Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 5, 2021 10:00am-12:01pm BST

10:00 am
this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. fully vaccinated travellers will no longer need to quarantine on arrivalfrom france — as part of a shake—up of coronavirus travel rules in england, scotland and northern ireland. the un issues a stark warning about the safety of thousands of civilians, in the afghan city of lashkar gar — as fierce fighting continues between the taliban and government forces. the new chief executive of nhs england says one in five people being admitted to hospital with covid are now aged between eighteen and thirty four. the rugby league world cup — which was due to be held in england in autumn — has been postponed until 2022, after defending champions australia, and new zealand, withdrew citing covid concerns.
10:01 am
and i'm lucy hockings, in tokyo, where it's been a day of world record smashes and upsets. i'll have the latest in a moment. hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. fully vaccinated travellers will no longer need to quarantine on arrivalfrom france —— as part of a shake—up of coronavirus travel rules in england, scotland and northern ireland. seven more european countries have been added to the green list, while spain will remain amber despite concerns about covid variants there.
10:02 am
other changes include —— india, bahrain, qatar and the united arab emirates, switching from red to amber meaning arrivals from those countries will no longer have to quarantine in government—approved accommodation. while austria, germany, slovenia, slovakia, latvia, romania and norway will be moved onto the green list. but georgia and mexico have been now be added to the red list — the highest level of restrictions. this report from our transport correspondent, caroline davies. a near empty swimming pool, few tents pitched and no—one propping up the bar. this would normally be the busiest time of year at this campsite in western france, but at the moment, they're half—empty. hopefully there'll be a flurry of last—minute campers.
10:03 am
we're hoping so, especially in september with the older couples who normally come who don't have families. i think it's too late for families to come because they will have booked elsewhere in the uk. across the channel, these british holiday—makers are staying home. with the kids and too late in summer, we've already had to change my holiday. i work for the nhs, so i've had to change my holiday that way. i couldn't quarantine when i get back, so, yeah, this is it for us this year. it's too risky to commit to an overseas holiday right now in my opinion. it's too much of an issue, effort to get tested. ijust feel a bit safer- in my own country, quite frankly, at the moment. even though they make those changes, they can make the changes again. there are new additions to the green list, including germany, but of the seven countries added, only two will allow in non—vaccinated tourists without quarantine. spain is still amber,
10:04 am
but the government is advising passengers to have the more expensive pcr test rather than the cheaper lateral flow test before they depart for the uk. what we do want to do is just be able to work with the clinicians, with the experts in spain in order to just keep a very close eye on this beta variant that we already know so much more about now, and pcr tests enable us to do that. labour have argued the government are still overcomplicating travel. having this confusion, having these changes country by country almost on a weekly basis now doesn't help the industry, it doesn't help passengers and it doesn't help instil confidence in the government. some countries are going from red to amber, including the uae. it means neil, who lives in dubai, will be able to see his one—year—old grandson for the first time in a year. despite the anger i feel towards the government, i can now put that behind me and we can now look forward and we can travel, so that's really good. and we can almost get our lives back to a form of normality of being able to see our friends and family.
10:05 am
country by country, more of the world is opening up to uk travellers, but well into summer and after months of uncertainty, the question is how many will want to make the trip? caroline davies, bbc news. our correspondent chris bockman is in a village in south western france. what is the situation like there? i am in one of the most popular villages in south—west france, 12,000 british people usually come here summer, now the tourism office has told me there are about 200 and they probably live not far from here anyway. the situation is that i do not think many people will come on holiday here because you may remember last year, many people came over and then they had two days to come back or they would face a quarantine of two weeks so many are hesitant to come over. apart from
10:06 am
those who have second homes here, there are many teach people with second homes here, there is no accommodation to be found. the dutch and the belgians had no problems coming here, the two things, the french, eight out of ten are staying at home and taking three weeks holiday in august. they have booked everything as well. even if you do, and you have no accommodation you would have a problem finding somewhere to stay. let's speak to the uk's shadow transport secretary, jim mcmahon. thank you forjoining us. labour's reaction to the announcement. we have reaction to the announcement. - have called for a simplified system and financial support for the aviation industry that has been devastated after 18 months of lockdown measures which has hitjobs and security in that industry, the route through this has given the public consumer confidence that it is safe to travel and that relies on
10:07 am
transparency, the data to be published, the criteria to be published, the criteria to be published and a clear direction of travel assessment for every country so you know if you book for a holiday that is two weeks away, the country is heading in the right direction and not the wrong one. every time we have called for that, the government has refused to publish it. we have a confused traffic light system with so many categories... traffic light system with so many categories- - -_ traffic light system with so many cateuories... ., ., ., categories... how would you do it? if ou are categories... how would you do it? if you are in — categories... how would you do it? if you are in power? _ categories... how would you do it? if you are in power? what - categories... how would you do it? if you are in power? what would i categories... how would you do it? | if you are in power? what would you do? we if you are in power? what would you do? ~ , ., , if you are in power? what would you do? . , ., , ., if you are in power? what would you do? ~ , ., , ., ., do? we believe the route is to have an international _ do? we believe the route is to have an international vaccination - an international vaccination passport where the key destinations by bilateral agreement where they recognise our vaccination programme and we recognise there, there is a high bar that makes sure we protect ourselves with variance, testing and place as well, we would publish the data and we would be transparent country by country so that people had the information to hand and could make that decision. a more
10:08 am
simplified system also, rather than traffic light, we would be very clear that would have a system that was safe to go, on the green mice, not safe to go, on the red list. gave me an example of a country that was listed on yesterday's announcement that you were not happy with and you would like to see their data. 15 with and you would like to see their data. , . , with and you would like to see their data. , ., , ., ., , data. is a very real example is france. data. is a very real example is france- it _ data. is a very real example is france. it is _ data. is a very real example is france. it is only _ data. is a very real example is france. it is only four- data. is a very real example is france. it is only four weeks i data. is a very real example is l france. it is only four weeks ago that the government put france on a special list, the amber plus left, the rationale was there were high rates of the beta variant. we tested that because on mainland france there was 92 compared to a50 in spain. why would you put france on the list are not spin? they said because it was of high rates of infection. they got the numbers wrong, including an island which was 6000 miles away. they have separated
10:09 am
out that ireland, and it is on the red list at the moment. we noticed that four weeks ago and the government has taken four weeks to take action on the holidays of thousands of people were affected. you mentioned the islands that were included in the figures for france, what date i would you like to see? is it the number of cases? you can access that anywhere, can you? the government — access that anywhere, can you? iie: government only access that anywhere, can you? tie: government only publish the data for countries that move from one category to the other so you have no idea if the country you are booking to go to is heading in the right direction in terms of vaccination or new variants, the government promised they would do it country by country assessment and it would be published but they have not done that, only the country is moving from one category to the other. we believe transparency is needed. find
10:10 am
believe transparency is needed. and the article in — believe transparency is needed. and the article in the financial times questioning donations to the conservative party, what is your reaction? ., ., , ., reaction? throughout the course of the pandemic. _ reaction? throughout the course of the pandemic, the _ reaction? throughout the course of the pandemic, the government -- | reaction? throughout the course of. the pandemic, the government -- the the pandemic, the government —— the government have had allegations of corruption and sleaze, and this does not help. it is important for full transparency that the conservative party hauled themselves to account on that measure. we need a full inquiry into donations, into the covid—19 contracts, far too much evidence of contracts given to people with no track record in that industry but they have connections with the conservative party. how are labour transparent _ with the conservative party. how are labour transparent about _ with the conservative party. how are labour transparent about their - labour transparent about their donations? what is the difference? no we are absolutely transparent, all of our donations artfully reported. we are not the government,
10:11 am
we are not spending public money in that way and we are talking about billions of pounds of money that has gone into the pocket of people connected with the conservatives. the un says it's deeply concerned about the safety of tens of thousands of civilians in the afghan city of lashkar gah — the capital of helmand province. taliban militants and government forces are waging an intense battle for control of the city. a un spokesman said there were reports of increased civilian casualties, and of homes and hospitals being destroyed. afghan and us airstrikes on taliban positions continued throughout wednesday. earlier i spoke to our south asia editor, anbarasan ethirajan. the fighting has been going on for eight or nine days and it has become a bone
10:12 am
of contention between the two sides because the taliban who launched the attacks on three major cities in the west and in the south wanted to pull a point that they were in a position to capture provincial capitals, and if it had happened it would have been a huge blow to the afghan government. now the afghan government says they are launching a clearing operation in lashkar gah. there is also concern about what is going to happen to the civilians because the regional commander urged the civilians to leave to carry out an operation against taliban militants. a dozen people have been killed and both sides are inflicting casualties on each other. both sides are known to make huge claims about casualties. i am looking at a comment here from the general who is the former commander of american forces in afghanistan and he is expressing concern that we could see a return
10:13 am
to the 1990s and a fully fledged civil war. many commanders have expressed that opinion. if you look at afghanistan, it is not one community all across the country, there are many different communities in the population who are spread out throughout the country. in the 1990s, they were fighting against the americans, the russians, and later on with the americans, it is becoming more complicated because the government, talking about popular forces, arming several groups, in the city there is a local warlord who was galvanising people to fight against the taliban with the afghan military managing to push back these militants. if these people are armed, will it turn into an ethnic rivalry between these groups?
10:14 am
many commanders are worried where this will lead to, if the afghan army alone is fighting, that is a different story, but when you are talking about popular uprising forces, providing arms to the local population to stand against the taliban, and with a country like afghanistan with different ethnic groups, that can create a problem and that is the concern that many people are expressing. one in five patients admitted to hospital with covid—19 in england are aged between 18 and 3a — which is four times higher than last winter. that's according to the new chief executive of nhs england, who says there are currentlyjust under five thousand coronavirus patients in english hospitals. speaking in herfirst television interview since being appointed, amanda pritchard said the numbers of young people affected should be an incentive for others to get vaccinated it is still very important that
10:15 am
for those people who have not yet taken the opportunity to come forward, or they know somebody who hasn't, this is the time. and the reason it is so important is we have as of today, over 5000 people really unwell in hospital. one in five, 20%, are young people. so in that 18 to 30 category. and that compares with one in 20 at the peak injanuary time. i've been speaking to our health editor, hugh pym. it is quite a striking figure, isn't it? one in five hospital admissions last month were under 35, between 18 and 3a. that might be a bit of a wake—up call to some, a reminder that young people who are not vaccinated especially can get seriously ill. that being said, obviously there were far more in absolute terms injanuary admitted in the peak when only one in 20 were between 18 and 3a. we have to bear that in mind.
10:16 am
also you could argue, it is a bit of a wake—up call, but it shows the success of the vaccination programme, that there are relatively, in proportionate terms, fewer older people who are more vulnerable ending up in hospital because they have been vaccinated and have had both jabs. i think that's the point nhs england are making, that it shows the vaccination programme is working, but for those who are not vaccinated, particularly younger people, they really are urging them to come forward now, or if they know anyone who hasn't been vaccinated to do so because there is a risk of getting seriously ill and ending up in hospital. hospitals in sri lanka are struggling to cope with a sharp rise in the number of covid patients. the association of medical specialists said the country's oxygen supply could run out in a matter of days given the rise in the number of oxygen—dependent patients. sri lankan hospitals are close
10:17 am
to reaching their maximum capacity. the australian state of victoria is go into another seven day lockdown after new covid cases were discovered. the new restrictions — impacting more than six million people — are due to come into force in the next few hours — after eight community cases were identified. it means that australia's three largest cities — sydney, melbourne and brisbane — will be locked down. the rugby league world cup, which was due to be held in england in the autumn, has been cancelled. the tournament will be postponed until next year — after the withdrawal of defending champions australia ,and new zealand, over player welfare and safety concerns, related to covid. the world cup, featuring men's, women's and wheelchair events, was set to start in newcastle in october. it will take some time for
10:18 am
international rugby to recover from this. i hope we can be a beacon of light, prioritise player choice, we know the players want to play, we took our responsibilities very seriously and we are determined to stay the best ever rugby league world cup, a shame that it is not this year, but leadership is about making tough decisions and about being responsible and we have done it in the best interests of the tournament and the league. the headlines on bbc news... fully vaccinated travellers will no longer need to quarantine on arrivalfrom france — as part of a shake—up of coronavirus travel rules in england, scotland and northern ireland. the un issues a stark warning about the safety of thousands of civilians, in the afghan city of lashkar gar — as fierce fighting continues between the taliban and government forces. the new chief executive of nhs england says one in five people being admitted to hospital with covid are now aged between 18 and 3a.
