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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 5, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news i'm xxxx. this is bbc news. the headlines... fully vaccinated people returning to england, scotland and northern ireland from france will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. we want our travel industry to be successful and ideally in the ideal world, i make no bones about it, i wish that people could just travel freely without any of this bureaucracy or tests or anything else. the belarusian sprinter at the centre of an olympic row with her own government has arrived in poland after being given a humanitarian visa. they said to me, plea does come back to belarus_ they said to me, plea does come back to belarus and it was the reason why i went_ to belarus and it was the reason why i went back— to belarus and it was the reason why i went back to poland. another gold for team gb injapan, as matt walls
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triumphs in the velodrome — taking the olympics medal tally to 50. a wild fire that has raged for eight days in turkey reaches a thermal power plant on the aegean coast. the government has defended the way donations are handled by the conservative party, saying there was "nothing wrong" with people giving money to political parties. and, uk adults spent more than a third of their waking hours watching tv and online video last year, because of the pandemic. good afternoon. welcome to bbc news. british holiday—makers who are fully vaccinated can more easily travel to france this summer, as part of significant changes to the covid travel rules that
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will come into force in the early hours of sunday. france will be brought into line with other amber list countries, so anyone who's had both doses of a vaccine will no longer have to quarantine when arriving in england, scotland or northern ireland. wales is due to make a decision shortly. india, bahrain, qatar and the united arab emirates will switch from red to amber, meaning arrivals from those countries will no longer have to quarantine in government—approved accommodation. while austria, germany, slovenia, slovakia, latvia, romania and norway will be moved onto the green list. but mexico and georgia have been added to the red list — the highest level of restrictions. up to 6,000 british residents are currently in mexico — and if they can't get back before sunday morning they will have to quarantine in a hotel at their own expense. the welsh government is expected to announce this afternoon whether they will adopt the same rules as the rest of the uk. with the latest, here's our transport correspondent caroline davies. a near—empty swimming pool, a few tents pitched, and no—one propping up the bar.
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this would normally be the busiest time of the year at this campsite in western france, but at the moment, they are half empty. so happy about it. we couldn't understand why we were on the amber—plus list anyway, to start with. we've had so many cancellations as a result of it and we're over the moon now. the amber—plus was a bit nonsensical to us because infection rates were lower here in france. ferry companies are hoping this will give a much—needed boost to passenger numbers. in terms of demand, we know it's out there because we know how many people visit our website, how many people are looking for prices. we expect that to pick up sharply, people will be able to book and travel. across the channel, these british holiday—makers are staying home. not this year. due to the pandemic we feel that holidaying in the uk
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is a lot better and safer for us. we've come here for a week and we probably would have gone to spain with the family and kids, but, obviously, it's a bit risky with flight restrictions. we have already had to change our holiday — i work for the nhs, i couldn't quarantine when i get back — so this is it for us this year. these changes are for england, scotland and northern ireland. wales are yet to say if they will follow. there are new additions to the green list including germany, but out of the seven added, only two will allow non—vaccinated tourists without quarantine. spain is still amber, but the government is now advising passengers to have the more expensive pcr test rather than the cheaper lateral flow test before they depart for the uk. now, we set a very high specification, so—called that's helpful. now, we set a very high
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specification, so—called the sensitivity, and specificity for that test, which in the case of spain means virtually everyone is already taking a pcr test. that's helpful. countries including the uae and india will also move from red to amber, meaning arrivals don't need to quarantine if they are double—jabbed in the uk, us or europe. although the travel industry are pleased more of the world is opening up, many feel it's too slow. quite frankly, it is happening at a real snails pace, so seven more countries coming on, none of which are the traditional holiday destinations that people would go to. country by country, more of the world is opening up to uk travellers, but well into summer after months of uncertainty, the question is how many will want to make the trip? caroline davies, bbc news. 0ur correspondent chris bockman is in a village in south western france. this is going to be music to the ears of many holiday—makers who need to get back to uk france. yes indeed. maybe _ to get back to uk france. yes indeed. maybe for— to get back to uk france. 133 indeed. maybe for those getting back but i will expect a huge wave of two
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coming here. this cobbled street behind me is usually a pipe beautiful marketplace with amazing local produce and food and has lots of bits here but i don't think many brits will be coming, one because this is coming now after the first week of august and most people plan their holidays in may and june and quite frankly there is no accommodation from brits unless they have second homes are yet many do have second homes are yet many do have second homes here but those who don't won't find anywhere to stay in places like this all along the coast because 80% of french people are actually staying on holiday in france this year and the others have gone to the dutch and the belgians who have also been able to have free movement between france and northern europe so any brits thinking of coming won't be able to find anywhere to stay if they are looking, whether here or on the coast. 0n looking, whether here or on the coast. on top of that, this region has seen the number of delta cases at the covid—i9 virus multiply by ten in the past month. multiplied by ten in the past month. multiplied by ten and yesterday the regional health authorities announce what they called the white plan. what is that? it means the hospitals
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convulse nursing staff, as doctors, to come back to the hospitals and they can stop others from actually going on holiday because the wards are getting full right now of holiday—makers who do have covid so it is not entirely sure that they will want more holidays anyway wherever they're from. if you come across any british people who have chosen to go to that part of france? i am based in toulouse as people watch bbc news will know and lots of bits usually come here, drive or take the plane and i have seen very few in the region. there are about 30,000 here and 40,000 a body who live here year—round so you will hear and see them but in terms of very new ones coming on holiday very few. —— 40,000 me at bordeaux. i have been talking to shops and stores and very few brits have come here on holiday because it has been difficult to do so. last year many did come over and tried it and then were told they had 48 was to return
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before they face quarantines and many are saying it is not worth the risk this time round.— risk this time round. chris from south-west _ risk this time round. chris from south-west france. _ the sprinterfrom belarus — krystina timanovskaya — has told a news conference in poland that she refused orders to fly home from the tokyo 0lympics early, because of concerns for her safety. she's now been granted a humanitarian visa by the polish government. the 24—year—old athlete claims she was removed from the belarus national team after criticising her country's coaching staff, and in the last hour, she's been speaking to journalists in warsaw. when i was in olympic village some coach and mentor martin came to my room and said i should say have some injury and come back to home if i would not do it because then i can get some problem in my country and they don't know which problem but after this date they also come to my room and they say that i have no chance to run 200 metres and i should come back to home and it's
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not their decision it is their choice to do it and when i pick up my clothes and go to the car my grandmother, she called me and she said you can come back to home because on the tv —— you can't come home because on the tv they say a lot of bad words about you that you have some mental problems and maybe you can go to some hospital in belarus or into jail, we don't know. before that press conference, she gave an interview to the bbc. ms timanovskaya also spoke of her sadness at not being able to return home and encouraged her country's citizens to speak out. now i cannot come back to belarus because for sure now it is so dangerous for me. i don't know when i can come back to him. i love my country so i wanted to come back to home and i was born belarus so it is my country but now it is so sad that i can't come back. i wanted the
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people in my country to not be afraid any more and to say all things what they don't like and to respect each other and themselves. let's get all the news from the olympics, with a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. holly bradshaw has won the first ever british medal in the pole vault after clearing 4 metres 85 to take bronze. it was a tense final with bradshaw trying for the third time to get on the podium. after clearing 4.85, she had three failed attempts at 4.90. katie nageotte of the usa did clear it to take gold... while russian anzhelika siderova got silver it's not sunk in. i don't not to say. i'm almost, light, emotionless because i don't know what emotion is
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i'm feeling. it's belief, peer enjoyment and just excited and proud of myself sticking with it and i knew i could get it one day and i just, i can't express how, you know, grateful i am to be involved in the sport and to finally get an olympic medal. i can't believe it. that is just one of three medals team gb have taken on day 13 of the games, including gold in the track cycling... matt walls winning the olympic omnium at the first time of asking. andy swiss reports. 0lympic debutsjust 0lympic debuts just don't get better than this. 23—year—old matt walls from 0ldham after the ride of his life. wolves was already at the european champion in the omnium, one of track cycling's most brutal spectacles, for energy sapping faces culminating in a 100 lap epic and after dominating the event from start to finish he did more than enough to clinch the title. fortune
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favours the _ enough to clinch the title. fortune favours the bold _ enough to clinch the title. fortune favours the bold and _ enough to clinch the title. fortune favours the bold and there - enough to clinch the title. fortune favours the bold and there were . enough to clinch the title. fortune i favours the bold and there were none bolder then walls in this one! if he wasn't a household _ bolder then walls in this one! if he wasn't a household name before he is now after a win dedicated to his family back home. i now after a win dedicated to his family back home.— now after a win dedicated to his family back home. i wouldn't be here now without — family back home. i wouldn't be here now without my _ family back home. i wouldn't be here now without my parents _ family back home. i wouldn't be here now without my parents when - family back home. i wouldn't be here now without my parents when i - family back home. i wouldn't be here now without my parents when i was l family back home. i wouldn't be herej now without my parents when i was a youth _ now without my parents when i was a youth growing up travelling round the country they sing a chance i'd be here _ the country they sing a chance i'd be here without them so big thank you to _ be here without them so big thank you to them so yeah, they are all shoreside — you to them so yeah, they are all shoreside so have fun. it you to them so yeah, they are all shoreside so have fun.— you to them so yeah, they are all shoreside so have fun. it wasn't all aood shoreside so have fun. it wasn't all good news — shoreside so have fun. it wasn't all good news for _ shoreside so have fun. it wasn't all good news for britain's _ shoreside so have fun. it wasn't all good news for britain's cyclist - good news for britain's cyclist though. jason's nine—year reign as 0lympic sprint champion was over as he was beaten in the quarterfinals and in the women's there was an abrupt end to katie mash's chances as her coach of victory came crashing down. meanwhile, time for some cattle power. —— pedal power. liam heath the defending champion. could he do it again? after a
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sluggish start he came roaring back in third from the topic agonisingly close. . ~ , ., ., , close. takes the goal for hungary... behind him, — close. takes the goal for hungary... behind him, he _ close. takes the goal for hungary... behind him, he took _ close. takes the goal for hungary... behind him, he took gold _ close. takes the goal for hungary... behind him, he took gold in - close. takes the goal for hungary... behind him, he took gold in the - behind him, he took gold in the tightest photo finishes, fourth 0lympic tightest photo finishes, fourth olympic medal confirming his status as britain's successful canoeist. in the boxing, another has gold within his reach after a stunning victory in flyweight semifinal. delight for the 28—year—old who is older brothers of also boxes. hour the 28-year-old who is older brothers of also boxes. now i'm fiuuhtin brothers of also boxes. now i'm fighting in _ brothers of also boxes. now i'm fighting in front _ brothers of also boxes. now i'm fighting in front of _ brothers of also boxes. now i'm fighting in front of everyone, . brothers of also boxes. now i'm| fighting in front of everyone, my mum, family and friends, the whole team the whole world watching and i'm in the olympic final and just got to deliver the goods and play that when i come home. {lin got to deliver the goods and play that when i come home.- got to deliver the goods and play that when i come home. on the track, dina asher-smith _ that when i come home. on the track, dina asher-smith was _ that when i come home. on the track, dina asher-smith was back _ that when i come home. on the track, dina asher-smith was back after - dina asher—smith was back after pulling out of the 200 metres she returned to the relay heats and helped the british team into the final with a new national record to boost. after asher smith's t is at
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the weekend it was all smiles. remember, these ladies are in great shape. _ remember, these ladies are in great shape, incredibly talented so i knew that shape, incredibly talented so i knew thai i_ shape, incredibly talented so i knew that i had _ shape, incredibly talented so i knew that i had to rest up and get ready for the _ that i had to rest up and get ready for the team event and that was what i for the team event and that was what iwas _ for the team event and that was what iwas going _ for the team event and that was what i was going to be doing this week. i have been— i was going to be doing this week. i have been training hard to get ready! — have been training hard to get read ! �* , ., ~' , have been training hard to get read ! �* , ., ~ , , ready! but if you think it is 'ust the competitors i ready! but if you think it is 'ust the competitors putting h ready! but if you think it isjust - the competitors putting themselves on the line, watch this. in the skateboarding, one cameraman got rather more of a close up than he bargained for. in a spot of thrills and spills it was surely top marks to him. andy smith, bbc news. away from the olympics, james anderson has taken two wickets in two balls, including virat kohli for a golden duck... to give england a bit of hope in the first test against india. it took until the stroke of lunch
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for england to make their first breakthrough before anderson's two wickets takes him to 619 overall — that's level with anil kumble in third in the list of most test wickets. india are 112—4 after england's 183 all out. meanwhile there's been serious news on the injury front for england bowlerjofra archer. he's been ruled out for the rest of the year with an elbow injury. after returning to action last month — scans have revealed he has suffered a recurrence of a stress fracture of his right elbow — that's his bowling arm — so will miss the t20 world cup and the ashes series in australia. it is deeply concerning. tim in my if there was never the same bowler and loss that yard of pace when he came back from his elbow injury. you just hope no medical science has improved the his sake because he is such a great bowler to have in your armoury and particularly now the shorter form armoury and particularly now the shorterform of armoury and particularly now the shorter form of it. armoury and particularly now the shorterform of it. we'll armoury and particularly now the shorter form of it. we'll be armoury and particularly now the shorterform of it. we'll be never see him bolt the red ball again? as a set case now that his elbows will only allow him to bowl four overs? you can't blame him if he makes that decision but for me ijust hope
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personally that he is ok and there is a light at the end of the tunnel and we get him back playing even if it isjust and we get him back playing even if it is just with a white bowl. —— white ball. after a troubled few weeks, the rugby league world cup, which was due to be held in england in the autumn, has now been postponed until next year. it follows the withdrawal of defending champions australia and also new zealand over player welfare and safety concerns related to covid. the world cup, featuring men's, women's and wheelchair events, was set to start in newcastle in october. work will now begin on the best way to stage the tournament in the autumn of next year... i think it will take some time for international rugby league to recover from this. i hope that we can be a beacon of light. certainly, we've prioritised player voice, player choice. we know that the players want to play. we took our responsibilities very seriously and we are determined to stage the biggest and best ever rugby league world cup. it's a real shame that cannot be this year,
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but leadership is about making tough decisions and being responsible and we've done this in the best interests of not just the tournament but also of the sport of rugby league. that's all the sport for now. the headlines on bbc news... fully vaccinated people returning to england, scotland and northern ireland from france will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. the belarusian sprinter at the centre of an olympic row with her own government, has arrived in poland after being given a humanitarian visa. a wild fire that has raged for eight days in turkey reaches a thermal power plant on the aegean coast. a wildfire that has raged for more than a week has now reached a thermal power station on turkey's aegean coast. the coal—fired facility was already evacuated and flammable and explosive materials were removed in advance of the flames. in greece, fires exacerbated by a heatwave are also causing severe damage. the bbc�*s lebo diseko reports.
