they seem invincible, but we all have our weaknesses as well and for people to know that this can affect anyone in our communities, and that's why we need to get it right in sport, but in the broader community as well. i
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think we are starting to realise what level of expectation we place on our athletes to perform well and it varies from country to country but there is an expectation of gold and the question must be at what cost? not only physically, but we are acknowledging it mentally as well. i look at naomi osaka or simone biles, that they felt they had the weight of the nation. we thought originally that naomi osaka when she refused to do interviews at the french open that it was just her not being ready for it and then when she has now shared how significant her struggles have been since the us open and even leading into tokyo in the 11 games, we saw that she beat her childhood hero who then had to consult because the official was being booed and then gave her the p9p being booed and then gave her the pep talk she needed all within a few minutes playing out throughout the world and that is tough for anyone who is unprepared for it. we are
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really making a conscious effort to improve where we are out with what we are doing in mental health services for athletics. good morning. yesterday temperature is widely reached 23 or 2a degrees across the uk. today they will be down a touch because we have rain coming in from the west and it's also going to be windier than it has been and the strongest winds are through the irish sea and the areas adjacent to it. that's because we have an area of low pressure coming our way and you can see the extent of the isobars. in the centre of the low pressure there won't be much wind so later in northern ireland there will be slow moving, prolonged showers which could lead to issues with localised flooding but we start on a dry note and in the east there will be missed in fog around first thing that will lift in the cloud is building ahead of the band of rain coming in and you can see there are
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showers ahead and also behind this band of rain, some of which will be heavy and also thundery. temperatures today, 16 in the north up temperatures today, 16 in the north up to 22 as we move south. through the evening and overnight the band of rain continues to push northwards and we also have showers rotating around the area and also pretty windy across the northern half of the country, especially the north—east and the southern half of the country. these are the overnight lows, between 13 and 15 degrees. as we go through the rest of friday we still are being dominated by low pressure so we have all of the showers moving around and we are looking at heavy and prolonged showers across northern ireland, the northern half of wales, northern england and also central and southern scotland in particular and here we could have issues with localised flooding. still pretty windy across the southern half of the uk and also the north—east with the uk and also the north—east with the temperature range between 16 and 21 degrees. low pressure is not done with us heading from friday into
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saturday and it drifts across scotland and you can see the isobars and we have this little system coming across the english channel so we still have rain or showers rotating around the area of low pressure as well as the system coming up from the english channel bringing in some further spells of rain. still pretty breezy as well but in between the rain there will be bright spells or some sunshine with temperatures tween 15 and 20 degrees, so disappointing for the time of year. as we head through the weekend it remains unsettled, even into monday with showers and longer spells of rain and by tuesday something drier and less windy.
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this is bbc world news. our top stories. britain changes its international travel rules, making journeys to the uk easier for fully—vaccinated passengers. the government says they're following the science what we do want to do is just be able to work with the clinicians, with the experts, in order to just keep a very close eye on this beta variant that we already know so much more about now. pcr tests enable us to do that. 11 people are arrested by police investigating the online racist abuse of england footballers after the euro 2020 final. the un issues a stark warning about the safety of thousands of civilians in the afghan city of lashkar gar, as fierce fighting continues between the taliban and government forces. a major upset on day 13 of the olympics, as jamaican hansele parchment beats the american world champion, to the gold in the 110 metres hurdles.
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and, agricultural pesticides are having a more harmful effect on bees than previously thought. hello and welcome to bbc world news. fully vaccinated travellers returning to england, northern ireland or scotland from france will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. the change is part of a series of adjustments to the traffic light system for international travel, and brings france into line with other amber list countries. india and the united arab emirates are among the destinations that have been moved from red to amber, while seven more countries, including germany and norway, have been added to the green list. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies. a near empty swimming pool,
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few tents pitched and no—one propping up the bar. this would normally be the busiest time of year at this campsite in western france, but at the moment, they're half—empty. hopefully there'll be a flurry of last—minute campers. we're hoping so, especially in september with the older couples who normally come who don't have families. i think it's too late for families to come because they will have booked elsewhere in the uk. across the channel, these british holiday—makers are staying home. with the kids and too late in summer, we've already had to change my holiday. i work for the nhs, so i've had to change my holiday that way. i couldn't quarantine when i get back, so, yeah, this is it for us this year. it's too risky to commit to an overseas holiday right now in my opinion. it's too much of an issue, effort to get tested. ijust feel a bit safer- in my own country, quite frankly, at the moment.
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even though they make those changes, they can make the changes again. there are new additions to the green list, including germany, but of the seven countries added, only two will allow in non—vaccinated vaccinated tourists without quarantine. spain is still amber, but the government is advising passengers to have the more expensive pcr test rather than the cheaper lateral flow test before they depart for the uk. what we do want to do is just be able to work with the clinicians, with the experts in spain in order to just keep a very close eye on this beta variant that we already know so much more about now, and pcr tests enable us to do that. labour have argued the government are still overcomplicating travel. having this confusion, having these changes country by country almost on a weekly basis now doesn't help the industry, it doesn't help passengers and it doesn't help instil confidence in the government. some countries are going from red to amber, including the uae. it means neil, who lives in dubai, will be able to see his one—year—old grandson for the first time in a year. despite the anger i feel towards the government,
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i can now put that behind me and we can now look forward and we can travel, so that's really good. and we can almost get our lives back to a form of normality of being able to see our friends and family. country by country, more of the world is opening up to uk travellers, but well into summer and after months of uncertainty, the question is how many will want to make the trip? caroline davies, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent chris bockman, who's in saint—antonin—noble—val, in south west france. welcome. i guess the big question is, will british tourists return? that's right. i am actually in the beautiful of saint—antonin—noble—val, which usually gets tens of thousands of visitors, many of them british. i'm not convinced, even though the quarantine rules have changed from sunday, because first of all, the french are staying at home right now. eight out of ten are not going
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to spain or portugal, they are staying here. the belgians have been here a while, the dutch. there's hardly any accommodation unless have a second home. otherwise there is hardly any accommodation here, on the coast, or even towards bordeaux. if you speak to the tourism offices, they are full because the staycations. .. they are full because the staycations... also, naturally british will come here because you may remember when some did come over here last year, they were suddenly told they had to go back urgently to the uk or they would face quarantine rules. they don't want to go through that again. i think they will not be a huge wave of brits coming over here in the next few weeks. what a huge wave of brits coming over here in the next few weeks. what are the covid figures _ here in the next few weeks. what are the covid figures looking _ here in the next few weeks. what are the covid figures looking like - here in the next few weeks. what are the covid figures looking like there i the covid figures looking like there is the moment? this the covid figures looking like there is the moment?— the covid figures looking like there is the moment? this is another thing which is pretty _ is the moment? this is another thing which is pretty serious. _ is the moment? this is another thing which is pretty serious. about i which is pretty serious. about 30,000 new cases each day in france. in this region last night, health authorities issued a white alert. it
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means hospitals are virtually full. that means that medical staff, including doctors and nurses who are on holiday, can be forced to return to the hospitals to deal with the covid situation. the last thing they want is more holiday—makers coming down here, which could actually make the situation even worse. for those two reasons i wouldn't expect a huge wave of british people coming over here. �* . . wave of british people coming over here. �* ., ., ., ., , here. and what are the authorities sa in: ? here. and what are the authorities saying? they _ here. and what are the authorities saying? they were _ here. and what are the authorities saying? they were pretty - here. and what are the authorities saying? they were pretty cross i here. and what are the authorities i saying? they were pretty cross when france was put on a number list? i can tell you, i saw the french transport minister a few weeks ago in toulouse, he was there to promote tourism, and i asked him what the situation was big —— between the british and french. he said he had a good relationship with grant shapps. he said there would be ideal imminently. they are speaking several times on the each day. there will be a change imminently. of course, that didn't happen. they were pretty annoyed to say the least that didn't happen. it has taken some time. at least they are now off that strange list where they were
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isolated as one of the only countries in europe facing this strange amber list. nevertheless, i wouldn't expect a huge rise in tourism between the two countries over the next few weeks.— tourism between the two countries over the next few weeks. thank you for the over the next few weeks. thank you forthe update- _ the un says it's deeply concerned about the safety of tens of thousands of civilians in the afghan city of lashkar gah, the capital of helmand province. taliban militants and government forces are waging an intense battle for control of the city. a un spokesman said there were reports of increased civilian casualties, and of homes and hospitals being destroyed. afghan and us air strikes on taliban positions continued throughout wednesday. mark lobel reports. several provincial capitals under taliban attack — at least two reportedly breached. insecurity is forcing many afghan residents from their homes. we see a lot of schools that are being destroyed, a lot of water plants, hospitals which are essential. we see that access to care and health care is extremely difficult.
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displaced in kandahar, these families were separated from loved ones in the chaos. kabul came under attack on tuesday night, first a car bomb targeting the defence minister, then deadly attackers roamed the streets. but these protesters say the taliban aren't welcome in the capital. our message was more to our troops, to stand in solidarity with our soldiers who are fighting the war, notjust for afghanistan but for the entire world, against terrorism. in step with the protesters, the afghan president branded the taliban "hypocrites" for attacking what he called "real muslims." he pledged to rapidly expand the number of afghan special forces fighting them. translation: there is no better. opportunity to end the 43-year war and bloodshed as foreigners have left the country. after all, it is only the efforts
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and swords of the afghans that keep this country together! but despite the army's efforts, the taliban has already taken swathes of the country in the past few weeks. the question is how easily they may be able to capture urban areas. there is a much wider middle—class established, the cities are much bigger and stronger within the political economy of the country, and women have really come into their own, but how much of these kinds of social and economic bulwarks will stop a kind of traditional afghan — i mean, taliban islamist takeover — and a reversion to the kind of maoist policies that they adopted last time round is hard to tell. this is a bad time. it will take more than people power to keep the taliban off the main streets, with many weeks of the country fighting season season yet to come.