10:19 am
let's head to tokyo where we can get a full roundup of all the action at the olympics. lucy hockings is there a warm welcome to tokyo where there have been a number of golds and upsets today. one of the most emotional wins we've seen in the games so far was american ryan crouser in the shot put. he beat his own olympic record to defend his shot put title. crouser maintained the lead from his first throw, pushing compatriot and world championjoe kovacs into second place. after his win was confirmed, crouser donned a cowboy hat and showed to the cameras a home—made sign saying, "grandpa, we did it, 2020 olympic champion." team gb�*s most successful canoeist, liam heath, has added to his olympic medal haul with a bronze in the k1
10:20 am
200 metres sprint. heath has now won medals at three successive olympic games. hungary's sandor totka took the gold. portugal's pedro pichardo won the gold medal in the men's triplejump — his winning leap was 17.98 metres. and jamaica's hansle parchment delivered one of the biggest shocks of the olympics athletics competition... beating world champion grant holloway in the men's 110 metres hurdles final.holloway had not lost a hurdles race since august last year and was the overwhelming favourite to win. but he lost momentum in the final two hurdles, and parchment surged past him, adding a gold medal to his london olympic bronze. he said afterwards "it's unbelievable that i caught the guy." but disappointment for the us after it failed to make the men's ax100 metres relay.
10:21 am
the star—studded team finished a shocking sixth in the semifinal. the latest in a series of sprint relay failures for the nation. lots of criticism about that performance. well, here injapan, the government is considering expanding emergency coronavirus restrictions in a bid to contain the rapid surge of infections. mariko oi is in shimbashi in central tokyo. what would that mean, expanding the restrictions? figs what would that mean, expanding the restrictions? ~ , , ., what would that mean, expanding the restrictions? a ~ ., what would that mean, expanding the restrictions? r ~' ., what would that mean, expanding the restrictions? r “ ., , restrictions? as you know, tokyo is under a state _ restrictions? as you know, tokyo is under a state of _ restrictions? as you know, tokyo is under a state of emergency - restrictions? as you know, tokyo is under a state of emergency as - restrictions? as you know, tokyo is under a state of emergency as well| under a state of emergency as well as the surrounding prefectures, there are other prefectures which have strict measures in which people are asked to stay at home and that measure may be expanded because we continue to see a surge in covid—19 cases. the latest figure for tokyo, over 5000 for the very first time.
10:22 am
experts are now warning that this number could double to over 10,000 injust two weeks, number could double to over 10,000 in just two weeks, so the speed at which this virus is spreading is a lot faster because this is obviously the very infectious dealt out variant. hospitals are getting overwhelmed and a lot of criticism towards the government which shifted its policy is now asking people with symptoms to stay—at—home. some lawmakers from the prime minister's own ruling party asking the prime minister to withdraw that request although he is sticking to it and also ruled out a nationwide state of emergency. a mayor injapan getting into hot water. a mayor in japan getting into hot water. , ._ ., a mayor in japan getting into hot water. , ., _, water. yes, the mayor, coming under a lot of criticism _
10:23 am
water. yes, the mayor, coming under a lot of criticism and _ water. yes, the mayor, coming under a lot of criticism and his _ water. yes, the mayor, coming under a lot of criticism and his name - water. yes, the mayor, coming under a lot of criticism and his name is - a lot of criticism and his name is trending on social media after he took a bite at an athlete's gold medal. it was one of the members of the japan softball team and they beat the united states and won a gold medal. she was visiting the mayor, took his face masked off and took a bite out of the medal. a lot of angry reaction, the mayor office has received a lot of phone calls and a lot of athletes speaking out on social media. of course, it is not disrespectful, but also during the pandemic it is unthinkable. a very rare statement from toyota which sponsored the team saying it is unfortunate that he was able to feel admiration as well as respect for the athlete. it is very unusual for the athlete. it is very unusual for goater to release a statement like that.
10:24 am
and before we go, let's take a quick look at the medal table. china still far out in the lead with 33 gold medals and 2a silvers, but the us is catching up with 27 golds. australia has been clinging on to that fourth position with 17 gold medals. and the uk has dropped from fifth to sixth, overtaken by the russian olympic committee. plenty more to come in tokyo. for now, it's back to the studio in london. a wildfire that has raged for more than a week has now reached a thermal power station on turkey's aegean coast. the coal—fired facility was already evacuated and flammable and explosive materials were removed in advance of the flames. in greece, a heatwave there is causing severe damage too, as lebo diseko
10:25 am
one step closer to safety. forced into journeys to stay afloat. here is the epicentre of concern, a thermal power plant storing thousands of tonnes of coal. the authorities try to contain it and remove chemicals and other flammable materials. they stay the main units are not seriously damaged despite being part of the worst wildfires in the country's history according to the country's history according to the president. translation: as we consider our efforts on the eighth day, due date, we have faced a fire in a power plant. hopefully we will get over this before it spreads entirely. there have been dozens of places
10:26 am
across party, many under control. but some remain heartbreakingly alight. translation: we are not making a movie. this is not hollywood. it is turkey and turkey is burning furiously. all of the crew are working voluntarily with their own efforts. we are helpless and there is no one helping us. we are so desperate. in is no one helping us. we are so desperate-_ is no one helping us. we are so deserate. , . , ., desperate. in greece, in the grip of its own heatwave, _ desperate. in greece, in the grip of its own heatwave, more _ desperate. in greece, in the grip of its own heatwave, more flames - desperate. in greece, in the grip of| its own heatwave, more flames tear through a pine forest. with rolling hills and little visibility hampering rescue effort, it is no surprise over 150 houses are burnt. with this monastery surrounded by fire. the northern suburbs of athens are ablaze as the mayor of olympia
10:27 am
calls for help to stop it encroaching on the ancient home of the olympic games. for if you home is the fire is not prepared to enter. with further extreme conditions are predicted soon. the sprinter from belarus, krystina timanovskaya, who refused orders to fly home from the olympics early because she feared for her safety has arrived in poland. she's been granted a humanitarian visa by the polish government. the 2a—year—old athlete claims she was removed from the belarus national time after criticising her country's coaching staff. the international olympic committee says it's investigating. our correspondent bethany bell has this update from warsaw. well, after a very long trip all the way from tokyo via vienna, krystina timanovskaya has arrived in warsaw. she was greeted by senior officials here. poland has given her a humanitarian visa.
10:28 am
they have been expressing sentiments of support and solidarity for her. and there are also plans for her husband to come to warsaw as well. he fled belarus to ukraine after the news of this incident occurred. and we understand that he will be joining herfairly soon. this though, of course, was a journey that was full of incident. initially she was planning to fly directly here. then she flew via vienna because of security concerns, but all of this, of course, shining the spotlight on the very difficult situation in belarus at the moment. nearly 90% of the adult population in england has had their first dose of the coronavirus vaccine — many of them delivered at large venues like the one set up at ashton gate stadium in bristol, in western england. when it opened injanuary it was the uk's first mass vaccination hub.
10:29 am
but with such a high rate of take—up, these huge centres are now being wound down, in this case to make way for the football which starts at the weekend, as robin markwell reports. full time at ashton gate for vaccination. callum and ellie are among the last to get theirjabs here. i didn't feel a thing. it was really fine. i am not great with needles but ijust looked the other way and it was fine. just a scratch. it was january when the prime minister came to open the west's biggest vaccination hub. since then, almost 250,000 jabs have gone into arms at the stadium. tara fortune has been wielding the needle from the start. she has seen her clientele get younger and younger. it was really cute, because we had a lot of the older generation and for many of them, it was the first time they'd been out in, like, ages. so they were coming in, like, fully glammed up in there, very smartly dressed.
10:30 am
the time per patient was a lot longer because we were having a lot longer chats with them where as now, the younger generation, they are more like they want to get in and out. i think they are a lot... i wouldn't say less bothered, but more concerned about getting to the pub after. but the football and rugby seasons beckon, with crowds due back on saturday. city at home to blackpool. so it is time for vaccination to stop and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever and i think it's an important milestone that things are slowly getting back to normal. we at ashton gate and bristol city and bristol bears want it to get back to normal. it would be great to get crowds back in the seats. we want to get live entertainment back. so today, being the last day, is an important milestone to return to normality in bristol. but nhs bosses know that this pandemic is far from over. we've still got a long way to go, so the younger population are coming forward more slowly than the older population weere. and, of course, there
10:31 am
are still a lot of second vaccinations to get through, that waiting interval for your second vaccination comes along. we hear all the time about new cohorts younger people being offered vaccination. so i think we are in it for some time yet. fittingly, the last to be vaccinated here will be among the first to use it as a stadium. the bristol bears rugby team have been offered the last appointment of the day for their second jabs. suitable end to a remarkable chapter in the history of ashton gate. the headlines on bbc news... fully vaccinated travellers will no longer need to quarantine on arrival from france as part of a shake—up of coronavirus travel rules in england, scotland and northern ireland. the un issues a stark warning about the safety of thousands of civilians, in the afghan city of lashkar gah, as fierce fighting continues between the taliban and government forces. the new chief executive of nhs england says one in five people being admitted to hospital with covid are now aged
10:32 am
between 18—3a. the rugby league world cup, which was due to be held in england in autumn, has been postponed until 2022, after defending champions australia, and new zealand, withdrew citing covid concerns. team gb�*s most successful canoeist, liam heath, has added to his olympic medal haul with a bronze in the k1 200 metres sprint. let's return to our top story now and the changes to international travel rules for those arriving in england. uk transport secretary, grant shapps, told me what is being done to help british people travelling to mexico, which has just been added to the government's red list we think there are 5—6,000 brits in mexico
10:33 am
and obviously they will be making arrangements to come home. and mexico, unlike some of the european countries going onto the green list, does not have the same level of vaccination and i imagine it has made it a more tricky situation there. mexico is back on the red list, many people will be saying that spain, for example, or even france and even india, let's take those three countries. india is seeing another rise in cases. france have shown, certain measures, that they are now reintroducing certain restrictions, how can you guarantee people who are travelling that, whilst they are out there, those countries won't go back onto the red list? in the last year, we have taken the advice of scientists, know that the approach
10:34 am
of having people double vaccinated is very important. it is one of the things that has enabled us to open up too many european locations as their vaccination levels have become higher enabling travel to take place. rather than last summer having weekly reviews of this, which meant people were always looking over their shoulders when they went away on holiday, the reviews are taking place on a three—weekly basis, so the people who are there can relax and enjoy their holiday and their well—earned breaks and the next changes are not due until the end of the month, barring anything completely unexpected, people do not have to watch twitter to keep up with the news. for travellers who have to quarantine, for example, from mexico, do you have enough hotels and why are you upping the price of quarantine hotels? yes, there will be enough hotels.
10:35 am
with the government—managed quarantine programme which works to hotels, the principal has been set that it should pay for itself. it should not be the situation that the general public pays through their taxes for those quarantine facilities for people coming from red list countries. currently, it has cost about £75 million to run that, to the taxpayer, so there will be increases in prices, which come in on the 12th of august for quarantine, managed quarantine. we do not want people travelling to red list countries, people who are not uk citizens cannot travel here from red list countries, they are very much off the reservation as far as travel is concerned right now, but some countries have come off the red list, including india as you mentioned before. catherine hill is an epidemiologist from france and joins us now. thank you very much forjoining me.
