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tv   Newsday  BBC News  August 9, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... a code red for humanity — the un warns in a landmark report that human activity is changing the climate in unprecedented and sometimes irreversible ways. the world listened, but didn't hear. the world listened, but it didn't act strongly enough and as a result of climate change, it's a problem that is here now. nobody is safe and it's getting worse and faster. raging wildfires in greece — one of many countries already feeling the impact, the flames fanned by strong winds and rising temperatures. documents obtained by the bbc suggest former uk
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prime minister david cameron made around £7 million from the failed finance company greensill. the president of belarus calls the uk "america's lapdog" after britain and the us announce new sanctions against his country over human rights violations. live from our studio in singapore. this is bbc news. it's newsday. hello, and welcome. it's 6am in singapore, and ”pm in london. global warming is accelerating, and human influence is to blame — that's the warning from a damning new report from the un and its secretary general. antonio guteres says the evidence cannot be denied —
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greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel burning and deforestation are choking the planet, and putting billions of people at immediate risk. it's the most comprehensive climate change study ever, and is produced by hundreds of the world's top scientists from 66 countries. the report warns that the global average temperature rise could reach or exceed 1.5 celsius in the next 20 years — ten years sooner than expected. it said rising temperatures will cause more frequent, extreme weather events across the globe, and warned that irreversible changes are already ongoing in melting ice sheets, rising sea levels, and increasing acidification. but the report also stated that climate change could be slowed down — with rapid and sustained emission reductions. our science editor david shukman has this report. as the world gets hotter, it's becoming more threatening.
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the terrifying scenes of mass escape from greek islands, burning amid heatwaves, just as devastating fires also hit california. and the new report from the un climate panel says there will be much more of this to come. with a real additional amount of global warning... this major study concludes that temperatures are rising and that it's beyond doubt that human activity is driving them up. and all the warnings so far have been ignored. the world listened, but didn't hear. the world listened, but it didn't act strongly enough. and as a result, climate change is a problem that is here now. nobody's safe, and it's getting worse faster. people in every region of the world are now feeling the impacts of more violent weather, fuelled by the gases that we release into the atmosphere. | it is an absolute fact that human| influence is warming the climate,
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and that's a very stark reminder that it is our activities _ which are changing the climate and affecting these _ extreme weather events. and as the planet continues to warm, these consequencesjust get worse. l the scientists are more certain of all this because they've got satellites spotting in minute detail how the planet is changing. and teams of researchers out in the toughest conditions, gathering data to help work out what's likely to come next. the big question is how much more the planet will heat up in the coming decades, so scientists explore different scenarios. in two of them, there are rapid and deep cuts in carbon emissions, and although the temperature does rise to potentially damaging levels, it's just about within the limits set by the international community. but in two other scenarios, which are actually much closer to where we're heading right now,
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the increases are much more dangerous. and in the most extreme, where emissionsjust keep growing, things become, well, catastrophic. but the message is that there is still time to act. in one sentence, this report shows that human action has got us to where we are, but human action can also crucially decide how the future will look like. we are not doomed. there is a lot we can all do, like this project in cambridge to fit shades to keep the sun off the windows. this problem's only going to get worse with climate change. we're going to have, i fear, more and more heatwaves and they're going to be worse and worse, so that's why i think it makes sense to shade your windows now, start learning how to adapt. but some changes will be far tougher to deal with. the oceans will keep rising,
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we just don't know how much. the scientists are warning that there's going to be some rise in sea level really whatever we do. maybe half a metre by the end of the century if emissions are brought under control, or a metre if they aren't. and that would be really devastating for millions of people on coastlines around the world. but they can't rule out a far bigger rise approaching two metres if the polar ice sheets collapse. the great ice sheets are already adding to the level of the sea, but this process may suddenly accelerate. scientists aren't sure, but the implications would be disastrous. india is now in the grip of flooding. higher seas would make it worse. the science has never been so clear that we can head off the worst of climate change, but not all of it, so we urgently need to get ready. david shukman, bbc news.
