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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 10, 2021 2:00pm-4:59pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines: oh, my god! a record high number of top a—level grades in england, wales and northern ireland. the education secretary says students deserve to be rewarded after more than a year of disruption. this cohort of students have had to deal with a level of disruption that no—one has ever seen before, not even during a world war, as a result of this pandemic. the pass rate for scottish school qualifications fell slightly this year — but a record number of a grades were awarded. a lawsuit is filed against prince andrew by a us woman who alleges she was "trafficked
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to him" by the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, and then "sexually abused". an apology from the greek prime minister, for failures in tackling widlfires, which continue to burn across parts of the country. lionel messi has agreed a two—year deal tojoin paris st—germain, following his shock exit from barcelona. and could dementia be diagnosed in just one day? scientists begin trials of an artificial intelligence system that could lead to that breakthrough. good afternoon and welcome.
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more a grades have been awarded for a levels this year, after exams were cancelled for a second year because of the pandemic. nearly 45% of entries in england, wales and northern ireland were awarded an a or a star — that's an all—time record, and much much higher than when exams were last held in 2019. students�* work was assessed and graded by their teachers in place of exams. this year, no algorithm was used to moderate grades, after a backlash to last year's results led to a u—turn from the government. in scotland, the pass rate for highers, advanced highers and national 5s dropped slightly from last year, after their second year of cancelled exams. elaine dunkley reports. oh, my god! finally, relief in a year that has felt relentless.
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grades that mark the end of uncertainty and the start of a new path. injanuary, traditional exams were scrapped and replaced with teacher assessed grades. i got a distinction, star and a b. this man is happy with his results but there have been no easy options. as students we would rely on teachers for answers when we were stuck. this time the teachers didn't have the answer straightaway. it was a learning expense for everyone. no one was prepared for this but we had a great experience and our teachers are great in terms of being there for us in terms of our academics and mental health. with exams cancelled, ensuring fairness has been a challenge. students have been assessed only on what they have been told. the pandemic has also put pressure on teachers who have had to provide evidence for every single grade awarded. it has been a phenomenal amount of work. every single grade has been looked at by at least two staff members
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and then robust internal and external quality assurance processes. our students have had to stay in that performance level as opposed to, normally, it isjust a one—off performance on the day. top grades for a—level results in england, wales and northern ireland have reached a record high, with 45% getting a star or a grades this year. it is the second year in a row that traditional exams have been cancelled and results have significantly increased. compared to 2019, a stars and as have risen by 75%. we set out in the last academic year moves to moving back to examination as a form of assessment. we also recognise that those students who will be looking at taking exams in 2022, will also have had their education disrupted. in scotland, students completing their exams had their grades confirmed.
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230,000 btec students also received their level three results. i got a high score, which is pretty good. with high numbers of students applying to universities and getting grades, there is concern this could put pressure on places. we know from last year that universities and colleges were super flexible. so where they had to expand capacity, that is what they will be looking at doing. in terms of clearing, obviously for those who are looking at clearing, they can have a choice from 2pm today. there are plenty of courses. nearly 30,000 courses available. i got three a stars. back in loughborough, these students are celebrating. just a massive, massive relief. we were really stressed the last nine months. you want to get it over and done with. i'm really pleased i've done well. it all feels worth it now. they may not have sat traditional exams but showingresilience throughout the pandemic has been one of the toughest tests. elaine dunkley, bbc news.
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let's hear from our correspondents across the uk — our scotland correspndent alexandra mackenzie, chris page in northern ireland, and first our wales correspondent hwyel griffith. yes, the students coming here today were seeing their results not for the first time. as they opened the envelopes, it was confirmation of the results they got injune and were allowed to appeal if they weren't happy back then. in terms of what those results show, well, a record number of a stars and as. in wales, the proportion this year, 48% of entries at a star or a. that is 6% up from last year, the class of 2020, which clearly also had difficulties during the pandemic. a whopping 20% up on the last set of students to sit a—level exams in 2019. that debate about grade inflation is alive and active here. the welsh government say they are certain these teacher assessed grades are valid and that they will stand the test of time.
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and asking everyone to remember what this cohort of students have been through. speaking to the students, it's a point they make. they say the majority of their learning of the past two years was done online. they didn't have the advantage of face—to—face teaching for much of it. they hope the class of 2021 will be remembered for their great achievement in a very tough time. more than half of a—levels have received top grades. more than 50%, 51% in fact, receiving a stars and, or a5, 4% receiving a grades or b grades. students in this part of the uk have been picking up the results here. a number of them here in lurgan, one of northern
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ireland's biggest schools. pupils have been coming and going all morning. a real sense of nervousness, yes, but also excitement and joy whenever those envelopes have been opened. many students also picking up their btec results, those vocational qualifications have become a very common pathway to university. the education minister in the devolved government, of the democratic unionist party, has praised the resilience of pupils in these exceptional times, and she says the high grades awarded have reflected their hard work over these last two difficult years. pupils already had theirl results here in scotland. today, it was the - formal announcement. there were 110 exams. it was all down to assessment graded by teachers. _ what they were getting results for were the national 55, - which you take when you are around 15, 16. _ then the highers, which you take after that. - then the advanced highers. this year saw the highest number of higher passes since 1999. - and the highest number— of advanced higher passes since that
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qualification began 20 years ago. the scottish qualifications authority said pass rates, | they are higher than 2019, so pre—pandemic level. i but they are slightly lower than they were last year. i national 55 are down from an 89% pass rate tojust under 86%. - and highers are down from just over 89% to just over 87%. _ now in scotland there is a record number of a grade passes - this year for highers. this was 40% last year- and up to 47.6% this year. scotland's education secretary, i shirley somerville, said pupils had delivered a very strong set of results. - that is the view from scotland,
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northern ireland and wales. i can now speak to kate green, labour's shadow education secretary. good afternoon. a big jump in a and a stars, does that concern you? first of all we want to congratulate the students on what has been a very disruptive couple of years and it is greatly to their credit that they have shown what they are capable of and have secured these really good results. we should also pay tribute to teachers and staff in colleges and universities who are working very hard to get them the grades in schools and then to make sure they can take the next steps in their learning journey. this has been a one—off experience and we hope we won't have more years like this, although there are concerns about how they will be examining students next year, so we have got to recognise that in a year in which students have faced huge pressures and challenges, these results are a fair reflection of their
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capabilities.- fair reflection of their caabilities. ~ ., ., .,~ ., capabilities. what do you make of the big disnarity _ capabilities. what do you make of the big disparity is _ capabilities. what do you make of the big disparity is that _ capabilities. what do you make of the big disparity is that we - capabilities. what do you make of the big disparity is that we are - the big disparity is that we are seeing which are both regional, for example, a high percentage of those high grades in london and the south—east if you compare it with the north—east of england and also big disparities between the private sector, comprehensive and academies with a much higher proportion especially in relation to the private sector getting those higher grades, what are your thoughts on that? ., ., ~ ., that? you are right. we are concerned _ that? you are right. we are concerned about _ that? you are right. we are concerned about these - that? you are right. we are - concerned about these inequities and you are right to highlight the fact that, for example, in private schools, it seems the increase in a grades is 50% higher and in the state secondary schools, that might be because they had access to better learning facilities over the past year, access to better resources in school and it also might be because of the way in which private schools chose to examine and ss their
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students. it may be that some parents have intervened more actively to encourage schools to give their children the chance to take up university places —— ss their students what we are also concerned about the regional disparities. some of the greatest disruption is in the north—east and also where we see some of the greatest socioeconomic disadvantage where the impact on grades has been greatest, and also children on free school meals, and children from a certain ethnic minority backgrounds and disadvantaged communities, they continue to be outperformed by children from better off areas and so there are real inequities to be concerned about in these results. that was inevitable to a degree because the government left to schools how to carry out the
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assessments and that means they have not been carried out in an identical fashion across the country. how would you _ fashion across the country. how would you be — fashion across the country. how would you be able _ fashion across the country. how would you be able to _ fashion across the country. how would you be able to redress any of that if you were the education secretary? this is set in stone, where these 18 and 19—year—olds go next and that travels with them through life?— through life? this is a very important _ through life? this is a very important point. _ through life? this is a very important point. the - through life? this is a very important point. the focusj through life? this is a very l important point. the focus is through life? this is a very - important point. the focus is on the next step in the learning journey and if students feel they do not have the grades they should have, the appeals process which is now available to them, it should work smoothly and it should prioritise young people who need grades to move forward, especially to make sure that we protect the interests of the more disadvantaged students who face the greatest challenges, because universities quite rightly want to widen the participation of students from those backgrounds. important that we make sure they are protected and that their appeals are dealt with swiftly and fairly. when those students move onto the next stage of
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their learning, whether that is couege their learning, whether that is college or university, that the extra study support they will need is in place and i know universities and colleges have been thinking carefully about that. and of course it is important that we make sure they have all the resources they need for their continuing learning, whether that is access to digital devices, the data they need for remote learning, because all face—to—face learning is going to be supplemented by some home studies, thatis supplemented by some home studies, that is inevitable, the way the world is changing, so i think there are real lessons about what extra support and protections we need to put in place, exactly as you say, to compensate for some of the inequities in the results we have got at the moment. hour inequities in the results we have got at the moment.— inequities in the results we have got at the moment. how should exams be run next year? _ got at the moment. how should exams be run next year? what _ got at the moment. how should exams be run next year? what should - got at the moment. how should exams be run next year? what should be - be run next year? what should be done? have we got to reach a situation where the regular exam system if i can call it that is a back up and running so that we are not sitting here discussing these
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inequalities this time next year? i hope that exams will be able to take place fairly next summer, but i do think that we are going to have to make some adjustments to make sure that they are as fair as possible. for example, giving students a bigger choice and greater choice and which questions they answer on exam papers so if there is future disruption to their learning and indeed they have already suffered a lot of disruption this year, that they can be examined and what they have been able to learn and what —— and not what they haven't. we say to the government that they need to give the plan for exams right now at the start of the academic year to schools and students, so they can plan and prepare properly knowing what the assessment process is going to look like and that's what we say to look like and that's what we say to the government, on the 1st of september, bring forward the plan so everyone knows the nature of the assessment process they will face next summer. assessment process they will face next summer-—
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assessment process they will face next summer. kate green, for now, the shadow— next summer. kate green, for now, the shadow education _ next summer. kate green, for now, the shadow education secretary, . the shadow education secretary, thanks forjoining us. we will be answering your questions about this at 330 today. maybe you have received your exam results today. may be concerns about apprenticeships, university, employment. send your questions to us. we'll put them to catherine sezen from the association of school and college leaders, and joanne elliott from the national careers service. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag bbcyourquestions and you can email us on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk that is coming up after 330. the headlines on bbc news... top grades as a—level results are published for england, wales and northern ireland. it's another record year — with 45% of students achieving an a* or a grade.
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the pass rate for scottish school qualifications fell slightly this year — but a record number of a grades were awarded. a lawsuit is filed against prince andrew by a us woman who alleges she was �*trafficked to him' by the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, and then �*sexually abused�*. and let�*s get more on that final headline — a woman from the us has filed a civil lawsuit in new york, accusing prince andrew of sexual abuse. in a statement, virginia roberts giuffre claims she was trafficked to the prince by the convicted paedophile jeffrey epstein, when she was 17. the duke of york has consistently denied the allegations. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. which of the people in this photograph is telling the truth? the man, prince andrew, who categorically denies any impropriety? or the woman, virginia giuffre,
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who alleges she was sexually assaulted by him on three occasions? miss giuffre has now filed a civil claim in a district court in new york. the claim states that when she was 17 years old, she was the victim of sex trafficking. prince andrew has offered no comment to the filing of the court claim. his position remains as it was in his interview with newsnight�*s emily maitlis in november 2019, when he denied any improper behaviour with miss giuffre — virginia roberts, as she was then. you can say categorically that you don�*t recall meeting virginia roberts, dining with her, dancing with her at tramp, or going on to have sex with her in a bedroom
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in a house in belgravia? i can, i can absolutely, categorically tell you, it never happened. do you recall any kind of sexual contact with virginia roberts, then or at any other time? none whatsoever. miss giuffre�*s lawyers claim andrew has failed to co—operate with the us authorities in their investigation into the activities of andrew�*s friend, jeffrey epstein, who the court papers say organised a sex trafficking network involving underage girls. epstein took his own life in 2019. for his part, prince andrew has withdrawn from public life with the royal family. these latest developments suggest there can be little immediate prospect of him restoring his public reputation. nicholas witchell, bbc news. lionel messi is to undergo a medical at paris st—germain after agreeing a two—year deal with the french club. the argentina star was pictured
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in a private plane, about to leave barcelona for paris. messi confirmed his exit from barcelona in a tearful farewell on sunday, after 21 years with the club. katie gornall reports. for the first time in his career, lionel messi knew he would start the season somewhere other than barcelona, but where he would go to next had been the subject of much talk. fans of paris st—germain were confident their city was the most logical destination. since yesterday, they have gathered at the parc des princes stadium, waiting. after all, psg, a club backed by qatari money are one of the few who can afford a 34—year—old master like messi. the record six time ballon d�*or winner is set to play alongside killian mbappe and former barca tea—mate neymar in what will surely be the most fearsome attack in world football.