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mark lobel, bbc news. police investigating the online racist abuse of england players following the euro 2020 final, have arrested 11 people. the uk football policing unit says it received 600 reports of offensive messages, around a third of which were judged to possibly be criminal. let's get more from our news correspondent tim muffett, who's with me. so tell us more about these arrests? there was such a dramatic end to the european championships between eight —— england and italy. a penalty shoot—out. marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka almost penalties. all three were victims of racial abuse online. the uk football policing unit received more than 600 reports of offensive messages. 207, about a third, possibly criminal in nature. 3a accounts have so far been
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identified as being in the uk. the unit made data requests to social media companies as part of their investigations. where they have been able to, they have passed on information to local police forces. 11 arrests have been made so far. offences include malicious communications and breaches of the communications act. the age range of those arrested ranges from 18 to 63. so from young adults to older adults. and chief constable mark roberts, overseeing this investigation, has thanked facebook, instagram and twitter for responding to the police request quickly. he says if people think they can hide behind a social media profile to make such abhorrent comments, they need to think again. that make such abhorrent comments, they need to think again.— need to think again. that the investigation _ need to think again. that the investigation in _ need to think again. that the investigation in the - need to think again. that the investigation in the uk. i need to think again. that the | investigation in the uk. there need to think again. that the i investigation in the uk. there are also people being investigated abroad? , :: , ., abroad? yes, the 207 posts deemed to have broken — abroad? yes, the 207 posts deemed to have broken the _ abroad? yes, the 207 posts deemed to have broken the law, _ abroad? yes, the 207 posts deemed to have broken the law, 123 _ abroad? yes, the 207 posts deemed to have broken the law, 123 accounts i have broken the law, 123 accounts have broken the law, 123 accounts have been identified as belonging to individuals outside the uk. so, in those cases police have passed on
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the relevant information they have to the relevant police forces in those countries. and really it is up to them to decide how to act upon them. there are 50 other cases in which the unit are still waiting to hear back from social media companies, to find out more details as to where those people live. the police have stressed how complex it can be to investigate online abuse. people hide behind false identities, false names. but they have made it perfectly clear they are still investigating the messages which were posted after this match. if they find any more deemed to have beached —— or breach the criminal threshold, those people who posted them will be arrested.— threshold, those people who posted l them will be arrested.— stay with us, still to come, and upset at the olympics as hansie parchment wins gold in the 110 metres hurdles. one in five patients admitted to hospital with covid—19 in england are aged between 18 and 3a —
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a figure four times higher than last winter. the numbers were revealed by the new chief executive of nhs england. there are currentlyjust under five thousand coronavirus patients in english hospitals. speaking in herfirst television interview since being appointed, amanda pritchard said the numbers affecting young people should be an incentive to them to get their vaccines. it is still very important that for those people who have not yet taken the opportunity to come forward, or they know somebody who hasn't, this is the time. and the reason it is so important is we have as of today, over 5000 people really unwell in hospital. one in five, 20%, are young people. so in that 18 to 30 category. and that compares with one in 20 at the peak injanuary time.
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this is bbc world news. the latest headlines. britain changes its international travel rules, making journeys to the uk easier for fully—vaccinated passengers. the government says its following the science. police investigating the online racist abuse of england footballers after the euro 2020 final, have arrested 11 people. day 13 of the tokyo olympics is well under way. there have already been a number of golds, including a big upset on the track. we'll have more on that in a moment. but first, in team gb news, 16—year—old andrea spendolini—sirieix and lois toulson both reached the final of the women's 10 metres platform event. and in the next few moments, they're about to compete against the chinese competition favourites. and let's take a look at the medal table. china still far out in the lead, with 32 gold medals and 23 silvers. the us is coming in second with 27 golds. australia is holding on closely to that fourth position with 17 gold medals, and the uk isjust
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trailing behind with 15. our correspondent sarah mulkerrins has been following all the key results from tokyo. we had a shock on the track this morning in tokyo as the outright favourite for the men's110 metres hurdles, america's grant holloway, was beaten in the final. the gold medal went to jamaica's hansele parchment. bronze in london back in 2012. he produced a very strong finish to this race to win gold from the big favourite from the usa. there were two other finals this morning. the favourite there, ryan krauser, in the shot put, no problems for him. an olympic record for him to claim the gold medal. the men's triplejump was for him to claim the gold medal. the men's triple jump was won by portugal. there was drama as well in
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the hockey today. with the bronze medal going to india. they were taking on germany. there were 3—1 down at one stage but they were able to work their way back to win 5a. —— s-a. that to work their way back to win 5a. —— 5—a. that is india's first medal in hockey since the 1980 olympics in moscow. we have been loving the skateboarding. we have had the men's final today in the park event. victory and that went to an 18—year—old australian, keegan palmer. he pulled off a sensational first run to set the score that all of them were trying to match. and they failed along the way. then he did even better with his third and final run, a score of 95.83 saw him win the first ever men's gold medal awarded in the park event in skateboarding. the sprinter from belarus, krystina timanovskaya, who refused orders to fly home from the olympics early because she feared for her safety, has arrived in poland.
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she landed there on wednesday after being granted a humanitarian visa by the polish government. earlier, the most prominent opposition leader left in belarus, maria kolesnikova, made a defiant appearance as she stood trial for trying to overthrow president lukashenko. our correspondent, bethany bell, joins me live from warsaw. welcome to you. bring us up—to—date on what happened last night? weill. on what happened last night? well, after a very — on what happened last night? well, after a very long — on what happened last night? well, after a very long trip _ on what happened last night? well, after a very long trip all _ on what happened last night? well, after a very long trip all the - on what happened last night? -ii after a very long trip all the way from tokyo via vienna, krystina timanovskaya has arrived in warsaw. she was greeted by senior officials here. poland has given her a humanitarian visa. they have been expressing sentiments of support and solidarity for her. and there are also plans for her husband to come to warsaw as well. he fled belarus to warsaw as well. he fled belarus to ukraine after the news of this incident occurred. and we understand
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that he will be joining her fairly soon. this now, of course, was a journey that was full of incident. initially she was planning to fly directly here. but then she flew via vienna because of security concerns, but all of this shining the spotlight on the very difficult situation in belarus at the moment. and bethany, what do we expect to happen today?— and bethany, what do we expect to happen today? well, we understand that she may _ happen today? well, we understand that she may actually _ happen today? well, we understand that she may actually speak - happen today? well, we understand that she may actually speak to i happen today? well, we understand that she may actually speak to the l that she may actually speak to the media a bit later today, talking a little bit more about her plans, how she will manage to live here. but of course an enormous life changing experience she has gone through. she told the bbc earlier this week that she had not been part of a political protest. that her actions had not been political protest. she had a just, in her words, been political protest. she had a just, in herwords, criticised been political protest. she had a
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just, in her words, criticised the coaches for their actions with her. but of course she said she understood the political context of this. and said that it could be a number of years before she can get back to belarus.— number of years before she can get back to belarus. bethany belly more so, thank back to belarus. bethany belly more so. thank you- _ malta is being urged to drop a case against three young migrants, accused of terrorism. the teenagers, two of whom were children at the time, are alleged to have hijacked a ship and forced it to take them to europe. they were rescued in the mediterranean in 2019 along with more than 100 others, as they fled libya. both the united nations office for human rights and the arch—bishop of malta are asking authorities to drop the case, calling the charges disproportionate. in a bbc exclusive, our europe correspondent, jean mackenzie, has been to meet the boys, who face life in prison. this is the first time they have spoken publicly. one is still a minor, so we're using the name given to him by court. these three young men risked their lives to make it to europe. in return, they have lost their freedom.
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i am not a terrorist. i cannot be a terrorist and i will never be a terrorist. they have been accused by maltese authorities of hijacking the ship that rescued them and 100 others at sea, as they attempted the treacherous crossing from libya. this is the moment they arrived in malta. seconds later, they were handcuffed and led away. here is the place where they disembarked us. they arrested me and took me to the prison directly from here to the prison. lamine was just a child, 15. he says that, at first, the captain tried to take them back to libya. people panicked, then protested, and eventually, he agreed to take them to malta. lamine was the only person on the boat who spoke english. and he says the captain asked him to translate. why would i hijack the ship? why?
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the captain was in full control of the ship. what's it like to live being accused of being a terrorist by the maltese government? it is very, very hard for me. very, very hard. it is eating me up whenever i think that they are calling me a terrorist. what happened on board has never been proven. the authorities are still collecting evidence. it could be years before they face trial. so far we haven't seen evidence of terrorism. and we question the ability of the prosecution to bring such charges. where they are fleeing from is a hell hole. from our clients' perspectives, they did the natural thing anybody would have done to save themselves and the other people on board. malta is on the front line of migration across the mediterranean. human rights organisations say that in trying to stop boats arriving,
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it acted disproportionately. the archbishop of malta has intervened and urged authorities to drop the case. migration is not a crime. honestly, i don't know why the exaggeration. i don't know if it was to give an example. i don't know. no one from the police or the prosecution would answer any of our questions. but the maltese foreign minister has agreed to meet us. is this case reallyjustified? i told you, i'm not in a position to go into the specifics of the case. i'm not trying to simply avoid your question. but people are telling us that these three people have been caught up in a political game, that this case is the product of politics? i don't agree with that interpretation. these self—righteous people should try to understand what pressure we are faced with, and what it means to carry the responsibility on our own to deal with the central mediterranean route.
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in these sacks are letters of support. hundreds arrive each week. lamine, as translator, reads them out. "my name is nina..." this helps them hope for a betterfuture. one that is not behind bars. the government in thailand has banned sunscreens containing chemicals that damage coral from all of its national parks. the thai department of conservation said four ingredients commonly found in sun creams, including oxybenzone, were shown to destroy coral larvae, obstruct coral reproduction and cause reef bleaching. anyone using products that contain them can be fined up to $3,000. similar bans have been introduced by the pacific island of palau and the us state of hawaii.
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a new study has discovered that a mix of agricultural pesticides is more harmful to bees than was previously thought. the researchers from royal holloway, university of london, found that a cocktail of chemicals reacted with each other to kill larger numbers of bees. precious pollinators in decline. our bees face multiple threats to their survival. from a loss of food—rich rich natural grassland, to the dozens of pesticides commonly used in agriculture. this new study set out to quantify each of these threats, and to work out how they combine to affect the health of the insects. the research has examined 90 studies that each measured the effect of —— on bees of pesticide or another environmental challenge. they worked out that combinations of several chemicals killed many more bees than expected. this is because the researchers say
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pesticides interact. each chemical enhances the damage caused by another. what we found is really important when you consider how agrochemicals are sold. commercial formulas are sold to farmers and they often contain various different agrochemicals — pesticide, fungicide — and what our research showed is that these chemicals can interact and significantly increase the potential harm, intentionally impact on bee mortality. scientists say regulation needs to be updated to factor in this chemical interaction. and to avoid harmful cocktails of pesticides that pose a threat to be pollinating insects that we rely on. victoria gill, bbc news. to stay with us on bbc news. plenty more coming up from the olympics. more action i had from tokyo. and we
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are also going to be finding out just how much time we have been spending online as a result of the pandemic. back in a few moments. good morning. yesterday temperature is rightly reached 23 or 2a degrees. today they will be down a touch because we have got rain coming in from the west. it is going to be windier than it has been. the strongest winds through the irish sea and adjacent areas. that is because we have this area of low pressure coming our way. you can see the extent of the isobars. in the centre of the low pressure there won't be much went. later in northern ireland there will be some prolonged showers which could lead to flooding. we start off on a dry note in the east. mist and fog were left. the cloud building ahead of this band of rain. you can see the showers ahead and behind this band
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of rain. some of it will be heavy and also thundery. temperatures today 16 in the north to 22 as we move steadily southwards. through this evening and overnight a band of rain continues to push northwards. we have also got a showers rotating around this area of low pressure. and also pretty windy across the northern half of the country, especially the north—east and the southern half of the country. these are the overnight lows. 13 to 15 degrees. as we go through the rest of friday, we are still dominated by low pressure. we still have these showers moving around. we are looking at heavy and prolonged showers across northern ireland, the northern half of wales, northern england and central and southern scotland in particular. and here we could have some issues with localised flooding. still pretty windy in the southern half of the uk and also the north—east, with the temperature range 16 to 21 degrees. low pressure is not done with us, even as we had from friday into saturday. a drift across scotland.