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i'm joined now by gavin schmidt, an acting senior adviser on climate for nasa. thank you so much forjoining us here on newsday. the report warns of irreversible damage already done, gavin, and i know a lot of people out there are thinking that it might be too late to do anything? let out there are thinking that it might be too late to do anything?- be too late to do anything? let me answer that _ be too late to do anything? let me answer that very _ be too late to do anything? let mej answer that very straightforwardly. no, it is not too late. there are changes that will occur, we have an inertia in the system, it is out of balance and needs to get back into balance and needs to get back into balance before things will start changing. so that means there will be continued sea—level rise and temperature warming. but what we can do is we can prevent it from getting much worse. the choices that we have, the amount of future warming is very, very much in our hands
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still. and if we take a strong approach to reducing emissions, we can avoid the worst case scenarios. but if we decide to burn all the carbons that we find, then we will end up in a very much worse situation. so it'll never actually be too late — whatever happens, we can always be making better decisions with respect to the climate. . �* , ., , climate. that's encouraging, but this report _ climate. that's encouraging, but this report will _ climate. that's encouraging, but this report will put _ climate. that's encouraging, but this report will put a _ climate. that's encouraging, but this report will put a lot - climate. that's encouraging, but this report will put a lot more i this report will put a lot more pressure on countries and governments. but have the big offenders, the big countries honoured their pledge to do more was yellow well, i cannot say too much on that particular question. the pledges that people were making our for 2030 and 2050. so pledges that people were making our for 2030 and 2050. 50 it pledges that people were making our for 2030 and 2050.— for 2030 and 2050. so it is yet to be seen whether— for 2030 and 2050. so it is yet to be seen whether they _ for 2030 and 2050. so it is yet to be seen whether they will - for 2030 and 2050. so it is yet to be seen whether they will match | be seen whether they will match those pledges. but what we can see is that there is the willingness at last for countries all around the world to both accept the goals of
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the paris agreement and to accept the paris agreement and to accept the science that underpins this report, and to propose their national contributions to reducing this problem. there is a learning process here — not everybody�*s plan will work. we should be able to learn from other environments, other countries, otherjurisdictions on countries, other jurisdictions on what countries, otherjurisdictions on what works for them and what can be translated to other countries. there's a lot of great ideas that range from, you know, utilities to insulation and buildings, manufacturing, transport, and there's a lot of great new technologies, new approaches — a lot of them have been accelerated by what's happened during the pandemic. the move towards more remote working, less commuting — all those things are actually quite positive from a claimant standpoint, and also from a claimant standpoint, and also from an air pollution standpoint ——
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climate standpoint. from an air pollution standpoint -- climate standpoint.— from an air pollution standpoint -- climate standpoint. gavin, thanks so much forjoining _ climate standpoint. gavin, thanks so much forjoining us _ climate standpoint. gavin, thanks so much forjoining us on _ climate standpoint. gavin, thanks so much forjoining us on newsday. - greece is continuing to battle raging wildfires on the country's second—largest island, evia. the fires have been burning for a week after the most severe heatwave in 30 years. the greek prime minister said they were facing a natural disaster of unprecedented dimensions, and it was obvious the climate crisis was now knocking on the door of the entire planet. more than 600 firefighters, some of them from the uk, are trying to control blazing forests which have destroyed homes and businesses. 0ur europe correspondent bethany bell reports from evia. fires rage on in evia. it's been a week and they're still not under control here. greece is experiencing its worst heatwave in decades. the searing temperatures and scorching winds mean these forests are like a tinderbox. the flames leave behind a ghostly
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landscape, white with ash. the fire swept through these hills, killing the trees, and this is what has been left behind — wreckage and destruction. the ashes are still smouldering. the ground beneath my feet is hot from the blaze. vangelis has come to check up on his family's farm. it belongs to his son—in—law who's off fighting the fires. their flock of 2,000 sheep and goats used to graze on this hillside, now all lost in this disaster. he says he's never experienced a fire like this before. translation: climate change in my opinion l is hurting the entire planet, and especially these forests, which are flammable. the authorities certainly haven't handled this very well, but the fire was our destiny. no one could have put it out. dozens of wildfires have broken out