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you have to go to social media for the latest already in the street is it is the best trio ever in history? i say at the moment, perhaps luis suarez, neymar and messi at barcelona that won everything but they are in history now and we will see how far they can go. his numbers are staggering. in 778 games for barcelona he scored 672 goals, secured ten league titles and there could have been more. messi never wanted to leave barcelona and in a tearful press conference on sunday he said he was convinced he would stay in the city he called home. translation: this is really difficult for me | after so many years. but the club, due to la liga salary cap rules, could no longer afford to keep him so after 21 years, his association with barcelona is over and now a new story will begin. katie gornall, bbc news. we have been looking at pictures of some fairly excited looking crowds
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in paris. they have got wind of who is arriving. i can�*t tell you what time lionel messi�*s plane is due to land but he is in a private plane so this is not the main paris airport. this is another paris airport where he is due to be coming in and clearly lots of people know about it and they are waiting to see him. we will keep an eye on. british firefighters are among more than 1,000 from across europe helping to battle wildfires on greece�*s second largest island, evia. thousands of people have been evacuated since the blaze started a week ago. meanwhile, in california, rescue workers are preparing for even higher temperatures, as they tackle the second—largest fire in the state�*s history. lebo diseko reports. the apocalyptic scenes of what the greek prime minister has
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called a nightmarish summer. nearly 600 fires have broken out across the country since latejuly, fuelled by strong winds and the worst heatwave in decades. the biggest is in evia, an island north—east of athens, which has been ablaze for a week. help has been flown in by other countries, including british firefighters. i haven't seen fires like this before in the uk, it's something that's completely new to me. i've seen grass fires and open area fires, but this is just something on another scale. they are helping with manual tools, trying to put in fire breaks and stopping the fire from spreading. there has been public anger at the government response, something the greek prime minister has apologised for. but he says climate change is causing fires that last for weeks, speaking just hours after the un warned that human activity is making extreme weather events more common. something locals say they are experiencing first hand. we didn�*t see any rain
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to stop this fire. i used to run in this forest, i used to cycle, we used to go and collect fruit. now everything�*s gone. 0n the other side of the world, in the us, california, too, is battling catastrophic blazes. this fire started almost a month ago and is now the second largest wildfire in state history, with claims so ferocious they destroyed nearly all of the historic town of greenville. several times in the last week, i wished i could just go home and then i remember, i can't go home, there is nothing to go back to. then, if, even if the house survived, like, pretty much the rest of the town is gone. surveying the damage, the state governor said the cause was clear. the extreme weather conditions, extreme droughts, leading to extreme conditions and wildfire challenges the likes of which we�*ve never seen in our history and, as a consequence, we need to acknowledge, just straight up,
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these are climate induced wildfires. with more high temperatures expected in the coming days, the fear is that even more towns could be at risk. lebo diseko, bbc news. the jury in the inquest of the streatham attacker sudesh amman has been watching cctv and police footage of his attack, and the moment he was shot dead by armed surveillance officers. amman stabbed two people on a busy high street, ten days after being released from a prison sentence for terrorism offences. james reynolds has been following the hearing — james, what was shown at the hearing? thejury spent the the jury spent the morning look at the compilation of footage taken during taken from shop fronts and inside body cams to build up a picture of the movements of sudesh amman in the moments before the attack on the attack itself and they showed him walking up and down
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streatham high road quite slowly, changing direction several times and he then went into a low price shop. at that point the footage showed one of under cover, walking towards that shop, the officer got to within two or three paces of entering the shop itself when footage showed sudesh amman running out of the shop and heading the opposite direction and going out of shot. the jury was told that he then stabbed two bystanders and footage was not shown at that and footage was not shown at that and then continued running down streatham high road. he was pursued by two of those same officers who had been the undercover officers, part of the two monitoring him, they raced down the street after him and footage was then shown from the shop boots which showed sudesh amman stopping during the race and turning round to face those officers who were about 8—10 feet away from him and then he held his knife in his right hand and made a motion towards
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them and the footage showed them at shooting him and he fell to the ground. 0ther shooting him and he fell to the ground. other officers arrived quickly and by car, by motorbike, and they sealed off the area, worried he was wearing a real suicide vest, and explosive officers then went to check and found the vest was a fake rest. there has been a testimony from a thumb of the surveillance officers and one man, —— from some of the surveillance officers, and one man said he had been blocking the movements of sudesh amman but as soon as he saw the chase happening he said he put away his logbook and tried to jointly chase as soon as possible, he drew his firearm, he says, then they waited for explosive officers to appear the scene. the court will hear from a to appear the scene. the court will hearfrom a number of to appear the scene. the court will hear from a number of those surveillance officers and of course the inquest hearing does continue. james reynolds, thanks forjoining us. humanitarian agencies are warning that hundreds of thousands of civilians
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are at risk as fighting escalates in afghanistan. the international red cross said it�*s already treated more than 4,000 wounded people since the beginning of august. it said street—to—street fighting in lashkar gah and elsewhere had injured hundreds of civilians. a woman has been killed and two people have been injured in a crash between two buses at victoria bus station in london. police officers were called to the incident at around 8:30 this morning. it appears that a single—decker bus crashed into the rear of another, causing damage to both vehicles. the woman, believed to be in her 30s, was pronounced dead around 9am. two people have appeared in court over the death of a two—year—old girl in dungannon in county tyrone. ali jayden doyle died in hospital on friday after sustaining head injuries. 32—year—old darren armstrong has been charged with her murder,
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while 24—year—old jade dempsey has been charged with causing or permitting the death of a child. both are also charged with perverting the course ofjustice. they will next appear in court on 1st stepmber. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren bett. most pa rt most part of —— most parts of the country are staying dry. a few showers coming and mainly over more northern parts of england but the bulk of the showers will be in the north—east of scotland and those could be heavy and foundry for a while. those showers will move away overnight tonight. we look to the west and we have cloud coming in from the atlantic and that will thicken up in northern ireland and may be a few spots of rain before the end of the night. temperatures typically 12—13. it could be a sunny start to many eastern parts of
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england into the midlands, and the cloud will move its way east, and the spell of rain around in the morning in northern ireland, moving quickly into scotland, rain for wales and north—west england and into cornwall perhaps. sunshine follows in northern ireland and more cloud towards the east and east anglia but this is warmer air so temperatures could reach 2a, possibly 25.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... a record high number of top a—level grades in england, wales and northern ireland. the education secretary says students deserve to be rewarded after more than a year of disruption. this cohort of students have had to deal with a level of disruption that
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we have not seen before, not even during a world war as a result of this pandemic. the pass rate for scottish school qualifications fell slightly this year — but a record number of a grades were awarded. a lawsuit is filed against prince andrew by a us woman who alleges she was �*trafficked to him�* by the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, and then �*sexually abused�*. an apology from the greek prime minister, for failures in tackling widlfires, which continue to burn across parts of the country. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, lionel messi is set to complete his
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move to paris saint germain in one of the most shocking moves in history. neymarseems of the most shocking moves in history. neymar seems to have confirmed the news in the last few minutes with our spanish football expert keeping across all the developments for ours. like mike i am at the parc de princes. he wanted am at the parc de princes. he wanted a one—year deal to a two—year deal which is the way it will happen. his dad and representative are in the airport on the way to paris well there will be a medical on the presentation. everything was getting ready this morning, all the entrance to the stadium was being cleaned and as you can see, if you can, there are fans gathering, at the early
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hours in the morning it wasjust are fans gathering, at the early hours in the morning it was just the police and now it�*s fans and media. was paris the only option? it was the only option — was paris the only option? it was the only option right _ was paris the only option? it was the only option right now, - was paris the only option? it was the only option right now, there i the only option right now, there were calls for others, couple from england, but no real choice because financialfair england, but no real choice because financial fair play play certainly a role and paris saint germain had a plan in place in case lionel messi did not stay at barcelona but even four days ago, five days ago when lionel messi was in ibiza and was going to go out with paredes and de maria who play here, they were all saying, all these paris saint
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germain players, come with us, it we will be great. instead what lionel messi said is he was staying. from the 12th ofjuly, he had a deal but the 12th ofjuly, he had a deal but the deal could not approved by la liga. the financial situation at barcelona is terrible, they don�*t have money so after that it was a matter of looking around and i think the idea of going to play here, all of the friends he has here, and he�*s a very competitive animal and a team that can win things was really at the end the option. elsewhere... all—rounder moeen ali has been added to the england squad, for the second test against india, which starts on thursday at lord�*s. he last played in a test match in february, during england�*s tour of india, but he�*s been in great form as captain of birmingham phoenix in the hundred, helping them to the top of the table. he�*lljoin up with the england squad for training this afternoon.
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we had a long chat about it. it gives us another option in terms of balancing the team out so he�*s obviously full of confidence, poise and believable cricket in the hundred and in the shorter format, and we know how talented he is and what he is capable of in test cricket, so he�*s a serious contender for this game. and we�*re still celebrating the achievements of team gb in tokyo — today we�*ve been talking to keely hodgkinson. she broke the british record to win silver in the 800—metres, which she said was a real suprise, but she told us that she�*d been feeling confident in the build—up to the games and that she always believed that she could make the podium, even though it was her first 0lympics. i think ithinki i think i was definitely one of the underdogs going into that race but i just wanted to put myself in a good position and put it all out there
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because that was a big opportunity for me and not many people get that opportunity at 19 so i wanted to take it and perform well. i was not the only 19—year—old in the race, there was the american who will make for good battles in the next couple of years but breaking the record was definitely what i was shocked about, tested for so long, 1995, i was happy to do it and i knew it was possible but you don�*t know how it will go on the day but i was shocked ljy will go on the day but i was shocked by that, still processing it i think but it�*s been a good couple of days. 0lympic silver medallist. well there�*s plenty more on lionel messi�*s move to paris saint germain on the bbc sport website. but that�*s all your sport for now. back to our main story about a levels. the proportion of a—level entries awarded one of the top two grades has risen to an all—time high in england, wales and northern ireland, after exams were cancelled for the second year in a row
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because of covid—19. there was also a record proportion of a—grades in scotland. south of the border, nearly 45% of a—level students received as and a*s. that�*s up from 38.5%, last year — an increase 6.3%. last summer, after a u—turn over a—level results, record numbers of top grades were awarded — with 38.6% of entrants achieving an a* or a grade. this year�*s grades — at 44.8% — are even higher — and represent a 75% increase over the last 2 yea rs. with official exams scrapped this year, marks have been awarded based mainly on teacher assessment. the education secretary for england, gavin williamson, has urged against "talking down" their achievements. �*scottish national 5s�* passes are down to 86% — that�*s a 3% drop on last year. but there are a record number — at 47% — of a grades this year. �*scottish highers�* pass rates are at 87% — a 2% drop. there was also a 2% drop to 91% in �*advanced highers�*. vocational �*btec�* results are also out today. students will also find the results for apprenticeships and degree apprenticeships. young people are being urged to "explore all the options open to them" when they receive their results.
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0ur correspondent nina warhurst has been speaking to some students who received the results of their btec qualification in bolton. yes, good morning, i don�*t know what your college lucite or classroom but wasn�*t anything like this? mine was not, it was desks in front of a board but here for the students doing qualifications and things like health care, hairdressing, engineering, it�*s much more hands—on training and has been a real growth,
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250,000 bead techs were taken and there has been an increase this year because there has been an increase in hands—on practical caucasians. —— btecs. more people doing btecs than a—levels. congratulations on all the excellent result you fad but i can only imagine what an 18 months it has been for you.— only imagine what an 18 months it has been for you. yes, like no other frankl . has been for you. yes, like no other frankly- due — has been for you. yes, like no other frankly- due to _ has been for you. yes, like no other frankly. due to the _ has been for you. yes, like no other frankly. due to the fact _ has been for you. yes, like no other frankly. due to the fact we've - has been for you. yes, like no other frankly. due to the fact we've just . frankly. due to the fact we�*ve just got a fantastic set of staff here, they�*ve all pulled together and really driven forward to come up with what we�*ve ended up with today which is the end of the academic year. which is the end of the academic ear. ., ., , ., which is the end of the academic ear. ., ., ., ., ., .,~ year. how have you managed to take the thin . s year. how have you managed to take the things that _ year. how have you managed to take the things that are _ year. how have you managed to take the things that are very _ year. how have you managed to take the things that are very hands-on - year. how have you managed to take the things that are very hands-on in | the things that are very hands—on in the things that are very hands—on in the classroom and make sure students still have that experience? iquite still have that experience? quite frankl , still have that experience? quite frankly. the _ still have that experience? quite frankly, the inventiveness - still have that experience? quite frankly, the inventiveness and i frankly, the inventiveness and innovation of my staff is beyond measure. they�*ve done everything you could possibly not even imagine,
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they�*ve been taking model heads from they�*ve been taking model heads from the hairdressing salons and sending them out to the students, they�*ve been doing catering, doing practical is in their own homes, everything they could possibly do has been done. early in a challenge but we�*ve adapted wherever possible. why 20 number crunches are looking at the result and there is always the debate about that. particularly so this year because a lot of the grading has been done with some guesswork, i think it�*s fair to say, what would your reaction to that be? not a lot of guesswork, evidence—based, effort by the staff are possible, we've done a whole range _ are possible, we've done a whole range of— are possible, we've done a whole range of different assessment, moderated across all of the different areas within the college and also — different areas within the college and also reviewed externally as well _ and also reviewed externally as well i'm — and also reviewed externally as well. i'm very, very confident. when --eole well. i'm very, very confident. when people say — well. i'm very, very confident. when people say the _ well. i'm very, very confident. when people say the grades _ well. i'm very, very confident. when people say the grades are _ well. i'm very, very confident. when people say the grades are not - well. i'm very, very confident. barman people say the grades are not fair, what would you say? i people say the grades are not fair,
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what would you say?— people say the grades are not fair, what would you say? i would say stop lookin: at what would you say? i would say stop looking at the — what would you say? i would say stop looking at the inflation _ what would you say? i would say stop looking at the inflation of _ what would you say? i would say stop looking at the inflation of and - what would you say? i would say stop looking at the inflation of and look . looking at the inflation of and look at what _ looking at the inflation of and look at what is — looking at the inflation of and look at what is more fantastic which is what _ at what is more fantastic which is what students have done.- at what is more fantastic which is what students have done. we've been with them all— what students have done. we've been with them all morning _ what students have done. we've been with them all morning waiting - what students have done. we've been with them all morning waiting for- with them all morning waiting for the result, hannah needed a qualification to go do midwifery at university, what did you get rose i got an a star which means i can hope to go— got an a star which means i can hope to go and _ got an a star which means i can hope to go and he — got an a star which means i can hope to go and be a midwife in the future — to go and be a midwife in the future "— to go and be a midwife in the future. —— eight a star. and to go and be a midwife in the future. -- eight a star. and what about you? _ future. -- eight a star. and what about you? i _ future. -- eight a star. and what about you? i got _ future. -- eight a star. and what about you? i got d _ future. -- eight a star. and what about you? i got d star, - future. -- eight a star. and what about you? i got d star, d - future. -- eight a star. and what about you? i got d star, d star, i future. -- eight a star. and what| about you? i got d star, d star, d star. about you? i got d star, d star, d star- that — about you? i got d star, d star, d star. that means _ about you? i got d star, d star, d star. that means i _ about you? i got d star, d star, d star. that means i can _ about you? i got d star, d star, d star. that means i can take - about you? i got d star, d star, d - star. that means i can take swimming coaching _ star. that means i can take swimming coaching in_ star. that means i can take swimming coaching in the — star. that means i can take swimming coaching in the future. _ star. that means i can take swimming coaching in the future. how— star. that means i can take swimming coaching in the future.— coaching in the future. how have you co ed with coaching in the future. how have you coped with not _ coaching in the future. how have you coped with not being _ coaching in the future. how have you coped with not being able _ coaching in the future. how have you coped with not being able to - coaching in the future. how have you coped with not being able to have . coped with not being able to have the hands—on stuff you would need to have normally?