10:36 am
your reaction to that news and more importantly, how it will be welcomed in france? it importantly, how it will be welcomed in france? , _, in france? it will be welcome, mostly by _ in france? it will be welcome, mostly by french _ in france? it will be welcome, mostly by french citizens - in france? it will be welcome, | mostly by french citizens living in france? it will be welcome, i mostly by french citizens living in the uk and people living in the uk and having for instance a country house in france. it will really be fascinating the exchanges, facilitate the exchanges. does that mean for the _ facilitate the exchanges. does that mean for the french _ facilitate the exchanges. does that mean for the french they - facilitate the exchanges. does that mean for the french they will - facilitate the exchanges. does that mean for the french they will not l facilitate the exchanges. does that l mean for the french they will not be particularly happy to see an influx of brits travelling to the country for tourism?— of brits travelling to the country for tourism? ., ., , ., , ,y for tourism? no, we are very happy, es, of for tourism? no, we are very happy, yes. of course- _ for tourism? no, we are very happy, yes, of course. it's _ for tourism? no, we are very happy, yes, of course. it's a _ for tourism? no, we are very happy, yes, of course. it's a very _ for tourism? no, we are very happy, yes, of course. it's a very good. - for tourism? no, we are very happy, yes, of course. it's a very good. i - yes, of course. it's a very good. i wonder if you could take us through the data. how is france doing when it comes to the coronavirus? the situation is _ it comes to the coronavirus? the situation is not _ it comes to the coronavirus? the situation is not so _ it comes to the coronavirus? tia: situation is not so different from the uk. we are a bit behind in the increasing death, we are in the middle of this delta variant crisis,
10:37 am
with a fraction of the population vaccinated, but the unvaccinated population constitutes a reservoir for this new variant which is very contagious, as you know. the situation is not very good but it is in no way worse than the uk. so there is no reason to have special restrictions. there is no reason to have special restrictions-_ restrictions. local media is reporting _ restrictions. local media is reporting france _ restrictions. local media is reporting france has - restrictions. local media is l reporting france has entered restrictions. local media is - reporting france has entered a fourth wave, slightly behind where the uk was. special attention for corsica, some of the coastal areas, but any, tightening up because they are seeing a spike in cases. —— brittany. are seeing a spike in cases. -- brittan . , , . . ., brittany. the virus is circulating amonu brittany. the virus is circulating among the _ brittany. the virus is circulating among the unvaccinated - brittany. the virus is circulating among the unvaccinated who i brittany. the virus is circulating l among the unvaccinated who are younger on average than among the vaccinated, but yet there are older
10:38 am
people not vaccinated and these people not vaccinated and these people are arriving in intensive care questions which is creating a new crisis. care questions which is creating a new crisis-— care questions which is creating a new crisis.- it _ care questions which is creating a new crisis.- it is - care questions which is creating a new crisis.- it is going i new crisis. carry on. it is going to be a crisis — new crisis. carry on. it is going to be a crisis and _ new crisis. carry on. it is going to be a crisis and it _ new crisis. carry on. it is going to be a crisis and it is _ new crisis. carry on. it is going to be a crisis and it is relieved if- new crisis. carry on. it is going to be a crisis and it is relieved if to l convince people who are not vaccinated, some of them are really very adamant against vaccination, so this is a problem and we have two repeat again and that's pretty much the only way we have to control the epidemic since france, like the uk has never decided to isolate people before they have symptoms. what before they have symptoms. what our travel arrangements _ before they have symptoms. what our travel arrangements between - before they have symptoms. what our travel arrangements between france | travel arrangements between france and neighbouring countries? for example, spain. what sort of requirements are needed for travellers between the two
10:39 am
countries? i travellers between the two countries?— travellers between the two countries? ., �* ~' travellers between the two countries? ., �* ~ ., countries? i don't think there are any requirements. _ countries? i don't think there are any requirements. at _ countries? i don't think there are any requirements. at some - countries? i don't think there are | any requirements. at some point, the french authorities said that people should not go to spain and i looked at the situation at the time and the situation in spain was exactly the same as france. i did not make much sense. sometimes, one wonders whether the rules are more political, economical, french authorities are happy to see the french spend their vacations in france rather than go to spain to spend their money. but really, i don't think there are many restrictions but i'm not sure, i'm not aware of that. i don't keep an eye on those facts.— not aware of that. i don't keep an eye on those facts. thank you very much for updating _ eye on those facts. thank you very much for updating us _ eye on those facts. thank you very much for updating us on _ eye on those facts. thank you very much for updating us on the - much for updating us on the situation in france, thank you. a man is due to appear before magistrates in cardiff today, charged with murdering a five—year—old boy. logan mwangi's body was found in a river in bridgend last week, after police were called to a report of a missing child. 39—year—old john cole is also
10:40 am
accused of perverting the course ofjustice, along with a 30—year—old woman and a 13—year—old boy. police investigating the online racist abuse of england players following the euro 2020 final have arrested 11 people. the uk football policing unit says it received 600 reports of offensive messages, around a third of which were judged to be criminal. our home affairs correspondent talked us through the detail. of those allegations received by police, we're talking about 207 cases where they believe an offence may have been committed, they have identified... these are offences on social media, you will remember that following the penalty shoot—out in the euro 2020 final when england sadly
10:41 am
didn't win the match, that marcus rashford, jayden sancho and bukayo saka were abused very quickly after that incident on the pitch online. police say they have identified approximately 35 social media accounts so far and they have got requests to social media companies for the names of the people behind another 50. they have arrested 11 people so far, including a 21—year—old man and a a9—year—old woman from christchurch in dorset, as well as men from various parts of the country in their a0s and 50s. what can you tell us about the new campaign that marcus rashford has launched? still concerned about parents and children getting the right amount of food. marcus rashford took the government on last summer, when he managed to get the government to agree to extend free school meals throughout the summer holidays, very high profile campaign,
10:42 am
again fuelled by support on social media. he has written an open letter to the british medicaljournal saying that a0% of the families who are entitled to government food vouchers under healthy start or best start food in scotland, have not yet signed up to get access to that help from the government. he is saying they really need to take up the offer. it is good food, good for families, it improves their health and well—being and he wants them to get what they are able to get from this government scheme. the government says it is spending £a00 million on helping low—income families but i think marcus rashford is making it clear that he is prepared to take part in this campaigning given his very high profile on social media. team gb have claimed another gold medal at the tokyo olympics, 23—year—old matt walls from oldham has won in the omnium event.
10:43 am
campbell stewart of new zealand takes silver and it's bronze for italy's elia viviani. uk adults spent a third of their waking hours in 2020 watching tv and online video. that's one of the findings of ofcom's annual survey of our media habits. the regulator says subscription services such as netflix were the big beneficiaries as repeated lockdowns left millions at home looking for entertainment. here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. like many of us, the oakley family spent much of 2020 glued to screens, though not necessarily all together.
10:44 am
mum and dad were in front of the main telly, son arun spent lots of time gaming, chatting to friends and watching youtube videos. but it is streaming services, not broadcast tv, which was big for all of them. increasingly, it is just news and current affairs really, is what we're watching on broadcast. otherwise it is streaming. almost everything else is streamed by one service or another. arun, do you watch any television? almost none. i am usually watching youtube on netflix. i ofcom's annual snapshot of our media habit shows we spent an average of five hours and a0 minutes a day watching tv or online video in 2020. that's up a7 minutes on the year before. much of the increase is down to the fact that the time watching subscription streaming services almost doubled, to an hour and five minutes a day. the biggest player, netflix, is now in more than half of all uk homes. with hit series like bridgerton, netflix now has more subscribers than sky, virgin and the other uk paid tv providers put together. what we are seeing is that younger
10:45 am
people are migrating from traditional tv, to really engaging in these streaming services where they can watch what they want when they want on their own device, whether that's netflix or youtube. but we're now seeing older audiences also catching up and turning to these streaming services. so 2020 was the year britain became a streaming nation, with traditional broadcast tv something for other people and set to decline. but is this a permanent change? and will we want to continue to pay for the likes of netflix, amazon prime, nowtv, disney plus, or will we start switching some of them off? we had a total of six streaming services subscribed at one point. that has now kind of slimmed down to four at the moment and i think another one will be dropping off soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech ted podcast... 0k, bbc... one other change in our media habits, more
10:46 am
than half of uk homes now have a smart speaker. an internet connection, not an aerial or satellite dish, is becoming the key way we all get access to entertainment. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... fully vaccinated travellers will no longer need to quarantine on arrivalfrom france, as part of a shake—up of coronavirus travel rules in england, scotland and northern ireland. the un issues a stark warning about the safety of thousands of civilians, in the afghan city of lashkar gah, as fierce fighting continues between the taliban and government forces. the new chief executive of nhs england says one in five people being admitted to hospital with covid are now aged between 18—3a. malta is being urged to drop a case against three young migrants, who are alleged to have hijacked a ship and forced it to take them to europe, two years ago.
10:47 am
they were rescued in the mediterranean in 2019 along with more than 100 others, as they fled libya. both the united nations and the arch—bishop of malta are asking the authorities to drop the case, calling the charges disproportionate. in a bbc exclusive, our correspondent, jean mackenzie has been to meet the boys, who face life in prison. this is the first time they have spoken publicly. one is still a minor, so we're using the name given to him by court. these three young men risked their lives to make it to europe. in return, they have lost their freedom. i am not a terrorist. i cannot be a terrorist and i would never be a terrorist. they have been accused by maltese authorities of hijacking the ship that rescued them and 100 others at sea, as they attempted the treacherous crossing from libya. this is the moment they arrived in malta. seconds later, they were
10:48 am
handcuffed and led away. this is the place where they disembarked us. it was the same place they arrested me, and took me to the prison directly from here to the prison. lamina wasjust a child, 15. he says that, at first, the captain tried to take them back to libya. people then protested, and eventually, he agreed to take them to malta. people panicked and protested, and eventually, he agreed to take them to malta. lamine was the only person on the boat who spoke english. and he says the captain asked him to translate. why would i hijack the ship? why? the captain was in full control of the ship. what's it like to live being accused of being a terrorist by the maltese government? it is very, very hard for me. very, very hard. it is eating me up whenever i think that they are calling me a terrorist.
10:49 am
what happened on board has never been proven. the authorities are still collecting evidence. it could be years before they face trial. so far we haven't seen evidence of terrorism. and we question the ability of the prosecution to bring such charges. where they are fleeing from is a hell hole. from our clients' perspectives, they did the natural thing anybody would have done to save themselves and to save the other people on board. malta is on the front line of migration across the mediterranean. human rights organisations say that in trying to stop boats arriving, it acted disproportionately. the archbishop of malta has intervened and urged authorities to drop the case. migration is not a crime. honestly, i don't know why the exaggeration. i don't know if it was to give an example.
10:50 am
i don't know. no—one from the police or the prosecution would answer any of our questions. but the maltese foreign minister has agreed to meet us. is this case reallyjustified? i told you, i'm not in a position to go into the specifics of the case. i'm not trying to simply avoid your question. but people are telling us that these three people have been caught up in a political game, that this case is the product of politics. i don't agree with that interpretation. these self—righteous people should try to understand what pressure we are faced with, and what it means to carry the responsibility, on our own, to deal with the central mediterranean route. in these sacks are letters of support. hundreds arrive each week. lamin, as translator, reads them out. "my name is nina..." this helps them hope for a betterfuture. one that is not behind bars. jean mackenzie, bbc news, malta.