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across greece in recent days. the prime minister says climate change is to blame. translation: it is obvious that l a climate crisis is now knocking| on the door of the entire planet, with fires that last weeks. this is a reason but it's not an excuse nor an alibi, and i will say it clearly — we may have done whatever is humanly possible, but in many cases it did not appear to be enough in the unequal battle with nature. in some areas of evia, the fires only stopped when they reached the sea. many locals say they've been abandoned. they say the authorities haven't done enough to protect the forests and their homes. and with temperatures rising, there are fears of more wildfires like this in the years to come. bethany bell, bbc news, evia. meanwhile, a huge wildfire in northern california is now the second largest in the state's
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history with thousands of people forced out of their their homes. the dixie fire has been burning for more than 26 days, and more than 5,000 firefighters are trying to contain it. it has consumed hundreds of buildings and threatens thousands more. 11 other major wildfires are also burning in california. there's lots of information and articles on our website about the un climate change report, including what each of us can do to reduce our own carbon footprint. chris morris of the bbc�*s reality check has made a short film about three things we could do to make a difference. take a look on bbc.com/news, or on the news app. let's take a look at some of the stories in the headlines in the uk... almost all of scotland's remaining coronavirus restrictions have been lifted. it means an end to social distancing and limits on indoor gatherings — although the wearing of masks is still compulsory in some public spaces. the first minister, nicola sturgeon,
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says it's the right moment to try to get back to normality. but she warned that the pandemic is not over. vodafone has become the second uk mobile company to reintroduce roaming charges for users travelling in europe. from january, new and upgrading customers will be charged at least £1 a day to use their mobile phone in eu destinations. fee—free roaming was not protected in the brexit agreement britain signed with the eu. london's iconic landmark tower bridge has been hit by a technical fault — leaving the bridge stuck while open, causing major traffic problems. the i27—year—old bridge was scheduled to open this afternoon to allow a large wooden ship through, but it becamejammed. if you want to get in touch with me, i'm on twitter — @bbckarishma.
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you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme: a baby thought to be the world's smallest at birth is finally discharged from a singapore hospital. the big crowds became bigger as the time of the funeral approached. as the lines of fans became longer, the police prepared for a huge job of crowd control. idi amin, uganda's brutalformer dictator, has died at the age of 80. he's being buried in saudi arabia, where he lived in exile since being overthrown in 1979.
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two billion people around the world have seen the last total eclipse of the sun to take place in this millennium. it began itsjourney off the coast of canada, ending three hours later when the sun set over the bay of bengal. this is newsday on the bbc. i'm karishma vaswani in singapore. our main headlines... a code red for humanity — the un warns in a landmark report that human activity is changing the climate in unprecedented and sometimes irreversible ways.
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a woman has accused prince andrew of sexually abusing her. the selling pretty serious allegations, talk us through them. they'll make the timing here is important. the civil lawsuit was filed under the child victims victims act, and it's a landmark new york state law that essentially opened up a one year window to sue over sexual abuse allegations no matter how long ago they occurred. and that one year window expires in just a few days. so virginia roberts to frei's lawyers say they have been in touch through letters with prince andrew's team but they've been completely ignored. they had suggested they would like to resolve this case the renegotiated settlement. they once again say they
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were ignored by prince andrew's team, so they decided to go forward with filing the civil lawsuit which alleges that virginia roberts giuffre, when she was just 17, was sexually trafficked byjeffrey epstein and sexually abused by prince andrew in london, new york, and the us virgin islands. prince andrew has emphatically denied all the allegations against him, but in a statement, virginia roberts giuffre said she did not come to this decision lightly. she knows that that will subject her to further attacks, that that will subject her to furtherattacks, but that that will subject her to further attacks, but she knew if she did not pursue this action, she would be letting others down around the world. so as i say, prince andrew has emphatically denied the allegations, but a new civil lawsuit filed in new york — just one more piece of what virginia roberts