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the hands-on stuff you would need to have normally?— have normally? zoom has helped a lot. and have normally? zoom has helped a lot- and the _ have normally? zoom has helped a lot. and the investment _ have normally? zoom has helped a lot. and the investment put - have normally? zoom has helped a lot. and the investment put into i have normally? zoom has helped a| lot. and the investment put into me and other— lot. and the investment put into me and other swimmers. _ lot. and the investment put into me and other swimmers.— lot. and the investment put into me and other swimmers. you've been open about the impact _ and other swimmers. you've been open about the impact on _ and other swimmers. you've been open about the impact on your _ and other swimmers. you've been open about the impact on your mental - about the impact on your mental health, being in isolation when you�*re so used to being out there, playing sport and a group environment.— playing sport and a group environment. , , ., ., environment. yes, it is a mental... because for— environment. yes, it is a mental... because for me _ environment. yes, it is a mental... because for me swimming - environment. yes, it is a mental... because for me swimming is - environment. yes, it is a mental... because for me swimming is an - environment. yes, it is a mental... - because for me swimming is an escape for me. _ because for me swimming is an escape for me. it's _ because for me swimming is an escape for me. it'san— because for me swimming is an escape for me. it's an escape _ because for me swimming is an escape for me, it's an escape of— because for me swimming is an escape for me, it's an escape of issues- for me, it's an escape of issues with— for me, it's an escape of issues with problems _ for me, it's an escape of issues with problems that _ for me, it's an escape of issues with problems that i— for me, it's an escape of issues with problems that i have - for me, it's an escape of issues with problems that i have and i for me, it's an escape of issues. with problems that i have and it's 'ust with problems that i have and it's just a _ with problems that i have and it's just a second _ with problems that i have and it's just a second home _ with problems that i have and it's just a second home to _ with problems that i have and it's just a second home to me - with problems that i have and it's just a second home to me so- with problems that i have and it's just a second home to me so i. with problems that i have and it's. just a second home to me so i feel absolutely— just a second home to me so i feel absolutely delighted _ just a second home to me so i feel absolutely delighted when - just a second home to me so i feel absolutely delighted when i- just a second home to me so i feel absolutely delighted when i see i just a second home to me so i feel absolutely delighted when i see a i absolutely delighted when i see a swimming — absolutely delighted when i see a swimming pool— absolutely delighted when i see a swimming pool or— absolutely delighted when i see a swimming pool or i'm _ absolutely delighted when i see a swimming pool or i'm doing - absolutely delighted when i see a - swimming pool or i'm doing something sporting _ swimming pool or i'm doing something sporting wise — swimming pool or i'm doing something sporting wise. back— swimming pool or i'm doing something sporting wise-— sporting wise. back in the pool with our sporting wise. back in the pool with your results — sporting wise. back in the pool with your results and _ sporting wise. back in the pool with your results and hopefully - sporting wise. back in the pool with your results and hopefully going - sporting wise. back in the pool with your results and hopefully going on| your results and hopefully going on to become a pe teacher which i think it would be excellent at. you are hoping to go to college and on to university which shows a break the qualification can lead on to that. triple distinction, pretty good grade — triple distinction, pretty good grade i— triple distinction, pretty good trade. ~ , triple distinction, pretty good trade. ~' , , . grade. i think triple distinctions more than _ grade. i think triple distinctions more than a — grade. i think triple distinctions more than a pretty _ grade. i think triple distinctions more than a pretty good - grade. i think triple distinctions more than a pretty good grade. excellent, i will say.
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more than a pretty good grade. excellent, iwill say. i more than a pretty good grade. excellent, i will say. i can�*t wait excellent, i will say. i can't wait to go— excellent, i will say. i can't wait to go on— excellent, i will say. i can't wait to go on to _ excellent, i will say. i can't wait to go on to university _ excellent, i will say. i can't wait to go on to university and - excellent, i will say. i can't wait. to go on to university and perform their— to go on to university and perform their the _ to go on to university and perform theirthe same— to go on to university and perform their the same as _ to go on to university and perform their the same as i _ to go on to university and perform their the same as i did _ to go on to university and perform their the same as i did here. - their the same as i did here. congratulations. _ their the same as i did here. congratulations. and - their the same as i did here. congratulations. and she - their the same as i did here. i congratulations. and she only started learning english five years ago, tell me about your result today. ago, tell me about your result toda . . , ago, tell me about your result toda. ._ today. really happy with them, i cannot wait _ today. really happy with them, i cannot wait to _ today. really happy with them, i cannot wait to go _ today. really happy with them, i cannot wait to go to _ today. really happy with them, i cannot wait to go to university. i today. really happy with them, i | cannot wait to go to university. it will be _ cannot wait to go to university. it will be a — cannot wait to go to university. it will be a long four years, but it will be a long four years, but it will be — will be a long four years, but it will be a — will be a long four years, but it will be a lot of experience, a lot of things— will be a lot of experience, a lot of things to try sol will be a lot of experience, a lot of things to try so i can't wait. you'll— of things to try so i can't wait. you'll make your plan now is to go to botton— you'll make your plan now is to go to bolton university and carry on studying — to bolton university and carry on studying business. and do my masters, _ studying business. and do my masters, hopefully, so maybe four years. _ masters, hopefully, so maybe four years. long — masters, hopefully, so maybe four years, long journey but i can't wait to finish— years, long journey but i can't wait to finish it — years, long 'ourney but i can't wait to finish it.— years, long 'ourney but i can't wait to finish if.— to finish it. i'm sure you will be brilliant, congratulations - to finish it. i'm sure you will be brilliant, congratulations to - to finish it. i'm sure you will be | brilliant, congratulations to you all, i know you have worked hard and been very resilient over a top period. and i want to introduce you to someone who has passed their catering qualification. that can�*t have been easy and hospitality venues were close, what did you do? sign like i was working for the nhs at the nightingale hospital in manchester and i was doing catering
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support staff with feeding patients. you could carry it on with takeaways. i you could carry it on with takeaways.— you could carry it on with takeaways. you could carry it on with takeawa s. . ., ., , , ., takeaways. i have had five “obs over a iockfiown. — takeaways. i have had five “obs over a iockfiown. i— takeaways. i have had five “obs over a lockdown. i haven't _ takeaways. i have had five jobs over a lockdown. i haven't stopped - a lockdown. i haven�*t stopped working. a lockdown. i haven't stopped workini. ~ ., , a lockdown. i haven't stopped workinf. s . , , ., a lockdown. i haven't stopped workin. ., , ., n working. what is the plan now? i will io working. what is the plan now? i will go on _ working. what is the plan now? i will go on to _ working. what is the plan now? i will go on to michelin _ working. what is the plan now? i will go on to michelin star - will go on to michelin star restaurants, looking at the manchester area and i might do a year abroad in france.— manchester area and i might do a year abroad in france. these are the --eole of year abroad in france. these are the people of the _ year abroad in france. these are the people of the future _ year abroad in france. these are the people of the future doing _ year abroad in france. these are the people of the future doing all - year abroad in france. these are the people of the future doing all of - people of the future doing all of these jobs that make society to over, fundamental to what we do. congratulations to them all and to everybody watching who has got the qualifications that and if it hasn�*t turned out the way you wanted, i�*m sure there will be other opportunities down the road as they were for me and steve the cameraman you get nowhere near the grades we wanted. that was nina who was in bolton speaking rather earlier today as you may have gathered. for more on this year�*s exam
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results across the uk, including how grades have been decided, how to appeal and other questions, go to the bbc news website at bbc.co.uk/news or visit the bbc news app. scientists have begun trials of an artificial intelligence system that may be able to diagnose dementia in a day. researchers at the alan turing institute have told bbc news that their system could help spot the onset of dementia much earlier, which could improve outcomes for patients. 0ur science correspondent, pallab ghosh, has this exclusive report. penelope clark noticed that her husband denis began to forget things last year. they are concerned he is developing some form of dinner break dementia. —— her husband dennis. the couple are taking part —— some form of dementia. they will be able to tell them not only if there is any
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form of dementia but how quickly it is likely to develop. if you had a diagnosis that gave you some indication of the progression, would it be of help?— it be of help? then we could plan financially as _ it be of help? then we could plan financially as a _ it be of help? then we could plan financially as a couple _ it be of help? then we could plan financially as a couple to - it be of help? then we could plan financially as a couple to be - it be of help? then we could plan financially as a couple to be able | financially as a couple to be able to perhaps have eight fewer holidays before things got bad. that bad that i couldn�*t take dennis on holiday. it makes me more comfortable because if you haven't got a diagnosis, you're — if you haven't got a diagnosis, you're not— if you haven't got a diagnosis, you're not waiting months for someone _ you're not waiting months for someone to come back and say we know what it— someone to come back and say we know what it is— someone to come back and say we know what it is now _ someone to come back and say we know what it is now. denis' brain scan will be _ what it is now. denis' brain scan will be analysed by an artificial intelligence computer programme which _ intelligence computer programme which composes scan to those of thousands— which composes scan to those of thousands of dementia patients. in thousands of dementia patients. preclinical thousands of dementia patients. in preclinical tests, thousands of dementia patients. in preclinicaltests, it thousands of dementia patients. in preclinical tests, it has been able to diagnose dementia years before symptoms develop. to to diagnose dementia years before symptoms develop.— symptoms develop. to have a diagnosis _ symptoms develop. to have a diagnosis of — symptoms develop. to have a diagnosis of dementia, - symptoms develop. to have a diagnosis of dementia, is - symptoms develop. to have a diagnosis of dementia, is a i symptoms develop. to have a | diagnosis of dementia, is a big thing to take on board so when i�*m delivering this diagnosis, anything which i can do to be more confident about that, to give people more
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information, help them plan their lives, it�*s a great thing to be able to do. lives, it's a great thing to be able to do. . ., to do. the new technique and give results much _ to do. the new technique and give results much faster. _ to do. the new technique and give results much faster. currently - to do. the new technique and give results much faster. currently it i results much faster. currently it can take several scans and many other test to find out whether someone is dementia. the new artificial intelligence system could potentially pick it up with just one scan and it can pick it up much earlier in the progression of the disease. the researcher who led the development of the system believes that early and accurate diagnosis of dementia will make treatments much more effective. the treatments can early and slow down the progression and that the same time, avoid more damage happening to the brain. it�*s likely that these symptoms might occur much later in life or they may actually never occur. the system is currently being tested to see if it works just as well in the clinical setting as it has in the lab. if so, it will make a big difference denis
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and millions like him. —— if so, it will make a big difference to denis and millions like him. more information on covid and the vaccination programme because we have had figures through from the nhs regarding the uptake of the covid vaccine with them saying three in four uk adults have now had both doses of the vaccine so 75% of all uk adult have now had both doses of vaccine, that is confirmation in the last few moments there from the government and from the nhs so there is the latest figures. the time is edging up to ten to three. busy afternoon. the headlines on bbc news... top grades as a—level results are published for england, wales and northern ireland.
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it�*s another record year — with 45% of students achieving an a* or a grade. the pass rate for scottish school qualifications fell slightly this year — but a record number of a grades were awarded. a lawsuit is filed against prince andrew by a us woman who alleges she was �*trafficked to him�* by the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, and then �*sexually abused�*. the health secretary sajid javid has been visiting a hospital in milton keynes, as the nhs tries to address a huge backlog of routine operations. mrjavid visited the hosptial alongside amanda pitchard, nhs england�*s new chief executive. analysis from the institute for fiscal studies suggest up to lg million people could be on nhs waiting lists in england by next autumn.
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sajid javid has previously committed to reduce the backlog. sadly, during the pandemic, the waiting lists have grown. i think everyone understands why that has happened. people have kept away from coming to the nhs during the height of the pandemic and we all understand that. i have to say that from what i have seen, as more people now start coming forward, we estimate perhaps that there are around 7 million but didn�*t come forward that usually would have during the pandemic. i want them to come forward, i want them to come to their gps, their hospitals and get seem to but as they do start doing that, the waiting lists will grow and no one knows what the final number will be. i have said it could go as high as 30 million. an independent study this week suggested that that was a reasonable proposition. what i want to do is just to make sure that if it does grow, it grows at the lowest possible rate. and we are seeing as many people as possible, as quickly as possible and that will require notjust new investment but also new ways of doing things.
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sajid javid speaking in milton keynes. a charity founded by nhs workers during the pandemic is launching a fund to support children of front—line healthcare staff who died with covid—19. children of front—line healthcare the fund set up by the healthcare workers�* foundation will provide an annual grant of five thousand pounds to pupils starting a higher education or higher qualification course. let�*s speak to doctor katie rogerson who is one of the people from the charity — she is also a paediatrician. hello, a very good afternoon. thank ou so hello, a very good afternoon. thank you so much — hello, a very good afternoon. thank you so much for— hello, a very good afternoon. thank you so much for having _ hello, a very good afternoon. thank you so much for having us _ hello, a very good afternoon. thank you so much for having us on - hello, a very good afternoon. thank you so much for having us on today. tell us about the bond, everything you are announcing today, what you hope could be achieved with it. this is an hope could be achieved with it. t�*i 3 is an incredibly exciting day for health healthcare workers�* foundation —— four healthcare
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workers�* foundation. students getting a result today, it is exciting and it comes after tragedy because this is a fund to support the more than 1500 health and social care staff who passed away from covid—19. care staff who passed away from covid-19. 639 care staff who passed away from covid—19. 639 of those were nhs staff from march last year to may this year and that has left many children without a parent. now, we cannot replace what a parent does, we cannot give emotional support or mental... meant orshipped. the we cannot give emotional support or mental... meant or shipped. the love that a parent can give. but what we can do is alleviate financial pressure so we are delighted to mancha memorialfund pressure so we are delighted to mancha memorial fund which pressure so we are delighted to mancha memorialfund which is a £5,000 grant every year that you are in higher education if you�*ve lost a parent to covid—19 who worked for the nhs. parent to covid-19 who worked for the nhs. ., , ., the nhs. that figure is worth repeating _ the nhs. that figure is worth repeating because _ the nhs. that figure is worth repeating because 1500 - the nhs. that figure is worth i repeating because 1500 health the nhs. that figure is worth - repeating because 1500 health and social care staff who died with covid—19 between march last year and
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may this year and that is a very sobering figure and that is explained therefore... it is a desperate figure, explain how the charity has come about and how... what that came out of, at what point in the pandemics and health care workers get together and think, actually, we need to try i suppose to make something positive out of this? ~ . ., , to make something positive out of this? . . . , .,, this? well, the charity was... in march 2020, — this? well, the charity was... in march 2020, started _ this? well, the charity was... in march 2020, started by - this? well, the charity was... in march 2020, started by a - this? well, the charity was... in march 2020, started by a friend j this? well, the charity was... in i march 2020, started by a friend of mine and nhs staff and we were in a privileged position where we could see devastation first hand, and for many of us, colleagues did pass away from covid, we were very aware of the impact it would have so we got together and started this incredible charity and its done so much really
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fantastic work in a year, helping half a million health care staff and we want to have that it might help lots more. the memorialfund isjust one of many areas of support and we would love for everyone to know about it, come on board to help us or get involved and use our services because they are there for you, for nhs staff and their families. you've mentioned lots _ nhs staff and their families. you've mentioned lots of _ nhs staff and their families. you've mentioned lots of different - nhs staff and their families. you've mentioned lots of different things l mentioned lots of different things but in terms of the fund you�*re talking about today, what is it particularly about higher education? why did you focusing on that as some you thought would help youngsters, teenagers i suppose, lay teenagers who have lost a parent through this pandemic? it is who have lost a parent through this handemic? , ., , who have lost a parent through this handemic? , . , ., who have lost a parent through this handemic? , . , . ., , no limit, that your parent has passed away from covid—19 that work for the nhs that makes you eligible. they should be such an exciting day
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getting results, looking to the future, thinking what you can do but for some children and people have been through the trauma and devastations as a parent, it�*s a very different experience, they will feel limited potentially, they will feel limited potentially, they will feel lost and really want to help them through that. it�*s a tricky time being a teenager and it�*s an additional pressure that you�*re going through, that we feel strongly that we all have a responsibility to try and help out and the health care workers foundation is the only charity offering a fund like this so it�*s important that you guys watching the tv right now help us get the word out and help us read as much information about the charity in this fund in particular, to all the students and anyone you can think of today to keep us doing what we need to to get to them. thank you for all our we need to to get to them. thank you
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for all your endeavours. _ we need to to get to them. thank you for all your endeavours. thank - we need to to get to them. thank you for all your endeavours. thank you. i for all your endeavours. thank you. that charity launching the new fund today. let�*s pause and take a look at the weather prospects. hello there. most parts of the country have been enjoying better weather today. let me show you what is happening on the satellite picture because a lot of the rain clouds that we had yesterday have moved away eastwards as low pressure moves away. looking out into the atlantic, we have got this area of cloud here which will bring some rain into the west tomorrow. we into the west tomorrow. are in between. we have got some sunshine out there and a lot of places are remaining dry and it feels warmer because the winds all remaining light as well. these are the temperatures we are looking at throughout this afternoon. could be 23 or 2a degrees. it is warmer across southern scotland, where it is a lot drier than it was yesterday. one or two showers further southern scotland, across northern england. those will all move away this evening. 0vernight, we are looking about cloud coming in to the atlantic. it will be thickening
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and keeping temperatures up to around 12 or 13 degrees, similar to what we had last night. tomorrow, we will look at the clouds moving in through the west. sunny start for the eastern side of the uk. the clouds moved in, we will get a spell of rain across northern ireland pushing its way through scotland and parts of england and wales as well. we do actually get some sunshine eventually later on in the day across western parts of scotland but that rain moves across much of the country into the afternoon. sunnier afternoon across northern ireland but we have got more rain coming onto the pennines come into the welsh hills and into cornwall as well. midlands looked relatively dry. we have got some warmer air in east anglia and the south—east — 2a or 25 degrees. we have not had that during the whole of august so far. that weather front takes very little rain into england and wales. it might bring some wet and windy weather into the north—west later on sunday.