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one step closer to safety, seeking refuge from wildfires in turkey's southwest. hundreds forced into journeys like this just to stay afloat. here's the epicentre of concern — a thermal power plant storing thousands of tonnes of coal. authorities desperately trying to contain it and remove chemicals, coal and other flammable materials. they say its main units are not seriously damaged, despite being part of the worst wildfires in the country's history, according to the president. translation: as we continue our efforts on the eighth day, - for example, today we have faced a fire in a power plant. hopefully, we will get over this before it spreads there entirely. there have been dozens of blazes across turkey's south, many now under control,
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but some remain heartbreakingly alight. translation: we are not making a movie here. - this is not hollywood. it is turkey and turkey is burning furiously. as you see, all the crew here are working voluntarily with our own efforts. we are helpless and there is no—one believing us. we are so desperate. in greece's evia island, in the grip of its own heatwave, more flames tear through a pine forest. with rolling hills and little visibility hampering rescue efforts, it's no surprise over 150 houses are said to have burned... ..with this monastery surrounded by fire. sirens wail. the northern suburbs of athens ablaze, as the mayor of 0lympia calls for help to stop it encroaching on the ancient home
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of the olympic games. there are few homes the fire isn't prepared to enter, with further extreme conditions predicted soon. lebo diseko, bbc news. let's get more on the situation in greece with lenio myrivili — she's the chief heat officer for the arsht and rockefeller resilience centre which does work on the impact of climate change. she's also a former deputy mayor of athens and she is also extremely hot! tell us what it is like where you are. it hot! tell us what it is like where ou are. , , ., hot! tell us what it is like where ouare. , , ., ., you are. it is very hot. today, the hithest you are. it is very hot. today, the highest temperature _ you are. it is very hot. today, the highest temperature was - you are. it is very hot. today, the highest temperature was 41 - you are. it is very hot. today, the | highest temperature was 41 celsius and i think the highest we got here in athens was two days ago when it was 43 degrees. which is unprecedented. we've never had temperatures like that. but the worst part is that because of the
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fires in the north of the city there that these thick plumes in the sky every now and then and heavy smoke and their�*s ash rain onto was when we go out on our balconies or outdoors which is, it feels really apocalyptic and just reminds us of the extraordinary difficulty is that these people that their houses are being burned are going through right now. ., . y being burned are going through right now. ., ., , , ., being burned are going through right now. ., . , , ., , . . being burned are going through right now. ., ., , , ., . ., now. how many people have decided to net out of now. how many people have decided to get out of athens? _ now. how many people have decided to get out of athens? athens _ now. how many people have decided to get out of athens? athens feels - get out of athens? athens feels re get out of athens? athens feels pretty empty — get out of athens? athens feels pretty empty right _ get out of athens? athens feels pretty empty right now. - get out of athens? athens feels pretty empty right now. in - get out of athens? athens feels pretty empty right now. in the l pretty empty right now. in the centre of athens it feels like the city is abandoned. there are some tourists who are trying to find some places that are cool. the acropolis is closed in the middle of the day from 12 noon until five is closed in the middle of the day from 12 noon untilfive in is closed in the middle of the day from 12 noon until five in the afternoon, it'sjust from 12 noon until five in the afternoon, it's just too from 12 noon until five in the afternoon, it'sjust too hot from 12 noon until five in the afternoon, it's just too hot for anybody to be up there. we are
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really worried about the health of the people, both the residents and the people, both the residents and the people, both the residents and the people visiting the city. and it looks like the city, it feels like the city is abandoned because people are indoors. even the ones who are here are hiding. hour are indoors. even the ones who are here are hiding.— are indoors. even the ones who are here are hiding. how much relief as there from — here are hiding. how much relief as there from the _ here are hiding. how much relief as there from the heat _ here are hiding. how much relief as there from the heat on _ here are hiding. how much relief as there from the heat on some - here are hiding. how much relief as there from the heat on some of - here are hiding. how much relief as there from the heat on some of the j there from the heat on some of the islands where you might be closer to the water? it islands where you might be closer to the water? , , ., ., , the water? it depends. it totally de ends. the water? it depends. it totally depends- for— the water? it depends. it totally depends. for example, - the water? it depends. it totally depends. for example, if - the water? it depends. it totally depends. for example, if you i the water? it depends. it totally i depends. for example, if you have the capacity to go in the water it is great but not all the people can go in the water. there are so many people that work on the islands or even waiters, it is exhausting to be working on this extraordinary heat or, you know, any other people that are about working for the tourist sector, it is taking an incredible, what's it cold? toll on the working
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people. usually at the end of the summer they feel exhausted already. i've heard from people saying that they are absolutely exhausted. yes. they are absolutely exhausted. yes, the 'll be they are absolutely exhausted. yes, they'll be longing — they are absolutely exhausted. yes, they'll be longing for _ they are absolutely exhausted. yes, they'll be longing for cooler weather but of course that is when the visitors tend to go home and quite considerable numbers. tell us about this role of yours is the chief heat officer for the rockefeller resilience centre. this is a new one on me.— rockefeller resilience centre. this is a new one on me. yes, it is a new role. is a new one on me. yes, it is a new role- first— is a new one on me. yes, it is a new role- first time _ is a new one on me. yes, it is a new role. first time it _ is a new one on me. yes, it is a new role. first time it has _ is a new one on me. yes, it is a new role. first time it has been - role. first time it has been appointed to anybody in europe. it was appointed to somebody in miami—dade county for the first time and the idea is that we have to take heat more seriously and we've been focusing a lot on different types of weather, extreme weather phenomena that are caused from climate change but we haven't focused enough on extreme heat and especially extreme heatin extreme heat and especially extreme heat in cities. usually, the people
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that study climate change, they study oceans or, you know, sea level rise or other big, very dramatic climate phenomena. he is a silent killer. we know it is the climate related phenomenon that kills more people then all of the other extreme weather events put together. but because it is silent it is not represented enough. we don't know enough about the results, the impact it has because they are not so visibly evident. we haven't been focusing too much on it and cities, because they are only 3% of the land of our earth, they are not very much studied in relation to sheet and its impacts on people and we have a loss of, we have 50% of the population of the earth living in cities and it is
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going to go up to 70% very soon and the vulnerability, the vulnerable populations are usually the poorest populations are usually the poorest populations and the ones that are actually the least responsible for this terrible things that are happening because of climate change. to our environment.— to our environment. what, briefly, is the purpose _ to our environment. what, briefly, is the purpose of _ to our environment. what, briefly, is the purpose of having _ to our environment. what, briefly, is the purpose of having that - to our environment. what, briefly, is the purpose of having that role? | is the purpose of having that role? what you are aiming to achieve? i have to do three things, as far as i'm concerned. i have to raise awareness, make sure that decision—makers know more about it and how to protect the vulnerable populations. we are talking about naming and categorising heatwave so that they have more of an entity into people can think about the more clearly and also categorising them so that people can prepare for the more clearly and most succinctly. the other thing is to make sure that there are specific measures in place for when the heat waves rolling and
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for when the heat waves rolling and for the preparation of the fires, of the wildfires, forest fires and also specifically for the vulnerable populations in the city, we have to figure out how to protect them better than we do right now and the final thing is the transformation of cities themselves. we have to really be brave and start bringing in much more nature into cities, water and treves to make cities cooler because this is the best way to make cities lower the temperatures. —— water and trees. lower the temperatures. -- water and trees. ., ., ' . lower the temperatures. -- water and trees. ., .g . ., ~ lower the temperatures. -- water and trees. ., . ., ~ , ., trees. chief heat officer, thank you for coming — trees. chief heat officer, thank you for coming on _ trees. chief heat officer, thank you for coming on the _ trees. chief heat officer, thank you for coming on the programme. - the government has defended the way donations are handled by the conservative party, saying there was "nothing wrong" with people giving money to political parties. it comes after reports of a group of high—value donors being given access to seniorfigures in government, including the prime minister — something labour has described as 'murky�*.
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let's speak to our political correspondent, jonathan blake. nothing wrong, says the conservative party, but there are rules? there are rules and the conservative party say they have stuck to them, having published all details of political donations and declared those to the electoral commission in line with the law but there has been scrutiny in the last few days after those reports are mentioned in the sunday times and a financial times about the existence of a so—called advisory boards of the conservative party, a group of big—money donors handing over, it is reported, at least £250,000 a year and with that, it seems, has come the opportunity for those individuals to meet the chancellor and the prime minister, we are told, occasionally. now, this group was set up before boris johnson became prime minister. there is nothing new in donations to political parties, sometimes very large ones from very rich individuals but the question is the conservatives are facing here are around transparency, details of this group and exactly who is on it and
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what they might be expecting in return for their money and also of access. who these people are allowed to eat and how regularly and perhaps the terms on which those meetings are held and this morning the transport secretary grant shapps is a former chairman of the conservative party was asked if he was comfortable with this arrangement. you have to have political parties funded some way. you either tax people to do that — some countries do that, i think it would be very unpopular here. or you fundraise by people joining as members or by people making donations, but what they get when they do that is to hear about party policy, party approach to winning elections and that side of things. what they don't get to do is to intervene on or get involved in government policies, so there's a very, very important distinction and, of course, if we want political parties that are vibrant in this country we've got to pay for them some way. either you pay with the taxpayer —
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i don't think that's very desirable — or through donations. now, they get to hear about policy but don't get involved in what the government is doing, the summary of what grant shapps said there but nevertheless labour are keeping up the pressure on the conservative over this and so keir starmer was asked any of his thoughts on the matter, saying there is nothing wrong with donations to political parties per se but there is in his eye is a problem here. what's so concerning about what we have seen in relation to this special club of conservatives is, sort of, cash—for—access and the influence that is being bought by this process, and it is the latest example of one rule for them and another rule for everybody else. and what we've called for is transparency — tell us who's been involved in this, who's been meeting who, and how much money has exchanged hands.
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but we can't have this sleaze, this murky cash for access. you can find details about this on line and it talks about those giving more than £5,000 a year to the party being able to gain access to among other things a preconference perception with the party's deputy leader angela rayner. so far, the conservatives have shown no sign of going any further in disclosing the details of the advisory board scheme of a hierarchy of their party donors any more widely. they have, though, told us in a statement that donations to the party are properly and transparently declared to the electoral commission, published by then and comply fully with the law. thank you very much, jonathan blake at westminster. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. low pressure is dominating the scene now for the next few days. it is going to bring rather windy conditions to pretty much all areas. and we will see heavy showers, longer spells of rain at times. it is going to feel rather cool, as well, for august.
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but there will be some sunshine around, so it is not going to be raining all the time everywhere. this is the culprit, this new area of low pressure, lots of isobars on the charts, hence the strong winds across many areas, particularly around the irish sea coast. there will be longer spells of rain, some thundery downpours in places through this evening and overnight. some drier, quieter moments in between the showers, though. and because of the air source and also the strong winds, it is not going to be a particularly cold night, around 14—15. friday, again, showers, longer spells of rain, some of these downpours could be pretty intense in places, but there will be some sunnier moments, too, particularly across the south of the country. temperature wise, where we have the sunnier spells, then around 20—22, otherwise the high teens generally for most. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: fully vaccinated people returning to england, scotland and northern ireland from france will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. the belarusian sprinter at the centre of an olympic row
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with her own government has arrived in poland after being given a humanitarian visa. called on the track once again for the first time at these 0lympic the first time at these olympic games. another gold for team gb injapan as matt walls triumphs in the velodrome — taking the olympics medal tally to 50. a wild fire that has raged for eight days in turkey reaches a thermal power plant on the aegean coast. the government has defended the way donations are handled by the conservative party, saying there was "nothing wrong" with people giving money to political parties. and uk adults spent more than a third of their waking hours watching tv and online video last year because of the pandemic. let's return now to the changes in coronavirus travel advice. while france moves to the uk's amber list, others including georgia, mayotte, reunion island and mexicojoin the red list. it means travellers will have to quarantine in a hotel, at their own expense,
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on their return to england. claudia rattray has onlyjust arrived in mexico city after travelling from the uk earlier today. shejoins us now she joins us now with shejoins us now with her daughter. i am so sorry to talk to you under these circumstances. it should be a joyful occasion for you. tell us what you had planned for this trip. we came here just to see my family. i have not seen them for the last two years. so the reason to come here, it was not a holiday, like summer holiday with the family. i just wanted to bring my two girls to see my family and spend some quality time with my mum and my sisters. irate time with my mum and my sisters. we have just seen your other get waving to us in the background. what is her name? ,, , , ., to us in the background. what is her name? . , , ., what name? summer is my little one. what was our name? summer is my little one. what was your reaction _ name? summer is my little one. what was your reaction when _ name? summer is my little one. what was your reaction when you _ name? summer is my little one. what was your reaction when you heard... l was your reaction when you heard... hello, welcome. what was your
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reaction when you heard that mexico was going on to the red list on sunday morning? to was going on to the red list on sunday morning?— was going on to the red list on sunday morning? to be honest, i thou~ht it sunday morning? to be honest, i thought it was — sunday morning? to be honest, i thought it was a _ sunday morning? to be honest, i thought it was a joke _ sunday morning? to be honest, i thought it was a joke at _ sunday morning? to be honest, i thought it was a joke at first. - thought it was a joke at first. because _ thought it was a joke at first. because my dad actually sent a text to my _ because my dad actually sent a text to my mum, and i was a bit concerned because _ to my mum, and i was a bit concerned because my— to my mum, and i was a bit concerned because my mum was a bit nervous, she was— because my mum was a bit nervous, she was a _ because my mum was a bit nervous, she was a hit— because my mum was a bit nervous, she was a bit shocked. i wasjust thinking — she was a bit shocked. i wasjust thinking of— she was a bit shocked. i wasjust thinking of all the things i'm going to miss _ thinking of all the things i'm going to miss out, like my first week of year— to miss out, like my first week of yearten. — to miss out, like my first week of year ten, which is big because my gcse, _ year ten, which is big because my gcse, i_ year ten, which is big because my gcse, i may— year ten, which is big because my gcse, i may be missing a bit of context— gcse, i may be missing a bit of context on— gcse, i may be missing a bit of context on my gcses. but at least we will get _ context on my gcses. but at least we will get to— context on my gcses. but at least we will get to stay with her family. we are lucky— will get to stay with her family. we are lucky that we have got a family to stay— are lucky that we have got a family to stay wet — are lucky that we have got a family to stay wet over here. get are lucky that we have got a family to stay wet over here. get summer to .o . to stay wet over here. get summer to -o- down to stay wet over here. get summer to pop down so _ to stay wet over here. get summer to pop down so that — to stay wet over here. get summer to pop down so that we _ to stay wet over here. get summer to pop down so that we can _ to stay wet over here. get summer to pop down so that we can see - to stay wet over here. get summer to pop down so that we can see her. - pop down so that we can see her. that is better. you might as well join in. what are you going to do, then, claudia? how are you going to manage this trip? are you going to stay, come home, what are you going
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to do? we stay, come home, what are you going to do? ~ ., stay, come home, what are you going to do? ~ . ., ., ., to do? we landed at around nine hours ago- _ to do? we landed at around nine hours ago- as— to do? we landed at around nine hours ago. as soon _ to do? we landed at around nine hours ago. as soon as _ to do? we landed at around nine hours ago. as soon as we - to do? we landed at around ninel hours ago. as soon as we landed, to do? we landed at around nine i hours ago. as soon as we landed, i got a message from my husband saying that mexico had changed to the red list. so my first reaction was to ask him to get in contact with the airline and to see if we were able to fly back again today or tomorrow. just to avoid that quarantine restriction. but unfortunately there is not many flights leaving from mexico back to the uk, so there is no seats available. so, i decided to enjoy the time here with my family, and i am not going... i am going to see if in three weeks the government review this list, and hopefully mexico will be moved back to the amber list and mexico will be moved back to the amber listand i mexico will be moved back to the amber list and i will be able to fly back. if not, i think i'm going to stay here in mexico because ijust cannot afford to pay for the quarantine hotel for the three of us
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and to stay there for ten days. it is just too much. and to stay there for ten days. it isjust too much.— and to stay there for ten days. it isjust too much. you will extend our isjust too much. you will extend your holiday. _ isjust too much. you will extend your holiday, well _ isjust too much. you will extend your holiday, well you? - isjust too much. you will extend your holiday, well you? yes, - isjust too much. you will extend your holiday, well you? yes, i. isjust too much. you will extend | your holiday, well you? yes, i will extend my — your holiday, well you? yes, i will extend my holiday. _ your holiday, well you? yes, i will extend my holiday. we _ your holiday, well you? yes, i will extend my holiday. we are - your holiday, well you? yes, i will extend my holiday. we are lucky i your holiday, well you? yes, i will. extend my holiday. we are lucky we are staying with family. i do not know if this is true, but my husband is well found out that the quarantine hotels have increased the prices to £2400 per person for the ten days. that is not including their children. we are looking around £4000. it is a lot of money to spend just because of the government decision. i am double vaccinated, so i am more than happy that when i come back to get the test here in mexico to present the negative results, but to quarantine i think is a step too far. it
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negative results, but to quarantine i think is a step too far.— i think is a step too far. it looks like ou i think is a step too far. it looks like you will— i think is a step too far. it looks like you will have _ i think is a step too far. it looks like you will have a _ i think is a step too far. it looks like you will have a much - i think is a step too far. it looks| like you will have a much longer holiday from school then, does it? yes, they go back to school on the 6th of september. so probably yes. but hopefully, i am really hopeful that this situation will change. 0r that this situation will change. or i do not know what is going to happen. i do not know what is going to ha . en, ., ., ., i do not know what is going to hauen. . . . , i do not know what is going to ha en, ., ., ., , happen. claudia, what is your view ofthe happen. claudia, what is your view of the government _ happen. claudia, what is your view of the government introducing - happen. claudia, what is your view of the government introducing this change with so little notice? i was cuite change with so little notice? i was quite shocked. _ change with so little notice? i was quite shocked. i _ change with so little notice? i was quite shocked. i still— change with so little notice? i was quite shocked. i still do _ change with so little notice? i was quite shocked. i still do not - quite shocked. i still do not understand how... when india has been moved from red to amber, they have more cases than mexico, so it is the rational i do not understand behind these decisions. i do not understand. behind these decisions. i do not understand-— behind these decisions. i do not understand. , , ~ understand. girls, it looks like you have not understand. girls, it looks like you have got a — understand. girls, it looks like you have got a much _ understand. girls, it looks like you have got a much longer— understand. girls, it looks like you have got a much longer trip - understand. girls, it looks like you have got a much longer trip to - have got a much longer trip to mexico, which in some ways is wonderful, but not under the circumstances. how will you try to make the most of it? taste circumstances. how will you try to make the most of it?—