10:51 am
15 million people in england are living with a long—term chronic illness, and numbers rising. celebrities like lady gaga and selena gomez are opening up about their conditions, and like—minded influencers on social media are attracting huge followings. but as their profiles have grown, so have accusations of fakery. in a new documentary, octavia woodward meets both accusers and their targets. let's take a look. back in february last year, a friend in the office sent me a link. "people are accusing chronic illness influencers of faking it online," he said. there is a reddit group called illness fakers, where nearly 80,000 people act as judge and jury on who is really ill and who is not. they create timelines, scouring influencers' social media
10:52 am
profiles for inconsistencies. i remember one of my friends saying that they have some group chats and my name had come up, and i remember going on to try and find whatever had been said and seeing the absolute torrent of information that they were sharing and the thousands of people on there. they moved it over to a forum that is completely unregulated and they shared my address and... it was so terrifying. i kept my blind shut, my windows shut. i ended up getting incredibly mentally unwell and eventually hospitalised for it. i”ve been speaking to octavia and asked her why this was something she wanted to investigate. i decided when my friend sent me a link to the reddit group where people were focusing on proving that people with chronic
10:53 am
illnesses where faking etc. at first, i thought they were lying, i thought it was just a new form of bullying for disabled people. but the more i looked into it, it was a lot more complicated, some people are genuinely faking illnesses out there and the people who are doing the accusing are typically chronically ill themselves. we are talking munchausen by internet. munchausen by internet is a relatively new form of munchausen where people fake or exaggerate illnesses exclusively online, the people on the reddit group referred to them as munchies and they think that it is a widespread issue throughout the community. and we did actually speak to the sister of someone who has munchausen by internet, and it's a devastating condition. what impact has that reddit group had? the point is that not many people do fake illnesses. it is a small minority.
10:54 am
but the way that it has worked is a feedback loop has been created where the reddit group accuse the influencers, the influencers then try and provide more proof that they are in fact ill, and then because they are providing more proof, they are accused of exaggerating it. and they get to the point of self—harm sometimes. a new uk invetsigation has discovered that a mix of agricultural pesticides sold to farmers is more harmful to bees than was previously thought. the researchers from royal holloway university found that a cocktail of chemicals reacted with each other to kill larger numbers of bees. our science correspondent, victoria gill reports precious pollinators in decline. our bees face multiple threats to their survival.
10:55 am
from a loss of food—rich rich natural grassland, to the dozens of pesticides that are commonly used in agriculture. this new study set out to quantify each of these threats, and to work out how they combine to affect the insects' health. the researchers examined 90 studies that each measured the effect on bees of pesticide or another environmental challenge. they worked out that combinations of several chemicals killed many more bees than expected. this is because, the researchers say, pesticides interact. each chemical enhances the damage caused by another. what we found is really important, when you consider how agrochemicals are sold. commercial formulas are sold to farmers and they often contain various different agrochemicals, pesticide, fungicide, and what our research showed is that these chemicals can interact and significantly increase the potential harm, potentially impact on bee mortality. scientists say that regulation needs
10:56 am
to be updated to factor in this chemical interaction. and to avoid harmful cocktails of pesticide that pose a threat to be pollinating insects that we rely on. victoria gill, bbc news. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. some of us have already seen quite a bit of rain this morning. for others, it is yet to arrive, but more of us will see rain today than we have done in the last few days and it's also going to be windier. the strongest winds will be in areas adjacent to the irish sea. what's happening is low pressure is coming in with its attendant fronts, so a dry and bright start in the east will be usurped by this area of low pressure coming in, introducing thicker cloud and then later on, some rain. so, there are some shows in scotland, northern england and here is the rain moving steadily from the south—west towards the north—east. as we go through the day with the cloud building ahead. behind it, a return to some showers,
10:57 am
some of which will be heavy and thundery and we're looking at some prolonged heavy showers across northern ireland this afternoon, which could lead to some issues with localised flooding. temperatures today, 16—22, down on the 23s and 2as we saw widely yesterday. through this evening and overnight, the strongest winds will be across southern england and north—east scotland. we continue with an array of showers, some of which will be heavy and some rain pushing northwards. overnight close, 12—15, not going to be a particularly cold night in prospect. for the rest of friday, low pressure still very much dominating our weather, so we have got bands of showers rotating around it, some of them merging to give some heavier downpours, especially the northern half of wales, northern england, central and southern scotland and northern ireland, where there is the risk of localised flooding once again. still strong wind, gusty wind across southern and north—east scotland, with temperatures 16—22. as we move through friday into the weekend, low—pressure drifts further northwards, you can see fronts wrapped around and we have another front coming the south. this one introducing some rain across the channel islands and southern counties
10:58 am
through the day and for the rest of us, we still have a lot of showers or rain wrapped around at low pressure, courtesy of the weather front which could give some heavy downpours as well. in between, some brighter skies. still quite breezy too. temperatures, 17—20. as for the outlook, it remains unsettled with rain or indeed showers, but by tuesday it looks like something drier is coming our way.
10:59 am
11:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at 11... fully vaccinated travellers will no longer need to quarantine on arrivalfrom france — as part of a shake—up of coronavirus travel rules in england, scotland and northern ireland. gold scotland and northern ireland. on the track once a team gb wins its first gold medal in the velodrome as matt walls takes home gold in the men's omnium. the new chief executive of nhs england says one in five people being admitted to hospital with covid are now aged between 18 and 3a. police investigating the online racist abuse of england players following the euro 2020 final have arrested 11 people. the rugby league world cup — which was due to be held
11:01 am
in england in the autumn — has been postponed until 2022, after defending champions australia, and new zealand, withdrew citing covid concerns. uk adults spent nearly a third of their waking hours watching tv and online videos last year, according to a new report from regulator ofcom. hello and welcome to bbc news. fully vaccinated travellers will no longer need to quarantine on arrivalfrom france, as part of a shake—up of coronavirus travel rules in england, scotland and northern ireland. seven more european countries have been added to the green list, while spain will remain amber despite concerns about covid variants there.
11:02 am
other changes include india, bahrain, qatar and the united arab emirates switching from red to amber, meaning arrivals from those countries will no longer have to quarantine in government—approved accommodation. while austria, germany, slovenia, slovakia, latvia, romania and norway will be moved onto the green list. but georgia and mexico have been now be added to the red list, the highest level of restrictions. this report from our transport correspondent caroline davies. a near empty swimming pool, few tents pitched and no—one propping up the bar. this would normally be the busiest time of year at this campsite in western france, but at the moment, they're half—empty. hopefully there'll be a flurry of last—minute campers. we're hoping so, especially in september with the older
11:03 am
couples who normally come who don't have families. i think it's too late for families to come because they will have booked elsewhere in the uk. across the channel, these british holiday—makers are staying home. with the kids and too late in summer, we've already had to change my holiday. i work for the nhs, so i've had to change my holiday that way. i couldn't quarantine when i get back, so, yeah, this is it for us this year. it's too risky to commit to an overseas holiday right now in my opinion. it's too much of an issue, effort to get tested. ijust feel a bit safer- in my own country, quite frankly, at the moment. even though they make those changes, they can make the changes again. there are new additions to the green list, including germany, but of the seven countries added, only two will allow in non—vaccinated vaccinated tourists without quarantine. spain is still amber, but the government is advising passengers to have the more expensive pcr test rather than the cheaper lateral flow test before they depart for the uk.
11:04 am
what we do want to do is just be able to work with the clinicians, with the experts in spain in order to just keep a very close eye on this beta variant that we already know so much more about now, and pcr tests enable us to do that. labour have argued the government are still overcomplicating travel. having this confusion, having these changes country by country almost on a weekly basis now doesn't help the industry, it doesn't help passengers and it doesn't help instil confidence in the government. some countries are going from red to amber, including the uae. it means neil, who lives in dubai, will be able to see his one—year—old grandson for the first time in a year. despite the anger i feel towards the government, i can now put that behind me and we can now look forward and we can travel, so that's really good. and we can almost get our lives back to a form of normality of being able to see our friends and family. country by country, more of the world is opening up to uk travellers, but well into summer and after months of uncertainty,
11:05 am
the question is how many will want to make the trip? caroline davies, bbc news. graeme buck is from abta, the travel assocation, a trade body for uk tour operators and travel agents. good to have you with us. i know the travel industry has been calling for a simplified system. you have got that now, so are you happy? it is a mixed bag. — that now, so are you happy? it is a mixed bag. the _ that now, so are you happy? it is a mixed bag, the announcements i that now, so are you happy? it is a i mixed bag, the announcements over the last 2a hours. it is good that france is back on a normal amber list, good that spain and greece haven't had the overall status change despite some very unhelpful speculation earlier this week. so there is a little bit of simplification there. we do have more countries going up to the growing list but quite frankly it is happening at a real smell�*s pace, so seven more countries coming on, none of which are traditional holiday destinations people would go to, so
11:06 am
a little bit of good news and things in a way weren't as bad as they could have been and that must provide some going to france, greece, spain, but not really the speed of change we need to see. 50 speed of change we need to see. so what would you like to have seen given i assume you support the government trying to protect the uk from variants of concern critical it goes without saying? we from variants of concern critical it goes without saying?— from variants of concern critical it goes without saying? we want trouble to 0 en u- goes without saying? we want trouble to open no safely _ goes without saying? we want trouble to open up safely and _ goes without saying? we want trouble to open up safely and we _ goes without saying? we want trouble to open up safely and we need - goes without saying? we want trouble to open up safely and we need to - goes without saying? we want trouble to open up safely and we need to be l to open up safely and we need to be guided by experts to do that but let's look at how the uk is opening up let's look at how the uk is opening up compared to the rest of europe. europe in general is much faster and still in a safe way. there were some statistics recently which showed from the opening of the aviation industry that air travel in europe was at about 50% of the prequel rate normal whereas in the uk it was 16,
11:07 am
one in six, so it is a really stark difference i went to see the uk start to benefit more from the success of vaccination programme and to get international travel opened up, still safely but were quickly. nonetheless lets talk about confidence which was mentioned did that report there. we were talking to people who just don't feel confident to go away, and i do wonder whether these changes will be enough to reassure the public and indeed if things were opened up more quickly, whether that would have the desired effect that you would like to see. ., , . ., . desired effect that you would like to see. ., , . , to see. consumer confidence is something _ to see. consumer confidence is something that _ to see. consumer confidence is something that is _ to see. consumer confidence is something that is very - to see. consumer confidence is i something that is very important. to see. consumer confidence is - something that is very important. i understand why some people may be confused, why some people may like to go on holiday because i have been a lot of changes, really depressing to do to find out more if you're lacking in confidence is either speak to travel professionals or we have tips on how you can confidence and all the various changes on regulations on the website and that
11:08 am
might give people a bit of comfort to take that step and go on the holiday date looking forward to going on. holiday date looking forward to auoin on. . .. holiday date looking forward to auoin on. . ~' holiday date looking forward to auoin on. ., ~ ., holiday date looking forward to auoin on. . ~' ., ., holiday date looking forward to auoin on. . .. ., ., , on the beach is the uk's biggest online travel agent. it's removed holidays from sale for the whole of the summer in response to uncertainty around the impact of traffic light requirements and the restrictions still in place in most destinations. zoe harris is its chief customer officer. shejoins us now. do you she joins us now. do you welcome today's news? i she joins us now. do you welcome today's news?— today's news? i think the simplification _ today's news? i think the simplification of - today's news? i think the simplification of the - today's news? i think the l simplification of the traffic today's news? i think the - simplification of the traffic lights is definitely good news, it makes it a bit easier for consumers to understand and keep on top of. but we have to bear in mind that these gradings of different destinations can change at very short notice, so the next announcement is due in three weeks' time but we have seen before there can be changes in between. so whilst it is a positive step and it feels like we're going
11:09 am
in the right direction, at the same time there is still uncertainty about travel for customers and we still won't be selling holidays for august this year. i still won't be selling holidays for august this year.— still won't be selling holidays for august this year. i was going to ask ou about august this year. i was going to ask you about that. _ august this year. i was going to ask you about that, i _ august this year. i was going to ask you about that, i knew _ august this year. i was going to ask you about that, i knew you - august this year. i was going to ask you about that, i knew you stop - you about that, i knew you stop selling holidays over the summer, will today's news encourages you to start selling them september and october? brute start selling them september and october? ~ . , start selling them september and october? ~ ., , ., , ., october? we are selling holidays for se tember october? we are selling holidays for september and _ october? we are selling holidays for september and october, _ october? we are selling holidays for september and october, we - october? we are selling holidays for september and october, we are - september and october, we are monitoring our sales, the vaccination rates across europe, and seeing the logistics of the change regulations, how that is managing to be handled by customers in terms of the tests you have to have. although you now come home, you don't have to quarantine if you have been double vaccinated, you still have to have a test before you travel, before you come back and after you have been back. so we're just keeping a close on how airports are coping with those different regulations for customers coming back into the country and as you say, we are still seeing customers being very cautious about working. i5 seeing customers being very cautious about working-— about working. is that the reason, because i'm _ about working. is that the reason, because i'm trying _ about working. is that the reason, because i'm trying to _ about working. is that the reason, because i'm trying to work- about working. is that the reason, because i'm trying to work out - about working. is that the reason, | because i'm trying to work out why the picture will be different in a
