Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 10, 2021 9:00pm-10:00pm BST

9:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. our top stories: the governor of new york, andrew cuomo, has resigned. there were growing cells for him to step down after an inquiry found he sexually harassed multiple women. mr cuomo said he would leave his post for the greater good. i work for you, and doing the right thing is doing the right thing for you. the us senate passes a $1 trillion infrastructure bill, with 19 republicans voting for the package. it's a major win for president biden�*s agenda. prince andrew declines to comment after an american woman files a civil case in new york claiming he sexually assaulted her when she was 17. and she's the icon with the iconic voice.
9:01 pm
superstar lulu joins us to talk about returning to the stage. hello and welcome. for years, andrew cuomo successfully navigated the murky waters of new york politics — amassing power with precision, leaving his opponents trailing in his wake. but it took just a week for the governor to find himself out of moves following the publication of a report by the new york attorney general�*s office which claimed that mr cuomo had sexually harassed 11 women. he denied the accusations, but that wasn't enough to save him. the democrat faced a growing cacophony of voices from within his own party to resign since then — and today, he succumbed to those calls.
9:02 pm
i take full responsibility for my actions. given the circumstances, the best way i can... let government get back to government. that's what i'll do because i work for you. and doing the right thing is doing the right thing for you. as we say, it's not about me, it's about we. my lieutenant governor is smart and competent. this transition must be seamless. we have a lot going on. i'm very worried about the delta variant, and so should you be. but she can come up to speed quickly, and my resignation will be effective in 14 days. let's bring in anna gronewold from politico. how inevitable was this in the end?
9:03 pm
we had been waiting on this announcement for several months now after top democrats have called for his resignation when these allegations came out. but the governor said he is not going to resign and continued that, up until a few days ago. yesterday, the state legislator instead decided that they would move forward with an effort to impeach him, and i think by that point, when it looked like there was no other option, he came forward with the statement today. find no other option, he came forward with the statement today. and some ofthe with the statement today. and some of the address, _ with the statement today. and some of the address, he _ with the statement today. and some of the address, he talked _ with the statement today. and some of the address, he talked about - with the statement today. and some of the address, he talked about how| of the address, he talked about how he didn't think he crossed a line, but the line had moved in what was acceptable behaviour. even that to some people, will sound defensive. it was a very interesting argument and it was additionally companions by a long addressed by his personal
quote
9:04 pm
lawyer, and which she said that his account and his intentions had been mischaracterized and that he had been treated unfairly. those two things made a number of his critics argue that this wasn't a true apology and he was still trying to prove his good intentions and behaviour even on the way out. where does this leave — behaviour even on the way out. where does this leave him _ behaviour even on the way out. where does this leave him politically? - behaviour even on the way out. where does this leave him politically? he - does this leave him politically? he says that these claims, this report has been politically motivated. well, we don't really know where he will go next. he has 14 days until the lieutenant governor takes over. no one has a good idea of where andrew cuomo might go next and the political world or if there's even a spot for him there, but it's pretty clear that it's not going to be in the governor's office.— the governor's office. anna, we appreciate _ the governor's office. anna, we appreciate you _ the governor's office. anna, we appreciate you talking - the governor's office. anna, we appreciate you talking to - the governor's office. anna, we appreciate you talking to us. i we're joined now by new york state senator shelley mayer.