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you can see the isobars. and we have got this little system coming up across the english channel. we still have some rain or some showers rotating around the area of low pressure, as well as the system coming up from the english channel, bringing in some further spots of rain. still pretty breezy as well. in between the rain they will be bright spells or some sunshine. temperatures 15 to 20 degrees. disappointing for the time of the year. as we head on through the weekend it remains unsettled, even into monday, with showers else longer spells of rain. we should be drier and less wendy.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: britain is changing its international travel rules making journeys to england, northern ireland or scotland easier for fully—vaccinated passengers. the alterations are part of a series of adjustments to the uk's traffic light system. the united nations has issued a stark warning about the safety of thousands of civilians, in the afghan city of lashkar gar — as fierce fighting continues between the taliban and government forces. police investigating the online racist abuse of england footballers after the euro 2020 final, have arrested 11 people. marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka were abused after they missed penalties in the penalty, shoot—out defeat at wembley last month. there's been a major upset on day 13 of the olympics — as the jamaican sprinter, hansel parchment beat the american world champion grant holloway, to the gold medal in the 110 metres hurdles.
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uk adults spent a third of their waking hours in 2020 watching tv and online video. that's one of the findings of ofcom's annual survey of our media habits. the regulator says subscription services such as netflix were the big beneficiaries as repeated lockdowns left millions at home looking for entertainment. here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. like many of us, the oakley family spent much of 2020 glued to screens, but not necessarily all together. mum and dad were in front of the main telly, their son spent a lot of time gaming, chatting to friends and watching youtube videos but it is streaming services not broadcast tv which were big for all of them. increasingly it's just news and current affairs, really, is what we are watching on broadcast. otherwise it is streaming. almost everything else is streamed by one service or another. do you watch any television? almost no. i'm normally watching
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youtube or netflix. ofcom's annual snapshot of media habits should be spent an average of five hours and a0 minutes a day watching tv or online video in 2020, up a7 minutes on the year before. much of the increase is due to the fact that the time watching subscription streaming services almost doubled to one hour and five minutes per day. the biggest player, netflix, is now in more than half of all uk homes. with hit series like bridgeton, netflix now has more subscribers than sky, virgin and the other uk pay—tv providers put together. we are seeing that younger people are migrating from traditional tv to really engage in streaming services where they can watch what they want, when they want on their own device, whether that is netflix or youtube but we are now seeing older audiences catching up and turning to the streaming services. so 2020 was the year britain became a streaming nation with traditional broadcast tv something for older
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people and set to decline. but is this a permanent change, and will we want to continue to pay for the likes of netflix, amazon prime, now tv, disney+, or will we start switching some of them off? we have a total of six streaming services subscribed to at one point. that has now slimmed down to four at the moment, and i think another one will be dropping off soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech tent podcast. one other change in media habits, more than half of uk homes now have a smart speaker. an internet connection and not an aerial or satellite dishes is becoming the key way we all get to entertainment. in england nearly 90 percent of the adult population has had their first dose of the coronavirus vaccine — many of them delivered at large venues like the one set up at ashton gate stadium in bristol in the west of england. when it opened injanuary
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it was the uk's first mass vaccination hub. but with such a high rate of take—up these huge centres are now being wound down — in this case — to make way for the football which starts at the weekend, as the bbc�*s robin markwell reports. full time at ashton gate for vaccination. callum and ellie are among the last to get their jabs here. it didn't hurt at all. didn't feel a thing. it was fine. i'm not great with needles but i looked the other way and it was just a scratch. it was january when the prime minister came to open the west's biggest vaccination hub and since then almost a quarter of a millionjabs have gone into arms at the stadium. tara has been wielding the needle from the start and has seen her clientele get younger and younger. it was really cute, because we had a lot of the older generation and for many of them it was the first time they'd been out in ages, so they were coming in fully glammed up and very smartly dressed and the time per patient was a lot longer because we had long chats with them
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whereas now, especially for the younger generation, they want to get in and out. i wouldn't say they are less bothered but more concerned about getting to the pub afterwards. but the football and rugby season is back in, with crowds due back on saturday. city at home to blackpool. so it is time for vaccination to stop and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever and it's an important milestone that things are slowly going back to normal. we at ashton gate and bristol city and bristol bears wanted to get back to normal and we want to get crowds back in the seats and get live entertainment back and today being the last day is another milestone in the return to normality in bristol. but nhs bosses know the pandemic is farfrom over. we've still got a long way to go, so the younger population are coming forward slower than the older population were, and of course, there's still a lot of second vaccinations to get through when the _ eight—week interval for the second vaccination comes along and we are
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hearing all the time about new cohorts of younger people being offered vaccination, so i think we are in it for some time yet. fittingly, the last to be vaccinated here will be amongst the first to use it as a stadium. the bristol bears rugby team have been offered the last appointment of the day for their second jabs. a suitable end to a remarkable chapter in the history of ashton gate. this year — perhaps for the first time at the olympics — a significant amount of attention is paying paid to the mental health of the athletes competing in tokyo. it's largely because the competitors themselves are opening up about the struggles they face competing at such an elite level. from naomi osaka to simone biles, some of the world's top athletes have been speaking openly about the importance to look after their mental — as well as physical state. the australian swimming great ian thorpe is another former olympian who's been open about the struggles he's faced.
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i think what it is and what the powerful message that does come from some of these very high—profile athletes around the world that have struggled with different mental illness or mental challenges that they have faced in their careers, and how they overcome them, and i guess it removes that false perception that all athletes are superheroes and they do not have vulnerability and they seem invincible, but we all have our weaknesses as well and for people to know that this can affect anyone in our communities, and that's why we need to get it right in sport, but in the broader community as well. i think we are starting to realise what level of expectation we place on our athletes to perform well and it varies from country to country but there is an expectation of gold and the question must be at what cost? not only physically, but we are acknowledging it mentally as well. i look at naomi osaka
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or simone biles, that they felt they had the weight of the nation. we thought originally that naomi osaka when she refused to do interviews at the french open that it was just her not being ready for it and then when she has now shared how significant her struggles have been since the us open and even leading into tokyo in the olympic games, we saw that she beat her childhood hero who then had to console her because the official was being booed and then gave her the pep talk she needed all within a few minutes playing out throughout the world and that is tough for anyone who is unprepared for it. we are really making a conscious effort to improve where we are out with what we are doing in mental health services for athletics. instead of talking a really good game about mental health and sport, we do the hard work and realise each
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individual athlete is going to have a different requirement and different needs going into an event like the lipid games. some can walk in and some naivety can help, walking and are not realising the significance of the accomplishment at that time, yet others need to be coached through it and have the constant affirmation that they require to be able to deliver that performance when it counts most. shah performance when it counts most. an engineering graduate has been inspired to make handcranked washing machines for refugees. brute inspired to make handcranked washing machines for refugees.— machines for refugees. we had an opportunity _ machines for refugees. we had an opportunity to _ machines for refugees. we had an opportunity to actually _ machines for refugees. we had an opportunity to actually do - opportunity to actually do something, and i can, using my hands, literally and help others. for me on the team it's been really humbling _ for me on the team it's been really humbling and to actually know that what we _ humbling and to actually know that what we are doing is going to make a difference _ what we are doing is going to make a difference to the wider world. this washin: difference to the wider world. try 3 washing machine story started its
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cycle four years ago. i washing machine story started its cycle four years ago.— cycle four years ago. i was an engineer— cycle four years ago. i was an engineer in — cycle four years ago. i was an engineer in wiltshire - cycle four years ago. i was an engineer in wiltshire and i cycle four years ago. i was an i engineer in wiltshire and decided to quit my— engineer in wiltshire and decided to quit myjob, sol engineer in wiltshire and decided to quit myjob, so i went to go and volunteer— quit myjob, so i went to go and volunteer for free and there i met my next— volunteer for free and there i met my next door neighbour in rural india. _ my next door neighbour in rural india. a — my next door neighbour in rural india, a lady who i promised a manual— india, a lady who i promised a manual washing machine to combat the time and _ manual washing machine to combat the time and effort she spent hand washing — time and effort she spent hand washing her and her family's close. back in— washing her and her family's close. back in britain the concept first came _ back in britain the concept first came in— back in britain the concept first came in the kitchen after he noticed the way— came in the kitchen after he noticed the way lettuce gets washed and dried _ the way lettuce gets washed and dried. so— the way lettuce gets washed and dried. the way lettuce gets washed and dried, , ., ., the way lettuce gets washed and dried. , ., ., , , dried. so it started with a simple salad spinner- — dried. so it started with a simple salad spinner. it _ dried. so it started with a simple salad spinner. it then _ dried. so it started with a simple salad spinner. it then moved i dried. so it started with a simple | salad spinner. it then moved onto dried. so it started with a simple i salad spinner. it then moved onto a plastic drum with another drum inside. and then, he grew even bigger, to the latest model, which is both a washer and a dryer. wait for it. and there it goes. it's been designed to be robust and as simple to use as possible. in a designed to be robust and as simple to use as possible.— to use as possible. in a washer mode, to use as possible. in a washer mode. it's _ to use as possible. in a washer mode. it's a — to use as possible. in a washer mode, it's a vertical— to use as possible. in a washer mode, it's a vertical position i to use as possible. in a washer| mode, it's a vertical position so the water— mode, it's a vertical position so the water is _ mode, it's a vertical position so the water is on the bottom so when you move _
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the water is on the bottom so when you move the drum around the clothing — you move the drum around the clothing will go into the water. when — clothing will go into the water. when you have finished with the wash turning _ when you have finished with the wash turning to _ when you have finished with the wash turning to the horizontal stage and change _ turning to the horizontal stage and change the gear, and it's a faster speed _ change the gear, and it's a faster speed for— change the gear, and it's a faster speed for the spin. and it spins all of the _ speed for the spin. and it spins all of the water out and it comes out through— of the water out and it comes out through the bottom. it of the water out and it comes out through the bottom.— of the water out and it comes out through the bottom. a design and fabrication firm _ through the bottom. a design and fabrication firm in _ through the bottom. a design and fabrication firm in bristol - through the bottom. a design and fabrication firm in bristol is i fabrication firm in bristol is amongst those helping out. this fabrication firm in bristol is amongst those helping out. as an enuineer, amongst those helping out. as an engineer. i— amongst those helping out. as an engineer, i know _ amongst those helping out. as an engineer, i know that _ amongst those helping out. as an engineer, i know that there's i amongst those helping out. as an engineer, i know that there's a i amongst those helping out. as an | engineer, i know that there's a lot of value in improving the infrastructure around the world, so with the machine parts for the door and the gearbox, they all bolt together to create a marking machine. , ., , machine. over the next three years seven and a — machine. over the next three years seven and a half— machine. over the next three years seven and a half thousand - machine. over the next three years seven and a half thousand of- seven and a half thousand of these washing machines are set to be delivered to more than ten countries. stay with us on bbc news, coming up next world business report.