11:10 am
month, from what it is now, is it you think because customers will just be more confident that the system isn't going to change? i think that is true. we are hoping that over the next four weeks we will get greater confidence that the traffic lights and the gradings of those destinations have are going to be with us for some time, albeit the pandemic and covid is very hard to predict. more confidence around that and more confidence operationally that this does become a bit of a new normal now and enough people have been through the system that lessons have been learned and we have confidence in the testing providers, that uk airports can cope with the volumes of customers going back into the uk, and therefore customers are clear about what they are signing up to when they book a holiday. in terms of spying the government has encouraged people on returning from spain to have this gold standard pcr test rather than the cheaper lateral flow test, of course that means more administration. i wonder if the people you are talking to who were
11:11 am
potentially thinking about booking holidays are put off by that. without doubt that test is more expensive and takes longer to have done, so we are just clarifying exactly what advice versus it being a requirement that customers have that and really it is another example of other the announcement last night was good news, there are so changes over time, so that advice has come in from an operation on sunday and we will have to let our customers now who are already on holiday and those customers travelling in the next couple of weeks if that changed.- travelling in the next couple of weeks if that changed. good to talk to ou. weeks if that changed. good to talk to you- many _ weeks if that changed. good to talk to you. many thanks. _ weeks if that changed. good to talk to you. many thanks. thank - weeks if that changed. good to talk to you. many thanks. thank you. i keir starmer has criticised the government travel rules saying frequent changes are bringing chaos for travellers. changes are bringing chaos for travellers-— changes are bringing chaos for travellers. �* ., , travellers. anyone who has been t in: to travellers. anyone who has been trying to organise _ travellers. anyone who has been trying to organise the _ travellers. anyone who has been trying to organise the summer i travellers. anyone who has been i trying to organise the summer has got their head in their hands because almost on a daily basis we
11:12 am
have had a changing system, changing colours, u—turns left right and centre. we have been saying since the beginning of the summer of a simple fight system. we may be edging towards it and i feel very strongly for those families and i hope it helps in going forward, but the big question i have for the government is why on earth have we had to go through this chaos to get there? it is not the first time. last summer we have the chaos of the exams, at christmas we had the chaos of the christmas mixing, and now we have had the summer of chaos about travels and holidays. every time there is a predictable problem the government goes through a wall of chaos before it begins to sort it out. most people don't say they object necessarily to the test. it is just the constant changing. one day they have to do something, next day they have to do something, next day they have to do something, next day they have to do something else, they don't know when they're backing they don't know when they're backing the whole day when they are trying to get back and what they have got comply with, and all they have asked for is what we have asked for, a simple understandable system that puts in place sensible controls for
11:13 am
those that are going on holiday. one in five patients admitted to hospital with covid—19 in england are aged between 18 and 3a — which is four times higher than last winter. that's according to the new chief executive of nhs england, who says there are currentlyjust under 5,000 coronavirus patients in english hospitals. speaking in herfirst television interview since being appointed, amanda pritchard said the numbers of young people affected should be an incentive for others to get vaccinated. it is still very important that for those people who have not yet taken the opportunity to come forward, or they know somebody who hasn't, this is the time. and the reason it is so important is we have as of today, over 5000 people really unwell in hospital. one in five, 20%, are young people. so in that 18 to 30 category. and that compares with one in 20
11:14 am
at the peak injanuary time. i'm nowjoined with toni francom, who is 33 and has been hopitalised with covid and still suffers from sympotoms till this day. it is very good of you to join us here on bbc news. i wonder if you could tell me a little bit more about what happened to you. what about what happened to you. what ha--ened about what happened to you. what happened to _ about what happened to you. what happened to me — about what happened to you. what happened to me was _ about what happened to you. what happened to me was i _ about what happened to you. hast happened to me was i unfortunately had sepsis and was taken into hospital, but they thought it was covid, right at the start of the pandemic. i was put on a board with covid patients. i got covid from the hospital. —— a ward. i had a horrific time. i unfortunately tested positive for seven weeks and needed support by ictu.—
11:15 am
needed support by ict u. you're sa in: needed support by ict u. you're saying you _ needed support by ict u. you're saying you cut _ needed support by ict u. you're saying you cut covid _ needed support by ict u. you're saying you cut covid in - needed support by ict u. you're| saying you cut covid in hospital. how long did you then stay in hospital? how long did you then stay in hosital? ,, ., ' hospital? seven weeks on different wards. it hospital? seven weeks on different wards- it was _ hospital? seven weeks on different wards. it was very _ hospital? seven weeks on different wards. it was very chaotic - hospital? seven weeks on different wards. it was very chaotic and - wards. it was very chaotic and traumatising. i wards. it was very chaotic and traumatising.— wards. it was very chaotic and traumatisinu. ., , ., ., traumatising. i write that you have been in and _ traumatising. i write that you have been in and out _ traumatising. i write that you have been in and out of _ traumatising. i write that you have been in and out of hospital- traumatising. i write that you have been in and out of hospital since i been in and out of hospital since then? , , ., ., ., ,., been in and out of hospital since then? , , ., ., ., ., then? yes. every month for about a week or 10 — then? yes. every month for about a week or 10 days. — then? yes. every month for about a week or 10 days, touch _ then? yes. every month for about a week or 10 days, touch wood, - then? yes. every month for about a week or 10 days, touch wood, i - then? yes. every month for about a | week or 10 days, touch wood, i have been out of hospital for 20 weeks will step but i have got lung and throat damage and they tested me because i might have asthma from covid. ijust can't get up and not be able to breathe at all or i could completely be fined one minute and then not be able to catch my breath then not be able to catch my breath the next minute.—
11:16 am
the next minute. what sort of su ort the next minute. what sort of support have _ the next minute. what sort of support have you _ the next minute. what sort of support have you had - the next minute. what sort of support have you had for- the next minute. what sort of| support have you had for what sounded like symptoms of what is described as long covid? unfortunately my doctors have been absolutely amazing but i feel like i have been let down, the long covid clinic and every time i am scheduled to see the respiratory consultant it gets cancelled because of covid. which makes no sense at all. i messed the end of that. it which makes no sense at all. i i messed the end of that. it makes no sense at all— messed the end of that. it makes no sense at all because _ messed the end of that. it makes no sense at all because covid _ messed the end of that. it makes no sense at all because covid is - messed the end of that. it makes no sense at all because covid is not i sense at all because covid is not going to go away and my family is suffering because it may as well, simple things i do any more. what simple things i do any more. what sort of things? _ simple things i do any more. what sort of things? any _ simple things i do any more. what sort of things? any day _ simple things i do any more. what sort of things? any day things, i l sort of things? any day things, i can't walk— sort of things? any day things, i can't walk up — sort of things? any day things, i can't walk up the _ sort of things? any day things, i can't walk up the stairs, - sort of things? any day things, i can't walk up the stairs, i i sort of things? any day things, i can't walk up the stairs, i get i sort of things? any day things, i | can't walk up the stairs, i get out of breath. i sometimes have to say i can't do things because physically i
11:17 am
just can't do it any more. i am tired all the time. i get brain fog so i forget what i'm saying. it is just not fair. i so i forget what i'm saying. it is just not fair-— just not fair. i am assuming you obviously. _ just not fair. i am assuming you obviously, when _ just not fair. i am assuming you obviously, when you _ just not fair. i am assuming you obviously, when you first i just not fair. i am assuming you obviously, when you first cut i just not fair. i am assuming you i obviously, when you first cut covid, you obviously haven't had a vaccination, it didn't exist then, did it? it vaccination, it didn't exist then, did it? �* ., , ., , did it? it didn't. i was offered throu~h did it? it didn't. i was offered through my — did it? it didn't. i was offered through my journey _ did it? it didn't. i was offered through my journey with i did it? it didn't. i was offered| through my journey with covid did it? it didn't. i was offered i through my journey with covid in the through myjourney with covid in the hospital, i was asked to go on the trial with oxford university and i accepted and i was given one of the trial drug that was used before the vaccine came out, which i think helped me, because i wasn't, i was lucky to be alive. i am now. home lucky to be alive. i am now. have ou lucky to be alive. i am now. have you subsequently _ lucky to be alive. i am now. have you subsequently been _ lucky to be alive. i am now. have you subsequently been vaccinated? yes, i am double vaccinated now. i
11:18 am
had my last one in april. has yes, i am double vaccinated now. i had my last one in april.— had my last one in april. has not made any _ had my last one in april. has not made any difference _ had my last one in april. has not made any difference or— had my last one in april. has not made any difference or is - had my last one in april. has not made any difference or is it i had my last one in april. has not made any difference or is itjustl had my last one in april. has not. made any difference or is itjust to let unfortunately? it made any difference or is it 'ust to let unfortunately?i made any difference or is it 'ust to let unfortunately? it has not made a difference. let unfortunately? it has not made a difference- i— let unfortunately? it has not made a difference. i am _ let unfortunately? it has not made a difference. i am still— let unfortunately? it has not made a difference. i am still very _ let unfortunately? it has not made a difference. i am still very cautious . difference. i am still very cautious of doing things. even now that we don't need to wear masks in england we still wear masks, we still wash our hands and sterilise everywhere, because covid is nothing like anyone has ever experienced ever. it is really good _ has ever experienced ever. it is really good to _ has ever experienced ever. it is really good to talk _ has ever experienced ever. it is really good to talk to you and i am so grateful that you felt able to come on bbc news and tell us about what happened to you. thank you so much. . .. what happened to you. thank you so much. ., ,, ,, , . let's just bring you the latest data from the nhs covid—19 app. figures just released show that in the latest period,
11:19 am
the week ending 28th july, nearly 396,000 in england and wales were pinged after a close contact tested positive with the virus. that compares with around 690,000 pings the previous week. next week, the way the app reaches out to contacts will change as it will begin to look back only two days and not five from the date a person without symptoms has a positive test. day 13 of the tokyo olympics is well under way. let's go to the bbc sport centre and talk to mike bushell, who's has been following all the action. good morning. team gb are celebrating their first gold medal of the day at the tokyo olympics and it's gone to matt walls, in the omnium, the multi—format event in the velodrome. after three energy—sapping races, walls, the 23—year—old from oldham, went into the final event, the 100—lap marathon, as the leader, and he got it right,
11:20 am
tactically and technically, to stay with his rivals and protect this points lead all the way to the line, crossing that in second but with the gold medal secured. it's the team's first track cycling gold medal at the tokyo games. what an achievement and what performance. i what an achievement and what performance-— what an achievement and what performance. what an achievement and what erformance. ., ., ., ., ., ., performance. i managed to get a good lead cominu performance. i managed to get a good lead coming into _ performance. i managed to get a good lead coming into the _ performance. i managed to get a good lead coming into the end, _ performance. i managed to get a good lead coming into the end, so - performance. i managed to get a good lead coming into the end, so i - performance. i managed to get a good lead coming into the end, so i was i lead coming into the end, so i was just playing it really, but it has been a hard day. but i came in that points race with a bit of a lead, which was nice so it gave me a bit of breathing room, and it was a good race. but huge disappointment forjason kenny — he's out of the men's sprint in the quarterfinals. britain's most—decorated olympian, had lost his last—16 race, and had to qualify through the repechage which gave him, a difficult quarterfinalagainst, harrie lavreysen of the netherlands. and the dutch rider won the first two races
11:21 am
to progress. but jack carlin is through to the semi—finals — with an impressive victory, against the experienced maximilian levy, of germany — again, the best of three races, but he won the first two and didn't need the third. earlier, there had been a reminder of the luck you need in the cycling. great britain's katy marchant crashed out of the women's keirin — as she and dutch rider laurine van riessen colided in their quarterfinal. luckily marchant is ok — she said after the race that she was "in the wrong place at the wrong time" as the dutch rider cut across her. but she will go again in the sprint tomorrow. walls' medal is team gb's 16th gold and a 50th overall, after a bronze earlier on the water, for liam heath, while on the athletics track, hopes have been raised for tomorow's sprint relay finals, after the return of one of britain's biggest names, as michael redford reports. and there is dina asher—smith, flying around the bend. this was a sight we did not expect to see, team gb's star sprinter back
11:22 am
from a hamstring injury and back on top. alongside, the foursome won the heat comfortable young created history. a1.5a, that is a new british record. in my head there was never any doubt in my mind that i was not going to be lining up here today because the relay is really important and we got a bronze medal in rio and these ladies are in great shape and are incredibly talented, so i knew that i could rest up and get ready for the team event. with the example set, could the british men follow suit? they could, but not quite as straightforward. second place behind jamaica enough to see them qualify for tomorrow's final which won't include the usa, who also suffered disappointment in the men's110 metres hurdles final as grant holloway had gone 2a races unbeaten but lost the one that mattered most.