9:05 pm
senator, thank you very much for joining us. what is your sense of what he's chosen to do today? andrew cuomo had been fighting to stop this. not so long ago, he was hailed for all the efforts he'd made during the pandemic. it's quite a come—down. i the pandemic. it's quite a come-down.— the pandemic. it's quite a come-down. ~ come-down. i think he did the right thing today- — come-down. i think he did the right thing today- the — come-down. i think he did the right thing today. the people _ come-down. i think he did the right thing today. the people i— come-down. i think he did the right| thing today. the people i represent, many of us called for him to resign in march, when the allegations became too numerous to continue to coexist to work together on behalf of new yorkers facing covid, economic challenges in the recovery. i thought he did the right thing today to step down, otherwise impeachment was going to proceed, and the senate was ultimately going to try him. i think the outcome was rather predictable — that he would be impeached. my focus is on the people that we represent. we have
9:06 pm
real important work to do. by him stepping aside, we can move forward. he talked about how sexism is involved. he talked about how he wanted his daughters to have the opportunities their talents deserved. how hollow does all of that sound when you think about the report that's found him guilty of harassment? i report that's found him guilty of harassment?— harassment? i think first of all, credit goes _ harassment? i think first of all, credit goes to _ harassment? i think first of all, credit goes to these _ harassment? i think first of all, credit goes to these 11 - harassment? i think first of all, credit goes to these 11 women i harassment? i think first of all, i credit goes to these 11 women who exhibited enormous courage. i've known governor cuomo for almost a0 years. he is a tough guy to take on, and these women did. and they ultimately deserve the credit to telling their story and having their stories validated by the report. so, he can spin it as he chose to do today, but i think for most of us, we believe these women. their stories were validated after an extensive inquiry and investigation
9:07 pm
that he originally supported, and they speak for themselves. frankly, they speak for themselves. frankly, they speak for lots of working women throughout the world and the challenges they face. i give them enormous credit for having changed you and your —— new york politics. it's often that the women who get overlooked. when a big political scout like this falls, what are the ramifications for other women coming forward, for politics to change? the first thing is — forward, for politics to change? tie: first thing is we're going to have forward, for politics to change? tia: first thing is we're going to have a woman governor who is a tremendous source of integrity and courage herself. she will be a terrific governor and will lead us without this stain that was hanging over our head. frankly, impeding the state to do its work. secondly, i think of women, particularly young working
9:08 pm
women, particularly young working women, will feel empowered to speak up women, will feel empowered to speak up and tell their stories and to challenge men in power when they engage in ways that are threatening, retaliatory, like this case, or abuse the trust that people have in their employer and particularly when they choose to go into public service. women should feel safe everywhere, but this was particularly in fresno because these women wanted to do the best for their community —— particularly offensive. i hope they feel vindicated and i hope other women feel empowered to continue to raise their voices. feel empowered to continue to raise theirvoices. i’m feel empowered to continue to raise their voices-— their voices. i'm sure many will. shelley mayer. _ their voices. i'm sure many will. shelley mayer, thank _ their voices. i'm sure many will. shelley mayer, thank you - their voices. i'm sure many will. shelley mayer, thank you very l their voices. i'm sure many will. - shelley mayer, thank you very much for your time. shelley mayer, thank you very much for your time-— an american woman has filed a civil lawsuit in new york, accusing prince andrew of sexual abuse. in a statement, virginia giuffre claims she was trafficked to the prince by the convicted paedophile jeffrey epstein when she was 17. the duke of york has consistently denied the allegations. 0ur royal correspondent,
9:09 pm
nicholas witchell, reports. which of the people in this photograph is telling the truth? the man, prince andrew, who categorically denies any impropriety? or the woman, virginia giuffre, who alleges she was sexually assaulted by him on three occasions? ms giuffre has made these allegations before. she's now followed up with a civil claim filed at a district court in new york. the claim states that when she was 17, she was the victim of sex trafficking. the document states... 20 years ago, prince andrew's wealth, power, position
9:10 pm
prince andrew has offered no reaction to the filing of the court claim. his position remains as it was in his interview with newsnight�*s emily maitlis in november 2019, when he denied any improper behaviour with ms giuffre — or virginia roberts, as she was then. you can say categorically that you don't recall meeting virginia roberts, dining with her, dancing with her at tramp, or going on to have sex with her in a bedroom in a house in belgravia? i can absolutely, categorically tell you it never happened. do you recall any kind of sexual contact with virginia roberts, then or at any other time? none whatsoever. so, what are the chances that this civil claim will lead to a trial? it is by no means certain. there's a lot of steps from filing i a lawsuit until you get to trial. i the first and major hurdle .
9:11 pm
is that they are going to have to serve prince andrew with process. in the united states and new york, i you have to personally serve someone with the lawsuit for it to get going - that's going to be difficult considering that he's - in the united kingdom. buckingham palace is doing its best to keep everything to do with prince andrew at arms length. but whatever the truth of these claims, the very fact that a member of the royal family finds himself facing them is clearly damaging. prince andrew has withdrawn from public life with the royal family. for all his denials, these latest developments suggest there can be little immediate prospect of him restoring his public reputation. nicholas witchell, bbc news. 50 hours of congressional debate. 2,700 pages to look over. after months of wrangling, the us senate passed a historic infrastructure bill 69—30 on tuesday, but its future still hangs in the balance. it's now on its way to the house of representatives.