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too many victims of fraud receive a "poor service" from police and are being denied justice, according to her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary and fire and rescue services. the watchdog says the crime is treated as a "low—priority" or "victimless", and more officers need to be working on fraud cases. it's after reports of fraud offences rose during the past year by 28 per cent compared to the year before. footballer marcus rashford is calling on health professionals to do more to persuade families in need to take up government food vouchers. the manchester united player has written an open letter to say he's concerned that more than a0 per cent of those entitled to claim healthy start scheme are still not registered. ministers say they are spending more than a00 million to help low income families. nearly 200 employers, including john lewis, have been "named and shamed" by the government for paying some employees less than the minimum wage in the years between 2011 and 2018.
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the companies have had to repay £2.1 million to more than 3a—thousand workers, and were fined £3.2 million. john lewis said the breach had been a technical error, which it had made public four years ago and which had been resolved.
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hope for holiday firms — as the uk eases travel restrictions — with france coming off the quarantine list from sunday time to taper? top fed officials hint that support for the us economy could be wound down sooner than expected. welcome to world business report,
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i'm sally bundock we start with the travel industry. it's been welcoming changes to the uk's covid travel rules — which come into force on sunday. france — a major destination for british tourists — is to be brought into line with other amber list countries. those coming from france to england, scotland and northern ireland will no longer need to quarantine if they are fully vaccinated. seven european countries including austria and germany willjoin the �*green' list. and india and the united arab emirates are among those moving from �*red' to �*amber�*. dfds which operates ferries between the uk and france is among the companies welcoming the changes. in terms of the amber plus rules we saw an immediate dip down in future bookings as people were only booking for the next few days, those who he had to travel and that was very disappointing because we had seen a surge in bookings when travel looked like it would be open. in terms of demand,
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we know it's there because we know how many people visit the website and are looking for prices and we expect it will pick up sharply and people will have more confidence in booking and travel and enjoying their holiday. stephanie boyle is from the flight booking site skyscanner and i asked her if the move would make a real difference to the travel industry. i think ithink so, i think so, is the short answer because we saw a a5% jump in traffic to the site following the announcement last night. we know that is very representative in time that is in addition to the green list or make travel a little bit more easy. it is frustrating it is coming so late in the summer season, however, we have noted that people are pretty spontaneous in their booking and at the moment in the uk travellers are looking to book something within the next 27 days, so there may be a few people out there still looking to understand where they can go and are obviously quite excited about the fact that
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france has been taken of the amber plus list, which means they can avoid quarantine on return so it is a big step in the right direction. many in the travel industry disappointed that the testing system has not been changed at all or made easier. for example, those who want to go to a green list country, in terms of tests before and when you return to the uk, it's expensive and complicated, isn't it? that's definitely what we are hearing. when we asked travellers which measures would make them feel more confident about travelling, cheaper and easier testing options tends to come up pretty frequently as one of the first or second options that they think would be the best. it is difficult for people to understand that we are moving into a different way of travelling. we have to acknowledge that that is the reality. however, there are lots of websites out there and lots of information for anybody who wants to understand where they can compare prices for testing and compare different
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options for testing, so while it is not ideal, i don't think it's a barrier to travel and i think most people would welcome the opportunity to travel and are happy to get tested if they can then avoid quarantine on return. but that's another reason why more countries moving to the green list would be advantageous for the travel industry. but if you're moving to the green list, you still have to pay for the tests and if you are a family of four, that could double the cost of your holiday, which i think is a significant barrier. what are the current trends to travel in europe? what are you seeing at the moment? we are seeing a lot of people looking at the traditional popular destinations for uk travellers so very much looking at spain, greece and obviously france, but we are also seeing people looking further afield into october. while testing is definitely a barrier, it's not putting people off. they are looking perhaps to have a big trip in the course of the next few months and looking even as far as bali
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and the united states, so there's a lot of optimism about travel returning and reopening and it is not a complete move towards the right direction but definitely heading in the right space and definitely i think we are seeing that more people are coming to our site to check for information to look at whether or not what requirements are in place, what documentation they will need and we have a number of tools to help people understand that and to look at where they can find that information, including a map updated with all of the current restrictions so that people know what is required when they arrive in the destinations and what they need to do when they come back. but we are seeing a lot of interest and huge amounts of demand. everybody has already reported this, but the pent—up demand within the travel industry is enormous and people are willing to change their plans if they can actually get on a plane again and get travelling. just to say there is so much
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information on the website about the restrictions on the dos and don'ts in what is needed, so do take a look at that. let's move to the us now because the federal reserve could be set to start removing its support for the economy sooner than expected. in a speech on wednesday — the fed's number two in charge — vice chair richard clarida — said interest rates could start rising in 2023. and he was joined by two other top officials in signalling that the central bank might soon start winding down the amount of cash it's pumping into the bond markets. that hit shares on wall street. samira hussain in new york has more. the comments by the vice chair of the federal reserve, that the current pace of the economic recovery could mean interest rates will start going up by 2023 is noteworthy, especially when you couple it with comments made earlier by two other central bank policymakers, that they would like to see the federal reserve start reducing its massive bond buying programme. it is a sign that the fed could be
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looking at using its monetary policy much sooner than it, and frankly many others, had originally thought. of course, all of this depends on incoming economic data in the next few weeks, including labour reports, inflation readings and, of course, consumer sentiment. and it also really depends on the virus. the delta variant of covid—19 is quickly spreading in many parts of the us, and that could derail the country's current economic recovery. let's go to australia now — where extended covid lockdowns in sydney and the surrounding regions are causing immense economic damage. new south wales state, of which sydney is the capital city, represents around a third of the nation's economic activity — and experts are predicting a significant hit to australia's economic growth in the current quarter. phil mercer reports from sydney.
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beer is hard to find in sydney's lockdown, but businesses are doing what they can to keep going. although the bar at this brewery has been forced to close, it has been converted into a temporary covid safe drive through. normally we have 120 people in here, all drinking pints and having lunch and dinner and there would be a line three deep at the bar. we might have five cars lined up on the street and it looks amazing, but that is like five people as opposed to 120 going through, so we are down 65% revenue. industrial estates are mostly empty, many shops are shut and construction suspended there are disaster support payments will businesses that need all the help they can get. the key is, and we've been speaking to government about this,
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that the payment has to be very quick, so government has to communicate very strongly with small business and they have to let them know that there is going to be money coming and it will help them. we've all learned resilience throughout the last year and a half but adaptability is crucial as well. each week, the lockdown in new south wales is costing the australian economy up to $600 million, and there is the impact of coronavirus restrictions in other states. before the pandemic, this was a country that went three decades without a recession. it is now at risk of having two in just over a year. this is what we used to give to our guests. international border closures are keeping away the tourists who used to rent francisco's bikes. he has changed his business model to become a repair shop. covid is not going anywhere. i don't think tourism is going to be back this summer, so we are in survival mode. right now, it's the only thing we can do. this is my business.
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i want to save this. it's literally my baby. covid—19 is again testing the fortitude of the australian economy, which did fight back from previous blows inflicted by the pandemic, but once more, businesses are having to adapt to survive. so many challenges ahead. let's look at the markets to see how they have gone today. in asia, you can see a mixed picture with hong kong losing about 1% whereas japan is up by half about 1% whereas japan is up by half a percent. in mainland china we saw some losses today and this is all still because of a real nervousness amongst investors about what new regulators the chinese authorities might introduce in the future, which could impact technology stocks and other big stocks going forward, so they are really out of favour now.
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in europe, the trading day in europe will start in about ten minutes' time and you can see how all of the main markets across europe ended the day yesterday. we have mentioned the big story that is first and foremost for those in financial markets, and thatis for those in financial markets, and that is what the fed will do next, but we've talked about that already. i will see you soon. good morning. yesterday temperatures widely reached 23 or 2a degrees across the uk. today they will be down a touch because we have rain coming in from the west and it's also going to be windier than it has been and the strongest winds are through the irish sea and the areas adjacent to it. that's because we have an area of low pressure coming our way and you can see the extent of the isobars. in the centre of the low pressure there won't be much wind so later in northern ireland there will be slow moving, prolonged showers which could lead to issues
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with localised flooding. but we start on a dry note and in the east there will be mist and fog around first thing that will lift in the cloud is building ahead of the band of rain coming in and you can see there are showers ahead and also behind this band of rain, some of which will be heavy and also thundery. temperatures today, 16 in the north up to 22 as we move south. through the evening and overnight, the band of rain continues to push northwards and we also have showers rotating around the area and also pretty windy across the northern half of the country, especially the north—east and the southern half of the country. these are the overnight lows, between 13 and 15 degrees. as we go through the rest of friday, we still are being dominated by low pressure so we have all of the showers moving around and we are looking at heavy and prolonged showers across northern ireland, the northern half of wales, northern england and also central and southern scotland in particular and here we could have issues with localised flooding. still pretty windy across
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the southern half of the uk and also the north—east with the temperature range between 16 and 21 degrees. low pressure is not done with us heading from friday into saturday and it drifts across scotland and you can see the isobars and we have this little system coming across the english channel so we still have rain or showers rotating around the area of low pressure as well as the system coming up from the english channel bringing in some further spells of rain. still pretty breezy as well but in between the rain there will be bright spells or some sunshine with temperatures tween 15 and 20 degrees, so disappointing for the time of year. as we head through the weekend it remains unsettled, even into monday with showers and longer spells of rain and by tuesday something drier and less windy.