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circumstances. how will you try to make the most of it? we are going to have lots of— make the most of it? we are going to have lots of fun _ make the most of it? we are going to have lots of fun with _ make the most of it? we are going to have lots of fun with our _ make the most of it? we are going to have lots of fun with our cousins. - have lots of fun with our cousins. and then — have lots of fun with our cousins. and then hopefully our school will send us _ and then hopefully our school will send us some work to do. because obviously— send us some work to do. because obviously with the time difference we will_ obviously with the time difference we will not be able to do online school — we will not be able to do online school through zoom. we willjust have _ school through zoom. we willjust have to _ school through zoom. we willjust have to do — school through zoom. we willjust have to do papers online. it is school through zoom. we will 'ust have to do papers online.�* have to do papers online. it is a bi ear have to do papers online. it is a big year for— have to do papers online. it is a big year for you. _ have to do papers online. it is a big year for you, starting - have to do papers online. it is a big year for you, starting your l big year for you, starting your gcses. what your are you in, summer? i am going into your nine. just gcses. what your are you in, summer? i am going into your nine.— i am going into your nine. just a ear i am going into your nine. just a year before _ i am going into your nine. just a year before gcses. _ i am going into your nine. just a year before gcses. that - i am going into your nine. just a year before gcses. that is - i am going into your nine. just a year before gcses. that is the l i am going into your nine. just a i year before gcses. that is the year you choose which subjects you want to do for later, isn't it?— to do for later, isn't it? yeah. that is the — to do for later, isn't it? yeah. that is the thing, _ to do for later, isn't it? yeah. that is the thing, we - to do for later, isn't it? yeah. that is the thing, we tried i to do for later, isn't it? yeah. that is the thing, we tried to l to do for later, isn't it? yeah. l that is the thing, we tried to go back before the rule comes into force, but there are no flights. i just cannot physically go back in time before mexico goes into the red list. it has been too long, two years without seeing my family. i just want to enjoy my time now. i
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just want to enjoy my time now. i just feel really, really bad for the holiday makers, for the people that come to mexico as a holiday, to have that extra cost on top of this is just outrageous.— that extra cost on top of this is 'ust outraueous. , .,, ,._ just outrageous. some people saying that they have _ just outrageous. some people saying that they have basically _ just outrageous. some people saying that they have basically spent - that they have basically spent thousands of pounds for a day trip because they're having to come back straightaway. it is a very difficult decision for you to make. i hope that you will be able to make the most of the time that you have there with your family. most of the time that you have there with yourfamily. claudia, havana, and some are battery, thank you very much for talking to us. your macro thank you so much. and now on the bbc news channel, it's time for your questions answered. fully vaccinated travellers will no longer need to quarantine on arrivalfrom france, as part of a shake—up of coronavirus travel rules in england, scotland and northern ireland. this seven more european countries have been added to the green list, and spain will remain amber despite concerns about
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covid variants there. our international business correspondent theo leggett is here. and also i'm joined by lisa minot, the sun's travel editor. she is making is immensely envious because she is in south—west france. welcome to you both. first of all, christine from cambridge says, despite low figures and a vaccination programme, turkey is still on the red list. why is that, lisa? , , ., , lisa? this is the main problem we have with the _ lisa? this is the main problem we have with the way _ lisa? this is the main problem we have with the way that _ lisa? this is the main problem we have with the way that the - have with the way that the government are allocating countries to our traffic light system. at the moment, there is no clarity, we do not understand exactly which metrics the government are using. we know generally that they are looking at the number of people vaccinated, number of cases, variants of concern, and the way that those variants are being genomic lay sequenced. it must be that the
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government feels that the way the turkish government are currently handling the pandemic does not give them the confidence to actually turn from red to amber. there was a thought at one point that... this latest traffic light, the likes of the uae, bahrain and qatar are all big airport hub countries, they have aptly made from red to amber. people have every right to be quite baffled as to why that has remained the case. the government do not seem to be giving the exact metrics they are using to make these decisions. we are a little bit in the dark.- are a little bit in the dark. thank ou. are a little bit in the dark. thank you- theo. _ are a little bit in the dark. thank you. theo, margaret _ are a little bit in the dark. thank you. theo, margaret from i are a little bit in the dark. thank- you. theo, margaret from somerset says she is going on holiday to majorca in two weeks. she and her husband have both been double vaccinated, they are in their 70s, can you help us out with this, what tests are involved before they go and in order to come back? gk. tests are involved before they go and in order to come back? ok, well, congratulations _ and in order to come back? ok, well, congratulations on _ and in order to come back? ok, well, congratulations on getting _ and in order to come back? ok, well, congratulations on getting a - and in order to come back? ok, well, congratulations on getting a holiday l congratulations on getting a holiday in majorca! if you are fully
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vaccinated, and you're heading out, you do— vaccinated, and you're heading out, you do not— vaccinated, and you're heading out, you do not need any tests. you will need _ you do not need any tests. you will need to— you do not need any tests. you will need to tell— you do not need any tests. you will need to fell in a health declaration form which you can find on the balearic— form which you can find on the balearic islands tourist authority website — balearic islands tourist authority website. you fill that out, you should — website. you fill that out, you should be _ website. you fill that out, you should be able to travel and without too many _ should be able to travel and without too many problems. if you were not vaccinated. — too many problems. if you were not vaccinated, you would have to take a pcr test. _ vaccinated, you would have to take a pcr test, that is one of the laboratory tests before leaving. when _ laboratory tests before leaving. when it — laboratory tests before leaving. when it comes to your return, if you're _ when it comes to your return, if you're in— when it comes to your return, if you're in a — when it comes to your return, if you're in a country that is in the amber— you're in a country that is in the amberlist. _ you're in a country that is in the amber list, which the balearic islands — amber list, which the balearic islands are, if you're fully vaccinated, you can come into this country— vaccinated, you can come into this country without having to quarantine. if you're not fully vaccinated, you will have to isolate for ten _ vaccinated, you will have to isolate for ten days. fully vaccinated passengers will have to undergo a pcr test— passengers will have to undergo a pcr test within two days of arriving _ pcr test within two days of arriving. why is it a pcr test are not the — arriving. why is it a pcr test are not the cheaper lateral flow? that is so _ not the cheaper lateral flow? that is so that — not the cheaper lateral flow? that is so that if— not the cheaper lateral flow? that is so that if the government does detect— is so that if the government does detect cases coming in, it analyse the genome of the variant of covid that you're — the genome of the variant of covid that you're infected with, and therefore know which variants are being _ therefore know which variants are being brought into the country. it is a pcr_ being brought into the country. it is a pcr test, that is the more
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expensive _ is a pcr test, that is the more expensive one. you will also have to fill out _ expensive one. you will also have to fill out a _ expensive one. you will also have to fill out a passenger locator form on your return — fill out a passenger locator form on your return-— fill out a passenger locator form on your return. thank you. a couple of --eole your return. thank you. a couple of people asking _ your return. thank you. a couple of people asking similar _ your return. thank you. a couple of people asking similar sorts - your return. thank you. a couple of people asking similar sorts of- people asking similar sorts of questions about travelling to spain. steve from nottingham, my friend and i are travelling to spain on the 18th of august, we are both been fully vaccinated, but we are still uncertain as to what tests, if any, you need to have both outbound and on your return. can you shed some light on this? similarly, guy is hoping to go and see his mum next week, has not seen herfor 18 months, she is in spain, is a pcr test on returnjust months, she is in spain, is a pcr test on return just a suggestion or a legal obligation? it is about the tests to and from mainland spain. that is right. as we have just heard, we do not have to have a test if we are double vaccinated to get into spain, it is the ones on the way back that we have seen a slight change of the way that the government have worded it in this latest update. you need to have, evenif latest update. you need to have, even if your double vaccinated, to come back into the uk you have to
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have a predeparture test, sounds ridiculous but that is the test you take to come back into the uk. that predeparture take to come back into the uk. that predepa rtu re test take to come back into the uk. that predeparture test can be either a lateral flow test or a pcr test. in this latest update, they have said that they would prefer, not saying it is legally necessary, but they would prefer people and advise people to take a pcr testjust to see if they can catch any more of those variants of concern before people actually arrive back in the uk. then of course you have that pcr test on day two. but there... it has been met by bafflement by the travel industry because these tests are not cheap, they really are a significant cost. to say to people we think you should take a pcr test but not seem to people you have to take a pcr test, nobody in their sane mine is going to go for the very much more expensive test to get back into the uk. so i am not really sure what the point was of saying that.— point was of saying that. well, i think there _ point was of saying that. well, i think there is _ point was of saying that. well, i think there is a _ point was of saying that. well, i think there is a lot _ point was of saying that. well, i think there is a lot of _ point was of saying that. well, i j think there is a lot of confusion. in fact, somebody is so confused they have called themselves confused
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of southsea. i return from france on saturday the 31st ofjuly, i'm currently in quarantine for ten days. do i still had to quarantine after the real change on sunday? and do i still need to take my d eight test? ~ , ., ., ., do i still need to take my d eight test? . , ., . ., ., test? well, first of all, i do not blame you _ test? well, first of all, i do not blame you for _ test? well, first of all, i do not blame you for being _ test? well, first of all, i do not blame you for being confused. | test? well, first of all, i do not| blame you for being confused. i test? well, first of all, i do not i blame you for being confused. i have been following this for weeks and the changes in regulations and classifications still make me feel a little bit _ classifications still make me feel a little bit dizzy, to be honest. but in terms — little bit dizzy, to be honest. but in terms of— little bit dizzy, to be honest. but in terms of your situation, i am afraid, — in terms of your situation, i am afraid, yes, _ in terms of your situation, i am afraid, yes, you do have to remain in isolation, — afraid, yes, you do have to remain in isolation, you have to take that extra _ in isolation, you have to take that extra test~ — in isolation, you have to take that extra test. the changes in the rules will only— extra test. the changes in the rules will only apply to people arriving after _ will only apply to people arriving after 4am on sunday. so sadly if you are in— after 4am on sunday. so sadly if you are in isolation you have to stay there _ are in isolation you have to stay there. ~ ., are in isolation you have to stay there. ~ . ., are in isolation you have to stay there. . . ., , ., are in isolation you have to stay there. . ., , ., , ., , there. we have had similar questions to that before. _ there. we have had similar questions to that before, haven't _ there. we have had similar questions to that before, haven't we? - there. we have had similar questions to that before, haven't we? when i to that before, haven't we? when other changes have been brought in, but people have been cut out even just day or so shy of the role is changing. martin in swindon says, lisa, i have booked to go to
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thailand on the 15th of october to see friends. if thailand is added to the red list, which looks like it will be, will i have to quarantine on my return on the 12th of november evenif on my return on the 12th of november even if i have had both jabs? that is quite a long way away, isn't it? things could have changed, but based on what we know now, what is the answer? , ., , on what we know now, what is the answer? , . , ., , answer? they have seen a surge in coronavirus — answer? they have seen a surge in coronavirus cases _ answer? they have seen a surge in coronavirus cases in _ answer? they have seen a surge in coronavirus cases in thailand. i coronavirus cases in thailand. 0bviously coronavirus cases in thailand. obviously the government here in the uk will be looking at that. at the moment, there is a very limited opening in thailand. they have what is called as a fan box, which is a limited amount of travel arrived just into the island of phuketjust for international visitors. they have not yet opened up the rest of the country. things can change any matter of minutes, hours, days, so to try to predict what could happen november is really difficult to work out. 0bviously, november is really difficult to work out. obviously, if the actual trip is not happening until october, it
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would be good to keep an eye on those facts and figures all the way through to make sure if you're seeing cases rise, and particularly the variance of concern. it is those variants of concern that making the government really tip countries onto the red list. but it really is, unfortunately right now too far in advance to tell what could possibly happen in november.— advance to tell what could possibly happen in november. thank you. gosh, thins are happen in november. thank you. gosh, things are changing _ happen in november. thank you. gosh, things are changing within _ happen in november. thank you. gosh, things are changing within days, - happen in november. thank you. gosh, things are changing within days, our i things are changing within days, our day, so never mind what might happen in a few months�* time. theo, susan does not fly, so when she travels she travels over land. she needs to get to finland. she changes trains usually. it is an amazing trip. she changes trains usually in brussels, but in belgium they have different rules. what is going to happen to her trip, rules. what is going to happen to hertrip, can rules. what is going to happen to her trip, can she do this trip in this way? does she need to rethink it? ~ �* ., ., ., it? well, belgium and finland are both in the _ it? well, belgium and finland are both in the eu — it? well, belgium and finland are both in the eu and _ it? well, belgium and finland are both in the eu and transport i it? well, belgium and finland are| both in the eu and transport within
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the eu _ both in the eu and transport within the eu itself is relatively straightforward at the moment. now, do not _ straightforward at the moment. now, do not shoot me if i'm wrong on this, _ do not shoot me if i'm wrong on this, but— do not shoot me if i'm wrong on this, but i— do not shoot me if i'm wrong on this, but i believe if you're travelling via brussels to finland and you — travelling via brussels to finland and you have fulfilled the entry requirements for both countries, which _ requirements for both countries, which will— requirements for both countries, which will be presumably a locator form _ which will be presumably a locator form and — which will be presumably a locator form and being fully vaccinated, you should _ form and being fully vaccinated, you should be _ form and being fully vaccinated, you should be ok. 0n form and being fully vaccinated, you should be ok. on your return, these countries _ should be ok. on your return, these countries are — should be ok. on your return, these countries are both on the amber list, _ countries are both on the amber list. there — countries are both on the amber list, there is no difference uk government's classification for them, so it will be the same process _ them, so it will be the same process. you take a lateral flow test before you return or a test depending on what the government says on— depending on what the government says on the given day, then you take a pcr_ says on the given day, then you take a pcr test— says on the given day, then you take a pcr test within two days of your return _ a pcr test within two days of your return that— a pcr test within two days of your return. that is what i think the answer— return. that is what i think the answer to— return. that is what i think the answer to this one is. but again these _ answer to this one is. but again these things are complicated, so check— these things are complicated, so check with— these things are complicated, so check with your travel provider if in any— check with your travel provider if in any doubt at all. lisa check with your travel provider if in any doubt at all.— in any doubt at all. lisa is nodding. _ in any doubt at all. lisa is nodding. so _ in any doubt at all. lisa is nodding, so hopefully i in any doubt at all. lisa isj nodding, so hopefully she in any doubt at all. lisa is - nodding, so hopefully she agrees. i am saying i am not sure we are able to enter belgium at the moment. i�*m pretty sure that both belgium and holland still have british subjects on a quarantine list. again, it would need to check if any kind of
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travel through the country is permitted. i�*m pretty sure that belgium has not lifted their need for any british citizens, even those who are fully vaccinated, to quarantine on arrival in brussels. it could be a slow ship to helsinki, then, instead? i it could be a slow ship to helsinki, then, instead?— it could be a slow ship to helsinki, then, instead? i think that might be then, instead? i think that might be the best way — then, instead? i think that might be the best way to _ then, instead? i think that might be the best way to do _ then, instead? i think that might be the best way to do it! _ then, instead? i think that might be the best way to do it! i _ then, instead? i think that might be the best way to do it! i know - then, instead? i think that might be the best way to do it! i know simon | the best way to do it! i know simon calder has come _ the best way to do it! i know simon calder has come back— the best way to do it! i know simon calder has come back from - calder has come back from scandinavia and a container ship before. i remembertalking scandinavia and a container ship before. i remember talking to him about it. that is what floats his boat, excuse the pun! there are lots of people who we are talking to who have gone to mexico, research, and have gone to mexico, research, and have arrived within the mag and then a few hours after arriving, they say they have spent £6,000 on essentially a day trip to cancun. they got to make the decision today, take the hit when they come back, or do they scramble for a flight to get back before 4am on sunday morning. where do they stand with regard to refunds on a holiday? if the holiday has already begun. titer?
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refunds on a holiday? if the holiday has already begun.— refunds on a holiday? if the holiday has already begun. very much depends who ou has already begun. very much depends who you booked _ has already begun. very much depends who you booked your _ has already begun. very much depends who you booked your holiday _ has already begun. very much depends who you booked your holiday with. i i who you booked your holiday with. i have been chatting to you over the last few weeks and months, i�*ve been saying make sure you book with an atoll protected package holiday provider. the issue here is the fact that the likes of tui, our biggest established tour operator, they had not even begun their programme to mexico. i think because they had concerns that the country could turn from amber to red. 0ne concerns that the country could turn from amber to red. one thing i would say, and we have seen quite a lot of this, and i�*m sure my esteem colleague has talked about this as well, we are starting to see people plundering their quarantine. basically going from the likes of mexico, changing theirflights basically going from the likes of mexico, changing their flights to landing in another country that at the moment they we do not have to sci—fi site on return from, spending ten days in that country, and then coming back and once you have basically spent those ten days in that country without having then tested positive. it is possible that that would actually be cheaper for many people than actually having to
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have, especially families, if possible that would be cheaper than actually trying to do the hotel quarantine in the uk. so, change your flights, quarantine in the uk. so, change yourflights, go from mexico quarantine in the uk. so, change your flights, go from mexico to a different part of europe perhaps, one that well once you have done your ten days allow you to enter the uk quarantine free. that might be cheaper than actually doing the hotel quarantine itself. what really concerns me is the fact that i do not think we are going to have enough hotel rooms for or airline seats for the 5000, 6000 people that are currently in mexico. that seats for the 5000, 6000 people that are currently in mexico.— are currently in mexico. that is -rovin~ are currently in mexico. that is proving to _ are currently in mexico. that is proving to be _ are currently in mexico. that is proving to be problematic. i are currently in mexico. that is proving to be problematic. thej proving to be problematic. the airlines are trying to put more lights on, but it is not enough to meet demand. lisa calls it laundering the process, but there�*s nothing wrong with doing it that way, is there, theo? if you go from mexico to another european country thatis mexico to another european country that is on the amber list that is accepting flights from mexico, you�*re not breaking the rules, you�*re not breaking the rules, you�*re just effectively setting out your time somewhere else.