9:12 pm
if it passes there, it will end up on president biden's desk for a final signature. as the once—in—a—generation piece of legislation continues its trudge through the halls of capitol hill, let's look at the most interesting numbers to come out of it. there's a proposed $550 billion in new federal spending over five years. it invests $110 billion in roads, bridges and major projects, $66 billion in passenger and freight rail and $65 billion to expand broadband internet access. the bill serves as a win for both republicans and democrats, and president biden commended the senate for working together. i know compromise is hard for both sides. but it's important, it's necessary, for democracy to be able to function. so, i want to thank everyone on both sides of the aisle for supporting this bill. today, we proved that
9:13 pm
democracy can still work. let's bring in bbc political analyst and former advisor to president george w bush, ron christie. ron, it's good to have you with us. thank you very much forjoining us. a huge amount of money, the senate working sufficiently together, but why might it not be plain sailing? good evening. the real difficulty moving forward is that many democrats in the house and senate have said they are not going to move forward in the house until both the house and the senate approved a $3.5 trillion human infrastructure bill, looking at childcare and many different programmes. while it did pass the senate today, many house democrats are saying they're going to combine the infrastructure package with the infrastructural package with the infrastructural package on a human level as well.
9:14 pm
that's going to be a bumpy road. that's going to be a bumpy road. that sounds like it's very time—consuming. they want to go on holiday? time-consuming. they want to go on hohda ? , . time-consuming. they want to go on holida ? , ., . ., ,, ., , holiday? they do. what the senate is doinu is holiday? they do. what the senate is doing is vote — holiday? they do. what the senate is doing is vote over _ holiday? they do. what the senate is doing is vote over alma. _ holiday? they do. what the senate is doing is vote over alma. you - holiday? they do. what the senate is doing is vote over alma. you have i doing is vote over alma. you have over 500 amendments to this budget packet that have to be dispensed with, and it's going to take a long time —— vote—o—ramo. they want to go home and they want to find a way to start campaigning ahead of 2022, so the united states and its is going to be in for a while. the real question remains — how long will it take the house of representatives to pass the package passed by the senate? , ., ., ., strip out bits they don't think are important?— strip out bits they don't think are im ortant? , ., ., ., ., important? yes, and what we have to understand here _ important? yes, and what we have to understand here is _ important? yes, and what we have to understand here is that _ important? yes, and what we have to understand here is that in _ important? yes, and what we have to understand here is that in order i understand here is that in order understand here is that in order under this budget bill, you can only have three things that are attached to the bill. you can raise revenue, you can roll revenue, or you can use
9:15 pm
addressed the us federal debt. internet access for folks, making sure not to have critical race theory. i think a lot of these amendments will be stripped out of the 500 presented, and they will find a way to get down to business so they can get out of dodge and go home. �* , . ~ so they can get out of dodge and go home. �*, ., ,, ., i. ., so they can get out of dodge and go home. �*, ., ,, ., ., �* home. let's talk to you all we've not ou home. let's talk to you all we've got you here _ home. let's talk to you all we've got you here about _ home. let's talk to you all we've got you here about the - home. let's talk to you all we've l got you here about the resignation of andrew cuomo as the new york state governor. how much of his decision was down to political expediency? he was facing impeachment from his own party. �*igg�*zse impeachment from his own party. 10096 olitical impeachment from his own party. 10096 political expediency. _ impeachment from his own party. 12:% political expediency. he impeachment from his own party. 122% political expediency. he did not want to go down the same path richard nixon ultimately decided. you don't want to get impeached and you don't want that to be her legacy. new york state, once you get impeached by the house, you are stripped of your office immediately and removed from the governor's mansion. he recognised the votes just weren't there to save him. he
9:16 pm
took the easiest path out to save his legacy. took the easiest path out to save his lea . ., took the easiest path out to save his legacy-— took the easiest path out to save his lea . ., ., i. his legacy. good to have you with us. thank his legacy. good to have you with us- thank you — his legacy. good to have you with us. thank you very _ his legacy. good to have you with us. thank you very much. - his legacy. good to have you with us. thank you very much. always j his legacy. good to have you with i us. thank you very much. always good to see you- — here in the uk, the number of a—level students receiving an a or a star has risen to a record high after exams were cancelled for the second year in a row due to the pandemic. students were assessed by teachers in england, wales and northern ireland. a5% were awarded top grades, compared to 25% in 2019 before the pandemic. the gap between private and state school students achieving top grades has also widened. 0ur education editor branwen jeffreys reports from the north east of england, where the number students achieving top grades has risen, but not as much as everywhere else. after a tough year for students, the moment of truth. fewer surprises in this year's envelope — they know what work and tests teachers have used. fewertears, too, in a bumper yearfor top grades. and, afterall, proud of what they've achieved
9:17 pm
despite the disruption. that's kind of the priority for us, is just to keep going and try and get into the uni and try and get to where you want to go, because if you can work through the pandemic and do all your online learning and get your a—levels like you wanted, what's stopping you going off to uni and doing what you need to do? i think the standard has still definitely been there. it's definitely not we've just walked in and they've handed us the grades. we've worked for these grades. regardless of what you've got, i you should still be incredibly proud of what you've done. i know my family are going to be l incredibly proud of what i've done and all the work that i've put in. here, a—star grades were slightly down. the principal says they marked students over several months. they've had to learn from home, and learning behind a screen is vastly different to being in a college environment. i think the rigour of those grades has been extremely high, in terms of the amount of work that the students have had to produce. dylan got a distinction merit in his btec despite cancer treatment.