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this is bbc news broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the globe. i'm samantha simmonds. our top stories. britain changes its international travel rules, making journeys to the uk easier for fully—vaccinated passengers. the government says they're following the science. what we do want to do is just be able to work with the clinicians, with the experts, in order to just keep a very close eye on this beta variant that we already know so much more about now. the un issues a stark warning about the safety of thousands of civilians in the afghan city of lashkar gar, as fierce fighting continues between the taliban and government forces. a major upset on day 13 of the olympics, as jamaican, hansele parchment beats the american world champion to the gold in the 110 metres hurdles. and, agricultural pesticides
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are having a more harmful effect on bees than previously thought. hello and welcome. fully vaccinated travellers returning to england, northern ireland or scotland from france, will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. the change is part of a series of adjustments to the traffic light system for international travel, and brings france into line with other amber list countries. india and the united arab emirates are among the destinations that have been moved from red to amber, while seven more countries, including germany and norway, have been added to the green list. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies. a near empty swimming pool, few tents pitched and no—one propping up the bar. this would normally be the busiest
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time of year at this campsite in western france, but at the moment, they're half—empty. hopefully there'll be a flurry of last—minute campers. we're hoping so, especially in september with the older couples who normally come who don't have families. i think it's too late for families to come because they will have booked elsewhere in the uk. across the channel, these british holiday—makers are staying home. with the kids and too late in summer, we've already had to change my holiday. i work for the nhs, so i've had to change my holiday that way. i couldn't quarantine when i get back, so, yeah, this is it for us this year. it's too risky to commit to an overseas holiday right now in my opinion. it's too much of an issue, effort to get tested. ijust feel a bit safer- in my own country, quite frankly, at the moment. even though they make those changes, they can make the changes again. there are new additions to the green list, including germany,
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but of the seven countries added, only two will allow in non—vaccinated vaccinated tourists without quarantine. spain is still amber, but the government is advising passengers to have the more expensive pcr test rather than the cheaper lateral flow test before they depart for the uk. what we do want to do is just be able to work with the clinicians, with the experts in spain in order to just keep a very close eye on this beta variant that we already know so much more about now, and pcr tests enable us to do that. labour have argued the government are still overcomplicating travel. having this confusion, having these changes country by country almost on a weekly basis now doesn't help the industry, it doesn't help passengers and it doesn't help instil confidence in the government. some countries are going from red to amber, including the uae. it means neil, who lives in dubai, will be able to see his one—year—old grandson for the first time in a year. despite the anger i feel towards the government, i can now put that behind me and we can now look forward and we can travel,
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so that's really good. and we can almost get our lives back to a form of normality of being able to see our friends and family. country by country, more of the world is opening up to uk travellers, but well into summer and after months of uncertainty, the question is how many will want to make the trip? caroline davies, bbc news. chris bockman told us more from saint—antonin—noble—val, in south west france. i'm in the beautiful village of saint—antonin—noble—val, which usually gets tens of thousands of visitors, many of them british. i am not convinced, even though the quarantine rules have changed from the sunday, because first of all, the sunday, because first of all, the french are staying at home right now. eight out of ten are not going to spain or portugal, where they usually go, they are staying here. the belgians have been here for a while, the daughter here. there is hardly any accommodation available unless you have your own second home. otherwise, there is hardly any
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accommodation here on the coast. even over towards bordeaux. if you speak to the tourism offices, they are full because the staycation two... naturally british will come here because you may remember when some day to come over last year, they were told they had to go back urgently to the uk or they would face quarantine lockdown. i don't want to go through that again. i think there will not be a huge amount of brits coming here in the next few weeks.— amount of brits coming here in the next few weeks. what are the covid fi . ures next few weeks. what are the covid figures looking _ next few weeks. what are the covid figures looking like _ next few weeks. what are the covid figures looking like they're - next few weeks. what are the covid figures looking like they're at i next few weeks. what are the covid figures looking like they're at the i figures looking like they're at the moment? , , i, moment? this is the other thing which is pretty — moment? this is the other thing which is pretty serious. - moment? this is the other thing which is pretty serious. about i which is pretty serious. about 30,000 new cases each day in france. in this region last night, the health authorities issued a white alert. what does that mean? it means hospitals are virtually full. medical staff, hospitals are virtually full. medicalstaff, including hospitals are virtually full. medical staff, including doctors and nurses on holiday, can be forced to return to the hospitals to deal with the covid situation. the last thing they want, actually, is more
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holiday—makers coming down here, which could make the situation even worse. forthose which could make the situation even worse. for those two reasons i wouldn't expect a huge wave of british people coming over here. what are the authorities are saying? they were pretty cross when france was put on the other watchlist. i saw the french transport minister a few weeks ago in toulouse, where he was promoting tourism. i asked if the situation —— where what the situation was between britain and france. he said he had a good relationship with grant shapps, the british transport minister. they were speaking several times on the phone each day. he said there would be a change imminently. of course that didn't happen. they were pretty annoyed to say the least that didn't happen. it has taken some time. at least they are often strangely list worried they were isolated as being one of the only countries in europe facing this strange armour list. i wouldn't expect a huge rise in tourism between the two countries in the next few weeks. == tourism between the two countries in the next few weeks.— officials in afghanistan say the security forces have repelled
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a new taliban offensive on the western city of herat. they said the taliban had launched several overnight attacks on security checkpoints near the city. a police commander and two of his bodyguards were killed in the fighting in herat. in lashkar gah, the capital of helmand province, the military said it had launched a joint operation to clear militants from the city. intense clashes have been taking place in lashkar gah for more than a week with taliban militants fighting close to key government buildings. the un says it's deeply concerned about the safety of tens of thousands of civilians there. let's speak now to our south asia editor anbarasan ethirajan — he joins us live from delhi. welcome to you. bring us up to date on what we know about what is happening on the ground in afghanistan? the happening on the ground in afghanistan?— happening on the ground in afghanistan? happening on the ground in afu hanistan? ., . , afghanistan? the three main cities, which are in — afghanistan? the three main cities, which are in focus _ afghanistan? the three main cities, which are in focus for— afghanistan? the three main cities, which are in focus for the _ afghanistan? the three main cities,
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which are in focus for the last - which are in focus for the last couple of weeks, for example, kandahar and lashkar gah, there has been heavy fighting. we understand afghan officials have now said they have pushed back militants who lodged a fresh assault on herat city overnight. after these classes they were pushed back to the outskirts. one police commander and two of his bodyguards were killed. also, in herat it is notjust afghan forces. it is also the supporters of the war lords. they are doing the fighting. in the southern city of lashkar gah, where the british —— where the british forces were for a long time, the government player says it has announced a new operation to clear the city of militants. they are fighting very close to the government buildings. the provincial governor's office and the police headquarters. the government says it has sent dozens of commandos and an
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operation has begun to clear the city. both sides, the afghan army and the taliban, are known to exaggerate their claims. we have to wait and see when they militants are going to be cleared out of the city. nevertheless, the talilban look focused on capturing big cities, don't they? it focused on capturing big cities, don't they?— don't they? it is their big, big strate: don't they? it is their big, big strategy and _ don't they? it is their big, big strategy and also _ don't they? it is their big, big strategy and also a _ don't they? it is their big, big strategy and also a risky - don't they? it is their big, big . strategy and also a risky strategy for the taliban. you can see the number of fighters pouring into these cities. it shows the importance they are giving them. if they capture one provincial capital, that would be a turning point, big propaganda victory for the taliban. that would have a huge impact on the morale of government. that is why the afghan government has been sending special forces to these three cities to save these provincial capitals from falling to the taliban. what is interesting that has happened the last few days, there have been big rallies in the
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main cities, showing support for the afghan forces and the government because they know once the taliban takeover, their lifestyle, what they have achieved in the last 2a years, women's rights, education etc, will have a huge impact. that is a big boost for the afghan government but had asked has to translate on the battlefield as well. == had asked has to translate on the battlefield as well.— battlefield as well. -- that has to translate on _ battlefield as well. -- that has to translate on the _ battlefield as well. -- that has to translate on the battlefield. - battlefield as well. -- that has to | translate on the battlefield. thank you. day 13 of the tokyo olympics is well under way. there have already been a number of golds, including a big upset on the track. let's cross to mike bushell at the bbc sport centre, who's been following all the overnight olympic action. a big win forjamaica in the 110 metre hurdles final? a big win forjamaica in the 110 metre hurdles final?— a big win forjamaica in the 110 metre hurdles final? yes, what a surrise metre hurdles final? yes, what a surprise this _ metre hurdles final? yes, what a surprise this was. _ metre hurdles final? yes, what a surprise this was. i _ metre hurdles final? yes, what a surprise this was. i suppose - metre hurdles final? yes, what a surprise this was. i suppose the l surprise this was. i suppose the sprint races are full ofjeopardy. the margins are so fine. even if you are a hot favourite, nothing can be taken for granted. american grant holloway had not lost a hurdles race
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for a year. he is the reigning world champion. but look at that. on the line. he was leading in the 110 metres hurdles final. it lost momentum before the final hurdle. he was stunned to feel the presence and see jamaica's hansele parchment nipping see jamaica's hansele parchment pipping him to the line to take gold with a season's best. fantastic for him, as he won bronze in 2012. ronald leavy forjamaica claimed the bronze. two medal two forjamaica. that wasn't the only disappointment for the usa on the track. the men's a 100 metre relay team, they haven't meddled since 2012, yet they are always the favourites on paper. once again they were the hot tip for the gold medal in this one. but they failed to qualify for the final. again, so muchjeopardy in the reader. the second part on change went horribly wrong. they finished sixth in their heat, getting edged out by ghana. carl lewis said it was
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nothing short of a disgrace, total embarrassment, he said. better news for team gb�*s dina asher—smith. the 200 metres world champion, she was back, perhaps surprisingly, to help a team qualified for the four by 100 metres final in record time. she pulled out of the individual event after failing to reach the 100 metres final. she tore a hamstring last month. a welcome return for team gb. they will be in contention in the final friday. find team gb. they will be in contention in the final friday.— in the final friday. and lastly, skateboarding _ in the final friday. and lastly, skateboarding - _ in the final friday. and lastly, skateboarding - australia - in the final friday. and lastly, skateboarding - australia win i in the final friday. and lastly, i skateboarding - australia win a skateboarding — australia win a gold? skateboarding - australia win a old? , skateboarding - australia win a iold? , ., , skateboarding - australia win a old? , ,, u, skateboarding - australia win a old? , ., skateboarding - australia win a uold? , ,, . ., ., ., gold? this was special. heart in our mouths time- _ gold? this was special. heart in our mouths time. in _ gold? this was special. heart in our mouths time. in the _ gold? this was special. heart in our mouths time. in the men's - gold? this was special. heart in our mouths time. in the men's park- mouths time. in the men's park skateboarding 18—year—old keegan palmer produced two stunning displays. he had already led the way after the first performance. he sealed the gold with a jaw—dropping score of 95.03. various performing
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one of his tricks. he said afterwards it had been an honour to skate with his friends because he grew up as a child skating with many of the people who were there competing with him in tokyo. he said what an honour that was. they are all together now. world numberfour pedro barris got silver. usa took the bronze. what an event that has proved to be. the bronze. what an event that has proved to be— proved to be. yeah, real success. mike bushell. _ proved to be. yeah, real success. mike bushell, thank _ proved to be. yeah, real success. mike bushell, thank you. - proved to be. yeah, real success. mike bushell, thank you. thank l proved to be. yeah, real success. i mike bushell, thank you. thank you. in the last few minutes it's been annonced that the rugby league world cup is to be postponed until 2022. the tournament was due to be held later this year in england, but plans were thrown into disarray when australia and new zealand withdrew a fortnight ago. a wildfire that has raged for more than a week has now reached a thermal power station on turkey's aegean coast. the coal—fired facility was already evacuated and flammable and explosive materials were removed in advance of the flames. in greece, a heatwave there is causing severe damage too, as mark lobel reports.