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some sunshine further north but we will see the winds stronger and some showers move across northern ireland and to western scotland so cooler here. 25 possibly even 26 if we get a bit more sunshine across east anglia, for example. moving things onto friday, yes, it is a little bit cooler across many areas. some showers coming in, too. the bulk of those across scotland, the winds will be stronger through most of the day. temperatures are normal for this time of the year — around 19 to 22 celsius.
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understand how this is bbc new understand how s. this is bbc news. the headlines: oh, my god! a record high number of top a—level grades in england, wales and northern ireland. the education secretary says students deserve to be rewarded after more than a year of disruption. this cohort of students have had to deal with a level of disruption that no—one has ever seen before, not even during a world war, as a result of this pandemic. the pass rate for scottish school qualifications fell slightly this year — but a record number of a grades were awarded. a lawsuit is filed against prince andrew by a us woman who alleges she was �*trafficked to him�* by the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, and then �*sexually abused�*.
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lionel messi has arrived in france to agree a two—year deal with paris st—germain, following his shock exit from barcelona. an apology from the greek prime minister, for failures in tackling widlfires, which continue to burn across parts of the country. and could dementia be diagnosed in just one day? scientists begin trials of an artificial intelligence system that could lead to a breakthrough. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. more a grades have been awarded for a levels this year, after exams were cancelled
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for a second year because of the pandemic. nearly 45% of entries in england, wales and northern ireland were awarded an a or a star — that�*s an all—time record, and much much higher than when exams were last held in 2019. students�* work was assessed and graded by their teachers in place of exams. this year, no algorithm was used to moderate grades, after a backlash to last year�*s results led to a u—turn from the government. in scotland, pupils achieving a grades hit a record high this year as the pass rate for highers, advanced highers and national 5s dropped slightly from last year. elaine dunkley reports. oh, my god! finally, relief in a year that has felt relentless. grades that mark the end of uncertainty and the start of a new path. injanuary, traditional exams were scrapped and replaced
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with teacher assessed grades. i got a distinction, star and a b. moiz is happy with his results but there have been no easy options. as students we would rely on teachers for answers when we were stuck. this time the teachers didn�*t have the answer straightaway. it was a learning experience for everyone. no one was prepared for this but we had a great experience and our teachers were great in terms of being there for us in terms of our academics and mental health. with exams cancelled, ensuring fairness has been a challenge. students have been assessed only on what they have been taught. the pandemic has also put pressure on teachers who have had to provide evidence for every single grade awarded. it's been a phenomenal amount of work. every single grade has been looked at by at least two staff members and then a robust suite of internal and external quality assurance processes.
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our students have had six bouts of assessment so they have had to stay in that performance level as opposed to, normally, it isjust a one—off performance on the day. top grades for a—level results in england, wales and northern ireland have reached a record high, with 45% getting a star or a grades this year. it is the second year in a row that traditional exams have been cancelled and results have significantly increased. compared to 2019, a stars and as have risen by 75%. we�*ve already set out in the last academic year our moves to moving back to examination as a form of assessment. we also recognise that those students who will be looking at taking exams in 2022, will also have had their education disrupted. in scotland, students completing their exams had their grades told to them at the end of term. today they had them confirmed. 230,000 btec students also received their level three results. i got a high demerit,
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which is pretty good. with high numbers of students applying to universities and getting grades, there is concern this could put pressure on places. we know from last year that universities and colleges were super flexible. so where they can expand capacity, that is what they will be looking at doing. in terms of clearing, obviously, for those who are looking at clearing, they can have a choice from 2pm today. there are plenty of courses. nearly 30,000 courses available. i�*ve got three a stars. fantastic! back in loughborough, these students are celebrating. just massive, massive relief. we were really stressed the last nine minutes. you want to get it over and done with. i'm really pleased i've done well. it all feels worth it now. they may not have sat traditional exams but showing resilience throughout the pandemic has been one of the toughest tests. elaine dunkley, bbc news. let�*s hear from our correspondents across the uk — our scotland correspndent alexandra mackenzie, chris page in northern ireland,
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and first our wales correspondent hwyel griffith. yes, the students coming here today were seeing their results not for the first time. as they opened the envelopes, it was confirmation of the results they got injune and were allowed to appeal if they weren�*t happy back then. in terms of what those results show, well, a record number of a stars and as. in wales, the proportion this year, 48% of entries at a star or a. that is 6% up from last year, the class of 2020, which clearly also had difficulties during the pandemic. a whopping 20% up on the last set of students to sit a—level exams in 2019. that debate about grade inflation is live and active here. the welsh government say they are certain these teacher assessed grades are valid and that they will stand the test of time. and asking everyone to remember what this cohort of students have been through. speaking to the students, it�*s a point they make.
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they say the majority of their learning of the past two years was done online. they didn�*t have the advantage of face—to—face teaching for much of it. they hope the class of 2021 will be remembered for their great achievement in a very tough time. more than half of a—level results have received top grades. more than 50%, 51% in fact, receiving a stars and or a5, 74% receiving a grades or b grades. students in this part of the uk have been picking up the results here. a number of them here in lurgan, one of northern ireland's biggest schools. pupils have been coming and going all morning. a real sense of nervousness, yes, but also excitement and joy whenever those envelopes have been opened. many students also picking up their btec results, those vocational qualifications have become a very common pathway to university.
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the education minister in the devolved government, michele mcilveen of the democratic unionist party, has praised the resilience of pupils in these exceptional times, and she says the high grades awarded have reflected their hard work over these last two difficult years. pupils already had theirl results here in scotland. today, it was the - formal announcement. there were no exams. it was all down to assessment, graded by teachers. _ what they were getting results for were the national 55, - which you take when you are around 15, 16. _ then the highers, which you take after that. - then the advanced highers. this year saw the highest number of higher passes since1999.- and the highest number— of advanced higher passes since that qualification began 20 years ago. the scottish qualifications authority said pass rates, |
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they are higher than 2019, so pre—pandemic level. i but they are slightly lower than they were last year. i national 55 are down from an 89% pass rate tojust under 86%. - highers are down from just over 89% to just over 87%. _ now in scotland there is a record number of a grade passes - this year for highers. this was 40% last year- and up to 47.6% this year. scotland's education secretary, shirley—anne somerville, - said pupils had delivered a very strong set of results. _ and if you have received your exam results today, and have any questions about university, an apprenticeship or employment, we�*d like to hear from you. at 3:30 we�*ll put them to catherine sezen
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from the association of school and college leaders, and joanne elliott from the national careers service. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag bbcyourquestions and you can email us on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. for more on this year�*s exam results across the uk, including how grades have been decided, how to appeal and other questions, go to the bbc news website at bbc.co.uk/news or visit the bbc news app. an american woman, who says she was brought to the uk aged 17 to have sex with prince andrew, has filed a civil lawsuit in new york claiming he abused her. the prince has consistently denied virginia roberts guiffre�*s allegations. nicholas witchell reports. which of the people in this photograph is telling the truth? the man, prince andrew, who categorically denies any impropriety?
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or the woman, virginia giuffre, who alleges she was sexually assaulted by him on three occasions? miss giuffre has now filed a civil claim in a district court in new york. the claim states that when she was 17 years old, she was the victim of sex trafficking. prince andrew has offered no comment to the filing of the court claim. his position remains as it was in his interview with newsnight�*s emily maitlis in november 2019, when he denied any improper behaviour with miss giuffre — virginia roberts, as she was then. you can say categorically that you don�*t recall meeting virginia roberts, dining with her, dancing with her at tramp, or going on to have sex with her in a bedroom in a house in belgravia?
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i can, i can absolutely, categorically tell you, it never happened. do you recall any kind of sexual contact with virginia roberts, then or at any other time? none whatsoever. miss giuffre�*s lawyers claim andrew has failed to co—operate with the us authorities in their investigation into the activities of andrew�*s friend, jeffrey epstein, who the court papers say organised a sex trafficking network involving underage girls. epstein took his own life in 2019. for his part, prince andrew has withdrawn from public life with the royal family. these latest developments suggest there can be little immediate prospect of him restoring his public reputation. nicholas witchell, bbc news. three quarters of uk adults have now received both doses of a coronavirus vaccine. more than 47 million people have had a full course
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of either the astrazeneca, pfizer or moderna vaccine. the health secretary sajid javid spoke about the milestone a little earlier. 75% of adults have had two jabs and this is helping us to work our way out of his pandemic towards normal and i would urge anyone who has still not had their vaccine, if they are eligible, please go and do so. studio: the health secretary, sajid javid. in the last hour, lionel messi has touched down in france ahead of his move to paris saint—germain. a short while ago he waved to fans from a window of le bourget airport in paris. messi will have a medical at psg this afternoon after agreeing a two—year deal with the club. the argentine confirmed his exit from barcelona in a tearful farewell on sunday —
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after 21 years with the club. katie gornall reports. for the first time in his career, lionel messi knew he would start the season somewhere other than barcelona, but where he would go to next has been the subject of much talk. fans of paris st—germain were confident their city was the most logical destination. since yesterday, they have gathered at the parc des princes stadium, waiting. after all, psg, a club backed by qatari money, are one of the few who can afford a 34—year—old master like messi. the record six times ballon d�*or winner is set to play alongside mbappe and former barca tea—mate neymar in what will surely be the most fearsome attack in world football. you have to go to social media, the debate is already in the street, is it is the best trio ever in history? i say at the moment, perhaps luis suarez, neymar and messi at barcelona that
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won everything that year, but we will see how far they can go. his numbers are staggering. in 778 games for barcelona he scored 672 goals, secured ten league titles, and there could have been more. messi never wanted to leave barcelona and in a tearful press conference on sunday he said he was convinced he would stay in the city he called home. translation: this is really difficult for me | after so many years. but the club, due to la liga salary cap rules, could no longer afford to keep him, and so after 21 years, his association with barcelona is over and now a new story will begin. katie gornall, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... top grades as a—level results are published for england, wales and northern ireland. it�*s another record year — with 45% of students achieving an a* or a grade. the pass rate for scottish school qualifications fell slightly this year — but a record number of a grades were awarded.
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a lawsuit is filed against prince andrew by a us woman who alleges she was �*trafficked to him�* by the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, and then �*sexually abused�*. british firefighters are among more than 1,000 from across europe helping to battle wildfires on greece�*s second largest island, evia. thousands of people have been evacuated since the blaze started a week ago. meanwhile, in california, rescue workers are preparing for even higher temperatures, as they tackle the second—largest fire in the state�*s history. lebo diseko reports. the apocalyptic scenes of what the greek prime minister has called a nightmarish summer. nearly 600 fires have broken out across the country since latejuly, fuelled by strong winds and the worst heatwave in decades. the biggest is in evia, an island north—east of athens, which has been ablaze for a week.
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help has been flown in by other countries, including british firefighters. i haven't seen fires like this before in the uk, it's something that's completely new to me. i've seen grass fires and open area fires, but this is just something on another scale. they are helping with manual tools, trying to put in fire breaks and stopping the fire from spreading. there has been public anger at the government response, something the greek prime minister has apologised for. but he says climate change is causing fires that last for weeks, speaking just hours after the un warned that human activity is making extreme weather events more common. something locals say they are experiencing first hand. we didn�*t see any rain to stop this fire. i used to run in this forest, i used to cycle, we used to go and collect fruit. now everything�*s gone. 0n the other side of the world,
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in the us, california, too, is battling catastrophic blazes. this fire started almost a month ago and is now the second largest wildfire in state history, with claims so ferocious they destroyed nearly all of the historic town of greenville. several times in the last week, i wished i could just go home and then i remember, i can't go home, there is nothing to go back to. then, if, even if the house survived, like, pretty much the rest of the town is gone. surveying the damage, the state governor said the cause was clear. the extreme weather conditions, extreme droughts, leading to extreme conditions and wildfire challenges the likes of which we�*ve never seen in our history and, as a consequence, we need to acknowledge, just straight up, these are climate induced wildfires. with more high temperatures expected in the coming days, the fear is that even more towns could be at risk. lebo diseko, bbc news.
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a man and woman have appeared at omagh magistrates court charged in connection with the death of a two year old girl in dungannon last week. alijayden doyle died in hospital after being found injured in a house in the town. kelly bonner reports. ali jayden doyle died alijayden doyle died in hospital after sustaining what was described in court as a catastrophic head injuries. an ambulance was called to this house in park avenue in dungannon on friday morning, and they found the two—year—old unresponsive. the court heard one of the accused darrenjohn armstrong told doctors that all jayden doyle�*s younger brother had hit her over the head with a toy and she had fallen and hit her head on the fireplace. police said the pathologist said the injuries of the two—year—old could not have been accidental, saying they were so extensive they could not tell how many times she was hit. the court was also told the child
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had no evidence of previous trauma. today darrenjohn armstrong was charged with murder and perverting the course ofjustice. ali jayden doyle�*s mother, jade dempsey, was charged with perverting the course ofjustice charged with perverting the course of justice and charged with perverting the course ofjustice and causing the death of a child. the court heard that both of jay dempsey�*s children had been placed in child protection services because of her relationship it darren armstrong. armstrong was to have no access to the children, supervised or unsupervised, and both defendants were denied bail. the judge told the court that miss dempsey was a flight risk and she also said that mr armstrong had a litany of breach of court orders and that she had no confidence that he would adhere to the conditions of bail. kelly bonner, bbc news.
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scientists have begun trials of an artificial intelligence system that may be able to diagnose dementia in a day. researchers at the alan turing institute have told bbc news that their system could help spot the onset of dementia much earlier, which could improve outcomes for patients. 0ur science correspondent, pallab ghosh, has this exclusive report. penelope clark noticed that her husband denis began to forget things last year. they are concerned he is developing some form of dementia. the couple are taking part in trials of a new system, where they will be able to tell them not only if there is any form of dementia but how quickly it is likely to develop. if you had a diagnosis that gave you some indication of the progression, would it be of help? then we could plan financially as a couple, to be able
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to perhaps have a few holidays before things got so bad that i couldn�*t take denis on holiday. it makes me more comfortable because if you get a diagnosis, you're not waiting months and months for someone to come back and say "we know what it is now." denis�* brain scan will be analysed by an artificial intelligence computer programme. it compares his scan to those of thousands of dementia patients. in preclinical tests, it has been able to diagnose dementia years before symptoms develop. to have a diagnosis of dementia, it�*s a big thing to take on board so when i�*m delivering this diagnosis, anything which i can do to be more confident about that, to give people more information, to help them plan their lives, it�*s a great thing to be able to do. and the new technique can give results much faster... currently, it can take several scans and many other tests to find out whether someone has dementia.