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absolutely. as long as you�*re not absolutely. as long as you're not breaking — absolutely. as long as you're not breaking the rules and you do spend a full— breaking the rules and you do spend a full ten _ breaking the rules and you do spend a full ten days there. if you were to come — a full ten days there. if you were to come back within those ten days, you would _ to come back within those ten days, you would still have to go into hotel— you would still have to go into hotel quarantine. hotel quarantine now. _ hotel quarantine. hotel quarantine now. let's — hotel quarantine. hotel quarantine now, let's not forget, it is becoming a lot more expensive. it was £1750 — becoming a lot more expensive. it was £1750 for the first adult. as of sunday. _ was £1750 for the first adult. as of sunday, that will be £2285. the second — sunday, that will be £2285. the second adult was £650. it will now be £1430 — second adult was £650. it will now be £1430. if you can make an arrangement that allows you to do things— arrangement that allows you to do things more cheaply, then there is clearly— things more cheaply, then there is clearly an— things more cheaply, then there is clearly an incentive to do that now. you might— clearly an incentive to do that now. you might have a nicer time of it! you might have a nicer time of it! you are not necessarily be stuck in an airport hotel, will you, you can have some freedom? that an airport hotel, will you, you can have some freedom?— an airport hotel, will you, you can have some freedom? that is right. i do not know — have some freedom? that is right. i do not know what _ have some freedom? that is right. i do not know what the _ have some freedom? that is right. i do not know what the rules - have some freedom? that is right. i do not know what the rules are i have some freedom? that is right. i do not know what the rules are in i do not know what the rules are in terms of whether or not spain are accepting flights from mexico, but to spend ten days as a relatively cheap hotel in spain, it is very easy to go out and about, that must be better than spending ten days any
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hotel at heathrow for such a huge sum of money. that is common. the government have said that comes in on the 12th of august, so it is not quite the day on monday where the other rules change, it is from the 12th of august. it will be that extra increase in the price. just to make matters _ extra increase in the price. just to make matters more _ extra increase in the price. just to make matters more complicated l extra increase in the price. just to i make matters more complicated even further. lisa and theo leggett, thank you very much both forjoining us. some chemical mixtures used in farming could kill up to twice as many bees than previously thought, according to new research. scientists from the university of london found that multiple pesticides used in ready—mixed products can react to each other, having a negative impact on bee colonies. 0ur science correspondent victoria gill explains. precious pollinators in decline, our bees face multiple threats to their survival — from a loss of food rich natural grassland to the dozens of chemical pesticides that are commonly
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used in agriculture. this new study set out to quantify each of those threats and to work out how they combine to affect the insects�* health. the research has examined 90 studies that each measured the effect on bees of a specific pesticide or another environmental challenge. they worked out that combinations of several chemicals killed many more bees than expected. this is because the researchers say pesticides interact, each chemical enhances the damage caused by another. what we found is really important when you consider how agrochemicals are sold. commercial formulas are sold to farmers and they often contain various different agrochemicals — pesticides, fungicides — and what our research shows is that these chemicals can interact and significantly increase the potential harm, potential impact on bee mortality. the scientists say that regulation needs to be updated to factor in this chemical interaction, and to avoid harmful cocktails
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of pesticide that pose a threat to the pollinating insects that we rely on. victoria gill, bbc news. now, how did you get through lockdown? we spent about a third of our waking hours last year watching tv and online video, according to 0fcom�*s annual survey of our media habits. the figures apply to adults across the uk. the regulator says people increasingly turned to subscription services when repeated lockdowns left millions at home. here�*s our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. like many of us, the 0akley family spent much of 2020 glued to screens, though not necessarily all together. mum and dad were in front of the main telly. son arun spent lots of time gaming, chatting to friends, and watching youtube videos, but it�*s streaming services not broadcast tv which were big for all of them. increasingly, it�*s just news and current affairs, really, is what we are watching broadcast.
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otherwise it's streaming. almost everything else is streamed via one service or another. arun, do you watch any television? almost none. i'm usually watching youtube or netflix. i ofcom�*s annual snapshot of our media habits shows we spent an average of five hours and 40 minutes a day watching tv or online video in 2020. that�*s up 47 minutes on the year before. much of the increase is down to the fact that the time watching subscription streaming services almost doubled to an hour and five minutes a day. the biggest player, netflix, is now in more than half of all uk homes. with hit series like bridgerton, netflix now has more subscribers than sky, virgin and the other uk pay—tv providers put together. so what we're seeing is that younger people are migrating from traditional tv to really engaging in these streaming services, where they can watch what they want when they want on their own device, whether that's netflix or youtube, but we're now seeing older audiences also catching up and turning
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to these streaming services. so 2020 was the year britain became a streaming nation, with traditional broadcast tv something for older people and set to decline. but is this a permanent change, and will we want to continue to pay for the likes of netflix, amazon prime, nowtv, disney+, or will we start switching some of them off? we had a total of six streaming services subscribed at one point. that�*s now kind of slimmed down to four at the moment, and i think another one will be dropping off soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech tent podcast. one other change in our media habits — more than half of uk homes now have a smart speaker. an internet connection, not an aerial or satellite dish, is becoming the way we all get access to entertainment. rory cellan—jones, bbc news.
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the dog is fascinated by a period drama! now it�*s time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. low pressure is dominating the scene now for the next few days. it is going to bring rather windy conditions to pretty much all areas. and we will see heavy showers, longer spells of rain at times. it is going to feel rather cool, as well, for august. but there will be some sunshine around, so it is not going to be raining all the time everywhere. this is the culprit, this new area of low pressure, lots of isobars on the charts, hence the strong winds across many areas, particularly around the irish sea coast. there will be longer spells of rain, some thundery downpours in places through this evening and overnight. some drier, quieter moments in between the showers, though. and because of the air source and also the strong winds, it is not going to be a particularly cold night, around 14—15. friday, again, showers, longer spells of rain, some of these downpours could be pretty intense in places, but there will be some sunnier moments, too, particularly across the south of the country. temperature wise, where we have the sunnier spells, then around 20—22, otherwise
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the high teens generally for most.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... fully vaccinated people returning to england, scotland and northern ireland from france will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. but thousands of brits on holiday in mexico will have to quarantine in a hotel at their own expense. i think i�*m going to stay here in mexico, because ijust can�*t afford to pay for the quarantine hotel for the three of us and to stay there for ten days. it�*s just too much. the belarusian olympic sprinter who�*s in exile after refusing orders to go home, tells a news conference in warsaw: it was a warning from her grandmother which convinced her it was not safe to return.
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my grandmother, she called me and she said to me, please does come back to belarus, and it was the reason why why i go to the polish. another gold for team gb injapan, as matt walls triumphs in the velodrome — taking the olympics medal tally to 50. a wild fire that�*s raged for eight days in turkey reaches a thermal power plant on the aegean coast. the government has defended the way donations are handled by the conservative party, saying there�*s "nothing wrong" with people giving money to political parties. and, uk adults spent more than a third of their waking hours watching tv and online video last year, because of the pandemic.
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good afternoon. british holiday—makers who are fully vaccinated can more easily travel to france this summer, as part of significant changes to the covid travel rules that will come into force in the early hours of sunday. france will be brought into line with other amber list countries, so anyone who�*s had both doses of a vaccine will no longer have to quarantine when arriving in england, scotland or northern ireland. wales is due to make a decision shortly. india, bahrain, qatar and the united arab emirates will switch from red to amber, meaning arrivals from those countries will no longer have to quarantine in government—approved accommodation. while austria, germany, slovenia, slovakia, latvia, romania and norway will be moved onto the green list. but mexico and georgia have been added to the red list — the highest level of restrictions. up to 6,000 british residents are currently in mexico — and if they can�*t get back before sunday morning they will have to quarantine in a hotel at their own expense. the welsh government is expected
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to announce this afternoon whether they will adopt the same rules as the rest of the uk. with the latest, here�*s our transport correspondent caroline davies. a near—empty swimming pool, a few tents pitched, and no—one propping up the bar. this would normally be the busiest time of the year at this campsite in western france, but at the moment, they�*re half empty. so happy about it. we couldn�*t understand why we were on the amber—plus list anyway, to start with. we�*ve had so many cancellations as a result of it and we�*re over the moon now. the amber—plus was a bit nonsensical to us because infection rates were lower here in france. ferry companies are also hoping this will give a much—needed boost to passenger numbers. in terms of demand, we know it�*s out there because we know how many people visit our website, we know how many people are looking for prices. we expect that to pick up sharply, people will be able to book and travel. across the channel, these british
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holiday—makers are staying home. not this year. due to the pandemic we feel that holidaying in the uk is a lot better and safer for us. we've come here for a week and we probably would have gone to spain with the family and kids, but, obviously, it's a bit risky with flight restrictions. we have already had to change our holiday — i work for the nhs, i couldn�*t quarantine when i get back — so this is it for us this year. these changes are for england, scotland and northern ireland. wales are yet to say if they will follow. there are new additions to the green list, including germany, but out of the seven added, only two will allow non—vaccinated tourists without quarantine. spain is still amber, but the government is now advising passengers to have the more expensive pcr test rather than the cheaper lateral flow test before they depart for the uk. now, we set a very high specification, so—called the sensitivity, and specificity for that test, which in the case of spain means virtually everyone
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is already taking a pcr test. that�*s helpful. countries including the uae and india will also now move from red to amber, meaning arrivals don�*t need to quarantine if they�*re double—jabbed in the uk, us or europe. although the travel industry are pleased more of the world is opening up, many feel it�*s too slow. quite frankly, it is happening at a real snails pace, so seven more countries coming on, none of which are the traditional holiday destinations that people would go to. country by country, more of the world is opening up to uk travellers, but well into summer and after months of uncertainty, the question is how many will want to make the trip? caroline davies, bbc news. earlier we heard from claudia rattray and her two daughters. they travelled to mexico earlier today to see family, only to find out on arrival it had
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been added to the red list. we been added to the red list. came herejust we been added to the red list. came here just to see r we came here just to see my family. i have not seen for the last two years. so the reason to come here was not a summer holiday with the family, ijust wanted to bring my two years to see my family and spend some quality time with my mum and my sisters. taste some quality time with my mum and my sisters. ~ . , , , ., sisters. we have 'ust seen your other goal h sisters. we have just seen your other goal weight _ sisters. we have just seen your other goal weight and - sisters. we have just seen your other goal weight and thing i sisters. we have just seen your other goal weight and thing it l sisters. we have just seen your. other goal weight and thing it was in the background. what is her name? summer is my little one. what was your reaction when you heard... hello, welcome. what was your reaction when you heard that mexico was going on to the red list on sunday morning? to was going on to the red list on sunday morning?— was going on to the red list on sunday morning? to be honest, i thou~ht it sunday morning? to be honest, i thought it was — sunday morning? to be honest, i thought it was a _ sunday morning? to be honest, i thought it was a joke _ sunday morning? to be honest, i thought it was a joke at _ sunday morning? to be honest, i thought it was a joke at first i thought it was a joke at first because _ thought it was a joke at first because my dad actually sent a text to my _ because my dad actually sent a text to my mum — because my dad actually sent a text to my mum and i was a bit concerned because _ to my mum and i was a bit concerned because my— to my mum and i was a bit concerned because my mum was a bit nervous, she was— because my mum was a bit nervous, she was a _ because my mum was a bit nervous, she was a bit— because my mum was a bit nervous, she was a bit shocked. i wasjust thinking — she was a bit shocked. iwasjust thinking of— she was a bit shocked. i wasjust thinking of all the things that i'm going _ thinking of all the things that i'm going to — thinking of all the things that i'm going to miss out on, like my first
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week— going to miss out on, like my first week of— going to miss out on, like my first week of yearten going to miss out on, like my first week of year ten which is big because _ week of year ten which is big because my gcses are later this year and i because my gcses are later this year and i might— because my gcses are later this year and i might miss a bit of context on my gc55s— and i might miss a bit of context on my gcses but at least we'll get to stay with— my gcses but at least we'll get to stay with our family and we are lucky— stay with our family and we are lucky that— stay with our family and we are lucky that we have got a family to stay with — lucky that we have got a family to stay with over here. get lucky that we have got a family to stay with over here.— lucky that we have got a family to stay with over here. get so much as . o . stay with over here. get so much as -o- them stay with over here. get so much as pop them so — stay with over here. get so much as pop them so that — stay with over here. get so much as pop them so that we _ stay with over here. get so much as pop them so that we can _ stay with over here. get so much as pop them so that we can see i stay with over here. get so much as pop them so that we can see her. . pop them so that we can see her. that�*s better! you might as well join in, you know? what are you going to do then, claudia? how you going to do then, claudia? how you going to do then, claudia? how you going to manage this trip? a going to stay, come home? was he going to do? big night will be landed around nine hours ago. as soon as we landed i got a message from my husband saying mexico had changed to the red list so my first reaction was to ask him to get in contact with the airline and to see if we were able to fly back again today or tomorrow just to avoid that quarantine restriction but unfortunately there are not many flights leaving for
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mexico back to the uk so there are no seats available so i decided to enjoy their time here with my family and i�*m going to see in three weeks the government reviews this list and hopefully mexico will be moved back to the blessed and i�*ll be able to fly back. —— moved back to the amber lift. if not, i will have to do is stay here in mexico because ijust cannot afford to pay for the quarantine hotel for the three others and to stay here fits ten days. it isjust others and to stay here fits ten days. it is just too others and to stay here fits ten days. it isjust too much. you others and to stay here fits ten days. it is just too much. you will extend your holiday? days. it isjust too much. you will extend your holiday?— extend your holiday? yes, i will extend your holiday? yes, i will extend my _ extend your holiday? yes, i will extend my holiday _ extend your holiday? yes, i will extend my holiday because i extend your holiday? yes, i will extend my holiday because we. extend your holiday? yes, i will i extend my holiday because we are lucky that we are staying with family and i don�*t know if this is true but my husband as well find out that the quarantine hotels have increased the prices to £2400 per
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person for the ten days and that is not including for my children so we are looking at around £4000 so it is are looking at around £4000 so it is a lot of money to spend just because of the government decision. i am double vaccinated so i am more than happy that when i come back to get the test here in mexico, to present my negative results but the quarantine i think is a step too far. quarantine i think is a step too far, ., ., ~' quarantine i think is a step too far. ~ ., ., far. so, it looks like you are going to probably _ far. so, it looks like you are going to probably have _ far. so, it looks like you are going to probably have a _ far. so, it looks like you are going to probably have a much - far. so, it looks like you are going to probably have a much longer. to probably have a much longer holiday from school then, does it? yes. . holiday from school then, does it? yes-- yes. _ holiday from school then, does it? yes. yes. yes, because my kids go back to school _ yes. yes. yes, because my kids go back to school on _ yes. yes. yes, because my kids go back to school on the 6th of september so probably yes but hopefully, hopefully i am really hopefully, hopefully i am really hopeful that this situation will change. afamily in a family in mexico city. alan french is the chief executive of the travel company thomas cook, which now operates online.
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allen, how many of your customers are in these places which on sunday will go into the red list? we are in these places which on sunday will go into the red list?— will go into the red list? we do have a hand — will go into the red list? we do have a hand full _ will go into the red list? we do have a hand full of _ will go into the red list? we do have a hand full of people i will go into the red list? we do have a hand full of people who | will go into the red list? we do i have a hand full of people who are in mexico and we are working with them to give them options around bringing them back. it is not a large number, though. aha, bringing them back. it is not a large number, though.- bringing them back. it is not a large number, though. a mad scramble for fliahts, i large number, though. a mad scramble for flights, i think, _ large number, though. a mad scramble for flights, i think, for _ large number, though. a mad scramble for flights, i think, for a _ large number, though. a mad scramble for flights, i think, for a few _ forflights, i think, for a few people. assess the changes we have now heard. people are finding it very confusing still. it is now heard. people are finding it very confusing still.— very confusing still. it is very confusing — very confusing still. it is very confusing and _ very confusing still. it is very confusing and i _ very confusing still. it is very confusing and i think - very confusing still. it is very confusing and i think the i very confusing still. it is very. confusing and i think the good very confusing still. it is very - confusing and i think the good news around the announcement late last night was that it wasn�*t getting any more complicated and was perhaps getting marginally simpler in that they left out some of the... until french of the amber plot so i think that some of the cage is good news. the transport secretary announcing that he didn�*t want people looking over their shoulders and gives
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consumers a greater level of confidence that they can go on holiday with a reduced risk that the country can change colours and, of course, taking one of your sections from earlier, a lot of the destinations have got great deals on the quite quiet at the moment so if you are able to take advantage of it it is a good thing but it is, you know, it is a mixed message but in general i think it is good news for the travel industry because we are moving very slowly to freer travel. how would you assess consumer confidence at the moment when it comes to booking foreign holidays? it is low at the moment. i think that the consumer confidence has been hit with a number of repeated blows as, you know, portugal was green and then went on to amber,
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others change colour, and i think it is very clear that most people in the uk don�*t want to go through a quarantine process so i think that consumer confidence at the moment is low. i think this will help because it does give a period of time now, about six weeks where a few changes have been made. i think that the effectiveness of the vaccine programme coming through the uk is also giving people a little bit more confidence but certainly it is confidence but certainly it is confidence coming from a pretty low base. ~ .,, confidence coming from a pretty low base. m. ., confidence coming from a pretty low base. ~ ., ., confidence coming from a pretty low base. ., ., . ., , base. most of the extra changes, ingredients _ base. most of the extra changes, ingredients if _ base. most of the extra changes, ingredients if you _ base. most of the extra changes, ingredients if you like _ base. most of the extra changes, ingredients if you like that i base. most of the extra changes, ingredients if you like that will i ingredients if you like that will need to happen to make sure it bounces back to old levels? i think that, ou bounces back to old levels? i think that. you know. — bounces back to old levels? i think that, you know, the _ bounces back to old levels? i think that, you know, the transparency . that, you know, the transparency around the traffic light schemes, i think, is the first the step. we need to, you know, it is on the screen for most people who have been vaccinated. we would like to see many more countries going into green
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and then we would like to see bilateral agreements reached between the uk and other countries of it is clear not only what happens when you come back into the country but is also clear and understandable what happens when you go into another country because at the moment, she said earlier, it is quite confusing for the customer. you know, we�*ve got a very busy call centre full of travel experts who are trying to help customers through this time but it is very confusing and the guidance does change and sometimes the guidance changes without it being it�*s changed. blah the guidance changes without it being it's changed.— the guidance changes without it being it's changed. alan french from thomas cook- _ being it's changed. alan french from thomas cook. thank _ being it's changed. alan french from thomas cook. thank you _ being it's changed. alan french from thomas cook. thank you very i being it's changed. alan french from thomas cook. thank you very much | being it's changed. alan french from i thomas cook. thank you very much for joining us this afternoon. the sprinterfrom belarus — krystina timanovskaya — has told a news conference in poland that she refused orders to fly home from the tokyo olympics early, because of concerns for her safety. she�*s now been granted a humanitarian visa by the polish government. the 24—year—old athlete claims she was removed
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from the belarus national team after criticising her country�*s coaching staff, and has been speaking to journalists in warsaw when i was in olympic village some coach and some men from our team, they come to my room and said i should say have some injury and come back to home and if i would not do it i could get some problem in my country and they don�*t know which problem but after this date they also come to my room and they say that i have no chance to run 200 metres and i should come back to home, and it�*s not their decision, it�*s theirjob to do it and when i pick up my clothes and go to the car my grandmother, she called me and she said you can�*t come home because on the tv they say a lot of bad words about you, that you have some mental problems and maybe you can go to some hospital in belarus
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or maybe to jail, we don�*t know. before that press conference, ms timanovskaya gave an interview to the bbc. she spoke of her sadness at not being able to return home and encouraged her country�*s citizens to speak out. now i can�*t come back to belarus, because for sure now it�*s so dangerous for me. i don�*t know when i can come back to home, but i love my country so i wanted to come back to home, and i was born belarus so it�*s my country but now it�*s so sad that i can�*t come back. i wanted the people in my country to not be afraid any more, and to say all things what they don�*t like, and to respect each other and themselves. the sprinterfrom belarus — krystina timanovskaya —
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speaking earlier to the bbc in warsaw. we start with holly bradshaw who has made history becoming the first ever bit to clear 4.85 to make runs. after claiming 4.85 she had three failed attempts at 4.90 and then eight pole vault of the us did claim it to make the gold and then the russian got a gold medal and congratulations to her. it�*s not sunk in. i don�*t know what to say. i�*m almost, like, emotionless because i don�*t know what emotions i�*m feeling. it�*s belief, pure enjoyment and just excited and proud of myself sticking with it and i knew i could get it one day, and ijust, i can�*t express how, you know, grateful i am to be involved in the sport and to finally get an olympic medal.