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one step closer to safety. seeking refuge from wildfires in turkey's south west, hundreds forced into journeys like this just to stay afloat. here is the epicentre of concern. a thermal power plant storing thousands of tonnes of coal. authorities desperately trying to contain it and remove chemicals, coal and otherflammable materials. coal and other flammable materials. they coal and otherflammable materials. they say its main units are not seriously damaged. despite being part of the worst wildfires in the country's history, according to the president. translation: �* , ., translation: as we continue our efforts on the — translation: as we continue our efforts on the eighth _ translation: as we continue our efforts on the eighth day, - translation: as we continue our efforts on the eighth day, for - efforts on the eighth day, for example, today we have faced a a power plant. hopefully we will get over this before it spreads entirely.
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over this before it spreads entirely-— over this before it spreads entirel . . , ., , ., entirely. there have been dozens of laces entirely. there have been dozens of places across _ entirely. there have been dozens of places across turkey's _ entirely. there have been dozens of places across turkey's south, - entirely. there have been dozens of places across turkey's south, many| places across turkey's south, many now under control, but some remain heartbreakingly alight. translation: we heartbreakingly alight. tuna/mom- heartbreakingly alight. translation: ., ., ., translation: we are not making a movie here- — translation: we are not making a movie here. this _ translation: we are not making a movie here. this is _ translation: we are not making a movie here. this is not _ translation: we are not making a movie here. this is not hollywood. | movie here. this is not hollywood. it is turkey and turkey is burning furiously. as you see, all the crew here are working voluntarily with our own efforts. but we are helpless and there is nobody relieving us. we are so desperate. in and there is nobody relieving us. we are so desperate.— are so desperate. in greece, in the i ri . are so desperate. in greece, in the trio of its are so desperate. in greece, in the grip of its own _ are so desperate. in greece, in the grip of its own heatwave, - are so desperate. in greece, in the grip of its own heatwave, more - grip of its own heatwave, more flames tearing through a pine forest. with rolling hills and little visibility hampering rescue efforts, it is no surprise over 150 houses are said to have burned. withthis monastery surrounded by fire. the northern suburb of athens
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ablaze, as the mayor of olympia calls for help to stop fires encroaching on the ancient home of the olympic games. there are few homes the fire prepared to enter. with further extreme conditions predicted soon. mark lobel, bbc news. stay with us. still to come, the belarus athlete who resisted her governments attempt to force her to return home, has arrived in poland and it is expected to speak to the media lately. one in five patients admitted to hospital with covid—19 in england are aged between 18 and 3a — a figure four times higher than last winter. a figure four times the numbers were revealed by the new chief executive of nhs england. there are currentlyjust under 5,000 coronavirus patients in english hospitals. speaking in herfirst television interview since being appointed, amanda pritchard said the numbers affecting young people should be an incentive to them — to get their vaccines.
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it is still really important that those people who have not yet taken the opportunity to come forward, or they know someone who hasn't, this is the time. and the reason it is so important is we have, as of today, over 5000 people really unwell in hospital. one in five, 20% are young people. so in that 18 to 30 category. and that compares with one in 20 at the peak injanuary. this is bbc news. the latest headlines. britain changes its international travel rules — making journeys to the uk easier for fully—vaccinated passengers. the government says its following the science government forces in afghanistan claim to have repelled a new taliban offensive on the western city of herat.
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there's been a fourth day of protests in delhi over the alleged gang rape, murder and forced cremation of a nine—year—old girl. another factor is angering the protestors — the fact the girl was from a dalit family, a low status caste in india, which some claim is often ignored by the legal system. danjohnson sent this report. we feel shamed, they are chanting. there are hundreds of people protesting, calling forjustice for this family and protection for dallas across india. it is four days since the nine—year—old went missing after going to get water from a crematorium. we can't identify her family, but herfather crematorium. we can't identify her family, but her father told crematorium. we can't identify her family, but herfather told us crematorium. we can't identify her family, but her father told us when the hindu priest was confronted he confessed to killing the girl. there is never explained what happened on sunday.
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her parents came here crying. after they told us thy daughter had died, we asked what happened. they said the police told them she was electrocuted. then we asked them, did you take her to the hospital or call the police? they said, no, the priest burned the body. hang call the police? they said, no, the priest burned the body.— priest burned the body. hang the culrits, priest burned the body. hang the culprits. this _ priest burned the body. hang the culprits, this sign _ priest burned the body. hang the culprits, this sign says. _ priest burned the body. hang the culprits, this sign says. police . priest burned the body. hang the | culprits, this sign says. police are questioning the priest and three workers on suspicion of rape, child abuse and murder. but it is a complicated, sensitive investigation, and they have been accused of not taking it seriously to start with. the family belongs to the lowest group in india's social class structure. these protests follow other violent attacks and decades of oppression. the message is dalet lives matter. opposition congress party leader rahul gandhi has been to see the family and he described the girl as the daughter of the nation. delhi's chief minister has also paid a visit and
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promised swiftjustice, saying the death penalty would be in order if the allegations are proven. this case adds touched a nerve right across the country and the protest looked likely to grow. danjohnson, bbc news, delhi. the government in thailand has banned sunscreens containing chemicals that contain coralfrom its national parks. four ingredients commonly found in sun creams, including oxy benzoin, were shown to obstruct coral reproduction and cause bleaching. similar bans have been introduced by the pacific island of palau and the us state of hawaii. the sprinter from belarus, krystina timanovskaya, who refused orders to fly home from the olympics early, because she feared for her safety has arrived in poland. she landed there on wednesday, after being granted a humanitarian visa by the polish government. earlier, the most prominent opposition leader left in belarus, maria kolesnikova, made a defiant
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appearance as she stood trial for trying to overthrow president lukashenko. our correspondent bethany bell told me more from warsaw. well, after a very long trip all the way from tokyo via vienna, krystina timanovskaya has arrived in warsaw. she was greeted by senior officials here. poland has given her a humanitarian visa. they have been expressing sentiments of support and solidarity for her. and there are also plans for her husband to come to warsaw as well. he fled belarus to warsaw as well. he fled belarus to ukraine after the news of this incident occurred. and we understand that he will be joining her fairly soon. this though, of course, was a journey that was full of incident. initially she was planning to fly directly here. then she flew via vienna because of security concerns,
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but all of this, of course, shining the spotlight on the very difficult situation in belarus at the moment. and what do we expect to happen today? and what do we expect to happen toda ? ~ , ., ., , today? well, we understand that she may actually — today? well, we understand that she may actually speak — today? well, we understand that she may actually speak to _ today? well, we understand that she may actually speak to the _ today? well, we understand that she may actually speak to the media - today? well, we understand that she may actually speak to the media a i may actually speak to the media a bit later today. talking a little bit later today. talking a little bit more about her plans. how she will manage to live here. but of course an enormous life changing experience. she told the bbc earlier this week that she had not been part of a political protest. that her actions had not been a political protest. she had a just, in her words, criticised the coaches for their actions with her. but of course she said she understood of the political context of this. and said it could be a number of years before she can get back to belarus.
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let's get some of the day's other news. the biden administration is considering making it mandatory for all foreign visitors to the united states to be vaccinated against covid—19. the country closed its borders to most international travellers during the pandemic. police in texas say a truck carrying suspected illegal migrants has crashed, killing at least ten people. local media reported that the crash took place when the van lost control on a highway in brooks county, about 150 kilometres from the us border with mexico. the driver was amongst those killed. the mexican government is suing major us gun companies, accusing them of failing to stop the illegal flow of weapons across the border. thousands of murders in mexico have been linked to the trafficking of arms. meanwhile, the impact on chemicals on wildlife has been the focus of a study here in the uk, because a new investigation has discovered that a mix of agricultural pesticides is more harmful to bees than
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was previously thought. the researchers from royal holloway, university of london, found that a cocktail of chemicals reacted with each other to kill larger numbers of bees. precious pollinators in decline. our bees face multiple threats to their survival. from a loss of food—rich rich natural grassland, to the dozens of pesticides commonly used in agriculture. this new study set out to quantify each of these threats, and to work out how they combine to affect the health of the insects. the researchers examined 90 studies that each measured the effect on bees of pesticide or another environmental challenge. they worked out that combinations of several chemicals killed many more bees than expected. this is because the researchers say pesticides interact. each chemical enhances the damage caused by another. what we found is really important when you consider how agrochemicals are sold. commercial formulas are sold to farmers and they often contain various different agrochemicals —
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pesticide, fungicide — and what our research showed is that these chemicals can interact and significantly increase the potential harm, potentially impact on bee mortality. scientists say regulation needs to be updated to factor in this chemical interaction. and to avoid harmful cocktails of pesticides that pose a threat to be pollinating insects that we rely on. victoria gill, bbc news. finally, barack obama has scaled back plans for a big birthday party amid a rise in covid infections nationwide. the former president, who is turning sixty today, had planned a major celebration this weekend. but he faced criticism for throwing a massive bash as the delta variant is surging. the party on martha's vineyard will now only include family and close friends.