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giuffre, the suits she's had in connection to her allegations. thank ou so connection to her allegations. thank you so much — connection to her allegations. thank you so much for— connection to her allegations. thank you so much forjoining _ connection to her allegations. thank you so much forjoining us _ connection to her allegations. thank you so much forjoining us on - you so much forjoining us on newsday. documents obtained by bbc panorama suggest former british prime minister, david cameron, made around £7 million — or more than $9.5 million — from greensill capital before the controversial finance company collapsed. it was at the centre of controversy when it emerged the former prime minister had lobbied the government on behalf of the company during the pandemic. he has repeatedly refused to tell mps what he was paid by greensill. the company went into administration in march this year and investors are facing billions in losses. a spokesman for mr cameron said his remuneration was a private matter. andrew verity reports. lex greensill was the banker at the heart of david cameron's government. he had his own office at number ten. two years after david cameron left downing street, he went to work
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for his friends firm. greensill. changing finance - to change the world. mr cameron travelled the world promoting greensill capital. with david cameron onboard, it sold more than $14 billion of investments. having an ex—prime minister is a great way to open doors. he played a really crucial role in getting greensill in front of the right sort of people, which meant they could get access to more money, more funding, big investors. when greensill capital went bust in march, those investors were left facing billions in losses. but the man who set it up isn't short of cash. lex greensill took at least $40 million out of his company based at these offices in the west end of london, and his family trust took millions more. 0ur former prime minister also had a bumper payday. panorama has obtained a letter from greensill to mr cameron. it suggests david cameron
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pocketed $4.5 million, after cashing in greensill shares in 2019. before tax, including his salary and bonus, it looks like he made round $10 million, for two—and—a—half years part—time work. it was all about making money, and i think the danger is that cameron looks like he just saw the dollar signs. lobbying for greensill to be considered for the lending schemes. mr cameron's spokesman said he acted in good faith at all times, and there was no wrongdoing in any of the actions he took. lex greensill says the investments are covered by insurance that should cover 100% of any shortfall. but panorama understands greensill�*s main insurer may not pace the micro
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payout. investors investors could face huge losses while david cameron and his friend made a fortune. andy verity, bbc news. a baby thought to be the world's smallest at birth has been discharged from a singapore hospital after 13 months of intensive treatment. kwek yu xuan was just 212 grams — the weight of an apple — when she was born, and measured 2a centimetres long. her mother gave birth to her by emergency c—section four months ahead of schedule after she was diagnosed with pre—eclampsia — dangerously high blood pressure that can damage vital organs and be fatal for both mother and baby. yu xuan now weighs a much healthier six point three kilograms. i'm joined now by zubair amir, the head and senior consultant of the department of neo—natology at the singapore national university hospital who, along with his team, helped her to survive.
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such an inspirational story, i have to say, after having had so much bad news over the past year or so with covid. talk is how you and your team helped baby kwek yu xuan. goad helped baby kwek yu xuan. good mornin: , helped baby kwek yu xuan. good morning, thank _ helped baby kwek yu xuan. good morning, thank you _ helped baby kwek yu xuan. good morning, thank you for _ helped baby kwek yu xuan. (13mm morning, thank you for inviting me, i am talking honourable behalf of my beloved. when we had yu xuan on hand,it beloved. when we had yu xuan on hand, it was a surprise and there wasn't any precedent of how to look after such a tiny baby. but our team worked very diligently, and we have our own protocol from years of experience with premature babies, so we implemented that will stop and we modified our protocol according to the baby's need. so this was a team effort, and we are very grateful to yu xuan�*s parents and the community that, you know, trusted us to
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deliver care for her. she's doing well. . , ., . , deliver care for her. she's doing well. . , . . , ., well. that is fantastic news, i have to ask though. _ well. that is fantastic news, i have to ask though, are _ well. that is fantastic news, i have to ask though, are there _ well. that is fantastic news, i have to ask though, are there any - to ask though, are there any specific health concerns that you are worried about for her future? yes, babies born at this age and that tiny, you know, their lungs, their brain, their heart continues to grow for many years. so we have to grow for many years. so we have to keep monitoring her and provide her with the necessary treatment. we need to make sure she doesn't get into any infections, because her lungs are really, you know, premature still. but we hope that with time, she'll get better and better. ~ ., ., , ., with time, she'll get better and better. ~ ., ., . better. what do you credit her survival to _ better. what do you credit her survival to win _ better. what do you credit her survival to win so _ better. what do you credit her survival to win so many - better. what do you credit herj survival to win so many babies better. what do you credit her i survival to win so many babies in similar situations sadly don't make it? so