11:23 am
jamaica re—writing the record books with britain finishing in seventh. from sprinting on track to sprinting in a canoe, where liam heath was aiming to defend his olympic title. a poor start meant he had work to do. his comeback, though, was impressive. there is going to be inches in it. sadly he ran out of time, a third olympic games for heath ends with a fourth olympic medal. i didn't reach my full potential in terms of peak speed but still happy with the performance. it's hard to put into words. it's what you are working towards, just to be at your best for these events. and i've learned so much on myjourney. one journey is not over yet. a winner of the semifinal in the boxing flyweight event, winning on a split decision meaning gold is in touching distance, as was this cameraman when one trick in the skateboarding did not quite go to plan. down, but not out, and still professional enough to keep filming.
11:24 am
i love the way cameraman said of himself. but as all sport for now. let's speak to mark robinson — team gb's olympic performance managerfor sailing. the team came top of the sailing medal table — winning three golds, — in the a70 class, the a9er and the finn — as well as a silver and a bronze. grey tabby with his and many congratulations to you. why are we so good? we congratulations to you. why are we so aood? ~ ., ., , ., congratulations to you. why are we so nood? ., .,, ., ,.,, so good? we have a strong history for the past _ so good? we have a strong history for the past two — so good? we have a strong history for the past two decades, - so good? we have a strong history for the past two decades, either i so good? we have a strong history. for the past two decades, either top of the medal table in sailing or a close second, so it is mainly due to the fact of the national lottery support we get that we run deep squads i can play in two or three or four olympic cycles events so we
11:25 am
have a platter of at least we can take to the games. i have a platter of at least we can take to the games.— have a platter of at least we can take to the games. i wanted to ask ou what take to the games. i wanted to ask you what makes — take to the games. i wanted to ask you what makes you _ take to the games. i wanted to ask you what makes you an _ take to the games. i wanted to ask you what makes you an olympic. you what makes you an olympic winning sailor because there was a lot of discussion around the kind of build that helps olympic swimmers but what about sailing? do you need to be built on a certain way or is that relevant?— to be built on a certain way or is that relevant? there are 10 events in sailin: that relevant? there are 10 events in sailing or _ that relevant? there are 10 events in sailing or 10 _ that relevant? there are 10 events in sailing or 10 classes _ that relevant? there are 10 events in sailing or 10 classes a _ that relevant? there are 10 events in sailing or 10 classes a process i in sailing or 10 classes a process we call them and each of them has a difficult physical requirement, tall, short or heavy or light, so we can basically fit every athlete that comes our way into a certain category of equipment, far different to rowing where they are all generally a specific type. 50 to rowing where they are all generally a specific type. so at five foot is _ generally a specific type. so at five foot is hope _ generally a specific type. so at five foot is hope for— generally a specific type. so at five foot is hope for me. it i generally a specific type. so at five foot is hope for me. it is i five foot is hope for me. it is worth you talking us through some of the individual performances we have seenin the individual performances we have seen in tokyo. it the individual performances we have seen in tokyo-_ the individual performances we have seen in tokyo. it has been compared to rio where — seen in tokyo. it has been compared to rio where scott _ seen in tokyo. it has been compared to rio where scott won _ seen in tokyo. it has been compared to rio where scott won with - seen in tokyo. it has been compared to rio where scott won with a i seen in tokyo. it has been compared to rio where scott won with a race i to rio where scott won with a race to rio where scott won with a race to spare, it is a distinct
11:26 am
difference in this game is where the margins are much finer. more like sprinting in athletics. in the a9er and the fairand sprinting in athletics. in the a9er and the fair and it was only won on the last leg of the 11th race of the series, typically we see one or two classes that extend or even went before the medal race. in the a70 they went in with the big points buffer going into the medal race so just had to keep close touch with those in the silver and bronze medal winning positions to take gold. it has shown us there is such a narrow gap between winning and losing. what does it mean for the sport when the team does so well in the olympics? it is what drives british sailing, to be the top saving nation. we need to be the top saving nation. we need to win a lot of codes to get that, two or three goals, if the team only take 15 athletes to the games are 75
11:27 am
athletes in the british sailing team and they are all inspired by the performance and trying to go for paris 202a. performance and trying to go for paris 2024-— performance and trying to go for paris 2024. ., , ., ., .., paris 2024. final question, what can we exect paris 2024. final question, what can we expect in — paris 2024. final question, what can we expect in paris? _ paris 2024. final question, what can we expect in paris? we _ paris 2024. final question, what can we expect in paris? we have - paris 2024. final question, what can we expect in paris? we have a i paris 2024. final question, what can we expect in paris? we have a few. we expect in paris? we have a few new classes. _ we expect in paris? we have a few new classes, kite _ we expect in paris? we have a few new classes, kite boarding - we expect in paris? we have a few new classes, kite boarding is i we expect in paris? we have a few new classes, kite boarding is in, i new classes, kite boarding is in, the men's and women's a70 merge into a mixed gender event, but we probably see a bit more wind than we have seen injapan, racing in marseille and the south of france, some beautiful scenery and backdrop just as it has been here so we will see some fast and exciting new classes. , ~' see some fast and exciting new classes. , ,, , ., see some fast and exciting new classes. , «i ., ., ., , classes. sounds like you are already lookin: classes. sounds like you are already looking ahead- _ classes. sounds like you are already looking ahead. good _ classes. sounds like you are already looking ahead. good to _ classes. sounds like you are already looking ahead. good to talk - classes. sounds like you are already looking ahead. good to talk to i classes. sounds like you are already looking ahead. good to talk to you | looking ahead. good to talk to you but many congratulations. as we have been hearing, one in five patients admitted to hospital with covid—19 in england are aged between 18 and 3a — which is four times higher than last winter.
11:28 am
that's according to the new chief executive of nhs england, who says there are currentlyjust under 5,000 coronavirus patients in english hospitals. to explore this further, i am nowjoined by dr rupert pearse who is speaking on behalf of the intensive care society. thank you very much forjoining us. it is a striking figure, one in five hospital admissions in england under the age of 35. how worrying is that? can you hear me? you're shaking your head which suggest you might be able to but i think there might be a few problems there. we will try to get back to you, and apologies for that. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole. hello again. many more of us today are likely to see some rain or indeed some showers as we go through the course
11:29 am
of the day. it's been a relatively bright start in eastern areas, but it will cloud over through the course of the afternoon, with rain arriving here later, and some of that rain will be heavier across north wales and north—west england, preceded by some heavy showers and followed on by some heavy showers as well, which could well be thundery. with some heavy and prolonged rain across northern ireland this afternoon, there is the risk of some localised flooding. and windy in areas adjacent to the irish sea. now, overnight the winds will strengthen across southern counties as well as north—east scotland. we are looking at an array of rain or showers, still some heavy in there. but not a particularly cold night. temperatures falling to between about 12 and 15. tomorrow low pressure still dominating our weather. the heaviest showers likely to be across northern ireland, the northern half of wales, northern england and scotland. here there is the risk again of localised flooding, but in between there will be some sunshine.
11:30 am
hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: fully vaccinated travellers will no longer need to quarantine on arrival from france as part of a shake—up of coronavirus travel rules in england, scotland and northern ireland. team gb wins its first gold medal in the velodrome as matt walls takes home gold in the men's omnium. the new chief executive of nhs england says one in five people being admitted to hospital with covid are now aged between 18 and 3a. police investigating the online racist abuse of england players following the euro 2020 final have arrested 11 people. the rugby league world cup — which was due to be held in england in the autumn — has been postponed until 2022, after defending champions australia, and new zealand, withdrew citing
11:31 am
covid concerns. uk adults spent nearly a third of their waking hours watching tv and online videos last year, according to a new report from regulator ofcom. police investigating the online racist abuse of england players following the euro 2020 final have arrested 11 people. the uk football policing unit says it received 600 reports of offensive messages, around a third of which were judged to be criminal. our home affairs correspondent talked us through the detail. of those allegations received by police, we're talking about 207 cases where they believe an offence may have been committed, they have identified... these are offences on social media, you will remember that
11:32 am
following the penalty shoot—out in the euro 2020 final when england sadly didn't win the match, that marcus rashford, jayden sancho and bukayo saka were abused very quickly after that incident on the pitch online. police say they have identified approximately 35 social media accounts so far and they have got requests in to social media companies for the names of the people behind another 50 cases. they have arrested 11 people so far, including a 21—year—old man and a a9—year—old woman from christchurch in dorset, as well as men from various parts of the country in their a0s and 50s. the organisers of this year's rugby league world cup in england say they've postponed the tournament until 2022.
11:33 am
its chief executive said it had become unfeasible to carry on. the decision had been expected after new zealand, and the champions australia pulled out two weeks ago citing concerns over coronavirus in the uk. i think it will take some time for international rugby league to recover from this. international rugby league to recoverfrom this. i hope international rugby league to recover from this. i hope that we can be a beacon of light. we will certainly prioritise player choice. we take our responsibilities very seriously and we are determined to stage the biggest investment into rugby league world cup. it's a shame that cannot be now but it's about making tough decisions and being responsible and we've done this in the best interests of notjust the tournament but the sport of rugby league. let's speak to sam bradley from the british equestrian federation. team gb picked up two golds in the individualjumping and the team dressage as well as a silver and two bronzes.