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hgppy happy birthday from us. that's it from me for the moment. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @samanthatvnews. good morning. yesterday temperature is widely reached 23 or 2a degrees across the uk. today they will be down a touch because we have got rain coming in from the west. it is also going to be windier than it has been. the strongest winds through the irish sea and areas adjacent to it. that is because we have this area of low pressure coming our way. you can see the extent of the isobars. in the centre of the low pressure there won't be much wind. later, in northern ireland especially, there will be slow moving, prolonged showers, which could lead to issues with localised flooding. drying out in the east to start. mist and fog were left. the cloud building ahead of this rain. you can see the showers ahead and
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behind this band of rain, some of which will be heavy and thundery. temperatures today, 16 in the north to 22 as we move steadily south. through this evening and overnight a band of rain continues to push northwards. we have also got the showers rotating around this area of low pressure. and also pretty windy across the northern half of the country, especially the north—east and the southern half of the country. these are the overnight lows, 13 to about 15 degrees. then as we go through the rest of friday, we still are dominated by low pressure, so we still have these showers moving around. we are looking at heavy and prolonged showers across northern ireland, northern wales, northern england and central and southern scotland. here, we could have issues with localised flooding. still pretty windy across the southern part of the uk. and also the north—east. temperature range 16 to 21 degrees. no pressure is not done with us even as we had from friday into saturday. he drifts across scotland. you can see the
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isobars. plus, we have this system coming up across the english channel. so we still have some rain or some showers rotating around that area of low pressure, as well as the system coming up from the english channel, bringing in some further spells of rain. still really breezy as well. in between this ride they will be bright spells or some sunshine. temperatures 15 to 20 degrees. disappointing for the time of the year. as we head through the weekend eight remains unsettled, even into monday, with showers or longer spells of rain. by tuesday, something drier and less windy.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: britain is changing its international travel rules making journeys to england, northern ireland or scotland easier for fully—vaccinated passengers. the alterations are part of a series of adjustments to the uk's traffic light system. the biden administration is considering making it mandatory for all visitors to the us to be vaccinated against covid—19. the country closed its borders to most international travellers during the pandemic. government forces in afghanistan claim to have repelled a new taliban offensive on the western city of herat. they said the taliban had launched several overnight attacks on security checkpoints near the city. there's been a major upset on day 13 of the olympics — as the jamaican sprinter hansel parchment beat the american world champion grant holloway to the gold medal in the 110 metres hurdles. now for all the sport,
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here's mike bushell. good morning. on day 13 of the tokyo olympics, which hasn't given us the medal rush for team gb that we have enjoyed on previous days, but there has been a bronze on the white water and hopes have been raised of great things to come in the athletics after the return of one of britain's biggest names, as michael redford reports. and there is dina asher—smith, flying around the bend. this and there is dina asher-smith, flying around the bend. this was a site we did — flying around the bend. this was a site we did not _ flying around the bend. this was a site we did not expect _ flying around the bend. this was a site we did not expect to - flying around the bend. this was a site we did not expect to see, - flying around the bend. this was a i site we did not expect to see, team gb's site we did not expect to see, team gb�*s star sprinter back from a hamstring injury and back on top. alongside, the foursome won the heat comfortable young created history. 41 point 5a, that is a new british
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record. in 41 point 54, that is a new british record. , ., 41 point 54, that is a new british record. , . ., , record. in my head there was never an doubt record. in my head there was never any doubt in _ record. in my head there was never any doubt in my _ record. in my head there was never any doubt in my mind _ record. in my head there was never any doubt in my mind that - record. in my head there was never any doubt in my mind that i - record. in my head there was never any doubt in my mind that i was - record. in my head there was never| any doubt in my mind that i was not going _ any doubt in my mind that i was not going to _ any doubt in my mind that i was not going to he — any doubt in my mind that i was not going to be lining up here today because — going to be lining up here today because the relay is really important and we got a bronze medal in rio— important and we got a bronze medal in rio and _ important and we got a bronze medal in rio and these ladies are in great shape _ in rio and these ladies are in great shape and — in rio and these ladies are in great shape and are incredibly talented, so i knew— shape and are incredibly talented, so i knew that i could rest up and -et so i knew that i could rest up and get ready— so i knew that i could rest up and get ready for the team event. with get ready for the team event. with the example _ get ready for the team event. with the example set, _ get ready for the team event. it? the example set, could the get ready for the team event. tn the example set, could the british men follow suit question what they could, but not quite as straightforward. second place behind jamaica enough to see them qualify for tomorrow's final which won't include the usa, who also suffered disappointment in the men's110 metres hurdles final as grant holloway had gone 24 races unbeaten but lost the one that mattered most. jamaica's hansel parchment re—writing the record books with britain finishing in seventh. from sprinting on track to sprinting in a canoe, where liam heath was aiming to defend his olympic title. a poor start meant he had work to do. his combat, though, was impressive. there is going to be inches in it.
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sadly he ran out of time, third olympic games for heath ends with a fourth olympic medal. i olympic games for heath ends with a fourth olympic medal.— fourth olympic medal. i didn't reach m full fourth olympic medal. i didn't reach my full potential _ fourth olympic medal. i didn't reach my full potential in _ fourth olympic medal. i didn't reach my full potential in terms _ fourth olympic medal. i didn't reach my full potential in terms of - fourth olympic medal. i didn't reach my full potential in terms of peak i my full potential in terms of peak speed but still happy with the performance. it's hard to put into words. it's what you are working towards, just to be at your best for these events. and i've learned so much on myjourney. {line these events. and i've learned so much on my journey. much on my 'ourney. one 'ourney is not over much on my journey. one 'ourney is not overyet. — much on my journey. one 'ourney is not overyet. at much on my journey. one 'ourney is not over yet. a winner _ much on my journey. one 'ourney is not over yet. a winner of h much on my journey. one journey is not over yet. a winner of the - not over yet. a winner of the semifinal in the boxing flyweight event, winning on a split decision meaning gold is in touching distance, as was this cameraman when one trick in the skateboarding did not quite go to plan. down, but not out, and still professional enough to keep filming. the fist bumps well—deserved. never stop running that camera. katy marchant crashed out of the women's kirin in the velodrome as there was a collision in the quarterfinal.
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luckily marchant is okay — she said after the race that she was 'in the wrong place at tjhe wrong time' as the ductch some impressive scenes in the aquatics centre, as 14—year—old quan hongchan of china got gold. she scored two perfect dives, with 10s across the board in the process. just look a this. absolutely flawless. britain's andrea spendolini—sirieix and lois toulson finished 7th and 9th respectively in the 10 metre platform final. and just away from the olympics, it has just been confirmed that the rugby league world cup, which was due to be held in england in the autumn, is off. the tournament will be postponed until next year — after the withdrawal of defending champions australia and new zealand, over player welfare and safety concerns, related to covid. the world cup, featuring the men's, women's and wheelchair events, was set to start
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in newcastle in october. you can get more on the bbc sport website. for now, back to samantha. police investigating the online racist abuse of england players following the euro 2020 final have arrested 11 people. the uk football policing unit says it received 600 reports of offensive messages, around a third of which were judged to possibly be criminal. tim muffett has been telling me more tour operators have welcomed the news that france has been taken off the 'amber plus list�*, which means people returning from the country will no longer have to quarantine if they are double vaccinated. under the amber traffic light system, travellers will have to do a pcr test within 72 hours of returning.
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zina benchieki is managing director at intrepid travel. the removal of france from the amber plus list should be a welcome move, so what impact are you seeing? it's ureat so what impact are you seeing? it�*s great news, obviously under relief and also good to hear that there are more countries that have been added to the green list. it's not necessarily enough, especially as we've seen a lot of changes happening in the last months since the traffic light system wasn't lamented and we really need a simple, easy system that does not change —— was implemented. it is important that that happens. the travel industry have begged the uk government to announce changes. do you feel that now they are happening and more countries are added to the green list on the amber plus list going, is it too late or are people ready to make short—term bookings? it's absolutely not too late for the summer. it still possible to travel and there's lots of options out there for people to look for but we are also seeing a lot of people are looking at booking a holiday for
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next year, so this progression is giving hope that we will see more people travelling in the coming months, hopefully.— people travelling in the coming months, hopefully. what about for the remainder _ months, hopefully. what about for the remainder of _ months, hopefully. what about for the remainder of the _ months, hopefully. what about for the remainder of the summer - the remainder of the summer holidays? anotherfew the remainder of the summer holidays? another few weeks to go, and where are using bookings in particular surging? we and where are using bookings in particular surging?— and where are using bookings in particular surging? we have seen iceland particular surging? we have seen lceland doing _ particular surging? we have seen iceland doing really _ particular surging? we have seen iceland doing really well - particular surging? we have seen iceland doing really well since - particular surging? we have seenj iceland doing really well since it's been on the green list for many weeks. each time there is positive news joining the green list specifically we see a surge in bookings, for example, slovenia is a good destination for us and we are going to start to get enquiries and interest. obviously the uk has been a great option for people who did not want to take the risk of booking a holiday overseas and having to deal with the changes that happened at the last minute and are challenging for customers to deal with, so it's a mixed bag that a lot of those countries are within europe most likely. it’s of those countries are within europe most likely-— most likely. it's interesting you sa that most likely. it's interesting you say that people _ most likely. it's interesting you say that people are _ most likely. it's interesting you
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say that people are looking - most likely. it's interesting you say that people are looking to i say that people are looking to next summer already. are you hopefulfor a good recovery for the travel industry? it a good recovery for the travel industry?— a good recovery for the travel indust ? , ., industry? it is needed, and we really hope — industry? it is needed, and we really hope that. _ industry? it is needed, and we really hope that. the - industry? it is needed, and we really hope that. the demand | industry? it is needed, and we i really hope that. the demand is there and it's not about people wanting to travel or businesses wanting to travel or businesses wanting to travel or businesses wanting to restart, it's about what governments should do and how the vaccine roll—out will be and there are millions of livelihoods that depend on travel, notjust here in the uk, the demand we need governments to make travel possible again. governments to make travel possible aaain. ., ., , ., , malta is being urged to drop a case against three young migrants, accused of terrorism. the teenagers, two of whom were children at the time, are alleged to have hijacked a ship and forced it to take them to europe. they were rescued in the mediterranean in 2019 along
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with more than 100 others, as they fled libya. both the united nations office for human rights and the arch—bishop of malta are asking authorities to drop the case, calling the charges disproportionate. in a bbc exclusive, our europe correspondent, jean mackenzie has been to meet the boys, who face life in prison. this is the first time they have spoken publicly. one is still a minor, so we're using the name given to him by court. these three young men risked their lives to make it to europe. in return, they have lost their freedom. i am not a terrorist. i cannot be a terrorist and i could never be a terrorist. they have been accused by maltese authorities of hijacking the ship that rescued them and 100 others at sea, as they attempted the treacherous crossing from libya. this is the moment they arrived in malta. seconds later, they were handcuffed and led away. this is the place where they disembarked us. they arrested me and took me to the prison directly from here to the prison.
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lamina wasjust a child, 15. he says that, at first, the captain tried to take them back to libya. people then protested, and eventually, he agreed to take them to malta. lamine was the only person on the boat who spoke english. and he says the captain asked him to translate. why would i hijack the ship? why? the captain was in full control of the ship. what's it like to live being accused of being a terrorist by the maltese government? it is very, very hard for me. very, very hard. it is eating me up whenever i think that they are calling me a terrorist. what happened on board has never been proven. the authorities are still collecting evidence. it could be years before they face trial. so far we haven't seen evidence of terrorism.
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and we question the ability of the prosecution to bring such charges. where they are fleeing from is a hell hole. from our clients' perspectives, they did the natural thing anybody would have done to save themselves and the other people on board. malta is on the front line of migration across the mediterranean. human rights organisations say that in trying to stop boats arriving, it acted disproportionately. the archbishop of malta has intervened and urged authorities to drop the case. migration is not a crime. honestly, i don't know why the exaggeration. i don't know if it was to give an example. no one from the police or the prosecution would answer any of our questions. but the maltese foreign minister has agreed to meet us. is this case reallyjustified? i told you, i'm not in a position to go into the specifics of the case.