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i can�*t believe it. well, that�*s just one of three medals team gb have taken on day 13 of the games including gold on the track cycling. matt wolves won the olympic only and at the first time of asking. andy smith found that the rest of the day in tokyo so far. olympic debuts just don�*t get better than this. 23—year—old matt walls from 0ldham after the ride of his life. walls was already at the european champion in the omnium, one of track cycling�*s most brutal spectacles — four energy—sapping races culminating in a 100—lap epic, and after dominating the event from start to finish he did more than enough to clinch the title. fortune favours the bold and there were none bolder then walls in this one! if he wasn�*t a household name before he is now after a win dedicated to his family back home. i wouldn't be here now without my parents when i was a youth growing
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up travelling round the country racing, there's no chance i'd be here without them, so big thank you to them. it wasn�*t all good news for britain�*s cyclist�*s though. jason kenny�*s nine—year reign as olympic sprint champion was over as he was beaten in the quarterfinals, and in the women�*s there was an abrupt end to katie marsh�*s chances as her chance of victory came crashing down. meanwhile, time for some paddle power. in the kayakfinal, britain�*s liam heath the defending champion. could he do it again? well, after a sluggish start, heath came roaring back, and third and third from the top he was agonisingly close. takes the goal for hungary... behind him, he took gold in the tightest photo finish, his fourth olympic medal confirming his status as britain�*s
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most successful canoeist. in the boxing, meanwhile, another now has gold within his reach after a stunning victory in his flyweight semifinal. delight for the 28—year—old, whose two older brothers are also boxers. i talk about being with my brothers and now i�*m fighting in front of everyone, my mum, family and friends, the whole team the whole world watching, and i�*m in the olympic final and just got to deliver the goods and pray that win�*ll i come home. on the track, dina asher—smith was back. after pulling out of the 200m, she returned for the relay heats and helped the british team into the final with a new national record to boot. after asher—smith�*s tears at the weekend, it was all smiles. i know that these ladies are in great shape, they're incredibly talented, so i knew that i had to rest up and get ready for the team event. and that's what i was going to be doing this week.
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i have been training hard to get ready! but if you think it is just the competitors putting themselves on the line, watch this. in the skateboarding, one cameraman got rather more of a close—up than he bargained for. in a sport of thrills and spills, well, it was surely top marks to him. andy smith, bbc news. perks of thejob! perks of the job! we can take you away from the olympics and momentarily to trent bridge where james anderson has taken two wickets in two balls including virat kohli for a golden duck to give britain a bit of hope for the first test against india. took until the stroke of lunch for them to make their first breakthrough which is joint third on the list of most test wickets before bad light stopped play india were 125 for four. they trailed just 28 after bowling england out for only 183. meanwhile, there has been some serious news on there has been some serious news on the in goal intervene full —— on the
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injury front for england bowler jofra archer. each suffered a stress fracture of his right elbow which means he will miss the t20 world cup and also the ashes in australia. it is deeply concerning. tim in my era was never the same bowler and loss that yard of pace when he came back from his elbow injury. you just hope now medical science has improved forjofra�*s sake because he is such a great bowler to have in your armoury, and particularly now the shorter form of it. will we never see him bowl the red ball again? is it the case now that his elbows will only allow him to bowl four overs? you can�*t blamejofra if he makes that decision, but for me ijust hope personally that he is ok, and there is a light at the end of the tunnel and we get him back playing in an english even if it isjust with a white ball. the rugby league cup which was
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scheduled to be held in the autumn has now been postponed until next year following the withdrawal of defending champions australia and new zealand over player welfare and safety concerns relating to covid—19. the world cup also featuring women�*s wheelchair events was due to start in october. work is now beginning on finding the best way to stage the tournament in the autumn of year. for way to stage the tournament in the autumn of year-— autumn of year. for us, at least it's a postponement. _ autumn of year. for us, at least it's a postponement. it's - autumn of year. for us, at least it's a postponement. it's 12 i autumn of year. for us, at least i it's a postponement. it's 12 months it�*s a postponement. it�*s 12 months which i think as a player mentally more than physically as had to readjust to. you know, your life changes, you need to refocus on your commitment and where you need to hit your peak to make sure that you perform for the world cup but i think that it is the right decision. i think we�*ll need to take a little bit of time to process it but appreciate that we want to play in the best world cup ever and have the biggest impact on the sport and i think next year is the best way to do that. ~ ., ., , think next year is the best way to do that. a, ., , ., , ., , do that. more details on the story on the bbc _ do that. more details on the story on the bbc sport _ do that. more details on the story on the bbc sport website - do that. more details on the story on the bbc sport website and i do that. more details on the story| on the bbc sport website and that do that. more details on the story i on the bbc sport website and that is where you can keep up—to—date all
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the developments in the olympics but thatisit the developments in the olympics but that is it for now. martin. 10 men and a woman have been arrested by police investigating the racist online abuse which was directed at three england footballers after the euro 2020 final. marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka were targeted last month after missing penalties in the match against italy. police said they�*ve identified more than 200 possible criminal offences. tom symonds reports. it was a critical moment in the careers and the lives of three young footballers. sadly, england�*s euros dream wasn�*t to be. and the response of hundreds on social media was to hurl racist abuse, often from the safety of anonymous online profiles. now, the police say they have identified 207 possible criminal offences. 35 social media accounts are under investigation. police are waiting for information on 50 more from online providers. 123 accounts are abroad and have been referred
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to relevant police forces. those arrested range from a 21—year—old man in dorset to 40— and 50—year—old men in other parts of the country. chanting: black lives matter! the investigation is being led by the uk�*s specialist football policing unit. police chiefs are overseeing the process. i think it�*s incredibly important that people recognise there is no anonymity for people in many cases. if people post these things online, we will try and identify them and in many case we will identify them and then it�*s not just the criminal sanctions they can face — we�*ve seen people losing theirjobs, having university places denied to them. this morning the professional footballers association published research suggesting a 48% rise
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in online abuse against footballers in the uk. black players like marcus rashford but also women. racism but also messages of homophobia, sexism and anti—disability hate. the association is concerned not enough is being done about it. i think now there is strong evidence about the effect you can identify the comments, you can see where they are, those comments, and you can do two things, report to the police also report to the clubs. because the reports also show you can connect some of those people to specific fan bases and specific clubs. as for the police investigation is expected to last weeks and there are hoping to contact players themselves, to add weight to potential prosecutions. tom symonds, bbc news. a man has appeared in court charged with the murder of his step—son in bridgend. the body of five—year—old logan mwangi, who was also known as logan williamson, was found in a river on saturday. 39—year—old john cole is also charged with perverting the court ofjustice, along with a 30—year—old woman and 13—year—old boy.
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liverpool football club has announced that the name of andrew devine will be added to the hillsborough memorial at anfield, as the 97th person unlawfully killed in the 1989 disaster. the club is also planning to change the emblem on the back of the players�* shirts, and rename a path in front of the main stand, in memory of the 55 —year—old liverpool fan who died last week. the un says it�*s deeply concerned about the safety of tens of thousands of civilians in the afghan city of lashkar gah — the capital of helmand province. taliban militants and government forces are waging an intense battle for control of the city. a un spokesman said there were reports of increased civilian casualties, and of homes and hospitals being destroyed. afghan and us air strikes on taliban positions continued throughout yesterday. let�*s hear from our south asia editor, anbarasan ethirajan. the fighting there in lashkar gah, the capital of helmand province in southern afghanistan has been going on for more than eight or nine days and this has become a bone of convention between the two sides because the taliban, who launched the simultaneous
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attacks on three major cities, herat in the west, kandahar and lashkar gah in the south, they wanted to prove a point that they were in a position to even capture provincial capitals. if that had happened, that would have been a huge blow to the afghan government. but now the afghan military says now they are launching a clearing operation in lashkar gah. as you said in the introduction, there is also concern about what is going to happen to the civilians, because the regional commander urged the civilian population to leave so that they can carry out an operation against taliban militants. dozens of people have been killed and both sides are claiming, inflicting casualties on each other. but, you know, both sides are also known to make huge claims about casualties. 10 years ago, riots across england led to the worst public disorder seen in a generation. they began in tottenham in north london after the fatal shooting by police of 29 —year—old mark duggan, who was
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suspected of carrying a gun. an inquest laterfound he had been lawfully killed. within 48 hours of his death, protests led to conflict with police and escalated — there were days of widespread rioting in the capital and other english cities. our community affairs correspondent, adina campbell, has been assessing the impact of the tottenham riots and changes in the area in the last decade. no—one expected to see the shocking levels of unrest in the summer of 2011. this was tottenham in tatters. fire, anger and violence ripping through the heart of the community. much of the anger was directed at the police after they killed 29—year—old mark duggan, who they believed was carrying a gun. so black young men and women need to feel that they are safe
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with police, and i don�*t feel that safety exists with police and community relationships yet. we�*re not there yet. i also still see the poverty, the hardship, the issues around drugs and the poverty of aspiration, opportunity, yet there is some hope still. the metropolitan police in a statement say... regeneration has played a massive part in helping to transform this part of north london since the riots, including more than £40 million from the london mayor�*s office for new homes and jobs, one of the highest levels of investment in the entire capital. so much has changed here in tottenham over the last ten years with splashes of new housing developments, business ventures and other huge ongoing redevelopments, but for the people who still live here, many still feel stuck and left behind in a place they no longer
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recognise, with many opportunities passing them by. it�*s improving, but what is going to happen is that everything is going to go up so high that the average person won�*t be able to afford to live in tottenham any more. there's still, like, a divide. there is not really a communication with the police. a few miles away, this new exhibition tells the difficult stories black communities have faced in the uk over the last 70 years. this is my mum. i�*m obviously proud of her. including the trauma caused by the most recent riots. i don�*t think that we�*ve learnt a lot. i think we�*ve learned that there�*s no support in the system for young people. young people are being further marginalised — we�*ve just had covid so we know that they�*re going to be paying for it going forward. it's hard to see but it's right there. many hope the next generation
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will see tottenham as a safer space with more community groups like the selby centre in years to come. the riots no longer casting a shadow over their futures. i want tottenham to be the home that we all can be proud of and not feel ashamed or shy to call it our home. adina campbell, bbc news in tottenham. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. low pressure is dominating the scene now for the next few days. it is going to bring rather windy conditions to pretty much all areas. and we will see heavy showers, longer spells of rain at times. it is going to feel rather cool, as well, for august. but there will be some sunshine around, so it is not going to be raining all the time everywhere. this is the culprit, this new area of low pressure, lots of isobars on the charts, hence the strong winds across many areas, particularly around the irish sea coast. there will be longer spells of rain, some thundery downpours in places through this evening and overnight. some drier, quieter moments in between the showers, though. and because of the air source and also the strong winds, it is not going to be a particularly
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cold night, around 14—15. friday, again, showers, longer spells of rain, some of these downpours could be pretty intense in places, but there will be some sunnier moments, too, particularly across the south of the country. temperature wise, where we have the sunnier spells, then around 20—22, otherwise the high teens generally for most. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: fully vaccinated people returning to england, scotland and northern ireland from france will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. but thousands of brits on holiday in mexico will have to quarantine in a hotel at their own expense. i think i�*m going to stay here in mexico, because ijust can�*t afford to pay for the quarantine hotel for the three of us and to stay there for ten days. it�*s just too much. the belarusian olympic sprinter who�*s in exile after refusing orders to go home, tells a news conference
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in warsaw it was a warning from her grandmother which convinced her it was not safe to return. gold on the track once again. for the first time at these olympic games... another gold for team gb injapan, as matt walls triumphs in the velodrome — taking the olympics medal tally to 50. a wild fire that has raged for eight days in turkey reaches a thermal power plant on the aegean coast. the government has defended the way donations are handled by the conservative party, saying there�*s "nothing wrong" with people giving money to political parties. and uk adults spent more than a third of their waking hours watching tv and online video last year because of the pandemic. now on bbc news it�*s time to take a look some of the stories from our colleagues in our newsrooms across the uk.
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the bbc has obtained exclusive evidence which shows that the offer of support placements for students in london with special educational needs drops significantly once they reach the age of 16. gem o�*reilly went to meet one young person — from south—west london — who�*s now been out of education for four years. i have been out of education and denied education from 2017. i am 23 at the moment, and currently sofa surfing. i have dyslexia, this calculate, dyspraxia, autism, and most —— i have dyslexia, dyscalculate, dyspraxia, autism, and most of the neuro diverse titles other than adhd. since 2017, claude has been fighting for a college placement to study his gcses. he has special educational needs, also known as sen, so he requires extra support for learning. but he has not been able to get it.
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a placement is key for someone with sen that they are able to flourish and they are able to learn. claude is not alone. through the freedom of information act, i have obtained evidence of a significant drop in special educational needs provision across london for students post the age of 16. i submitted freedom of information requests to all 33 of london�*s local education authorities. of those that responded, we found that there were more than 13,000 sen placements offered to under 16 is between 2019 and 2021. compared to 2508 placements offered to over 16s. a difference of 81%. support should be increased, not decreased, when a child finishes their gcse, you know, post 16, in terms of what next? and we are letting them down. i think it all comes down to funding at the end of the day. early identification is key, early diagnosis is key. we need to build a support
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structure around that child that stays with them. while he has been out of education, claude has written a book and created a petition to try to help other people in his possession. it surprised me that there is many other cases similar and they are families that are going through similar challenges. throughout this investigation, i requested an interview with the local education authority of richmond to understand more about cloth�*s case. —— more about claude�*s case. they denied my request, and instead gave me a statement. placement data is monitored to ensure that statutory duties are met. richmond has a very small number of young people whose placement is under discussion. in this particular case, a further education placement was agreed for the young person through an independent first—tier tribunal process. richmond did give claude a placement to study from home, but due to his sen, he feels this is not possible. i also contacted the department for education to understand more about sen funding.
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they denied my request, and instead gave me this statement. i want an education, which i am entitled to. we cannot live in a society which exclusive and discriminative. we need to live in a diverse, equality world that gives equal opportunities. gem o�*reilly, bbc news. circumnavigating the british coast might not be on everyone�*s bucket list but it�*s something that�*s being taken on by coastal rowing clubs in scotland. community built boats called skiffs are taking part in the event. india grantjoined one team as they sailed from the village of collieston to the granite city of aberdeen. since april, coastal rowing clubs
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like this one have been taking part in a herculean feat — circumnavigating scotland�*s coasts in small skiffs. my name isjohn easton, i am a member of the collieston offshore rowing club. we row things called st ayles skiffs, which are community built wooden rowing boats. the idea is that a baton is passed from boat to boat all the way around the coast. collieston is small, only around 250 people live here, but the group ties people together. i got into coastal rowing when i first moved to the village about seven years ago. seeing the guys going out in the boat, obviously the clubhouse is here, and asked them about it. just started rowing from there. what is great about it as it got me involved in the community a lot more. it means a lot. it is friendships, it is camaraderie, i love the rowing, i have rowed river rowing, and then coastal rowing. i grew up next to the sea,
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so being able to row at sea is just the perfect combination for me. so much so, although i did not belong to the village, i bought a property out here. during covid, the team were unable to get out on the water. going back means a lot to them. i am really into being fit and fitness. and having something on the doorstep, and being on the sea, i actually really love it. and also the different light and the different say, every day —— and also the different light and the different sea, every day it is different and changing. you're always looking for something new. the skiffs are surprisingly stable, butjust a little way outside of collieston harbour, the sea picks up. when you�*re out in the boats, just like anything else to do with the sea, it will depend on the sea conditions. personally, i like it when it is a bit bumpy and you get a good rise from the bow and a splash down. you are in a different world when you are out there, you've got the scenery, you have got the wildlife, you've got the company, and you're next to it, it is as close as you can get, i think, to the offshore nature. it's like you relax, but you're
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working hard on the rowing, but you can enjoy it at the same time. after an hour in the open water and the baton being taken on by the crew down the coast in aberdeen, the skiff teams are done for the day. but they�*re are always welcoming new members. give it a go. it is definitely worth it. it is not everybody's cup of tea, but until you've tried it, you will be bitten by the bug. a wildfire that has raged for more than a week has now reached a thermal power station on turkey�*s aegean coast. the coal—fired facility was already evacuated and flammable and explosive materials were removed in advance of the flames. in greece, fires exacerbated by a heatwave are also causing severe damage. the bbc�*s lebo diseko reports.