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the new artificial intelligence system can potentially pick it up with just one scan and it can pick it up much earlier in the progression of the disease. the researcher who led the development of the system believes that early and accurate diagnosis of dementia will make treatments much more effective. the treatments can find it early and slow down the progression and, at the same time, avoid more damage happening to the brain. it�*s likely that these symptoms might occur much later in life or they may actually never occur. the system is currently being tested to see if it works just as well in a clinical setting as it has in the lab. if so, it will make a big difference to denis and millions like him. we will talk more about that story after four o�*clock. david cameron made about £7 million from greensill capital before
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the controversial finance company collapsed earlier this year — that�*s according to documents obtained by bbc panorama. the former prime minister had lobbied the government on behalf of the company — which made its money by lending to businesses — and has repeatedly refused to tell mps what he was paid by greensill. a spokesman for mr cameron said his remuneration was a private matter. 0ur economics correspondent andy verityjoins us now. that is one of the things we have learnt, the payment, or earn to make $10 million before tax from greensill.— greensill. that was the big revelation _ greensill. that was the big revelation panorama - greensill. that was the big revelation panorama last i greensill. that was the big - revelation panorama last night but i have something new to tell you, we have something new to tell you, we have something new to tell you, we have some further information which has never been reported before, about how david cameron personally promoted investment schemes run by
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lex greensill and marketed by the investment bank credit suisse, to investors who now face big losses, so this is a meeting injune 2019, david cameron appeared at an event, with his friend and boss, lex greensill, the event was good, the future of supply chain finance, and these were clients, wealthy investors looking for a good investment, and at the time credit suisse marketed finance funds which used cash to buy greensill investment and investors were told by credit suisse that the funds were at low risk and their money would be used by greensill to make short—term loans to businesses, backed up by invoices. panorama has discovered how at the time of mr cameron cosmic appearance, greensill was also using credit suisse�*s money to make longer term, high risk loans —— mr cameron�*s appearance. these were not actually backed up by invoices and the investors had no idea about
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this. , ., , ., this. this was an event 'ust over two years — this. this was an event 'ust over two years ago. h this. this was an event 'ust over two years age. he _ this. this was an event 'ust over two years ago, do we _ this. this was an eventjust over two years ago, do we know - this. this was an eventjust over| two years ago, do we know what this. this was an eventjust over - two years ago, do we know what david cameron actually said that event? we don't cameron actually said that event? - don't know his exact words but his don�*t know his exact words but his personal appearance is what would have lent credibility to greensill capital and its investment, and over several years credit suisse investors put more than $10 billion into greensill investments and they are now expecting to lose about two and a half billion dollars of that. david cameron�*s spokesperson said he was not a director of the company and not involved in any lending decisions and he said it is preposterous to suggest that david cameron would work for any company if he was aware that it was behaving improperly and was in any way seeking to mislead investors. we have comments from mr greensill denied misleading investors and he said his company made of the appropriate disclosures to credit suisse and the swiss bank was solely responsible for making any disclosures to their investors and from credit suisse, they say their focus is on returning cash to
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investors and that 59% of their cash has been returned so far. interesting. andy verity, thanks for joining us. you can see that bbc panorama programme. you can find it on the iplayer. humanitarian agencies are warning that hundreds of thousands of civilians are at risk as fighting escalates in afghanistan. the international red cross said it�*s already treated more than 4,000 wounded people since the beginning of august. it said street—to—street fighting in lashkar gah and elsewhere had injured hundreds of civilians. a woman has been killed and two people have been injured in a crash between two buses at victoria railway station in london.
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police officers were called to the incident at about 8.30 this morning. it appears that a single—decker bus crashed into the rear of another, causing damage to both vehicles. the woman who died is believed to be in her 30s. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren. most parts of the country are staying dry through the rest of the day and with some sunshine and with some light winds it feels a bit warmer. temperatures up to 23, possibly even 24. a few showers coming in, mainly over more northern parts of england but the bulk of the showers will be in the north—east of scotland and those could be heavy and thundery for a while. those showers will move away overnight tonight. we look to the west and we have cloud coming in from the atlantic and that will thicken up in northern ireland and may be a few spots of rain here before the end of the night. temperatures typically 12—13c. it could be a sunny start for many
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eastern parts of england, perhaps into the midlands, and the cloud will move its way east, and the spell of rain around in the morning in northern ireland, moving quickly into scotland, some rain for wales, north—west england and into cornwall, perhaps. sunshine follows in northern ireland and more cloud towards the east and east anglia but this is warmer air so temperatures could reach 24, possibly 25c.
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hello, this is bbc news with jane hill. the headlines... a record high number of top a—level grades in england, wales and northern ireland. the education secretary says students deserve to be rewarded after more than a year of disruption. this cohort of students have had to deal with a level of disruption that no one had ever seen before, not
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even during a world war as a result of this pandemic. the pass rate for scottish school qualifications fell slightly this year but a record number of a grades were awarded. a lawsuit is filed against prince andrew by a us woman who alleges she was �*trafficked to him�* by the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, and then �*sexually abused�*. an apology from the greek prime minister, for failures in tackling widlfires, which continue to burn across parts of the country. we have your questions answered coming up in the next few minutes talking about all today�*s exam result but before that, turning our attention to the sports news. it is austin. good afternoon. hi, jane, good afternoon. well, it was something many football fans thought they would never see but lionel messi will be wearing a different shirt this season.
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he�*s heading to paris right now, to sign a two—year deal with paris saint germain. the record six—time ballon d�*or winner admitted that he didn�*t want to leave barcelona, after 21—years in catalonia — but the club�*s finances are in such a bad way, they couldnt afford to keep him. these are pictures from the past hour. that is messy in paris at the airport, people waiting for this arrival and of the deal goes through, he could earn up to £550,000 per week. it's it�*s a club with big ambitions. the motto is dream bigger. they have an obsession about winning the champions league and in order to do that, they continue to build a very competitive team next season, with a front three of neyman, messi and
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mbappe. great on paper but it doesn�*t mean much. —— of neymar, messi and mbappe. maybe they will play as a team but that will be the challenge. 0ne play as a team but that will be the challenge. one of the biggest challenges of messi�*s career, fantastic score that his disposal. the reboot is on the way but we will see how it goes. the league is not the main concern, it is mainly of course the champions league and we will see the season if they can fight against manchester city, riel madrid, we will see in a couple of weeks. —— manchester city and real madrid. elsewhere... all—rounder moeen all has been added to the england squad, for the second test against india, which starts on thursday at lord�*s. he last played in a test match in february, during england�*s tour of india, but he�*s been in great form as captain of birmingham phoenix in the hundred, helping them to the top of the table. he�*lljoin up with the england squad for training this afternoon.
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it was a decision we took yesterday. we had a long chat about it. it gives us another option in terms of balancing the team out so he�*s obviously full of confidence, played some unbelievable cricket in the hundred in the shorter format, and we know how talented he is and what he is capable of in test cricket, so he�*s a serious contender for this game. and we�*re still celebrating the achievements of team gb in tokyo — today we�*ve been talking tojennifer and jessica gadirova, the twins who helped britain win bronze in the gymnastics team all around event. performing alongside alice kinsella and amelie morgan, it was the first medal for team gb in that event — for 93 years. the gadirovas now have their gsce results to look forward to, but they have a good idea of what their career will be — and as they�*re only 16, they�*re stilljust enjoying their sport.
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people say you have so much potential, but we are still kids so we just enjoy that really, people saying you have to do this, we did not put that pressure on saying you have to do this, we did not put that pressure on ourselves because if you put pressure on yourself and it doesn�*t happen, it makes it more sad and if you like you haven�*t accomplished anything but when you don�*t have that pressure and you just let it do itself, it is like, wow, we are actually happy, we didn�*t force anything, it�*s such a great way. that�*s all the sport for now. now it�*s time for your questions answered. thousands of students have received their a—level results today, and more than 435,000 people have been accepted on university courses. pupils have also been receiving their btec and apprenticeship results. many of them will have questions about their future, and we can answer some of them now in �*your questions answered�*. with me to answer your questions
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is catherine sezen, senior policy manager of the association of colleges and i�*m alsojoined byjoanne elliott, careers advisor at the national careers service, which runs the exam results helpline. a warm welcome to both of you. thank you very much. i am going to turn to first of all if i may becausejosh from surrey has our first question. will our employers view results differently of grade inflation are so high this year? i differently of grade inflation are so high this year?— differently of grade inflation are so high this year? i don't believe so high this year? i don't believe so because _ so high this year? i don't believe so because employers _ so high this year? i don't believe so because employers don't - so high this year? i don't believe so because employers don'tjust| so high this year? i don't believe - so because employers don'tjust look so because employers don�*tjust look at what rates you got. they will look at your work experience and what you call soft or transferable skills things like effective communication being planned and organised, working as part of a
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team, time management, it�*s good for you to have a mixture of both your qualifications as well as work experience but i don�*t think they will be any different. lets experience but i don't think they will be any different.— will be any different. lets hope that is of some _ will be any different. lets hope that is of some comfort. - will be any different. lets hope that is of some comfort. thankj will be any different. lets hope - that is of some comfort. thank you very much. cathy in 0xfordshire, what about people who have dropped out because of nonattendance of online lessons? my friend�*s son was classified as dropped out injanuary and therefore has school didn�*t enter him for a level. he said his mental health has improved and you want to take the exams in october but has been told he cannot because he was not enrolled the first time round, what should that family do? so, yeah, that is the case. if the student wasn�*t enrolled for the exam in the summer, then they cannot be automatically enrolled for the autumn series. the most important thing here is that your friend�*s son so much better and once engaged back with education so that the most
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important thing i suggest is seeking some careers advice and you can do that if you go to your local college for example, they would be able to help you or you would be able to talk to someone on the national careers service as joanne talk to someone on the national careers service asjoanne has been talking about, lots of opportunities to help and support and what i would say adjust as you�*ve made that first step, you want to get back into education, so go and find out what the options are.— the options are. joanne, you are noddinr the options are. joanne, you are nodding through _ the options are. joanne, you are nodding through a _ the options are. joanne, you are nodding through a lot _ the options are. joanne, you are nodding through a lot of- the options are. joanne, you are nodding through a lot of that - the options are. joanne, you are nodding through a lot of that so | the options are. joanne, you are | nodding through a lot of that so i want to know what your thought is on that as well. want to know what your thought is on that as well-— that as well. yes, absolutely, there will be other— that as well. yes, absolutely, there will be other options _ that as well. yes, absolutely, there will be other options available - that as well. yes, absolutely, there will be other options available to i will be other options available to this young gentleman so what i would recommend is, that is right, is to -et recommend is, that is right, is to get in _ recommend is, that is right, is to get in contact with the national courier— get in contact with the national courier service on oh 800100 900, and we _ courier service on oh 800100 900, and we have — courier service on oh 800100 900, and we have a lot of resources available — and we have a lot of resources available at ww w dot national careers— available at ww w dot national careers not serviced dot got uk, but certainly— careers not serviced dot got uk, but certainly speaking to an individual like myself could bring up all of the options available to you because
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a-levels _ the options available to you because a—levels are not the only option, a-levels — a—levels are not the only option, a—levels are not the only option, a—levels are not the only option, there is— a—levels are not the only option, there is btecs and nvqs, h n seasoned hnd is. so definitely reach out. seasoned hnd is. so definitely reach out |_ seasoned hnd is. so definitely reach out. , ._ , ., seasoned hnd is. so definitely reach out. , , ., , ., out. i will stay with you, question about being _ out. i will stay with you, question about being a _ out. i will stay with you, question about being a mature _ out. i will stay with you, question about being a mature student, i about being a mature student, someone who has been working professionally for 40 years, wants to go back to studying because they didn�*t complete their degree, most good universities have a criteria so i�*m thinking about improving my existing a—level grades but how can someone like me sit a—levels without having to go to college again? what would the procedure?— would the procedure? there is an 0 htion would the procedure? there is an option specifically _ would the procedure? there is an option specifically for _ would the procedure? there is an option specifically for mature - option specifically for mature students? —— right from mature students? —— right from mature students but what is that? it is someone who has access to higher education and this is specific designed for mature students who want to go into higher education but might not want to do the full two
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years of an a—level or the three a—levels that you need to go on to university, ora a—levels that you need to go on to university, or a level three extended apply rule. you can do it one year, and that will allow you to progress onto the... you will have to go into a college environment. there is the access courses as well, so you could do that online.- so you could do that online. thank ou, let's so you could do that online. thank you. let's take _ so you could do that online. thank you, let's take a _ so you could do that online. thank you, let's take a moment - so you could do that online. thank you, let's take a moment to - so you could do that online. thank you, let's take a moment to think| you, let�*s take a moment to think about the next set of students coming up because i think that is a really interesting question, let me put this to you, i�*m doing my exams next year. they can bidding for university places against inflated grey. will universities make an allowance for the fact that my year will not get the same sort of levels if we have to use it real exams? we
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don�*t fully know what will happen next year but a principal with the question, it�*s an interesting one, in that? it question, it's an interesting one, in that? , ., ., , question, it's an interesting one, in that? , . ., , in that? it is a really good question _ in that? it is a really good question and _ in that? it is a really good question and these - in that? it is a really good question and these rest i in that? it is a really good - question and these rest assured, thatis question and these rest assured, that is the most important thing, universities are very well aware, just in the same way employers are very well aware of the circumstances that have happened this year and the students that receive those today, there are valid for individual students and your grades will be valid for next year as well and hope they will be getting you to the destination you want to go to, you�*re quite right, there is a consultation closed recently looking at what assessment is going to look like so what would a—level exams and gcses look like next year? and what do different things are on the table so those decisions are yet to be made but rest assured that everyone in education, there is that they are
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in education, there is that they are in employment are very well aware of this year and students like yourself who have been through quite a lot of disruption over the past couple of years. it disruption over the past couple of ears. , ,., , disruption over the past couple of ears. , ,, years. it is so interesting because i ho he years. it is so interesting because i hope there _ years. it is so interesting because i hope there are _ years. it is so interesting because i hope there are some _ years. it is so interesting because| i hope there are some reassurance that what it is because you mention the consultation and we are all focusing today on those who have taken exams this year, or had result this year, but next year because my kids are affected, too, and that is hard because they not knowing must be pretty stressful.— be pretty stressful. absolutely, i arree. be pretty stressful. absolutely, i agree- my _ be pretty stressful. absolutely, i agree- my son — be pretty stressful. absolutely, i agree. my son is _ be pretty stressful. absolutely, i agree. my son is in _ be pretty stressful. absolutely, i agree. my son is in the - be pretty stressful. absolutely, i agree. my son is in the same - agree. my son is in the same position, he will be taking exams next year so i really do understand how you feel and the most important thing is we do get clarity as soon as possible for students like yourself, for parents and carers, and also for the schools and colleges who will be delivering the qualifications, so fingers crossed we will get that information as soon as possible but you can get back