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i'm not trying to simply avoid your question. but people are telling us that these three people have been caught up in a political game, that this case is the product of politics? i don't agree with that interpretation. these self—righteous people should try to understand what pressure we are faced with, and what it means to carry the responsibility on our own to deal with the central mediterranean route. in these sacks are letters of support. hundreds arrive each week. lamine, as translator, reads them out. "my name is nina..." this helps them hope for a betterfuture. one that is not behind bars. jean mackenzie, bbc news, malta. uk adults spent a third
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of their waking hours in 2020 watching tv and online video. that's one of the findings of ofcom's annual survey of our media habits. the regulator says subscription services such as netflix were the big beneficiaries as repeated lockdowns left millions at home looking for entertainment. here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. like many of us, the oakley family spent much of 2020 glued to screens, but not necessarily all together. mum and dad were in front of the main telly, their son spent a lot of time gaming, chatting to friends and watching youtube videos but it is streaming services not broadcast tv which were big for all of them. increasingly it's just news and current affairs, really, is what we are watching on broadcast. otherwise it is streaming. almost everything else is streamed by one service or another. do you watch any television? almost no. i'm normally watching youtube or netflix. ofcom's annual snapshot of media habits should be spent an average of five hours and 40 minutes a day watching tv or online video in 2020,
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up 47 minutes on the year before. much of the increase is due to the fact that the time watching subscription streaming services almost doubled to one hour and five minutes per day. the biggest player, netflix, is now in more than half of all uk homes. with hit series like bridgeton, netflix now has more subscribers than sky, virgin and the other uk pay—tv providers put together. we are seeing that younger people are migrating from traditional tv to really engage in streaming services where they can watch what they want, when they want on their own device, whether that is netflix or youtube but we are now seeing older audiences catching up and turning to the streaming services. so 2020 was the year britain became a streaming nation with traditional broadcast tv something for older people and set to decline. but is this a permanent change, and will we want to continue to pay for the likes of netflix, amazon prime, now tv, disney+, or will we start
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switching some of them off? we have a total of six streaming services subscribed to at one point. that has now slimmed down to four at the moment, and i think another one will be dropping off soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech tent podcast. one other change in media habits, more than half of uk homes now have a smart speaker. an internet connection and not an aerial or satellite dish is becoming the key way we all get to entertainment. this year at the olympics, significant attention is paying paid to the mental health of the athletes competing. it's largely because the competitors themselves are opening up about the struggles they face at such an elite level. from naomi osaka to simone biles, some of the world's top athletes have been speaking openly about importance of looking
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after their mental, as well as physical state. the australian swimming great ian thorpe is another former olympian who's been open about the struggles he's faced. he's been speaking to the bbc about his experiences. i think what it is and what the powerful message that does come from some of these very high—profile athletes around the world that have struggled with different mental illness or mental challenges that they have faced in their careers, and how they overcome them, and i guess it removes that false perception that all athletes are superheroes and they do not have vulnerability and they seem invincible, but we all have our weaknesses as well and for people to know that this can affect anyone in our communities, and that's why we need to get it right in sport, but in the broader community as well. i think we are starting to realise what level of expectation we place on our athletes to perform well and it varies from country to country but there is an expectation of gold
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and the question must be at what cost? not only physically, but we are acknowledging it mentally as well. i look at naomi osaka or simone biles, that they felt they had the weight of the nation. we thought originally that naomi osaka when she refused to do interviews at the french open that it was just her not being ready for it and then when she has now shared how significant her struggles have been since the us open and even leading into tokyo in the olympic games, we saw that she beat her childhood hero who then had to console her because the official was being booed and then gave her the pep talk she needed all within a few minutes playing out throughout the world and that is tough for anyone who is unprepared for it. we are really making a conscious effort to improve where we are at with what we are doing in mental health services for athletics. instead of talking a really good
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game about mental health and sport, we do the hard work and realise each individual athlete is going to have a different requirement and different needs needs going into an event like the olympic games. some can walk in and some naivety can help, walking and are not realising the significance of the accomplishment at that time, yet others need to he coached through it and have the constant affirmation that they require to be able to deliver that performance when it counts most. mike ashley is preparing to stand down as chief executive of frasers group, the retail empire he founded nearly 40 years ago. the board said discussions were underway for mr ashley to hand over control to his 31 year old future son—in—law, michael murray, next may. the news came as the business reported a 94% drop in pretax profits for the year to the end of april. catherine shuttleworth is the chief executive and founder of savvy marketing.
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good to see you. was this standing down expected and on the cards? i think so. there's been a real change of the guard at sports direct and frasers, because michael murray has headed up this elevation strategy which is a key to the successful future of the business and mike ashley is not going away, but he will step back from the day—to—day running of the business which in effect michael murray has been doing for some time. teii effect michael murray has been doing for some time-— for some time. tell us a bit more about michael— for some time. tell us a bit more about michael murray, _ for some time. tell us a bit more about michael murray, his - for some time. tell us a bit more about michael murray, his 31, - for some time. tell us a bit more i about michael murray, his 31, future son—in—law of mike ashley, so what has he done with the business that makes him the right choice? he has been driving — makes him the right choice? he has been driving the _ makes him the right choice? he has been driving the strategy _ makes him the right choice? he has been driving the strategy to - been driving the strategy to take the stores and completely redesign them, change them and i suppose make them, change them and i suppose make them the department store of the future and he's done some fantastic work in terms of getting the right brand is in place in those stores and making a mix of different brands that people are interested in brian
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alongside make—up and food and drink —— interested in buying. that's been very successful. his background is property, that's where he came from but he understands the guts of the retail business and is the whole of the business has changed in terms of its profile. it's notjust sports direct any more, there are the house of fraser stores, flannels and a business like jack wills, he's been instrumental in putting the businesses together and making them right for the future shopper and the future high street which is going to look so different. the future high street which is going to look so different.— look so different. the business re orted look so different. the business reported a _ look so different. the business reported a 94% _ look so different. the business reported a 94% drop _ look so different. the business reported a 94% drop in - look so different. the business| reported a 94% drop in pre-tax reported a 94% drop in pre—tax profit. is that all covid related and to be expected? does it show big gaps in the online offering? it looks like it is covid and related to stores being closed and an underperformance in europe. the online business has picked up significantly, but it does show how big high street retailers have been impacted by covid on what they say
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in the guidance is that they expect further disruption from the pandemic and potentially further store closures so they are unsure about what 2022 will bring but broadly the performance shows the cost and impact of covert on clicks and bricks retailers like themselves. you mention mike ashley is not going on anywhere and he will stay on as executive director so what will it mean and will he be the power behind the throne? i think so. there's a lot of power there but there's been a change in to the people brought into the business by michael murray, so a new senior team, a younger senior team who come from slightly different backgrounds who really understand their customers and i think mike ashley will still have a huge part to play. the reality is that he is one of the most successful retailers in britain and is highly committed to the uk high street and it sometimes times to hand the reins over and that could be his smartest move.
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police investigating the online racist abuse of england players following the euro 2020 final have arrested 11 people. the uk football policing unit says it received 600 reports of offensive messages, around a third of which were judged to possibly be criminal. tim muffett has been telling me more. there was such a dramatic end to the european championships between england and italy. a penalty shoot—out. marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka all missed penalties. all three were victims of racial abuse online afterwards. the uk football policing unit received more than 600 reports of offensive messages. 207, about a third, possibly criminal in nature. 34 accounts have so far been identified as being in the uk. the unit made data requests to social media companies as part of their investigations. where they have been able to, they have passed on information to local police forces. 11 arrests have been made so far.
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offences include malicious communications and breaches of the communications act. the age range of those arrested ranges from 18 to 63. so, from young adults to older adults. and chief constable mark roberts, overseeing this investigation, has thanked facebook, instagram and twitter for responding to the police request quickly. he says if people think they can hide behind a social media profile to make such abhorrent comments, they need to think again. that's the investigation in the uk. there are also people being investigated abroad? yes, the 207 posts deemed to have broken the law, 123 accounts have been identified as belonging to individuals outside the uk. so, in those cases police have passed on the relevant information they have to the relevant police forces in those countries. and really it is up to them to decide how to act upon them. there are 50 other cases in which the unit are still waiting to hear back from social media
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companies, to find out more details as to where those people live. the police have stressed how complex it can be to investigate online abuse. people hide behind false identities, false names. but they have made it perfectly clear they are still investigating the messages which were posted after this match. if they find any more deemed to have breached the criminal threshold, those people who posted them will be arrested. footballer marcus rashford is calling on health professionals to do more to persuade families in need to take up government food vouchers. the manchester united player has written an open letter to say he's concerned that more than 40 per cent of those entitled to claim healthy start scheme are still not registered. ministers say they are spending more than 400 million to help low income families. the government in thailand has banned sunscreens containing chemicals that damage coral from all of its national parks. the thai department
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of conservation says four ingredients commonly found in sun creams, including oxybenzone, were shown to destroy coral larvae, obstruct coral reproduction and cause reef bleaching. anyone using products that contain them can be fined up to $3,000. similar bans have been introduced by the pacific island of palau and the us state of hawaii. several of the uk's most popular heritage sites have been granted more than £14 million to help improve access for disabled people. the natural history museum is one site to benefit from the national lottery funding, and has received £3.2 million to develop outdoor galleries and improve access to the gardens. a boost was also given to the anglesey column trust to help it adapt the marquess of anglesey�*s column in wales. a reminder of our top story. fully vaccinated travellers returning to england, northern ireland or scotland from france will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. the change is part of a series
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of adjustments to the traffic light system for international travel — and brings france into line with other amber list countries. now the weather with carol kirkwood rain coming in from the west and also windier than it has been. that's because we have an area of low pressure coming our way and you can see the extent of the isobars. in the centre of the low pressure there won't be much wind so later in northern ireland there will be slow moving, prolonged showers which could lead to issues with localised flooding. but we start on a dry note and in the east there will be mist and fog around first thing that will lift in the cloud is building ahead of the band of rain coming in and you can see there are
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showers ahead and also behind this band of rain, some of which will be heavy and also thundery. temperatures today, 16 in the north up to 22 as we move south. through the evening and overnight, the band of rain continues to push northwards and we also have showers rotating around the area and also pretty windy across the northern half of the country, especially the north—east and the southern half of the country. these are the overnight lows, between 13 and 15 degrees. as we go through the rest of friday, we still are being dominated by low pressure so we have all of the showers moving around and we are looking at heavy and prolonged showers across northern ireland, the northern half of wales, northern england and also central and southern scotland in particular and here we could have issues with localised flooding. still pretty windy across the southern half of the uk and also the north—east with the temperature range between 16 and 21 degrees. low pressure is not done with us heading from friday into saturday and it drifts across scotland and you can see the isobars
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and we have this little system coming across the english channel so we still have rain or showers rotating around the area of low pressure as well as the system coming up from the english channel bringing in some further spells of rain. still pretty breezy as well, but in between the rain there will be bright spells or some sunshine with temperatures between 15 and 20 degrees, so disappointing for the time of year. as we head through the weekend it remains unsettled, even into monday with showers and longer spells of rain and by tuesday something drier and less windy.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: fully vaccinated travellers will no longer need to quarantine on arrivalfrom france — as part of a shake—up of coronavirus travel rules in england, scotland and northern ireland. one in five people being admitted to hospital with covid are now aged between eighteen and thirty four. that's according to the new chief executive of nhs england. the un issues a stark warning about the safety of thousands of civilians, in the afghan city of lashkar gar — as fierce fighting continues between the taliban and government forces. the rugby league world cup — which was due to be held in england in autumn — has been postponed until 2022, after defending champions australia, and new zealand, withdrew citing covid concerns.

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