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one step closer to safety, seeking refuge from wildfires in turkey�*s southwest. hundreds forced into journeys like this just to stay afloat. here�*s the epicentre of concern — a thermal power plant storing thousands of tonnes of coal. authorities desperately trying to contain it and remove chemicals, coal and other flammable materials. they say its main units are not seriously damaged, despite being part of the worst wildfires in the country�*s history, according to the president. translation: as we continue our efforts on the eighth day, - for example, today we have faced a fire in a power plant. hopefully, we will get over this before it spreads there entirely. there have been dozens of blazes across turkey�*s south, many now under control, but some
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remain heartbreakingly alight. translation: we are not making a movie here. i this is not hollywood. it is turkey and turkey is burning furiously. as you see, all the crew here are working voluntarily with our own efforts. we are helpless and there is no—one believing us. we are so desperate. in greece�*s evia island, in the grip of its own heatwave, more flames tear through a pine forest. with rolling hills and little visibility hampering rescue efforts, it�*s no surprise over 150 houses are said to have burned... ..with this monastery surrounded by fire. sirens wail. the northern suburbs of athens ablaze, as the mayor of olympia calls for help to stop it encroaching on the ancient home of the olympic games.
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there are few homes the fire isn�*t prepared to enter, with further extreme conditions predicted soon. lebo diseko, bbc news. the new chief executive of nhs england has revealed that one in five people admitted to hospital with covid are now aged between 18 and 34. in her first major interview in the role, amanda pritchard said the figure is four times higher than last winter, and demonstrates the importance of vaccination. there are just under 5,000 covid patients in english hospitals. our health correspondent katharine da costa reports. the average age of covid patients admitted to icu has dropped by a decade, from 59 in the winter peak to 49 in this third wave. intensive care consultants say they�*re seeing younger patients with no underlying health conditions. we�*ve been seeing young, fit patients who haven�*t been lucky enough to get vaccinated,
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coming in for some time. i�*ve been caring for young, fit men in their 30s — no medical problems whatsoever, very healthy, muscular people. i�*ve been looking after young pregnant women as well. more than 70% of adults in the uk are fully vaccinated. two doses offer high levels of protection and estimates suggest more than 50,000 hospital admissions have been prevented in england alone. at the peak of the second wave injanuary, there were around 34,000 covid patients in hospitals in england. around 5% of admissions were among young adults. currently there are just under 5,000 patients in hospital. 20%, orabout1,000 patients, are aged 18—34. the new boss of nhs england says the vaccination programme�*s having a massive impact. it shows how effective the vaccine programme has been at protecting people, stopping them needing hospitalisation, keeping them safe.
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so, young people are not immune and the best way they can protect themselves absolutely is to get that vaccine if they haven't already. around a third of 18—to—29—year—olds are still to come forward for a jab. now the roll—out�*s been extended to 16— and 17—year—olds, with vaccinations expected to begin this month. katharine da costa, bbc news. joining me now is dr asha padhiar who is a clinical teaching fellow at great ormond street. thank you very much forjoining us. how concerned are you by these numbers? it how concerned are you by these numbers? . how concerned are you by these numbers?— numbers? it is quite shocking, actuall , numbers? it is quite shocking, actually. to — numbers? it is quite shocking, actually. to say _ numbers? it is quite shocking, actually, to say that _ numbers? it is quite shocking, actually, to say that lots i numbers? it is quite shocking, actually, to say that lots of i actually, to say that lots of younger people are coming into hospital with covid. itjust emphasises how important having the vaccine is for younger people. i think it was quite evident from the second peak that we were seeing some younger adults being admitted into
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hospital and into icy you. now we are seeing even younger groups of people being affected. —— into icu. it is quite scary really. truths; people being affected. -- into icu. it is quite scary really.— it is quite scary really. why is it ounuer it is quite scary really. why is it younger people _ it is quite scary really. why is it younger people now? - it is quite scary really. why is it younger people now? imagine l it is quite scary really. why is it i younger people now? imagine the vaccine, are there any other factors? you�*ll macro it seems to be spreading a lot faster and it seems that the symptoms are more severe. it is affecting younger people. i think the vaccine is one of the best ways that we can try to protect younger populations at the moment. but how young? there is concern about vaccinating younger children. there is no talk of thatjust yet. not at the moment. i feel that they are trying to see how young they can go. but i think with the teenage generation, that is the best way to get it started. the young groups of people are mixing a lot more now, and schools are going back,
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universities, and we need to try to get that done before that new term starts. . ., , ., ., starts. the argument was that covid was not too — starts. the argument was that covid was not too much _ starts. the argument was that covid was not too much of _ starts. the argument was that covid was not too much of a _ starts. the argument was that covid was not too much of a risk - starts. the argument was that covid was not too much of a risk for i was not too much of a risk for younger people, they are not likely to die from it, they are not likely to die from it, they are not likely to contract it, necessarily, with the same severity of symptoms. but how great a risk as long covid, even if they only have mild symptoms? you'll macro it is very difficult to really pinpoint. i think covid affects people differently at the moment. initially we saw this as a virus that was affecting the older generation and more vulnerable population. slowly we have seen that actually a lot more younger people have been affected. with long covid, as well, i think this is one of those things that sometimes if you're unfortunate you have these severe symptoms that are prolonged for such a long time. with children, as you said, there was this whole chat that maybe this would not be affecting them as much, but i think
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that given what we are seeing today, children are just as much at risk as adults. children are 'ust as much at risk as adults. �* , , ., , , i, children are 'ust as much at risk as adults. ~ , , ., , , ., ., adults. and this is happening at a time when _ adults. and this is happening at a time when the _ adults. and this is happening at a time when the restrictions - adults. and this is happening at a time when the restrictions are - adults. and this is happening at a i time when the restrictions are being eased, there is more personal freedom to go out and socialise, so what would your advice be to young people who are at risk? at what would your advice be to young people who are at risk?— people who are at risk? at the moment. _ people who are at risk? at the moment. it — people who are at risk? at the moment, it is _ people who are at risk? at the moment, it is quite _ people who are at risk? at the moment, it is quite nice - people who are at risk? at the moment, it is quite nice to - people who are at risk? at the | moment, it is quite nice to see people who are at risk? at the - moment, it is quite nice to see that people are allowed to normalise their lives. i think it is good to try to get them out, it is giving them a lot more positive things to look forward to. but on the other side, they still have to take precautions. we still need to make sure that we are washing our hands, we maintain distance, and we are wearing ourfacemasks we maintain distance, and we are wearing our facemasks when we are around in public. it is the best way to protect yourself and other people. to protect yourself and other --eole. ., a ., ., ., to protect yourself and other ..eole. ., �*, ., ., ., ., , people. doctor asha padhiar, lovely to talk to yom _ people. doctor asha padhiar, lovely to talk to you. thank _ people. doctor asha padhiar, lovely to talk to you. thank you. _ the government has defended the way donations are handled by the conservative party, saying there was "nothing wrong" with people giving money to political parties. it comes after reports of a group
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of high—value donors being given access to seniorfigures in government including the prime minister — something labour has described as 'murky�*. our political correspondent jonathan blake has this update from westminster. there are rules and the conservative party say they have stuck to them, having published details of political donations and declared those to the electoral commission, in line with the law. but there has been scrutiny in the last few days after those reports you mentioned in the sunday times and the financial times about the existence of a so—called advisory board to the conservative party, a group of big—money donors handing over, it is reported, at least £250,000 a year. with that, it seems, has come the opportunity for those individuals to meet the chancellor and the prime minister, we are told, occasionally. now, this group was set up before borisjohnson became prime minister. there is nothing new in donations to political parties, sometimes very large ones from very rich individuals, but the questions the conservatives are facing
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is the conservatives are facing here are around transparency, details of this group and exactly who is on this group and what they might be expecting in return for their money. and also of access — who these people are allowed to meet and how regularly, and perhaps the terms on which those meetings are held. this morning, the transport secretary grant shapps, who is a former chairman of the conservative party, was asked if he was comfortable with this arrangement. you have to have political parties funded some way. you either tax people to do that — some countries do that, i think it would be very unpopular here. or you fundraise by people joining as members or by people making donations, but what they get when they do that is to hear about party policy, party approach to winning elections and that side of things. what they don't get to do is to intervene on or get involved in government policies, so there's a very, very important distinction and, of course, if we want political parties that are vibrant in this country, we've got to pay for them some way.
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either you pay with the taxpayer — i don't think that's very desirable — or through donations. now, they get to hear about policy but do not get involved in what the government is doing, the summary of what grant shapps had to say they are. nevertheless, labour are keeping up the pressure on the conservatives over this. and sir keir starmer was asked earlierfor his thoughts on the matter, saying there is nothing wrong with donations to political parties, per se, but there is in his eye is a problem here. what is so concerning about what we have seen in relation to this special club for the conservatives is sort of a cash for access and the influence that is being bought by this process. and it is the latest example of one rule for them and another rule for everybody else. what we have called for is transparency. tell us who has been involved in this, who has been meeting who, and how much money has exchanged hands. but we cannot have this sleaze, this murky cash for access.
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a particularly generous group of party donors, as the rose network's chair circle, you can find details about that online. it talks about those giving more than £5,000 a year to the party being able to gain access to, among other things, a preconference reception with the party's deputy leader, angela rayner. so far, the conservatives have shown no sign of going any further in disclosing the details of the advisory board scheme or the hierarchy of their party donors any more widely. they have, though, told us in a statement that donations to the party are properly and transparently declared to the electoral commission, published by them and comply fully with the law. jonathan blake at westminster. some chemical mixtures used in farming could kill up to twice as many bees than previously thought, according to new research. scientists from the university of london found that multiple pesticides used in ready—mixed products can react to each other, having a negative impact on bee colonies.
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our science correspondent victoria gill explains. precious pollinators in decline, our bees face multiple threats to their survival — from a loss of food rich natural grassland to the dozens of chemical pesticides that are commonly used in agriculture. this new study set out to quantify each of those threats and to work out how they combine to affect the insects�* health. the research has examined 90 studies that each measured the effect on bees of a specific pesticide or another environmental challenge. they worked out that combinations of several chemicals killed many more bees than expected. this is because the researchers say pesticides interact, each chemical enhances the damage caused by another. what we found is really important when you consider how agrochemicals are sold. commercial formulas are sold to farmers and they often contain various different agrochemicals — pesticides, fungicides — and what our research shows is that these chemicals can interact
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and significantly increase the potential harm, potential impact on bee mortality. the scientists say that regulation needs to be updated to factor in this chemical interaction, and to avoid harmful cocktails of pesticide that pose a threat to the pollinating insects that we rely on. victoria gill, bbc news. now, how did you get through lockdown? we spent about a third of our waking hours last year watching tv and online video, according to 0fcom's annual survey of our media habits. the figures apply to adults across the uk. the regulator says people increasingly turned to subscription services when repeated lockdowns left millions at home. here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. like many of us, the oakley family spent much of 2020 glued to screens, though not necessarily all together. mum and dad were in front of the main telly. son arun spent lots of time gaming, chatting to friends, and watching youtube videos,
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but it's streaming services not broadcast tv which were big for all of them. increasingly, it's just news and current affairs, really, is what we are watching broadcast. otherwise it's streaming. almost everything else is streamed via one service or another. arun, do you watch any television? almost none. i'm usually watching youtube or netflix. i ofcom's annual snapshot of our media habits shows we spent an average of five hours and 40 minutes a day watching tv or online video in 2020. that's up 47 minutes on the year before. much of the increase is down to the fact that the time watching subscription streaming services almost doubled to an hour and five minutes a day. the biggest player, netflix, is now in more than half of all uk homes. with hit series like bridgerton, netflix now has more subscribers than sky, virgin and the other uk pay—tv providers put together. so what we're seeing is that younger people are migrating
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from traditional tv to really engaging in these streaming services, where they can watch what they want when they want on their own device, whether that's netflix or youtube, but we're now seeing older audiences also catching up and turning to these streaming services. so 2020 was the year britain became a streaming nation, with traditional broadcast tv something for older people and set to decline. but is this a permanent change, and will we want to continue to pay for the likes of netflix, amazon prime, nowtv, disney+, or will we start switching some of them off? we had a total of six streaming services subscribed at one point. that's now kind of slimmed down to four at the moment, and i think another one will be dropping off soon. hey, google, play the bbc tech tent podcast. one other change in our media habits — more than half of uk homes now have a smart speaker.
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an internet connection, not an aerial or satellite dish, is becoming the way we all get access to entertainment. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. low pressure is dominating the scene now for the next few days. it is going to bring rather windy conditions to pretty much all areas. and we will see heavy showers, longer spells of rain at times. it is going to feel rather cool, as well, for august. but there will be some sunshine around, so it is not going to be raining all the time everywhere. this is the culprit, this new area of low pressure, lots of isobars on the charts, hence the strong winds across many areas, particularly around the irish sea coast. there will be longer spells of rain, some thundery downpours in places through this evening and overnight. some drier, quieter moments in between the showers, though. and because of the air source and also the strong winds, it is not going to be a particularly cold night, around 14—15. friday, again, showers, longer spells of rain, some of these downpours could be
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pretty intense in places, but there will be some sunnier moments, too, particularly across the south of the country. temperature wise, where we have the sunnier spells, then around 20—22, otherwise the high teens generally for most.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... fully vaccinated people returning to england, scotland and northern ireland from france will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. but thousands of brits on holiday in mexico will have to quarantine in a hotel at their own expense. i think i'm going to stay here in mexico, because ijust can't afford to pay for the quarantine hotel for the three of us and to stay there for ten days. it's just too much. the belarusian olympic sprinter who's in exile after refusing orders to go home, tells a news conference in warsaw it was a warning from her grandmother which convinced her it was not safe to return. my grandmother, she called me and she said to me, please does come back to belarus, and it was the reason why i go to the polish.
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another gold for team gb injapan, as matt walls triumphs in the velodrome — taking the olympics medal tally to 50. a wild fire that has raged for eight days in turkey reaches a thermal power plant on the aegean coast. the government has defended the way donations are handled by the conservative party, saying there's "nothing wrong" with people giving money to political parties. and, uk adults spent more than a third of their waking hours watching tv and online video last year, because of the pandemic. good afternoon. british holiday—makers who are fully vaccinated can more easily travel to france this summer,
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as part of significant changes to the covid travel rules that will come into force in the early hours of sunday. france will be brought into line with other amber list countries, so anyone who's had both doses of a vaccine will no longer have to quarantine when arriving in england, scotland or northern ireland. wales is due to make a decision shortly. india, bahrain, qatar and the united arab emirates will switch from red to amber, meaning arrivals from those countries will no longer have to quarantine in government—approved accommodation. while austria, germany, slovenia, slovakia, latvia, romania and norway will be moved onto the green list. but mexico and georgia have been added to the red list — the highest level of restrictions. up to 6,000 british residents are currently in mexico — and if they can't get back before sunday morning they will have to quarantine in a hotel at their own expense. the welsh government is expected to announce this afternoon whether they will adopt the same rules as the rest of the uk. with the latest, here's our transport correspondent caroline davies.
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a near—empty swimming pool, a few tents pitched, and no—one propping up the bar. this would normally be the busiest time of the year at this campsite in western france, but at the moment, they're half empty. so happy about it. we couldn't understand why we were on the amber—plus list anyway, to start with. we've had so many cancellations as a result of it and we're over the moon now. the amber—plus was a bit nonsensical to us because infection rates were lower here in france. ferry companies are also hoping this will give a much—needed boost to passenger numbers. in terms of demand, we know it's out there because we know how many people visit our website, we know how many people are looking for prices. we expect now that that will pick up sharply,
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people will have the confidence to book and travel. across the channel, these british holiday—makers are staying home. not this year. due to the pandemic we feel that holidaying in the uk is a lot better and safer for us. we've come here for a week and we probably would have gone to spain with the family and kids, but, obviously, it's a bit risky with flight restrictions. we've already had to change our holiday — i work for the nhs so i couldn't quarantine when i get back — so this is it for us this year. these changes are for england, scotland and northern ireland. wales are yet to say if they'll follow. there are new additions to the green list, including germany, but out of the seven countries added, only two will allow non—vaccinated tourists without quarantine. spain is still amber, but the government is now advising passengers to have the more expensive pcr test rather than the cheaper lateral flow test before they depart for the uk. now, we set a very high specification, so—called the sensitivity, and specificity for that test, which in the case of spain means virtually everyone is already taking a pcr test. that's helpful. countries including the uae and
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india will also now move from red to amber, meaning arrivals don't need to quarantine if they're double—jabbed in the uk, us or europe. although the travel industry are pleased more of the world is opening up, many feel it's too slow. quite frankly, it is happening at a real snails pace, so seven more countries coming on, none of which are the traditional holiday destinations that people would go to. country by country, more of the world is opening up to uk travellers, but well into summer after months of uncertainty, the question is how many will want to make the trip? caroline davies, bbc news. we have just got the latest corona by the statistics from the government now and we are told that 86 people have died in the last 24—hour period. that's within 28 days of testing positive for covid—i9 which compares to 119
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covid—19 which compares to 119 people who were reported to have died yesterday and the number of new cases in the last 2a hours, 30,215. earlier we heard from claudia rattray and her two daughters. they travelled to mexico city earlier today to see family , only to find out on arrival, that the country had been added to the red list. we came here just to see my family. i had not seen them for the last two years, so the reason to come here, it was not a holiday, like, a summer holiday with the family, ijust wanted to bring my two girls to see my family and spend some quality time with my mum and my sisters. we've just seen your other girl waving to us in the background. what's her name? summer is my little one. summer. evana, what was your reaction when you heard... hello, welcome. what was your reaction when you heard that mexico was going on to the red list on sunday morning? well, to be honest, ithought
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it was a joke at first, because my dad actually sent a text to my mum, and she wasjust... i was a bit concerned because my mum was a bit...nervous. she was a bit shocked. i'm just thinking of all the things that i'm going to miss out on, like my first week of year 10, which is big, because my gcses, i may be missing a bit of context on my gcses. but at least we'll get to stay with our family, and we're lucky that we have got a family to stay with over here. get summer to pop down so that we can see her. that's better. you might as welljoin in, you know? what are you going to do then, claudia? how are you going to manage this trip? are you going to stay, come home? what are you going to do? yeah, i mean, we landed around nine hours ago, and as soon as we landed i got a message from my husband
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saying that mexico had changed to the red list, so my first reaction was to ask him to get in contact with the airline and to see if we were able to fly back again today or tomorrow, just to avoid that quarantine restriction, but unfortunately there's not many flights leaving from mexico back to the uk, so there's no seats available. so i decided to enjoy the time here with my family, and i'm going to see if in three weeks the government review this list and hopefully mexico will be moved back to the amber list and i'll be able to fly back. if not, i think i'm going to stay here in mexico, because ijust can't afford to pay for the quarantine hotel for the three of us, and to stay there for ten days. it's just too much. so you will extend your holiday, will you?