11:34 am
congratulations, you must be delighted with how the team did. it was close at times, wasn't it? yeah, it's been fantastic, _ was close at times, wasn't it? yeah, it's been fantastic, those _ was close at times, wasn't it? yeah, it's been fantastic, those five i it's been fantastic, those five medals but by the slimmest of margins and still want to go in the team with showjumping over the next couple of days. tell team with show 'umping over the next couple of days.— team with show “umping over the next couple of days.— couple of days. tell us what we can exect. couple of days. tell us what we can expect- there _ couple of days. tell us what we can expect. there was _ couple of days. tell us what we can expect. there was an _ couple of days. tell us what we can expect. there was an explosion i expect. there was an explosion yesterday _ expect. there was an explosion yesterday with _ expect. there was an explosion yesterday with that _ expect. there was an explosion yesterday with that fantastic i yesterday with that fantastic individual gold but ben will go again tomorrow, our last opportunity for a team medal so i'm sure they will be really excited for that and i think we are in a great position to bring one more home.- i think we are in a great position to bring one more home. there so much focus _ to bring one more home. there so much focus on _ to bring one more home. there so much focus on the _ to bring one more home. there so much focus on the rider— to bring one more home. there so much focus on the rider but i to bring one more home. there so much focus on the rider but how i much focus on the rider but how important is the relationship with the horse? it’s important is the relationship with the horse? �* , ~ important is the relationship with the horse? �*, . ,, ,, the horse? it's huge. when you spend time with these _ the horse? it's huge. when you spend time with these people, _ the horse? it's huge. when you spend time with these people, you _ the horse? it's huge. when you spend time with these people, you realise i time with these people, you realise what this bond between the animal and human is. it's quite special and
11:35 am
quite unique and it is a partnership. one is no good without the other so it's incredible. explosion was a terrific horse but not everyone can ride that horse. ben is the one that can ride it and you might have heard him talk yesterday about the horse communicating with him in that round which, to the rest of us, probably sounds fanciful but to them that's the bond they have and how they work together. i did the bond they have and how they work touether. ., ., ., ., �* , together. i did hear that and that's really interesting. _ together. i did hear that and that's really interesting. how— together. i did hear that and that's really interesting. how long i together. i did hear that and that's really interesting. how long have l really interesting. how long have you been in development to get british equestrian to this point? because we come home with a sack full of medals and in some ways it looks easy. full of medals and in some ways it looks easy-— looks easy. that's when it is done well but it — looks easy. that's when it is done well but it looks _ looks easy. that's when it is done well but it looks like _ looks easy. that's when it is done well but it looks like that. - looks easy. that's when it is done well but it looks like that. like i well but it looks like that. like anything in life, it's anything but and i'm sure many of us can remember back to atlanta in 96 with the one medal for redgrave, back to atlanta in 96 with the one medalfor redgrave, no back to atlanta in 96 with the one medal for redgrave, no equestrian medals and since the advent of lottery funding and everyone playing every and supporting us through that, it has led to the
11:36 am
transformation of british sport and ourselves being one of those so a huge amount of hard work for a lot of people behind the scenes and that brilliant support from the british public through playing the lottery every day. it's a lot of hard work for everyone, no question. what for everyone, no question. what about those _ for everyone, no question. what about those young _ for everyone, no question. what about those young people i for everyone, no question. what about those young people who perhaps have been inspired by what they see and think, i'd like to give this a 90, and think, i'd like to give this a go, but perhaps put off by thinking, i don't know where to start and perhaps i haven't got enough money? absolutely, it's interesting that when you look at our team at the games, many of them have come from very normal backgrounds. ben would talk about his struggles to make it initially in this sport. oliver started as a milkman. it's possible whenever you come from and suddenly you've got to battle hard but that's probably a feature, an inner drive
11:37 am
for anyone that makes it to the top so you can absolutely do it wherever you've come from but it's going to need a lot of hard work butjust get out there, get writing, there are opportunities we are working really hard at grassroots level as a sport to make it more accessible and give everyone the opportunity to ride. sam bradley, so good to talk to you from the british equestrian federation and congratulations to you and everyone involved in the sport. thank you.— the bank of england's monetary policy committee will publish their decisin on interest rates and the uk economy at midday. i can get more on this from our business presenter, victoria fritz. we can expect perhaps more descent. this is what we are looking for. last month's meeting was a bit of a damp squib and anti—climactic.
11:38 am
there's a lot of chat at the moment in economic circles about inflation and rising prices and this is happening right across the world. is it as much transitory as bankers across the world would believe or is it a permanent feature of the recovery of major economies right across the world? what do you do about it if so? when do you raise rates and what you do about the flow of cheap money that many economies including our own have become hooked on, including the financial markets that support them? so the big question is what's going to happen to interest rates, what is going to happen to quantitative easing of bond buying? we are expecting the rate won't change. it's at 0.1%, tiny, and the current targets of quantitative easing will remain at £895 billion, quite a lot of money. but what's interesting is what will happen in terms of who says what and
11:39 am
where are we on the outlook for the future. economists here are divided. i'm going to bring in elizabeth martin's hsbc. a lot of this sounds highfalutin. how could this matter to me, bond buying? people might want to put the kettle on instead and not listen to this but what i want to get from you is a sense of why this matters, why does the timing, the voting and views of these eight people on the monetary policy committee matter to ordinary people? i policy committee matter to ordinary --eole? .. . policy committee matter to ordinary eo le? ,, ., , ., policy committee matter to ordinary --eole? «i ., ,, ., , people? i think what everyone wants to know is when _ people? i think what everyone wants to know is when interest _ people? i think what everyone wants to know is when interest rates i people? i think what everyone wants to know is when interest rates are i to know is when interest rates are going _ to know is when interest rates are going up— to know is when interest rates are going up and if we do have an economy— going up and if we do have an economy that is recovering quite well as— economy that is recovering quite well as we — economy that is recovering quite well as we seem to have an inflation pressure _ well as we seem to have an inflation pressure is — well as we seem to have an inflation pressure is picking up and many people — pressure is picking up and many people at— pressure is picking up and many people at home may have noticed that if they— people at home may have noticed that if they are _ people at home may have noticed that if they are buying their train tickets— if they are buying their train tickets or— if they are buying their train tickets or their supermarket shopping, you may have felt the impact _ shopping, you may have felt the impact of— shopping, you may have felt the impact of higher inflation already. when _ impact of higher inflation already. when you — impact of higher inflation already. when you have those factors together, the bank of england starts
11:40 am
together, the bank of england starts to think— together, the bank of england starts to think about raising interest rates — to think about raising interest rates and _ to think about raising interest rates and it affects all of us, through— rates and it affects all of us, through our savings accounts, mortgage payments, that kind of thing. _ mortgage payments, that kind of thing. so — mortgage payments, that kind of thing, so the signalling that we will get — thing, so the signalling that we will get today from the bank of england — will get today from the bank of england may be a little bit eccentric for some people, we'll be talking _ eccentric for some people, we'll be talking about quantitative easing and whether the bank of england should _ and whether the bank of england should stop doing that sooner rather than later, _ should stop doing that sooner rather than later, but ultimately what it is pointing towards is our interest rates _ is pointing towards is our interest rates -- — is pointing towards is our interest rates -- are — is pointing towards is our interest rates —— are interest rates going to id rates —— are interest rates going to go up? _ rates —— are interest rates going to go up? if_ rates —— are interest rates going to go up? if they were to stop doing this programme a bit earlier, that might— this programme a bit earlier, that might signal they are thinking we are a _ might signal they are thinking we are a little bit worried about inflation _ are a little bit worried about inflation and need to at some point start thinking about raising interest— start thinking about raising interest rates. 30 start thinking about raising interest rates.— start thinking about raising interest rates. ., «i interest rates. so far the bank has been pooh-poohing _ interest rates. so far the bank has been pooh-poohing the _ interest rates. so far the bank has been pooh-poohing the obvious i interest rates. so far the bank has i been pooh-poohing the obvious price been pooh—poohing the obvious price rises are set, commodity price rises for example. how long can they maintain this narrative that it's all short term i'm going to work its way through the system? because at the moment, there is an argument to not do anything much about inflation
11:41 am
but at what point does that change? i think there's a little bit of disagreement now on the committee. there's a couple of members of the monetary committee who have said they think risks to inflation are to they think risks to inflation are to the upside and there are two strands to inflation at least, one is on the manufacturing side, the global shipping costs which have risen a lot so that's really hurting companies trying to import goods from asia etc but then we have some domestic inflation as well which is things like wages and input costs therefore companies who are finding it harder to hire people and having to pay them a little bit more so we've got some high quite damp —— quite high wage growth year so you've got inflation. the bank of england say it's temporary and as a supply bottleneck and is a natural outcome following the pandemic and the shocks we've had there and it will all fall away and i think inflation probably does fall away or will start to fall back again from
11:42 am
next year, but there might be some nervousness on the way, particularly because the bank of england told us last time in may, they told us inflation is going to be higher in the next few months but even knowing inflation was going to be higher, their forecast inflation was going to be higher, theirforecast was inflation was going to be higher, their forecast was still too low, inflation came in even higher than they were expecting so i think there will be some debate around the transitory nature or otherwise of inflation and what should be done about it. . �* , inflation and what should be done about it. ., �* , ., , about it. that's right, it was the second-largest _ about it. that's right, it was the second-largest forecasting i about it. that's right, it was the | second-largest forecasting error about it. that's right, it was the i second-largest forecasting error for second—largest forecasting error for the on record last time so a lot of debate on whether or not they are actually putting on the right numbers and coming out with the right outcomes. thanks very much, elizabeth, i know we will both be looking for that number at 12 o'clock. one more story before i go, rebecca. if you spent a0 years building a business empire, how would you feel about handing it over to your future son—in—law? this is what mike ashley will —— who will be
11:43 am
familiar as the founder of sports direct is doing. he wants to hand over the reins to his future son—in—law michael murray as of next year. he's not leaving completely, he will remain on the board, but michael murray is currently in charge of transformation and the head of elevation which is a interesting business card and he's looking to move this business into the future. there's been some significant warnings about the future of house of fraser, the department stores, whether they will be able to keep going in their current guise. lots of concerns from the company today about the impact of business rates when they come backin of business rates when they come back in full swing and also about whether or not we will have future pandemics, future lock downs which will shut bricks and mortar businesses and leave businesses like department stores like house of fraser quite exposed. some interesting corporate news as well. and we will have that interesting
11:44 am
decision at 12 o'clock. keep your eyes peeled. as we have been hearing, one in five patients admitted to hospital with covid—19 in england are aged between 18 and 3a, which is four times higher than last winter. that's according to the new chief executive of nhs england, who says there are currentlyjust under 5,000 coronavirus patients in english hospitals. to explore this further, i am nowjoined by dr rupert pearse who is speaking on behalf of the intensive care society. thank you for your patience, i know we've been having technical problems but hopefully you can hear me now. it's a striking figure, one in five hospital admissions in england below the age of 35. how surprised are you? in the age of 35. how surprised are ou? ., , , ., , ., the age of 35. how surprised are ou? .,, ., ., ., you? in hospitals we are not that surrised you? in hospitals we are not that surprised at _ you? in hospitals we are not that surprised at all. _ you? in hospitals we are not that surprised at all. we've _ you? in hospitals we are not that surprised at all. we've been i you? in hospitals we are not that i surprised at all. we've been seeing young, fit patients who haven't been
11:45 am
lucky enough to get vaccinated coming in for some time. i've been caring for young, fit men in their 30s with no medical problems whatsoever, very healthy, muscular people. i've been looking after young pregnant women as well so this announcement is not a surprise to us in hospitals. share announcement is not a surprise to us in hospitals-— in hospitals. are all the people ou're in hospitals. are all the people you're seeing _ in hospitals. are all the people you're seeing in _ in hospitals. are all the people you're seeing in hospitals i in hospitals. are all the people you're seeing in hospitals not l you're seeing in hospitals not vaccinated or are some of them vaccinated?— vaccinated or are some of them vaccinated? initially in this latest wave we were — vaccinated? initially in this latest wave we were seeing _ vaccinated? initially in this latest wave we were seeing mainly i wave we were seeing mainly unvaccinated patients or patients who had had some sort of reason why their immune system might not work as well. increasingly as a virus has spread so widely in such a large number of people —— and such a large number of people —— and such a large number of people are infected, some of the people who get covid are vaccinated but that's more a function ofjust vaccinated but that's more a function of just the vaccinated but that's more a function ofjust the sheer weight of numbers and terms of infections rather than because the vaccinations aren't working and they are proving