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into school or college by september. you have to work hard in every way, because it has been a difficult year for you, too. because it has been a difficult year for you. too-— for you, too. sage advice. another ruestion, for you, too. sage advice. another question, talking _ for you, too. sage advice. another question, talking about _ for you, too. sage advice. another question, talking about her- for you, too. sage advice. another question, talking about her son i for you, too. sage advice. another. question, talking about her son who just missed what he needed to go to plymouth, he wanted to go to study physiotherapy, he was asked for aab and in fact he got to a*s and a c and in fact he got to a*s and a c and did not get in because she wants to know what he can do to get in because he has not got in. you�*ll make those a phenomenal grade so do not think you failed or anything of that description because you�*ve done phenomenally. what i would advise is actually contacting the university first before looking at other options just to ask if is any other
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way because some universities do offer something called a foundation year. they will do an extra year at the beginning of the three year degree, so that is an option but also look at his other options as well because obviously plymouth university must be his firm choice and if you�*ve chosen another, you will have an insurance option as well, so see if that is available to him also. you can resit the exams as well if you think you might improve that, that c could go up to a bee. you can reset your exams and act over and get your grades in december. the other option as you could appeal those greats as well and that is why the exam results days have been brought forward by two weeks to allow that period for healing. good point about appealing. a number of options there, thank
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you. and this question is very straightforward. it does not get discussed enough. they would like to know how any children with special educational needs figure in this picture. it�*s an important question. absolutely. young people educational needs and there is a whole range of them from young people who have dyslexia to young people who have more profound learning difficulties, so it�*s a whole range of young people taking exams every year and the most important things here is that those students have the opportunity to utilise when they are doing assessments whether those are exams or this year when we have had teacher assessed grey that it will have been taken into consideration, so some young people need a reader, some need a scribe, some may need to be in a room in their own so there are a variety of different arrangements that are put in place
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but the most important thing is that these are things that are put in place for the young person throughout the year so they do not come to do an assessment and it is a surprise that perhaps they have got a reader or a scribe, they know the things are in place and the schools and colleges go to a lot of trouble to make sure these arrangements are in place for every young person who needs them, and it�*s very individualised, so as i say, if a young person needs a scribe, someone to write for them because that is something they struggle with, then that would be in place and if they need to make sure time because they need to make sure time because they need some time to be able to process and read through, that would be in place, so it�*s very much individualised to each student. another question about karen newcastle�*s son, he did not get a place in medical school and there are no clearing spaces so is it worth him... we have multiple choice, is it worth him reapplying
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next year, trying medical biosciences as another route into medicine or applying through clearing for something else entirely? various options there. yellow might give kind of answer the question yourself, absolutely all three of those are options that are completely viable and again this is where your son may benefit from speaking to someone like myself as a careers adviser, whether at school or college or with the national careers service to our helpline because we can evaluate all the options that are available to him and it would definitely be useful to find out what he got so we can advise appropriately. but all of those options are available to him. answering your own question, fair point. and a final question from gary in london which sums up how difficult things have been four strings in the past two years but he asks what about the system where a
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set proportion of people taking the exam achieve a certain grey than the pass mark is moved up or down to preserve that? the current system now seems unfair to people who got grades based on that old system that he is just describing. grades based on that old system that he isjust describing. that�*s grades based on that old system that he is just describing. that�*s an interesting thought, reminding us how much has changed. —— how different things are. the how much has changed. -- how different things are.— different things are. the most important _ different things are. the most important thing _ different things are. the most important thing is _ different things are. the most important thing is it _ different things are. the most important thing is it goes - different things are. the most | important thing is it goes back different things are. the most i important thing is it goes back to one of the questions we looked at earlier of the great being valid for this year, they are valid for next year student as well for the individual student so every student that has got a great today, the grade is an important achievement particularly bearing in mind where we have all been over the past couple of years and so, so difficult for young people and all the difficulties they faced. i would like to reassure people that, in schools and colleges up and down the country, teachers to this process really, really seriously and there was lots of what we call internal moderation so teachers would have
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given the grades and then it would have gone to a curriculum head and to a head teacher to be signed off and working with colleges, i was in discussion with lots of colleges over that period of time and they were doing what we call quality boards, literally from 7am until hpm, so please rest assured that the most important thing is that there has been a lot of what we call quality assurance gone on to the results of this year. yes they look different from the results from last year and they may look different from the results next year but we also have to bear in mind that this is exceptional. last year was also exceptional. these have been very, very difficult time for everyone and as we go back to what we hope will be a more usual your next year, that is why we�*ve got this consultations going on to make sure we are embedding as much fairness as possible for all young people whether they took their exams in 2019 or they are going to take their
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exams in 2022.— exams in 2022. that is interesting because of— exams in 2022. that is interesting because of taken _ exams in 2022. that is interesting because of taken me _ exams in 2022. that is interesting because of taken me onto - exams in 2022. that is interesting because of taken me onto my - exams in 2022. that is interesting | because of taken me onto my final point, i�*m interested in both of you, just perhaps if you have a moment of reflection on the extraordinary last couple of years we have seen for students and young people, and whether anything might actually change come this time next year. i appreciated eventually consultation is under way but could anything be learned? could the exam system? the way we session people be changed at all given the real seismic events of the last couple of years? joanne, your thoughts about how things might in education this time next year. itirafellll how things might in education this time next year.— time next year. welll certainly think it needs _ time next year. welll certainly think it needs to _ time next year. welll certainly think it needs to evidences - time next year. well i certainly| think it needs to evidences that time next year. well i certainly - think it needs to evidences that are young people got such resilience, the fact they�*ve got through this two—year period which we historically never have done and yet they�*ve come out with these fantastic grades, it�*sjust
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they�*ve come out with these fantastic grades, it�*s just amazing and they should be so proud, including the current and guardians as well because they go through this whole journey with them as well. like you said, they haven�*t really had that process of reviewing, deciding maybe sit down exams are the way forward if they are, the young people should actually be gaining information prior to those exam so i do think the process has already started. what it will look like specifically next year is really hard to say but it does appear like that process and that reflection, and alteration has started. ., ., , ., ., started. your thoughts on that, too. i arree started. your thoughts on that, too. i agree with — started. your thoughts on that, too. i agree with joanna, _ started. your thoughts on that, too. i agree with joanna, there _ started. your thoughts on that, too. i agree with joanna, there is - started. your thoughts on that, too. i agree with joanna, there is a - i agree withjoanna, there is a resilience _ i agree withjoanna, there is a resilience shown by students and the teachers _ resilience shown by students and the teachers who have gone out of their way to _ teachers who have gone out of their way to make sure when they were doing _ way to make sure when they were doing online delivery that they were making _ doing online delivery that they were making it _ doing online delivery that they were making it exciting and engaging as possible. — making it exciting and engaging as possible, there's probably some learning — possible, there's probably some learning to be done from that as we
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io learning to be done from that as we go forward — learning to be done from that as we go forward and ijoanne was saying, they are _ go forward and ijoanne was saying, they are looking at what the adaptations might be for assessments for next _ adaptations might be for assessments for next year so whether they is something called option allergy are whether— something called option allergy are whether -- — something called option allergy are whether —— optionality. but what we have learned that there is a discussion about input from teachers as well_ discussion about input from teachers as well so— discussion about input from teachers as well so teachers know the students _ as well so teachers know the students very well and perhaps there is an option — students very well and perhaps there is an option going forward to think about— is an option going forward to think about the — is an option going forward to think about the part that teachers play in all of _ about the part that teachers play in all of this— about the part that teachers play in all of this and the fact that this year. _ all of this and the fact that this year. they— all of this and the fact that this year, they have done excellent work in terms _ year, they have done excellent work in terms of— year, they have done excellent work in terms of their assessment and planning — in terms of their assessment and planning around really, really quickly— planning around really, really quickly so there is a lot of work going _ quickly so there is a lot of work going into _ quickly so there is a lot of work going into all of this and the most important — going into all of this and the most important thing, though, is that for young _ important thing, though, is that for young people, getting ready for next year. _ young people, getting ready for next year. that— young people, getting ready for next year, that they feel excited about going _ year, that they feel excited about going back into school and college, and the _ going back into school and college, and the opportunity to be able to socialise — and the opportunity to be able to socialise with their friends, to perhaps— socialise with their friends, to perhaps go for a tea or coffee during — perhaps go for a tea or coffee during a — perhaps go for a tea or coffee during a break from lessons, and
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'ust during a break from lessons, and just enjoy— during a break from lessons, and just enjoy being a student because i think the _ just enjoy being a student because i think the most important thing is well—being and we think the most important thing is well— being and we have think the most important thing is well—being and we have seen increases _ well—being and we have seen increases in concerns about well— being increases in concerns about well—being and the opportunity to go back into _ well—being and the opportunity to go back into a _ well—being and the opportunity to go back into a physical environment and be with— back into a physical environment and be with your— back into a physical environment and be with your friends in many respects— be with your friends in many respects is what it's all about particularly when you're17—18. absolutely. thank you so much, really interesting to hear both your perspective and cure all your advice as well. thank you so much. 12—year—old oliver king from liverpool was a talented young sportsman. but ten years ago he died suddenly after going into cardiac arrest during a school swimming lesson. a defribrillator — which gives a high energy electric
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shock to the heart — could have saved his life. since his death his dad has been campaigning for a change in the law to make them mandatory in all schools — backed by ex—liverpool playerjamie carragher. abbiejones reports. oliver was kind, considerate, was beautiful inside and out. you would fall in love with him. his reach was unbelievable. no doubt in my mind he�*d still be alive today if someone had used a defib on him. five and a half thousand of the life—saving devices have been placed across the country saving 56 lives, they are in every school in knowsley, and wirral but mark backed by a cardiologist and football is once a government to make them mandatory in schools and sports clubs everywhere.
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there are your pads, there are your pictures that you can look at. it tells you... no, _ pictures that you can look at. it tells you... no, you _ pictures that you can look at. it tells you... no, you cannot - pictures that you can look at. it| tells you... no, you cannot miss pictures that you can look at. it - tells you... no, you cannot miss use this. tells you... no, you cannot miss use this- press — tells you... no, you cannot miss use this. press the _ tells you... no, you cannot miss use this. press the flashing _ tells you... no, you cannot miss use this. press the flashing button, - tells you... no, you cannot miss use this. press the flashing button, you | this. press the flashing button, you press it. shock delivered. white fleet mackay will not stop until we get legislation for this. these need to be seen as common as fire extinguishers. when footballer christian errikson had a cardiac arrest on the pitch during denmark�*s opening game of euro 2020, the world watched in horror. his life was almost certainly saved because of a defibrillator. former liverpool defender jamie carragher says that�*s focused public attention and is calling on the government to meet with mark and change the law. at this moment it is in the forefront of people�*s mine. if you can get to a defribrillator
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in four minutes the chance of survival is much greater. what mark has been through with young ollie it is heartbreaking. he does need that might not need to see other families go through it. it is heartbreaking and it is happening now _ abbiejones, bbc north west today. much more coming up in the next hour. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren. hello there. most parts of the country have been enjoying better weather today. let me show you what is happening on the satellite picture because a lot of the rain clouds that we had yesterday have moved away eastwards as low pressure moves away. looking out into the atlantic, we have got this area of cloud here which will bring some rain into the west tomorrow. we are in between. we have got some sunshine out there and a lot of places are remaining dry and it feels warmer because the winds all remaining light as well. these are the temperatures we are looking at throughout this afternoon. could be 23 or 24 degrees.
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it is warmer across southern scotland, where it is a lot drier than it was yesterday. one or two showers further southern scotland, across northern england. those will all move away this evening. overnight, we are looking about cloud coming in to the atlantic. it will be thickening and keeping temperatures up to around 12 or 13 degrees, similar to what we had last night. tomorrow, we will look at the clouds moving in through the west. sunny start for the eastern side of the uk. the clouds moved in, we will get a spell of rain across northern ireland pushing its way through scotland and parts of england and wales as well. we do actually get some sunshine eventually later on in the day across western parts of scotland but that rain moves across much of the country into the afternoon. sunnier afternoon across northern ireland but we have got more rain coming onto the pennines come into the welsh hills and into cornwall as well. midlands looked relatively dry. we have got some warmer air in east anglia and the south—east — 24 or 25 degrees. we have not had that during the whole of august so far. that weather front takes very little rain into england and wales. it might bring some wet and windy weather into the north—west
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later on sunday. some sunshine further north but we will see the winds stronger and some showers move across northern ireland and to western scotland so cooler here. 25 possibly even 26 if we get a bit more sunshine across east anglia, for example. moving things onto friday, yes, it is a little bit cooler across many areas. some showers coming in, too. the bulk of those across scotland, the winds will be stronger through most of the day. temperatures are normal for this time of the year — around 19 to 22 celsius.
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this is bbc news. i�*m jane hill. the headlines: oh, my god! a record high number of top a—level grades in england, wales and northern ireland. the education secretary says students deserve to be rewarded after more than a year of disruption. this cohort of students have had to deal with a level of disruption that no—one has ever seen before, not even during a world war, as a result of this pandemic. the pass rate for scottish school qualifications fell slightly this year — but a record number of a grades were awarded. three quarters of uk adults have now received both doses of a coronavirus vaccine. boris johnson described the milestone as a "huge national achievement".
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a lawsuit is filed against prince andrew by a us woman who alleges she was �*trafficked to him�* by the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, and then �*sexually abused�*. lionel messi has arrived in france to agree a two—year deal with paris st—germain, following his shock exit from barcelona. and could dementia be diagnosed in just one day? scientists begin trials of an artificial intelligence system that could lead to a breakthrough. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. more top grades have been awarded for a levels this year, after exams were cancelled for a second year because of the pandemic.
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nearly 45% of entries in england, wales and northern ireland were awarded an a or a star — that�*s an all—time record, and much much higher than when exams were last held in 2019. students�* work was assessed and graded by their teachers in place of exams. this year, no algorithm was used to moderate grades, after a backlash to last year�*s results led to a u—turn from the government. in scotland, pupils achieving a grades hit a record high this year as the pass rate for highers, advanced highers and national 5s dropped slightly from last year. elaine dunkley reports. oh, my god! finally, relief in a year that has felt relentless. grades that mark the end of uncertainty and the start of a new path. injanuary, traditional exams were scrapped and replaced with teacher assessed grades.