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yes, i will extend my holiday because as evana said, we're lucky that we are staying with family. and i don't know if this is true, but my husband, as well, found out that the quarantine hotels have increased the prices to £2,400 per person for the ten days, and that's not including evana and summer, so we're looking at around £11,000, so it's a lot of money to spend just because of the government decision. i am double—vaccinated, so i'm more than happy that when i come back, to get the test here in mexico, to present my negative results, but to quarantine, i think, is a step too far. so, summer, it looks like you are going to probably have a much longer holiday from school then, does it? yes. yeah. yes, because my kids go back
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to school on the 6th of september, so probably yes but hopefully, hopefully i'm really hopeful that the situation will change. the sprinterfrom belarus — krystina timanovskaya — has told a news conference in poland that she refused orders to fly home from the tokyo olympics early, because of concerns for her safety. she's now been granted a humanitarian visa by the polish government. the 24—year—old athlete claims she was removed from the belarus national team after criticising her country's coaching staff, and has been speaking to journalists in warsaw when i was in olympic village, some coach and some men from our team, they come to my room and they say that i should say that i have some injury and come back to home. if i will not do it then i can get some problem in my country, and they don't know which one problem, but after this day, they also come to my room and they say that i have no chance
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to run 200m, and i should come back to home, and it's not their decision, it's just theirjob to do it. and when i pick up my clothes and go to the car, my grandmother, she called me and she say, "you can't come back to home "because on the tv they say a lot of bad words about you, "that you have some mental problems and maybe you can go to "some hospital in belarus or maybe to jail, we don't know." before that press conference, ms timanovskaya gave an interview to the bbc, she spoke of her sadness at not being able to return home and encouraged her country's citizens to speak out. now i can't come back to belarus, because for sure now it's so dangerous for me. i don't know when i can come back to home, but i love my country so i wanted to come back to home, and i was born belarus so it's my country but now it's
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so sad that i can't come back. i wanted the people in my country to not be afraid any more, and to say all things what they don't like, and to respect each other and themselves. the bank of england has warned that inflation will rise further this year, after keeping interest rates on hold at 0.1%. it's predicting that inflation will increase to ii% — double the bank's target. our economic correspondent andy verity asked the governor of the bank of england, andrew bailey, why he wasn't taking action. because we have also projected we think the increase in inflation is only temporary and it will unwind. and that the reasons which are causing it, which are really quite specific to the situation we find ourselves in, you know, obviously big,
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necessary and somewhat bumpy recovery from the covid—induced economic impact is going to be temporary. and as our projection that we published today shows, we think that inflation will come back to target, to the 2% target. and our objective is to target inflation over the medium term, and so therefore we think that the current monetary policy setting is consistent with, you know, inflation being at target in the medium term, and is therefore consistent with supporting the economic recovery. that was the governor of the bank of england andrew bailey. the new chief executive of nhs england has revealed that one in five people admitted to hospital with covid are now aged between 18 and 34. in her first major interview in the role, amanda pritchard said the figure is four times higher than last winter, and demonstrates the importance of vaccination. there are just under 5,000 covid patients in english hospitals.
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our health correspondent katharine da costa reports. the average age of covid patients admitted to icu has dropped by a decade, from 59 in the winter peak to 49 in this third wave. intensive care consultants say they're seeing younger patients with no underlying health conditions. we've been seeing young, fit patients who haven't been lucky enough to get vaccinated, coming in for some time. i've been caring for young, fit men in their 30s — no medical problems whatsoever, very healthy, muscular people. i've been looking after young pregnant women as well. more than 70% of adults in the uk are fully vaccinated. two doses offer high levels of protection and estimates suggest more than 50,000 hospital admissions have been prevented in england alone. at the peak of the second wave injanuary, there were around 311,000 covid patients in hospitals in england. around 5% of admissions were among young adults. currently, there are just under 5,000 patients in hospital.
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20%, orabout1,000 patients, are aged 18—34. the new boss of nhs england says the vaccination programme's having a massive impact. it shows how effective the vaccine programme has been at protecting people, stopping them needing hospitalisation, keeping them safe. so, young people are not immune and the best way they can protect themselves absolutely is to get that vaccine if they haven't already. around a third of 18—to—29—year—olds are still to come forward for a jab. now the roll—out�*s been extended to 16— and 17—year—olds, with vaccinations expected to begin this month. katharine da costa, bbc news. the number of contact tracing alerts from the nhs covid—19 app fell sharply in the last week ofjuly. nearly 396,000 people in england and wales were pinged after contact with someone who tested positive in the week ending july 28th. that compares to around 690,000 the previous week. changes to the app take effect next week, meaning fewer people will be
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counted as close contacts. the headlines on bbc news... fully vaccinated people returning to england, scotland and northern ireland from france will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. the belarusian olympic sprinter who's in exile after refusing orders to go home, tells a news conference in warsaw it was a warning from her grandmother which convinced her it was not safe to return. a wild fire that has raged for eight days in turkey reaches a thermal power plant on the aegean coast. let's get all the news from the olympics, with a full round up from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall. good afternoon. she said she had worked at her whole career and finally holly bradshaw has an olympic medal after winning bronze in the full brunt becoming the first bit of either sex to take a medal at the event. —— winning
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bronze in the pole vault. she cleared four metres 85 to take third place. the us and russian champions achieved overfour place. the us and russian champions achieved over four metres 90 but she was thrilled nonetheless. it's not sunk in. i don't know what to say. i'm almost, like, emotionless because i don't know what emotions i'm feeling. it's belief, pure enjoyment and just excited and proud of myself sticking with it and i knew i could get it one day, and ijust, i can't express how, you know, grateful i am to be involved in the sport and to finally get an olympic medal. i can't believe it. tea m team gb have taken two more medals on day 13 of the games, including gold in the track cycling with matt walls winning the omnium at the first time of asking. andy smith went up the rest of the day in tokyo so far.
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olympic debuts just don't get better than this. 23—year—old matt walls from 0ldham after the ride of his life. walls was already at the european champion in the omnium, one of track cycling's most brutal spectacles — four energy—sapping races culminating in a 100—lap epic, and after dominating the event from start to finish he did more than enough to clinch the title. fortune favours the bold and there were none bolder then walls in this one! if he wasn't a household name before, he certainly is now after a win walls dedicated to his family back home. i wouldn't be here without them, especially my parents, when i was a youth growing up travelling round the country racing, there's no chance i'd be here without them, so big thank you to them. and, yeah, they're all at shoreside watching, so have fun! it wasn't all good news for britain's cyclist�*s though. jason kenny's nine—year reign as olympic sprint champion
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was over as he was beaten in the quarterfinals, and in the women's there was an abrupt end to katie marsh's chances as her hopes of victory came crashing down. meanwhile, time for some paddle power. in the kayak final, britain's liam heath the defending champion. could he do it again? well, after a sluggish start, heath came roaring back, and third from the top he was agonisingly close. it's totke who takes the goal for hungary... but behind him, heath took bronze in the tightest of photo finishes, his fourth olympic medal confirming his status as britain's most successful canoeist. in the boxing, meanwhile, another now has gold within his reach after a stunning victory in his flyweight semifinal. delight for the 28—year—old, whose two older brothers are also boxers.
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i talked about it at home with my brothers and now i'm fighting in front of everyone, my mum, family and friends, the whole team the whole world watching, and i'm in the olympic final and just got to deliver the goods and pray that win'll i come home. on the track, dina asher—smith was back. after pulling out of the 200m, she returned for the relay heats and helped the british team into the final with a new national record to boot. after asher—smith's tears at the weekend, it was all smiles. i know that these ladies are in great shape. they're incredibly talented, so i knew that rest up and get ready for the team event, that's exactly what i was going to be doing this week. i have been training hard to get ready! but if you think it is just the competitors putting themselves on the line, watch this. in the skateboarding, one cameraman got rather more of a close—up than he bargained for. in a sport of thrills and spills, well, it was surely top marks to him. andy smith, bbc news.
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virat kohli had a golden duck to give england a bit of hope in the test against india. the full anderson's two wickets they got to 619 which is joint third in the list of most test wickets. play had resumed after being stopped for bad light and resumed after being stopped for bad lightand rain, came back resumed after being stopped for bad light and rain, came back from one ball and then stopped again. the colours are back on and play is now back on. england were bowled out for 183. meanwhile, some serious news on the injury front for england bowler jaffer archer who has been ruled out the rest of the year after returning to action last munch tarmac month. the smackjofra archer. he suffered a stress fracture of his right elbow which means he will miss the t20 world cup and also the ashes final
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in australia. the nine time moto gp world champion said that he will retire at the end of the season and at 42 years old this season would be his last as a proud moment. his career has spanned 25 years and included 115 race victories. after a troubled few weeks, the rugby league world cup which was scheduled to be held in england in the autumn has been postponed until next year. it follows the withdrawal of defending champions australia and also new zealand over player welfare and safety concerns relating to covid. the world cup featuring men's women's and wheelchair events was due to start in newcastle in october. more details on all of those stories on the bbc sport website and you can keep up—to—date with all the olympic events there and that is it for now. the government
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that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport that's all the sport for now. the government has defended the way donations are handled by the conservative party, saying there was "nothing wrong" with people giving money to political parties. it comes after reports of a group of high—value donors being given access to seniorfigures in government including the prime minister — something labour has described as 'murky�*. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in westminster and he explained the conservative party says they have done nothing wrong. there are rules and the conservative party say that they have stuck to them, having published all details of political donations and declared those to the electoral commission, in line with the law. but there has been scrutiny in the last few days after those reports you mentioned in the sunday times and the financial times about the existence of a so—called "advisory board" to the conservative party, a group of big—money donors handing over, it is reported, at least £250,000 a year. with that, it seems, has come the opportunity for those individuals to meet the chancellor and the prime minister, we are told, "occasionally". now, this group was set up before borisjohnson became prime minister. there is nothing new in donations
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to political parties, sometimes very large ones from very rich individuals, but the questions the conservatives are facing here are around transparency, details of this group and exactly who is on this group and what they might be expecting in return for their money. and also of access — who these people are allowed to meet and how regularly, and perhaps the terms on which those meetings are held. and this morning, the transport secretary grant shapps, who's a former chairman of the conservative party, was asked if he was comfortable with this arrangement. you have to have political parties funded some way. you either tax people to do that — some countries do that, i think it would be very unpopular here. or you fundraise by people joining as members, or by people making donations, but what they get when they do that is to hear about party policy, party approach to winning elections and that side of things.
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what they don't get to do is to intervene on or get involved in government policies, so there's a very, very important distinction and, of course, if we want political parties that are vibrant in this country, we've got to pay for them some way. either you pay with the taxpayer — i don't think that's very desirable — or through donations. now, they get to hear about policy but don't get involved in what the government is doing, the summary of what grant shapps had to say they are. nevertheless, labour are keeping up the pressure on the conservatives over this. and sir keir starmer was asked earlierfor his thoughts on the matter, saying there is nothing wrong with donations to political parties, per se, but there is in his eyes a problem here. what's so concerning about what we have seen in relation to this special club for the conservatives is, sort of, cash—for—access and the influence that is being bought by this process. and it is the latest example of one rule for them and another rule for everybody else.
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and what we've called for is transparency — tell us who's been involved in this, who's been meeting who, and how much money has exchanged hands. but we cannot have this sleaze, this murky cash for access. a particularly generous group of party donors, known as the rose network's chair circle, you can find details about that online. it talks about those giving more than £5,000 a year to the party being able to gain access to, among other things, a preconference reception with the party's deputy leader, angela rayner. so far, the conservatives have shown no sign of going any further in disclosing the details of the advisory board scheme or the hierarchy of their party donors any more widely. they have, though, told us in a statement that donations to the party are properly and transparently declared to the electoral commission, published by them and comply fully with the law. jonathan blake at westminster. a man has appeared in court
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charged with the murder of his step—son in bridgend. the body of five—year—old logan mwangi, who was also known as logan williamson, was found in a river on saturday. 39—year—old john cole is also charged with perverting the course ofjustice, along with a 30—year—old woman and 13—year—old boy. at least a82 migrants crossed the english channel in 21 small boats yesterday — the home office says that's a new record for a single day. there have been more than 10,000 arrivals in 435 boats so far in 2021. a home office spokesman said the crossings were "putting lives at risk". liverpool football club has announced that the name of andrew devine will be added to the hillsborough memorial at anfield, as the 97th person unlawfully killed in the 1989 disaster. the club is also planning to change the emblem on the back of the players�* shirts, and rename a path in front of the main stand, in memory of the 55—year—old liverpool fan who died last week. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. hello there.
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low pressure is dominating the scene now for the next few days. it is going to bring rather windy conditions to pretty much all areas. and we will see heavy showers, longer spells of rain at times. it is going to feel rather cool, as well, for august. but there will be some sunshine around, so it is not going to be raining all the time everywhere. this is the culprit, this new area of low pressure, lots of isobars on the charts, hence the strong winds across many areas, particularly around the irish sea coast. there will be longer spells of rain, some thundery downpours in places through this evening and overnight. some drier, quieter moments in between the showers, though. and because of the air source and also the strong winds, it is not going to be a particularly cold night, around 14—15. friday, again, showers, longer spells of rain, some of these downpours could be pretty intense in places, but there will be some sunnier moments, too, particularly across the south of the country. temperature—wise, where we have the sunnier spells, then around 20—22, otherwise
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the high teens, generally, for most.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines: fully vaccinated people returning to england, scotland and northern ireland from france will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. but thousands of brits on holiday in mexico will have to quarantine in a hotel at their own expense. i think i'm going to stay here in mexico, because ijust can't afford to pay for the quarantine hotel for the three of us and to stay there for ten days. it's just too much. the belarusian olympic sprinter who's in exile after refusing orders to go home tells a news conference in warsaw it was a warning from her grandmother which convinced her it was not safe to return. my grandmother, she called me and she said to me, "please don;t and she said to me, "please don't come back to belarus," and it was the reason why i go to the police. the bank of england warns that inflation will rise further this gold on the track once again.
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for the first time at these olympic games... another gold for team gb injapan, as matt walls triumphs in the velodrome — taking the olympics medal tally to 51. the bank of england warns that inflation will rise further this year, after keeping interest rates on hold at 0.1%. a wild fire that has raged for eight days in turkey reaches a thermal power plant on the aegean coast. the government has defended the way donations are handled by the conservative party, saying there's "nothing wrong" with people giving money to political parties. and uk adults spent more than a third of their waking hours watching tv and online video last year because of the pandemic. a wildfire that has raged for more than a week has now reached a thermal power station on turkey's aegean coast. the coal—fired facility was already evacuated and flammable and explosive materials were removed in advance of the flames. in greece, fires exacerbated
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by a heatwave are also causing severe damage. the bbc�*s lebo diseko reports. one step closer to safety, seeking refuge from wildfires in turkey's southwest. hundreds forced into journeys like this just to stay afloat. here's the epicentre of concern — a thermal power plant storing thousands of tonnes of coal. authorities desperately trying to contain it and remove chemicals, coal and other flammable materials. they say its main units are not seriously damaged, despite being part of the worst wildfires in the country's history, according to the president. translation: as we continue our efforts on the eighth day, - for example, today we have faced a fire in a power plant. hopefully, we will get over this before it spreads there entirely.