11:46 am
very effective. aren't working and they are proving very effective-— very effective. what would you say to lose young _ very effective. what would you say to lose young people _ very effective. what would you say to lose young people who - very effective. what would you say to lose young people who are i very effective. what would you say to lose young people who are still| to lose young people who are still sceptical about having the vaccine? —— to those young people who are sceptical? it’s -- to those young people who are scetical? �*, a, , -- to those young people who are scetical? v t, , a, -- to those young people who are sceptical?— sceptical? it's always right to ask auestions sceptical? it's always right to ask questions about _ sceptical? it's always right to ask questions about your _ sceptical? it's always right to ask questions about your health - sceptical? it's always right to ask questions about your health and l questions about your health and medicines and the risks and benefits, that's a mature thing to do, but get your information from a trusted source, talk to your gp, the bbc news website is very good for trusted information, the nhs website is very useful. but covid is a very real disease that causes very real harm to people of all age groups. young people themselves are at risk but also family, their parents, grandparents and so on, are at risk from catching the virus from them. is the flip side that you are seeing fewer older people that have been vaccinated admitted to hospital? is that happening?— vaccinated admitted to hospital? is that happening? certainly we would have seen in _ that happening? certainly we would have seen in this _ that happening? certainly we would have seen in this way _ that happening? certainly we would have seen in this way more - that happening? certainly we would have seen in this way more than - that happening? certainly we would l have seen in this way more than four times as many patients, had we not
11:47 am
had vaccinations in place. if you compare the current wave to the one we had injanuary of this year we are seeing about a quarter of the number of hospital admissions and a lot of those patients were a little bit older, the median age, around 60, and some of those patients would have other medical problems as well. not exclusively but certainly if you compare that to what we are seeing at the moment, we are definitely seeing a younger group of patients and more patients who are pregnant and more patients who are pregnant and fewer patients with those complex medical problems that we saw before. ., ., . complex medical problems that we saw before. ., ., ~ complex medical problems that we saw before. ., ., . ., ~ complex medical problems that we saw before. ., ., ., before. doctor pearce, thank you for our before. doctor pearce, thank you for your thoughts _ before. doctor pearce, thank you for your thoughts and _ before. doctor pearce, thank you for your thoughts and insights. - a wildfire that has raged for more than a week has now reached a thermal power station on turkey's aegean coast. the coal—fired facility was already evacuated and flammable and explosive materials were removed
11:48 am
in advance of the flames. in greece, fires exacerbated by a heatwave are also causing severe damage. the bbc�*s lebo diseko reports. one step closer to safety. seeking refuge from wildfires in turkey's southwest, hundreds forced into journeys like this just to stay afloat. here is the epicentre of concern. a thermal power plant storing thousands of tonnes of coal. authorities desperately try to contain it and remove chemicals, coal and other flammable materials. they say its main units are not seriously damaged. despite being part of the worst wildfires in the country's history, according to the president. translation: as we continue our efforts on the eighth day, - for example, today we have faced
11:49 am
a power plant. hopefully we will get over this before it spreads entirely. there have been dozens of blazes across turkey's south, many now under control, but some remain heartbreakingly alight. translation: we are not making a movie here. - this is not hollywood. it is turkey and turkey is burning furiously. as you see, all the crew here are working voluntarily with our own efforts. but we are helpless and there is nobody relieving us. we are so desperate. in greece, in the grip of its own heatwave, more flames tearing through a pine forest. with rolling hills and little visibility hampering rescue efforts, it is no surprise over 150 houses are said to have burned. with this monastery
11:50 am
surrounded by fire. the northern suburbs of athens ablaze, as the mayor of olympia calls for help to stop it encroaching on the ancient home of the olympic games. there are few homes the fire isn't prepared to enter, with further extreme conditions predicted soon. more than 10,000 people have now made thejourney across the english channel in small boats this year. yesterday a82 migrants reached the uk on 21 boats, a new record for a single day. crossings have resumed in recent days following a spell of bad weather. uk adults spent a third of their waking hours in 2020 watching tv and online video. that's one of the findings of ofcom's annual survey
11:51 am
of our media habits. the regulator says subscription services such as netflix were the big beneficiaries as repeated lockdowns left millions at home looking for entertainment. here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones. like many of us, the oakley family spent much of 2020 glued to screens, though not necessarily altogether. mum and dad were in front of the main telly, arun, their son, spent lots of time gaming, chatting to friends and watching youtube videos. but it is streaming services, not broadcast tv, which were big for all of them. increasingly, it is just news and current affairs really, it's what we're watching on broadcast. otherwise it is streaming. almost everything else is streamed via one service or another. arun, do you watch any television? almost none. i'm usually watching youtube on netflix. | ofcom's annual snapshot of our media
11:52 am
habit shows we spent an average of five hours and a0 minutes a day watching tv or online video in 2020. that's up 47 minutes on the year before. much of the increases is down to the fact that the time watching subscription streaming services almost doubled to an hour and five minutes a day. the biggest player, netflix, is now in more than half of all uk homes. with hit series like bridgerton, netflix now has more subscribers than sky, virgin and the other uk paid tv providers put together. what we are seeing is that younger people are migrating from traditional tv to really engaging in these streaming services where they can watch what they want when they want on their own device, whether that's netflix or youtube. but we're now seeing older audiences also catching up and turning to these streaming services. so 2020 was the year britain became a streaming nation with traditional broadcast tv something for other people and set to decline. but is this a permanent change and will we want to continue to pay for the likes of netflix, amazon prime, now tv, disney+, or will we start
11:53 am
switching some of them off? we had a total of six streaming services subscribed at one point. that has now kind of slimmed down to four at the moment and i think another one will be dropping off soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech ted podcast... one other change in our media habits — more than half of uk homes now have a smart speaker. an internet connection, not an aerial or satellite dish, is becoming the key way we all get access to entertainment. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. nearly 90% of the adult population in england has had their first dose of the coronavirus vaccine. many of them delivered at large venues like the one set up at ashton gate stadium in bristol. when it opened injanuary it was the uk's first mass vaccination hub. but with such a high rate of take—up, these huge centres
11:54 am
reports. callu m callum and ellie are amongst the last to get their jabs callum and ellie are amongst the last to get theirjabs here. it callum and ellie are amongst the last to get theirjabs here.- last to get their 'abs here. it was 'ust a last to get their 'abs here. it was just a scratch. — last to get theirjabs here. it was just a scratch. it _ last to get theirjabs here. it was just a scratch. it was _ last to get theirjabs here. it was just a scratch. it was january - last to get theirjabs here. it was | just a scratch. it was january when the prime minister _ just a scratch. it was january when the prime minister came - just a scratch. it was january when the prime minister came to - just a scratch. it was january when the prime minister came to open i just a scratch. it was january when i the prime minister came to open the west's biggest vaccination hub. tara has been wielding the needle from the start. she's seen her clientele get younger and younger. it the start. she's seen her clientele get younger and younger.- get younger and younger. it was really cute — get younger and younger. it was really cute because _ get younger and younger. it was really cute because we - get younger and younger. it was really cute because we had - get younger and younger. it was really cute because we had a - get younger and younger. it was really cute because we had a lotj get younger and younger. it was i really cute because we had a lot of the older generation and for many of them it was the first time they had been out in ages so they were coming in fully dressed up and smartly dressed and the time per patient was a lot longer because we had longer chats with them where now, especially for the younger generation, they want to get in and out. i wouldn't say they are less bothered but more concerned about getting to the pub afterwards! but
11:55 am
the football and rugby seasons beckon with crowds due back on saturday. city at home to blackpool. so it's time for vaccination to stop and sport to start. it so it's time for vaccination to stop and sport to start.— and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever— and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever and _ and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever and i _ and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever and i think _ and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever and i think it's - and sport to start. it couldn't go on forever and i think it's an - on forever and i think it's an important milestone that things are slowly getting back to normal. we all wanted to get back to normal with crowds back in seats, we wanted to get live entertainment back so today being the last day is a big milestone and an important milestone to return to normality in bristol. but nhs bosses know this pandemic is far from over. but nhs bosses know this pandemic is far from over-— far from over. we've still got a lona wa far from over. we've still got a long way to — far from over. we've still got a long way to go _ far from over. we've still got a long way to go so _ far from over. we've still got a long way to go so the - far from over. we've still got a long way to go so the younger| long way to go so the younger population are coming forwards are slower_ population are coming forwards are slower than the older population where _ slower than the older population where and there's still a lot of second — where and there's still a lot of second vaccinations to get through and that— second vaccinations to get through and that eight week time interval for second vaccination comes along. we need _ for second vaccination comes along. we need all— for second vaccination comes along. we need all the time about new cohorts — we need all the time about new cohorts of— we need all the time about new cohorts of younger people being offered — cohorts of younger people being offered vaccination so i think we are in_ offered vaccination so i think we are in it — offered vaccination so i think we are in it for— offered vaccination so i think we are in it for some time yet.
11:56 am
fittingly, _ are in it for some time yet. fittingly, the last to be vaccinated here will be the —— among the first to use it as a stadium. the bristol buyers rugby team have been offered it for the appointment for their second jabs. a suitable end to a remarkable chapter in the history of ashton gate. too many victims of fraud receive a "poor service" from police and are being denied justice, according to her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary and fire and rescue services. the watchdog says the crime is treated as a "low—priority" or "victimless", and more officers need to be working on fraud cases. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole kirkwood. hello again. some of us have already seen quite a bit of rain this morning. for others, it is yet to arrive, but more of us will see rain today than we have done in the last few days and it's also going to be windier. the strongest winds will be in areas adjacent to the irish sea.
11:57 am
what's happening is low pressure is coming in with its attendant fronts, so a dry and bright start in the east will be usurped by this area of low pressure coming in, introducing thicker cloud and then later on, some rain. so, there are some shows in scotland, northern england and here is the rain moving steadily from the southwest towards the northeast. as we go through the day with the cloud building ahead. behind it, a return to some showers, some of which will be heavy and thundery and we're looking at some prolonged heavy showers across northern ireland this afternoon, which could lead to some issues with localised flooding. temperatures today, 16—22, down on the 23s and 2as we saw widely yesterday. through this evening and overnight, the strongest winds will be across southern england and northeast scotland. we continue with an array of showers, some of which will be heavy and some rain pushing northwards. overnight lows, 12—15, so it's not going to be a particularly cold night in prospect. for the rest of friday,
11:58 am
low pressure still very much dominating our weather, so we have got bands of showers rotating around it, some of them merging to give some heavier downpours, especially the northern half of wales, northern england, central and southern scotland and northern ireland, where there is the risk of localised flooding once again. still strong wind, gusty wind across southern and northeast scotland, with temperatures 16—22. as we move through friday into the weekend, low—pressure drifts further northwards, you can see fronts wrapped around and we have another front coming the south. this one introducing some rain across the channel islands and southern counties through the day and for the rest of us, we still have a lot of showers or rain wrapped around at low pressure, courtesy of the weather front which could give some heavy downpours as well. in between, some brighter skies. still quite breezy too. temperatures, i7—20. as for the outlook, it remains unsettled with rain or indeed showers, but by tuesday it looks like something drier is coming our way.
11:59 am
12:00 pm
watching on bbc one, please switch over to bbc two.

116 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on