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i got a distinction, star and a b. moiz is happy with his results but there have been no easy options. as students we would rely on teachers for answers when we were stuck. this time the teachers didn�*t have the answers straightaway. it was a learning experience for everyone. no one was prepared for this but we had a great experience and our teachers were great in terms of being there for us in terms of our academics and mental health. with exams cancelled, ensuring fairness has been a challenge. students have been assessed only on what they have been taught. the pandemic has also put pressure on teachers who have had to provide evidence for every single grade awarded. it's been a phenomenal amount of work. every single grade has been looked at by at least two staff members and then a robust suite of internal and external quality assurance processes. our students have had six bouts of assessment so they have had to sustain that performance level as opposed to, normally, it isjust a one—off
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performance on the day. top grades for a—level results in england, wales and northern ireland have reached a record high, with 45% getting a star or a grades this year. it is the second year in a row that traditional exams have been cancelled and results have significantly increased. compared to 2019, a stars and as have risen by 75%. we�*ve already set out in the last academic year our moves to moving back to examination as a form of assessment. we also recognise that those students who will be looking at taking exams in 2022, will also have had their education disrupted. in scotland, students completing their exams had their grades told to them at the end of term. today they had them confirmed. 230,000 btec students also received their level three results. i got a high demerit, which is pretty good. with high numbers of students applying to universities and getting grades, there is concern this could put pressure on places. we know from last year that universities and colleges
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were super flexible. so where they can expand capacity, that is what they will be looking at doing. in terms of clearing, obviously, for those who are looking at clearing, they can have a choice from 2pm today. there are plenty of courses. nearly 30,000 courses available. i�*ve got three a stars. fantastic! back in loughborough, these students are celebrating. just massive, massive relief. we were really stressed the last nine minutes. you want to get it over and done with. i'm really pleased i've done well. it all feels worth it now. they may not have sat traditional exams but showing resilience throughout the pandemic has been one of the toughest tests. elaine dunkley, bbc news. the shadow education secretary kate green said students should be proud of their results. but she warned the government to start planning now for any potential disruption
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to exams next year. we�*re saying to the government that they need to give schools and students the plan for exams right now at the start of the academic year so they can plan and prepare properly knowing what the assessment process is going to look like and that�*s what we say to the government, on the 1st of september, bring forward the plan so everyone knows the nature of the assessment process they will face next summer. let�*s now discuss this further. i�*m joined now by natalie perera, ceo of the think thank the education policy institute. good afternoon. we know students are operating in a vastly different environment so i�*m interested to see what you think of what we have reached today and how those decisions have been reached. clearly
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the first thing _ decisions have been reached. clearly the first thing to _ decisions have been reached. clearly the first thing to say _ decisions have been reached. clearly the first thing to say today _ decisions have been reached. clearly the first thing to say today is - decisions have been reached. clearly the first thing to say today is to - the first thing to say today is to acknowledge that young people have had an incredibly tough 18 months so everything they have achieved today, we should be congratulating them and as we heard earlier, congratulating them on their resilience over the last year or so. it is no surprise that we have seen higher grades this year and that is what we would expect to see, a teacher assessed system, but we also think there is more the government should have done and could have done to make sure there is... and could have done to make sure there is- - -— there is... inaudible we there is. .. inaudible we think— there is... inaudible we think the - there is... inaudible - we think the government could there is... inaudible _ we think the government could have done a lot better in that respect. are you concerned about those students who should be sitting exams assuming they go ahead next year, but will be sitting exams next year
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and they have been contacting us expressing concerns that they will be measured differently by definition and that it won�*t be a fair system? what could be done to mitigate against that scenario? the mitigate against that scenario? tia: government now mitigate against that scenario? ti2 government now needs to look at how it is going to control the distribution of grades in the next couple of years. but in a way that is really fair for students who are taking exams. making sure that the fact they have lost a learning is taken into account and making sure that can be done in a fairer way but as far as the students who receive their grades today go, the important thing for them is to focus on progressing to their next destination and if they have experienced lost learning time or gaps in their knowledge, they need support from the government and
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universities and employers to catch up universities and employers to catch up with that learning, and the government needs to put in a better package of support to address the lost learning that has occurred. when you are talking about a package of support, what is it in practical terms that can be done? more than just lump sums? what can be done to help students and teachers? more fundinr to help students and teachers? more funding to support _ help students and teachers? more funding to support more _ help students and teachers? ira funding to support more teaching time, for academic recovery, especially in some of the subjects like english and maths, but also more funding to support well—being activities including opportunities for pupils to socialise with each other in a way they haven�*t been able to in the last year. to improve their mental health and well—being. both of those are important as pupils progress throughout their education and into employment.
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natalie, much more we can discuss, but thanks forjoining us. the ceo of the think tank the education policy institute, there. moving onto coronavirus. the latest figures have been sent through for the last 24—hour is. these are the uk figures. 23,510 new cases of covid—19. in the last 24—hour period. slight decrease. it was more than 25,000 yesterday. in terms of the death toll, 146 new deaths recorded in the last 24—hour period. that is someone who has died within 28 days of a positive test for
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covid—19. we have also heard news today about the vaccine programme. three quarters of uk adults have now received both doses of a coronavirus vaccine. boris johnson described the milestone as a "huge national achievement". more than 47 million people have had a full course of either the astrazeneca, pfizer or moderna vaccine. the health secretary sajid javid spoke about the milestone a little earlier. 75% of adults have had two jabs and this is helping us to work our way out of this pandemic towards normal. i would urge anyone who has still not had their vaccine, if they are eligible, please go and do so. a woman from the us has filed a civil lawsuit in new york, accusing prince andrew of sexual abuse. in a statement, virginia roberts giuffre claims she was trafficked to the prince
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by the convicted paedophile jeffrey epstein, when she was seventeen. the duke of york has consistently denied the allegations. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. which of the people in this photograph is telling the truth? the man, prince andrew, who categorically denies any impropriety? or the woman, virginia giuffre, who alleges she was sexually assaulted by him on three occasions? miss giuffre has now filed a civil claim in a district court in new york. the claim states that when she was 17 years old, she was the victim of sex trafficking. prince andrew has offered no comment to the filing of the court claim. his position remains as it was in his interview
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with newsnight�*s emily maitlis in november 2019, when he denied any improper behaviour with miss giuffre — virginia roberts, as she was then. you can say categorically that you don�*t recall meeting virginia roberts, dining with her, dancing with her at tramp, or going on to have sex with her in a bedroom in a house in belgravia? i can, i can absolutely, categorically tell you, it never happened. do you recall any kind of sexual contact with virginia roberts, then or at any other time? none whatsoever. miss giuffre�*s lawyers claim andrew has failed to co—operate with the us authorities in their investigation into the activities of andrew�*s friend, jeffrey epstein, who the court papers say organised a sex trafficking network involving underage girls. epstein took his own life in 2019. for his part, prince andrew has
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withdrawn from public life with the royal family. these latest developments suggest there can be little immediate prospect of him restoring his public reputation. nicholas witchell, bbc news. lionel messi has touched down in france ahead of his move to paris saint—germain. in the last hour, he waved to fans from a window of le bourget airport in paris. messi will have a medical at psg this afternoon after agreeing a two—year deal with the club. the argentine confirmed his exit from barcelona in a tearful farewell on sunday — after 21 years with the club. katie gornall reports. for the first time in his career, lionel messi knew he would start the season somewhere other than barcelona, but where he would go to next has been the subject of much talk. fans of paris st—germain were confident their city was the most logical destination.
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since yesterday, they have gathered at the parc des princes stadium, waiting. after all, psg, a club backed by qatari money, are one of the few who can afford a 34—year—old master like messi. the record six times ballon d�*or winner is set to play alongside mbappe and former barca tea—mate neymar in what will surely be the most fearsome attack in world football. you have to go to social media, the debate is already in the street, is it the best trio ever in history? i say at the moment, perhaps luis suarez, neymar and messi at barcelona cos they won everything that year, but this three is close — we will see how far they can go. his numbers are staggering. in 778 games for barcelona he scored 672 goals, secured ten league titles, and there could have been more. messi never wanted to leave barcelona and in a tearful press conference on sunday he said he was convinced he would stay
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in the city he called home. translation: this is really difficult for me | after so many years. but the club, due to la liga salary cap rules, could no longer afford to keep him, and so after 21 years, his association with barcelona is over and now a new story will begin. katie gornall, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... top grades as a—level results are published for england, wales and northern ireland. it�*s another record year — with 45% of students achieving an a—star or a grade. the pass rate for scottish school qualifications fell slightly this year — but a record number of a grades were awarded. a lawsuit is filed against prince andrew by a us woman who alleges she was �*trafficked to him�* by the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, and then �*sexually abused�*.
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david cameron made about £7 million from greensill capital before the controversial finance company collapsed earlier this year — that�*s according to documents obtained by bbc panorama. the former prime minister had lobbied the government on behalf of the company — which made its money by lending to businesses — and has repeatedly refused to tell mps what he was paid by greensill. a spokesman for mr cameron said his remuneration was a private matter. panorama has also discovered that the former pm personally promoted greensill capital to investors, before the controversial company collapsed. earlier, we heard from our economics correspondent, andy verity who gave us the latest details on the relationship between former prime minister, david cameron and greensill capital.
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we have some further information which has never been reported before, about how david cameron personally promoted investment schemes run by lex greensill and marketed by the investment bank credit suisse, to investors who now face big losses. so this is a meeting injune 2019, david cameron appeared at an event, with his friend and boss, lex greensill, the event was called, the future of supply chain finance. short—term loans to businesses, backed up by invoices. panorama has discovered how at the time of mr cameron�*s appearance, greensill was also using credit suisse�*s money to make longer term, high risk loans.
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these were not actually backed up by invoices at all and the investors had no idea about this. this was an eventjust over two years ago, do we know what david cameron actually said at that event? we don�*t know his exact words but it�*s his personal appearance that would have lent credibility to greensill capital and its investment. 0ver several years credit suisse investors put more than $10 billion into greensill investments and they are now expecting to lose about $2.5 billion of that. david cameron�*s spokesperson said he was not a director of the company and not involved in any lending decisions and he said it is preposterous to suggest that david cameron would work for any company if he was aware that it was behaving improperly and was in any way seeking to mislead investors. we have comments from mr greensill who has denied misleading investors and he said his company made the appropriate disclosures to credit suisse and the swiss bank was solely responsible for making any disclosures to their investors. and from credit suisse, they say their focus
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is on returning cash to investors and that 59% of their cash has been returned so far. andy verity, there. you can see that bbc panorama programme. you can find it on the iplayer. british firefighters are among more than 1,000 from across europe helping to battle wildfires on greece�*s second largest island, evia. thousands of people have been evacuated since the blaze started a week ago. meanwhile, in california, rescue workers are preparing for even higher temperatures, as they tackle the second—largest fire in the state�*s history. lebo diseko reports. the apocalyptic scenes of what the greek prime minister has called a nightmarish summer. nearly 600 fires have broken out across the country since latejuly, fuelled by strong winds
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and the worst heatwave in decades. i haven't seen fires like this before in the uk, it's something that's completely new to me. i've seen grass fires and open area fires, but this is just something on another scale. they are helping with manual tools, trying to put in fire breaks and stopping the fire from spreading. there has been public anger at the government response, something the greek prime minister has apologised for. but he says climate change is causing fires that last for weeks, speaking just hours after the un warned that human activity is making extreme weather events more common. something locals say they are experiencing first hand. we didn�*t see any rain to stop this fire. i used to run in this forest, i used to cycle, we used to go and collect fruit. now everything�*s gone.
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0n the other side of the world, in the us, california, too, is battling catastrophic blazes. the dixie fire started almost a month ago and is now the second largest wildfire in state history, with claims so ferocious they destroyed nearly all of the historic town of greenville. several times in the last week, i wished i could just go home and then i remember, i can't go home, there is nothing to go back to. then, if, even if the house survived, like, pretty much the rest of the town is gone. surveying the damage, the state governor said the cause was clear. the extreme weather conditions, extreme droughts, leading to extreme conditions and wildfire challenges the likes of which we�*ve never seen in our history and, as a consequence, we need to acknowledge, just straight up, these are climate induced wildfires. with more high temperatures expected in the coming days, the fear is that even more towns could be at risk. lebo diseko, bbc news.
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the group campaigning for princess latifa — the daughter of the ruler of dubai — has disbanded, after her cousin met her in iceland and said she appeared happy and focused on her plans. a photo of the princess with her cousin marcus essabri — a member of the freelatifa campaign — has been posted on instagram. the campaign was set up after princess latifa was forcibly returned to dubai after making a bid for escape in 2018. scientists have begun trials of an artificial intelligence system that may be able to diagnose dementia in a day. researchers at the alan turing institute have told bbc news that their system could help spot the onset of dementia much earlier, which could improve outcomes for patients. 0ur science correspondent, pallab ghosh, has this exclusive report.
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penelope clark noticed that her husband denis began to forget things last year. they are concerned he is developing some form of dementia. the couple are taking part in trials of a new system, where they will be able to tell them not only if denis has any form of dementia but how quickly it is likely to develop. if you had a diagnosis that gave you some indication of the progression, would it be of help? then we could plan financially, as a couple, to be able to perhaps have a few holidays before things got so bad that i couldn�*t take denis on holiday. it makes me more comfortable because if you get a diagnosis, you're not waiting months and months for someone to come back and say, "we know what it is now." denis�* brain scan will be analysed by an artificial intelligence computer programme.
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it compares his scan to those of thousands of dementia patients. in preclinical tests, it has been able to diagnose dementia years before symptoms develop. to have a diagnosis of dementia, it�*s a big thing to take on board so when i�*m delivering this diagnosis, anything which i can do to be more confident about that, to give people more information, to help them plan their lives, it�*s a great thing to be able to do. and the new technique can give results much faster... currently, it can take several scans and many other tests to find out whether someone has dementia. the new artificial intelligence system can potentially pick it up with just one scan and it can pick it up much earlier in the progression of the disease. the researcher who led the development of the system believes that early and accurate diagnosis of dementia will make treatments much more effective.