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there have been dozens of blazes across turkey's south, many now under control, but some remain heartbreakingly alight. translation: we are not making a movie here. - this is not hollywood. it is turkey and turkey is burning furiously. as you see, all the crew here are working voluntarily with our own efforts. we are helpless and there is no—one believing us. we are so desperate. in greece's evia island, in the grip of its own heatwave, more flames tear through a pine forest. with rolling hills and little visibility hampering rescue efforts, it's no surprise over 150 houses are said to have burned... ..with this monastery surrounded by fire. sirens wail. the northern suburbs of athens
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ablaze, as the mayor of olympia calls for help to stop it encroaching on the ancient home of the olympic games. there are few homes the fire isn't prepared to enter, with further extreme conditions predicted soon. lebo diseko, bbc news. lenio myrivili is the chief heat officer for the arsht and rockefeller resilience centre which studies the impact of climate change, she's also a former deputy mayor of athens, and earlier she explained the high temperatures are making matters worse. the highest temperature was 41 degrees celsius, and i think the highest we got here in athens was two days ago when it was 43 degrees. which is unprecedented, we have never had temperatures like that. but the worst part is that, because of the fires in the north of the city, there are these thick plumes
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in the sky every now and then, and heavy smoke and then there is ash rain onto us when we go out on our balconies or outdoors. it feels really apocalyptic, and itjust kind of reminds us of the extraordinary difficulties that these people that their houses are being burned are going through right now. how many of have decided to get out of athens? athens feels pretty empty right now. in the centre of athens, it feels relatively... it feels like the city is abandoned. there are some tourists who are trying to find some places that are cool. the acropolis is closed in the middle of the day, from 12 noon until 5pm, it is just too hot for anybody to be out there. we are really worried about the health of the people, both residents and the people
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visiting the city. and it looks like the city... it feels like the city is abandoned because people are indoors. even the ones who are here, they are hiding. and now on the bbc news channel it's time for our your questions answered on travel. fully vaccinated travellers will no longer need to quarantine on arrivalfrom france, as part of a shake—up of coronavirus travel rules in england, scotland and northern ireland. seven more european countries have been added to the green list, and spain will remain amber despite concerns about covid variants there. our international business correspondent theo leggett is here. and also i'm joined by lisa minot, the sun's travel editor. she is making us immensely envious
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because she is in south—west france. welcome to you both, nice to see you first of all, christine from cambridge says, despite low figures and a vaccination programme, turkey is still on the red list. why is that, lisa? this is the main problem we have with the way that the government are allocating countries to our traffic light system. at the moment, there is no clarity, we do not understand exactly which metrics the government are using. we know generally that they are looking at the number of people vaccinated, number of cases, variants of concern, and the way that those variants are being genomically sequenced. it must be that the government feels that the way the turkish government are currently handling the pandemic does not give them the confidence to actually turn from red to amber. there was a thought at one point that...
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this latest traffic light update, the likes of the uae, bahrain and qatar, all big airport hub countries, they have moved from red to amber. people have every right to be quite baffled as to why that has remained the case. the government do not seem to be giving the exact metrics they are using to make these decisions. we are a little bit in the dark. thank you. theo, margaret from somerset says she is going on holiday to majorca in two weeks. she and her husband have both been double vaccinated, they are in their 705, can you help us out with this, what tests are involved before they go and in order to come back? 0k, well, congratulations on getting a holiday in majorca! if you are fully vaccinated, and you're heading out, you do not need any tests. you will need to fill in a health declaration form which you can find on the balearic islands tourist authority's website. you fill that out, you should be able to travel in without too many problems. if you were not vaccinated,
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you would have to take a pcr test, that is one of the laboratory tests, before leaving. when it comes to your return, if you're in a country that is in the amber list, which the balearic islands are, if you're fully vaccinated, you can come into this country without having to quarantine. if you're not fully vaccinated, you will have to isolate for ten days. fully vaccinated passengers will have to undergo a pcr test within two days of arriving. why is it a pcr test and not the cheaper lateral flow? that is so that if the government does detect cases coming in, it can analyse the genome of the variant of covid that you're infected with, and therefore know which variants are being brought into the country. it is a pcr test, that is the more expensive one. you will also have to fill out a passenger locator form on your return. thank you. a couple of people asking similar sorts of questions about travelling to spain. steve from nottingham, my friend and i are travelling to spain on the 18th of august, we are both been fully vaccinated, but we are still uncertain as to what tests, if any,
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you need to have both outbound and on your return. can you shed some light on this? similarly, guy is hoping to go and see his mum next week, has not seen herfor 18 months, she is in spain, is a pcr test on return just a suggestion or a legal obligation? it is about the tests to and from mainland spain. that is right. as we have just heard, we do not have to have a test if we are double vaccinated to get into spain, it is the ones on the way back that we have seen a slight change of the way that the government have worded it in this latest update. you need to have, even if your double vaccinated, to come back into the uk you have to have a predeparture test, sounds ridiculous but that is the test you take to come back into the uk. that predeparture test can be either a lateral flow test or a pcr test. in this latest update, they have said that they would prefer, not saying it is legally necessary, but they would prefer people and advise people to take a pcr test
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just to see if they can catch any more of those variants of concern before people actually arrive back in the uk. then of course you have that pcr test on day two. but there... it has been met by bafflement by the travel industry because these tests are not cheap, they really are a significant cost. to say to people we think you should take a pcr test but not seem —— to say to people we think you should take a pcr test but not say to people you have to take a pcr test, nobody in their sane mine test, nobody in their sane mind is going to go for the very much more expensive test to get back into the uk. so i am not really sure what the point was of saying that. well, i think there is a lot of confusion. in fact, somebody is so confused they have called themselves confused of southsea. i return from france on saturday the 31st ofjuly, i'm currently in quarantine for ten days. do i still had to quarantine after the real change on sunday? and do i still need
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to take my day eight test? well, first of all, i do not blame you for being confused. i have been following this for weeks and the changes in regulations and classifications still make me feel a little bit dizzy, to be honest. but in terms of your situation, i am afraid, yes, you do have to remain in isolation, you have to take that extra test. the changes in the rules will only apply to people arriving after 4am on sunday. so sadly if you are in isolation you have to stay there. we have had similar questions to that before, haven't we? when other changes have been brought in, but people have been cut out even just day or so shy of the role is changing. —— even just day or so shy of the rules changing. martin in swindon says, lisa, i have booked to go to thailand on the 15th of october to see friends. if thailand is added to the red list, which looks like it will be, will i have to quarantine on my return on the 12th of november even if i have had both jabs? that is quite a long
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way away, isn't it? things could have changed, but based on what we know now, what is the answer? they have seen a surge in coronavirus cases in thailand. obviously the government here in the uk will be looking at that. at the moment, there is a very limited opening in thailand. they have what is called as a phuket fan box, which is a limited amount of travel allowed just into the island of phuketjust for international visitors. they have not yet opened up the rest of the country. things can change any matter of minutes, hours, days, so to try to predict what could happen november is really difficult to work out. obviously, if the actual trip is not happening until october, it would be good to keep an eye on those facts and figures all the way through to make sure if you're seeing cases rise, and particularly the variants of concern. it is those variants of concern that making the government really tip countries onto the red list. but it really is, unfortunately
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right now too far in advance to tell what could possibly happen in november. thank you. gosh, things are changing within days, our day, —— gosh, things are changing within days, aren't they, so never mind what might happen in a few months�* time. theo, susan does not fly, so when she travels she travels over land. she needs to get to finland. she changes trains usually. it is an amazing trip. she changes trains usually in brussels, but in belgium they have different rules. what is going to happen to her trip, can she do this trip in this way? does she need to rethink it? well, belgium and finland are both in the eu and transport within the eu itself is relatively straightforward at the moment. now, do not shoot me if i'm wrong on this, but i believe if you're travelling via brussels to finland and you have fulfilled the entry requirements for both countries, which will be presumably a locator form and being fully vaccinated, you should be ok.
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on your return, these countries are both on the amber list, there is no difference in the uk government's classification for them, so it will be the same process. you take a lateral flow test before you return or a test depending on what the government says on the given day, then you take a pcr test within two days of your return. that is what i think the answer to this one is. but again these things are complicated, so check with your travel provider if in any doubt at all. lisa is nodding, so hopefully she agrees. i am nodding sagely and saying i am not sure we are able to enter belgium at the moment. i�*m pretty sure that both belgium and holland still have british subjects on a quarantine list. again, it would need to check if any kind of travel through the country is permitted. i�*m pretty sure that belgium has not lifted their need for any british citizens, even those who are fully vaccinated, to quarantine on arrival in brussels. it could be a slow ship to helsinki, then, instead?
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i think that might be the best way to do it! i know simon calder has come back from scandinavia and a container ship before. i remember talking to him about it. that is what floats his boat, excuse the pun! there are lots of people who we are talking to who have gone to mexico, lisa, and have arrived within the mag and then a few hours after arriving, they say they have spent £6,000 on essentially a day trip to cancun. they got to make the decision today, take the hit when they come back, or do they scramble for a flight to get back before 4am on sunday morning. where do they stand with regard to refunds on a holiday? if the holiday has already begun. very much depends who you booked your holiday with. i have been chatting to you over the last few weeks and months, i�*ve been saying make sure you book with an atoll protected package holiday provider. the issue here is the fact that the likes of tui, our biggest established tour operator, they had not even
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begun their programme to mexico. i think because they had concerns that the country could turn from amber to red. one thing i would say, and we have seen quite a lot of this, and i�*m sure my esteemed colleague has talked about this as well, we are starting to see people laundering their quarantine. basically going from the likes of mexico, changing their flights to landing in another country that at the moment we do not have to self isolate on return from, spending ten days in that country, and then coming back and once you have basically spent those ten days in that country without having then tested positive. it is possible that that would actually be cheaper for many people than actually having to have, especially families, if possible that would be cheaper than actually trying to do the hotel quarantine in the uk. so, change yourflights, go from mexico to a different part of europe perhaps, one that well once you have done your ten days allow
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you to enter the uk quarantine free. that might be cheaper than actually doing the hotel quarantine itself. what really concerns me is the fact that i do not think we are going to have enough hotel rooms or airline seats for the 5000, 6000 people that are currently in mexico. that is proving to be problematic. the airlines are trying to put more flights on, but it is not enough to meet demand. lisa calls it laundering the process, but there�*s nothing wrong with doing it that way, is there, theo? if you go from mexico to another european country that is on the amber list that is accepting flights from mexico, you�*re not breaking the rules, you�*re just effectively sitting out your time somewhere else. absolutely. as long as you're not breaking the rules and you do spend a full ten days there. if you were to come back within those ten days, you would still have to go into hotel quarantine. hotel quarantine now, let's not forget, it is becoming a lot more expensive. it was £1750 for the first adult.
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as of sunday, that will be £2285. the second adult was £650. it will now be £1430. if you can make an arrangement that allows you to do things more cheaply, then there is clearly an incentive to do that now. you might have a nicer time of it! you are not necessarily be stuck in an airport hotel, will you, you can have some freedom? that is right. i do not know what the rules are in terms of whether or not spain are accepting flights from mexico, but to spend ten days at a relatively cheap hotel in spain, it is very easy to go out and about, that must be better than spending ten days any hotel at heathrow for such a huge sum of money. that that does come in the government have said that comes in on the 12th of august,
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so it is not quite the day on monday where the other rules change, it is from the 12th of august. it will be that extra increase in the price. just to make matters more complicated even further. lisa minot and theo leggett, thank you very much both forjoining us. back now to the sprinter from belarus who refused orders to fly home from the olympics early because she feared for her safety. krystina timanovskaya has been giving more details about hertime injapan, from poland, where she�*s been given a humanitarian visa. our correspondent oksana antonenko is in warsaw airport. isa is a huge amount of interest from the media in this sprinter. yes. the media in this sprinter. yes, indeed. there _ the media in this sprinter. yes, indeed. there were _ the media in this sprinter. yes, indeed. there were i _ the media in this sprinter. yes, indeed. there were i think - the media in this sprinter. use: indeed. there were i think 30 or the media in this sprinter. ice: indeed. there were i think 30 or 40 indeed. there were i think 30 or a0 cameras during the press conference. it was her first press conference. what she was talking about, she
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described how it was her grandmother who had warned her it was not safe to go home. who had warned her it was not safe to go home-— to go home. yes, the press conference _ to go home. yes, the press conference was _ to go home. yes, the press conference was quite - to go home. yes, the press conference was quite long, | to go home. yes, the press - conference was quite long, more to go home. yes, the press _ conference was quite long, more than one hour... i conference was quite long, more than one hour- - -— conference was quite long, more than one hour...- she _ conference was quite long, more than one hour. . .- she said - conference was quite long, more than one hour. . .- she said that. one hour... i think... she said that her mother— one hour... i think... she said that her mother called _ one hour... i think... she said that her mother called her— one hour... i think... she said that her mother called her on _ one hour... i think... she said that her mother called her on her- one hour... i think... she said that her mother called her on her way l one hour... i think... she said that| her mother called her on her way to the airport. she also contacted her husband and her parents, so she discussed whether she should return to belarus or whether she should stay in japan to belarus or whether she should stay injapan or go somewhere else. she also contacted opposition of the belarusian politicians, asking to maybe... she said her grandmother was the one who called her last. after that call, she decided not to return to belarus. for after that call, she decided not to return to belarus.— after that call, she decided not to return to belarus. for the moment, thank ou return to belarus. for the moment, thank you very _ return to belarus. for the moment, thank you very much. _ return to belarus. for the moment, thank you very much. at _ return to belarus. for the moment, thank you very much. at warsaw i thank you very much. at warsaw airport, she is therefore that press
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conference with the belarus sprinter. ourapologies forthe sprinter. our apologies for the problem sprinter. ourapologies forthe problem we had with the sound and the pictures there. 10 years ago, riots across england led to the worst public disorder seen in a generation. they began in tottenham in north london after the fatal shooting by police of 29 year old mark duggan, who was suspected of carrying a gun. an inquest laterfound he had been lawfully killed. within a8 hours of his death, protests led to conflict with police and escalated — there were days of widespread rioting in the capital and other english cities. our community affairs correspondent, adina campbell, has been assessing the impact of the tottenham riots and changes in the area in the last decade. no—one expected to see the shocking levels of unrest in the summer of 2011. this was tottenham in tatters. fire, anger and violence ripping through the heart of the community. much of the anger was directed
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at the police after they killed 29—year—old mark duggan, who they believed was carrying a gun. so black young men and women need to feel that they are safe with police, and i don�*t feel that safety exists with police and community relationships yet. we�*re not there yet. i also still see the poverty, the hardship, the issues around drugs and the poverty of aspiration, opportunity, yet there�*s some hope still. the metropolitan police in a statement say... regeneration has played a massive part in helping to transform this part of north london since the riots, including more than £a0 million from the london mayor�*s office for new homes and jobs, one of the highest levels of investment in the entire capital.
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so much has changed here in tottenham over the last ten years, with splashes of new housing developments, business ventures and other huge ongoing redevelopments, but for the people who still live here, many still feel stuck and left behind in a place they no longer recognise, with many opportunities passing them by. it's improving, but what's going to happen is that everything is going to go up so high that the average person won't be able to afford to live in tottenham any more. there's still, like, a divide. there's not really— a communication with the police. a few miles away, this new exhibition tells the difficult stories black communities have faced in the uk over the last 70 years. this is my mum. i�*m obviously proud of her. including the trauma caused by the most recent riots. i don�*t think that
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we�*ve learnt a lot. i think we�*ve learned that there�*s no support in the system for young people. young people are being further marginalised — we�*ve just had covid so we know that they�*re going to be paying for it going forward. it's hard to see but it's right there. many hope the next generation will see tottenham as a safer space with more community groups like the selby centre in years to come. the riots no longer casting a shadow over their futures. i want tottenham to be the home that we all can be proud of and not feel ashamed or shy to call it our home. adina campbell, bbc news in tottenham. jane hill is with you at five. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with stav. the weather is going to turn and settled for the next few days with low pressure dominating the scene and making it feel like autumn rather than summer. it will be windier for all of us with heavy showers or longer spells of rain and it�*s going to feel relatively cool for the time of year but there will be
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some sunshine around, it won�*t be raining all the time everywhere. this is the culprit, this new area of low pressure which has arrived across western areas to start thursday. it will continue to move eastward through the course of the day. after a bright start for east and northeast scotland, eastern england the sunshine will fade and we will start to see cloud, wind and rain pushing eastwards. some of the rain will be heavy and thundery places, followed by heavy showers, particularly across northern ireland, thundery downpours could give rise to localised flooding but there will be a bit of sunshine in between. it won�*t feel as warm as it was yesterday in the winds, temperatures in the high teens in celsius. overnight, we continue with the breezy theme, continued cloud, longer spells of rain which will be heavy in places but there will be some quieter, drier moments in between the showers. temperature—wise, pretty mild, no lower than 13—15 celsius across the board. not much change into friday. our area of low pressure is still dominating,
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lots of isobars on the chart so it stays relatively breezy and windy particularly across southern counties of england and wales and in northern scotland. here, the rain piling up, heavy downpours for the northeast of scotland. further south, sunny spells, scattered showers and a chance of longer, sunny spells most likely across southern england and south wales but even here there will be showers. these are the mean wind speeds. quite strong wind speeds across southern and northern areas, gusts stronger than that around hills and coasts and those temperatures, high teens, maybe low 20s across the brighter spots in the south. as we head into the weekend, low pressure still dominates. this feature runs across southern parts of the country to bring an area of more prolonged rain and it stays breezy with further showers and longer spells of rain through saturday and sunday. these sorts of temperatures are around a little bit lower than the seasonal average. there will be some sunshine in between the showers as well.
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this is bbc news. i�*m jane hill. the headlines at 5pm — fully vaccinated people returning to england, scotland and northern ireland from france will no longer need to quarantine from sunday. the belarusian olympic sprinter who�*s in exile after refusing orders to go home tells a news conference in warsaw it was a warning from her grandmother which convinced her it was not safe to return. my grandmother, she called me and she said to me, "please don't come back to belarus." and that was the reason why i go to the police. gold on the track once
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again for the first time at these olympic games.

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