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similar situations sadly don't make it? , ., , similar situations sadly don't make it? , similar situations sadly don't make it? y, ., it? so she was born very small, in terms of her _ it? so she was born very small, in terms of her weight, _ it? so she was born very small, in terms of her weight, but - it? so she was born very small, in terms of her weight, but she - it? so she was born very small, in terms of her weight, but she was | it? so she was born very small, in i terms of her weight, but she was in that, you know, grey zone, the borderline viability of four weeks. so if you take her gestational criteria, she is 70%... but of course, she was very, very small, so that put her in unfavorable conditions. she didn't have any infections, her mother was, apart from that high blood pressure, didn't suffer from diabetes or any other diseases. so that helped us. thank you so much, doctor. a remarkable story, really heart—warming stuff. thank you for joining us on newsday. you have been watching newsday. thanks so much forjoining us, we
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have much more for you in later hours. well, many of us have had to endure days of torrential showers, the grass has sodded. what has happened to august, we wonder? i've got some good news — tuesday is looking sunnier and warmer than of late across most of the uk, not absolutely everywhere. we still have a few showers in the forecast in the short term. here's the unsettled weather recently. you can see the clouds spiralling across the uk, but we've got a gap in the weather. it's called a ridge of high pressure. there's a low which is heading our way, as well, but this ridge is going to settle things down on tuesday. so, what's tuesday, 6am in the morning looking like? a lot of fine, bright, if not already sunny weather across the uk. 13 celsius in london,
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10 celsius in glasgow, just the stray shower here and there. how about the rest of the morning into the afternoon? so, lots of sunshine, especially across england and wales. in scotland, we are anticipating downpours and thunderstorms to form over the highlands, and they'll probably drift towards the east coast, and there's a chance of a few scattered showers just close to the north sea coasts and maybe 1—2 other areas. but other than that, it is going to be a predominantly sunny day with scattered fairweather clouds, light winds, and very pleasant temperatures. i suspect they will probably hit around 2a celsius in 1—2 spots on tuesday. now, here's a look at wednesday's weather map. a low is approaching with its weather front — here's the low out there. the weather front is approaching western areas of the uk, so the weather will go downhill. 0ut towards the west on wednesday, you can see the rain sweeping in — this is the morning in northern ireland, western parts of scotland, and other western extremities also getting the cloud and rain, and a bit of a breeze, too. but eastern areas in the southeast should, at the very least, stay bright and actually quite warm in norwich, up to 2a —
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that's because, ahead of weather fronts, we quite often have a southerly wind that's strengthening the breeze — not strong, just a light summer breeze keeping those temperatures high enough. now, the weather front moves through the uk on thursday, but notice there's hardly any rain on the weather front, it's literallyjust a line of cloud. that will introduce just slightly fresher conditions to western areas here, but staying warm in the southeast, up to around 211—25 celsius. but in the northwest, closer to the centre of the low pressure, it will stay wet and, at times, windy.
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this is bbc news.
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the headlines: the un has sounded a dire warning that climate change is unfolding more quickly than feared and humanity is almost entirely to blame. it says ongoing emissions could also see a key temperature limit broken injust over a decade. it comes as people are forced leave their homes in parts it comes as people are forced to leave their homes in parts of greece and in california, where wildfires are continuing to burn out of control. the president of belarus has told the bbc that britain can "choke" on the economic sanctions it has imposed on his country in response to human rights abuses. he was speaking at a lengthy press conference one year since the disputed presidential election. the taliban have seized six provincial capitals in afghanistan, including the strategic town of kunduz. they have dismissed international calls for a ceasefire and warned the us against any further intervention.

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