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the treatments can find it early and slow down the progression and, at the same time, avoid more damage happening to the brain. it�*s likely that these symptoms might occur much later in life or they may actually never occur. the system is currently being tested to see if it works just as well in a clinical setting as it has in the lab. if so, it will make a big difference to denis and millions like him. pallab ghosh, bbc news. we can speak now to dr tim rittman from cambridge university who is leading the trial. good afternoon. it is early days, i know, i appreciate, good afternoon. it is early days, i know, iappreciate, how long is the trial and how many people might be involved? what happens from here on in? istate involved? what happens from here on in? ~ ., , involved? what happens from here on in? . . , , ., . in? we have run this in research studies and _ in? we have run this in research studies and got _ in? we have run this in research
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studies and got good _ in? we have run this in research studies and got good results - in? we have run this in research studies and got good results so | in? we have run this in research i studies and got good results so we are confident it works but that is very different to the real—world nhs setting. we havejust very different to the real—world nhs setting. we have just started recruiting people in the last few months and we are expecting to recruit about 500 people per year and over the next couple of years we will be able to tell whether the predictions that this algorithm makes is correct and that will give us confidence to take it forward for use in clinics more generally. ii use in clinics more generally. if someone is watching this and thinks they might like to volunteer or a family member, how do you go about choosing people? goad family member, how do you go about choosing people?— choosing people? good question. at the moment — choosing people? good question. at the moment we _ choosing people? good question. at the moment we are _ choosing people? good question. at the moment we are recruiting - choosing people? good question. at| the moment we are recruiting people from memory clinics so if you have been referred to a memory clinic because you or someone you know is concerned about your memory, and you need a scan, we will recruit you to the study at that point but at the moment we are recruiting across cambridgeshire and a couple of clinics in brighton and we are
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increasing the number of clinics across the rest of the country that we will be able to recruit from. you are interested in dementia research there is a great website called, join dementia research, that is a place to volunteer for studies similar to this and unless you are coming to one of our memory clinics you will not be eligible for this study but there are others that you can volunteer for.— can volunteer for. interesting. diseases of — can volunteer for. interesting. diseases of the _ can volunteer for. interesting. diseases of the brain - can volunteer for. interesting. diseases of the brain are - can volunteer for. interesting. diseases of the brain are such | can volunteer for. interesting. i diseases of the brain are such a complex field by definition and i appreciate that you are trying to reach a point where you could get a earlier diagnosis which is so important and could be so helpful as we have seen outlined, and i�*m interested whether this could potentially be used for other similar conditions where there is no cure in diseases like parkinson�*s. great question. in essence, yes, the algorithm, the machine only algorithm, the machine only algorithm does not care what data you give it, it is learning something about the dates, depending on the information you provide, so
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in our case we are providing people with dementia but it could potentially be used for other similar diseases —— is learning something about the data. there are lots of research papers on the use of neuroimaging in al in lots of different conditions but not many have taken this next step and said actually, how does it work in real life in clinical practice? that is what we are trying to achieve to demonstrate you can take things from the lab into the real world. flan demonstrate you can take things from the lab into the real world. can i the lab into the realworld. can i ask ou the lab into the realworld. can i ask you for _ the lab into the realworld. can i ask you for a _ the lab into the realworld. can i ask you for a summary, - the lab into the realworld. can i ask you for a summary, if- the lab into the real world. can i ask you for a summary, if someone is watching this and thinks, why is earlier diagnosis than we currently have such a holy grail, why could this be so beneficial? explain clinically what the benefits could be if we could only pinpoint this condition and others like it much earlier on that than we can at the moment? its, earlier on that than we can at the moment? �* .., , earlier on that than we can at the moment? . .., , ., ., ., earlier on that than we can at the moment? . , ., ., ,
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moment? a couple of good reasons, firstl , the moment? a couple of good reasons, firstly, the process _ moment? a couple of good reasons, firstly, the process of _ moment? a couple of good reasons, firstly, the process of having - moment? a couple of good reasons, firstly, the process of having the - firstly, the process of having the diagnosis can be challenging especially if you have a rare type of dementia or early onset dementia, it can be difficult and it can take some 18 months before we are confident of giving a diagnosis, so if we can use something like this algorithm alongside existing memory clinic services, this gives extra confidence and then we can give someone an answer earlier and they can help plan in terms of finances and care they might need in the future and it also tells us how fast or slow someone is progressing so we can put in extra help and support people need it. a number of clinical trials testing drugs for dementia and one of the criticisms of those trials is that maybe we are treating people too late so by the time you develop symptoms, it may be too late for the drug to be effective so one possibility for our algorithm is we can pick people up before they develop symptoms, we have demonstrated that is possible in the research setting, and so we can
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select people who might get the most benefit from these drugs which have been tried for dementia. hater? benefit from these drugs which have been tried for dementia.— been tried for dementia. very very interesting- _ been tried for dementia. very very interesting- i— been tried for dementia. very very interesting. i hope _ been tried for dementia. very very interesting. i hope we _ been tried for dementia. very very interesting. i hope we can - been tried for dementia. very very interesting. i hope we can speak. interesting. i hope we can speak again as the trial develops. really good to talk to you. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren. most parts of the country are staying dry through the rest of the day and with some sunshine and with some light winds it feels a bit warmer. temperatures up to 23, possibly even 24. a few showers coming in, mainly over more northern parts of england but the bulk of the showers will be in the north—east of scotland and those could be heavy and thundery for a while. those showers will move away overnight tonight. we look to the west and we have cloud coming in from the atlantic and that will thicken up in northern ireland and may be a few spots of rain here before the end of the night.
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temperatures typically 12—13c. it could be a sunny start for many eastern parts of england, perhaps into the midlands, and the cloud will move its way east, and the spell of rain around in the morning in northern ireland, moving quickly into scotland, some rain for wales, north—west england and into cornwall, perhaps. sunshine follows in northern ireland and more cloud towards the south—east and east anglia but this is warmer air so temperatures could reach 24, possibly 25c. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... a record high number of top a—level grades in england, wales and northern ireland. the education secretary says students deserve to be rewarded after more than a year of disruption. this cohort of students have had to deal with a level of disruption that no one had ever seen before, not even during a world war as a result of this pandemic.
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the pass rate for scottish school qualifications fell slightly this year — but a record number of a grades were awarded. three quarters of uk adults have now received both doses of a coronavirus vaccine. boris johnson described the milestone as a "huge national achievement". a lawsuit is filed against prince andrew by a us woman who alleges she was �*trafficked to him�* by the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, and then �*sexually abused�*. lionel messi has arrived in france to agree a two—year deal with paris st—germain, following his shock exit from barcelona. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here�*s austin halewood. hi,jane.
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well, it was something many football fans thought they would never see but lionel messi will be wearing a different shirt this season. he�*s in paris right now, for a medical this afternoon — ahead of signing a two year deal with paris saint germain. messi�*s spent the last 21 years with barcelona — and he admitted he didnt want to leave — but the club�*s finances are in such a bad way that they couldnt afford to keep him. so these are pictures from paris, within the last hour, messi waving to crowds of fans at le bourget airport. hundreds have been there for the last couple of days waiting for this arrival. if the deal goes through as planned, messi could be earning up to 550,000 pounds a week. here�*s french football jouralist sara menai. it�*s a club with big ambitions. psg�*s motto is dream bigger.
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they have an obsession about winning the champions league and in order to do that, they continue to build a very competitive team next season, with a front three of neymar, messi and mbappe. great on paper but it doesn�*t mean much. we will see how the manager copes with those players. maybe they will play as a team but that will be the challenge. one of the biggest challenges of the manager�*s career, fantastic squad at his disposal. the reboot is on the way but we will see how it goes. the league is not the main concern, it is mainly of course the champions league and we will see the season if they can fight against manchester city, riel madrid, —— fight against manchester city, real madrid, we will see in a couple of weeks. elsewhere... moeen ali could be back in test match action on thursday, for the second match of the series against india at lord�*s. the all rounder, who played his last
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test in february during england�*s tour of india, has been added to the squad after his great form as captain of birmingham phoenix in the hundred. some brilliant batting performances have helped them to the top of the table. he�*s joined up with the england squad this afternoon. it was a decision we took yesterday. we had a long chat about it. it gives us another option in terms of balancing the team out so he�*s obviously full of confidence, played some unbelievable cricket in the hundred in the shorter format, and we know how talented he is and what he is capable of in test cricket, so he�*s a serious contender for this game. well, manchester originals are hot on the heels of brimingham phoenix in the hundred. if they beat london spirit tonight at old trafford they will draw level with the phoenix at the top of the table. the women�*s fixture is already
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underway in manchester and they made 127—5 in their first. london spirit havejust they made 127—5 in their first. london spirit have just started their innings and got off to the worst possible start. tammy beaumont out in the second ball of the innings. we can follow it all on the bbc sport website and watch it right now on bbc two. and we�*re still celebrating the achievements of team gb in tokyo — today we�*ve been talking to keely hodgkinson. she broke the british record to win silver in the 800—metres, which she said was a real suprise, but she told us that she�*d been feeling confident in the build—up to the games and that she always believed that she could make the podium, even though it was her first olympics. i think ithinki i think i was definitely one of the underdogs going into that race but i just wanted to put myself in a good position and just put it all out there because i saw that has a big opportunity for me, not many people get that opportunity at 19 so i wanted to take it and perform well. i was the only —— i was not the only
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19—year—olds in the race, there was the american which will be good battles for the next two years but breaking the record was what shocked me, it stood since 1995. you don�*t know how it will go on the day and what races will be like what i was shocked by that, still processing it. and britain�*s harriet dart is through to the second round of the wta event in montreal, after beating a player ranked more than 100 places above her. she�*d come through two gruelling qualifiers before taking on canada�*s leylah fernandez — and she won a close match in straight sets, despite struggling with a calf problem and needing a medical time—out in the second set. 7—5,7—6 she won and she�*ll face bianca andrescu next. johana konta is looking
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to join her in the second round. she�*s on court against shuai zhang right now. and cameron norris is also in action right now in toronto in the canadian 0pen. he�*s taking on the world number 28 karen khachanov. it�*s 4—1 to the russian in the first set in that one. that�*s all the sport for now. let�*s return to our top story now — and the proportion of a—level entries awarded one of the top two grades has risen to an all—time high in england, wales and northern ireland, after exams were cancelled for the second year in a row because of covid—19. there was also a record proportion of a—grades in scotland. south of the border, nearly 45% of a—level students received as and a*s. that�*s up from 38.5%, last year — an increase 6.3%.
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last summer, after a u—turn over a—level results, record numbers of top grades were awarded — with 38.6% of entrants achieving an a* or a grade. this year�*s grades — at 44.8% — are even higher — and represent a 75% increase over the last 2 yea rs. with official exams scrapped this year, marks have been awarded based mainly on teacher assessment. the education secretary for england, gavin williamson, has urged against "talking down" their achievements. �*scottish national 5s�* passes are down to 86% — that�*s a 3% drop on last year. but there are a record number — at 47% — of a grades this year. �*scottish highers�* pass rates are at 87% — a 2% drop. there was also a 2% drop to 91% in �*advanced highers�*. vocational �*btec�* results are also out today. students will also find
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the results for apprenticeships and degree apprenticeships. young people are being urged to "explore all the options open to them" when they receive their results. 0ur correspondent nina warhurst has been speaking to some students who received the results of their btec qualification in bolton. dou btless doubtless will hear more from her a little bit later, in the evening. let�*s hear from our correspondents across the uk — our scotland correspndent alexandra mackenzie, chris page in northern ireland, and first our wales correspondent hwyel griffith. yes, the students coming here today were seeing their results not for the first time. as they opened the envelopes, it was confirmation of the results they got injune and were allowed to appeal if they weren�*t happy back then. in terms of what those results show, well, a record number of a stars and as. in wales, the proportion this year, 48% of entries at a star or a. that is 6% up from last year,
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the class of 2020, which clearly also had difficulties during the pandemic. a whopping 20% up on the last set of students to sit a—level exams in 2019. that debate about grade inflation is live and active here. the welsh government say they are certain these teacher assessed grades are valid and that they will stand the test of time. and asking everyone to remember what this cohort of students have been through. speaking to the students, it�*s a point they make. they say the majority of their learning of the past two years was done online. they didn�*t have the advantage of face—to—face teaching for much of it. they hope the class of 2021 will be remembered for their great achievement in a very tough time. more than half of a—level results have received top grades. more than 50%, 51% in fact, receiving a stars and or a5, 74% receiving a grades or b grades. students in this part of the uk have been picking up the results here.
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a number of them here in lurgan, one of northern ireland's biggest schools. pupils have been coming and going all morning. a real sense of nervousness, yes, but also excitement and joy whenever those envelopes have been opened. many students also picking up their btec results, those vocational qualifications have become a very common pathway to university. the education minister in the devolved government, michele mcilveen of the democratic unionist party, has praised the resilience of pupils in these exceptional times, and she says the high grades awarded have reflected their hard work over these last two difficult years. pupils already had theirl results here in scotland. today, it was the - formal announcement. there were no exams. it was all down to assessment, graded by teachers. _ what they were getting results for were the national 55, - which you take when you are around 15, 16. _ then the higher5, which you take after that. - then the advanced higher5. this year saw the highest number
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of higher pa55e5 5ince1999.- and the highest number— of advanced higher pa55e5 since that qualification began 20 years ago. the scottish qualifications authority 5aid pa55 rates, | they are higher than 2019, so pre—pandemic level. i but they are slightly lower than they were last year. i national 55 are down from an 89% pass rate toju5t under 86%. - higher5 are down from just over 89% to just over 87%. _ now in scotland there is a record number of a grade pa55e5 - this year for higher5. this was 40% last year- and up to 47.6% this year. scotland's education secretary, shirley—anne somerville, - 5aid pupils had delivered a very strong set of results. _
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that was the picture across scotland, northern ireland and wales. as we�*ve been hearing, thousands of students have received their a—level results today, and more than 435,000 people have been accepted on university courses. earlier i spoke to catherine sezen from the association of colleges and joanne elliott from the national careers service, who answered all of your results—related questions.
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lots of people getting in touch with questions about the future. with me to answer your questions is catherine sezen, senior policy manager of the association of colleges and i�*m alsojoined byjoanne elliott, careers advisor at the national careers service, which runs the exam results helpline. as we�*ve been hearing, thousands of students have received their a—level results today, and more than 435,000 people have been accepted on university courses. earlier i spoke to catherine sezen from the association of colleges and joanne elliott from the national careers service, who answered all of your results—related questions. a warm welcome to both of you. thank you very much.
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i am going to turn to first of all if i may becausejosh from surrey has our first question. will our employers view results differently of grade inflation are so high this year? i don�*t believe so because employers don�*tjust look at what rates you got. they will look at your work experience and what you call soft or transferable skills things like effective communication, being planned and organised, working as part of a team, time management, it�*s good for you to have a mixture of both your qualifications as well as work experience but i don�*t think they will be any different. let�*s hope that is of some comfort. thank you very much. cathy in 0xfordshire asks, what about people who have dropped out because of nonattendance of online lessons? my friend�*s son was classified as dropped out injanuary and therefore his school didn�*t enter him for a levels. he said his mental health has improved and you want to take the exams in october but has been told he cannot because he was not enrolled the first time round, what should that family do? so, yeah, that is the case. if the student wasn�*t enrolled for the exam in the summer, then they cannot be automatically enrolled for the autumn series. the most important thing here is that your friend�*s son
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is feeling so much better and wants to get engaged back with education so that the most important thing i suggest is seeking some careers advice and you can do that if you go to your local college for example, they would be able to help you or you would be able to talk to someone on the national careers service asjoanne has been talking about, lots of opportunities to help and support and what i would suggest is you�*ve made that first step, you want to get back into education, so go and find out what the options are. 0k. joanne, you were nodding through a lot of that so i want to know what your thought is on that as well. ye5, absolutely, there will be other options available to this young gentleman so what i would recommend is, that is right, is to get in contact with the national career service on 0800100 900, and we have a lot of resources available at www dot
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national careers service dot gov uk, but certainly speaking to an individual like myself could bring up all of the options available to you because a—levels are not the only option, a—levels are not the only option, there is btecs and nvqs, hnc, hnd. so definitely reach out for help. i will stay with you, question about being a mature student, someone who has been working professionally for 40 years, wants to go back to studying because they didn�*t complete their degree, most good universities have an entry criteria forgood grades so i�*m thinking about improving my existing a—level grades but how can someone like me sit a—levels without having to go to college again? what would be the procedure? there is an option specifically for mature students. bbut what is that? it is someone who has access to higher education and this is specific designed for mature students who want to go into higher education
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but might not want to do the full two years of an a—level or the three a—levels that you need to go on to university, or a level three extended btec. you can do it one year, and that will allow you to progress onto a degree. you will have to go into a college environment. there is the access courses as well, so you could do that online. thank you, let�*s take a moment to think about the next set of students coming up because i think that is a really interesting question, let me put this to you, i�*m doing my exams next year, i am worried. i will be competing for university places against inflated grades. will universities make an allowance for the fact that my year
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will not get the same sort of levels if we have to sit real exams? we don�*t fully know what will happen next year but as a principal with the question, it�*s an interesting one, in that? it is a really good question and these rest assured, that is the most important thing, universities are very well aware, just in the same way employers are very well aware of the circumstances that have happened this year and the students that receive those grades today, there are valid for individual students and your grades will be valid for next year as well and hope they will be getting you to the destination you want to go to, you�*re quite right, there is a consultation closed
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