9:18 pm
sorry! yeah, just everything that he's gone through over the past four years with his leukaemia, he deserves it. really happy that i'm getting to go to scarborough. - to go to scarborough, cos it's the one that i've been focused on getting to. - while top grades in some vocational qualifications are slightly up, the big leap has been in a—levels. what matters to students getting results today is what they do next in life — going into work, an apprenticeship or getting a place at university. the system this year has been designed to give them grades that will make sure they can go on to those next steps, but the price of that, it seems, is a boom in top grades. a—level grades this year across the uk are based on teacher assessments, from lurgan in northern ireland to wales, where students got
9:19 pm
provisional grades injune. but there was no attempt to hold back rising grades with an algorithm. there were some courses in clearing at newcastle today, but universities are having to choose carefully between top grade students. a—level grades are not the only thing that determines this. in their personal statement, and in some programmes, how they come across at interview and what is our assessment of why they're interested in a programme. their place at newcastle confirmed, these friends will be celebrating, while others rethink their plans in clearing. branwen jeffreys, bbc news, newcastle. stay with us on bbc news. still to come:
9:20 pm
singing sensation lulu on returning to the stage for the first time since the pandemic began. the inquest into the death of a man who attacked two people with a knife in south london in february last year has been shown footage of his fatal confrontation with undercover police officers. sudesh amman was shot dead after stealing a knife and wounding two bystanders in streatham high road. james reynolds reports. he was pursued by two of those same officers who'd been undercover officers as part of the team which were monitoring him. they raced down the street after him. footage was then shown from the shop boots, which showed sudesh amman stopping during this chase and turning around to face those two officers, who were about 8—10 feet away from him at the time. and then, he held his knife in his right hand, made a motion towards them, and they, the footage shows, shot him.
9:21 pm
he fell to the ground. other officers part of that undercover team arrived quickly by car, by motorbike. they sealed off the area, worried that he was wearing a real suicide vest. explosive officers then went in to check and found that that vest was a fake vest. for over 60 years, singing sensation lulu has been wowing audiences with her powerhouse vocals, and her whip smart wit, and she's back with a new tour, a series of intimate gigs which comes to london's powerhaus in camden tomorrow night. a little earlier, we checked in with lulu to talk returning to the stage. imean, it's... this is like my life's blood, you know? ever since i was 15, of course, i have worked. i'm a bit of a workhorse, bit of a workaholic, you might say, and i love myjob.
9:22 pm
but i cannot do myjob without an audience, you know? i mean, you can record, you can write stuff — which i do — but the live thing is how i started when i was just a teenager. so, it was fabulous, and you know i was loving it, the band were loving it. we were all dying, we've been all moaning over the past year. but when we got the audience, the punters, the people — you need the audience because it doesn't work without — they were just as hungry as we were. so, it was like... it was a lovefest, it was fabulous. you're performing at the powerhaus, which the powerhaus, which is where you are at the moment, in london. scottish audiences and london audiences, rightly or wrongly, have a bit of a reputation of being quite tough to please. but i'm guessing, like you said, they were also glad to be out again, listening to live music.
9:23 pm
they were all in the mood for a party. i think that, right now, that's the key. london audiences are tough. i mean, glasgow audiences are famously tough, but i think what you just said is the key to the door — is everybody is hungry to try to get back to some normality. live music is exciting, and i am just rocking! i am so enthusiastic. but if my enthusiasm doesn't transfer, it isn'tjust about me. everybody is feeling exactly the same way. i'm doing the powerhaus �*s tomorrow, which is a small intimate gig- tomorrow, which is a small intimate gig. i'm going on toward with boy george —— on tour with boy george. i got some more with george and i'm also doing chris evans. i'm going
9:24 pm
on... what's the name? imagine cruising. 0ctober, on... what's the name? imagine cruising. october, november, december, i'm going on tour. i am just rocking out! i think everybody wants... . ~ just rocking out! i think everybody wants... ., ~ ., , just rocking out! i think everybody wants... ., ~ ., ., , , , wants... that kind of answers my question. — wants... that kind of answers my question, what _ wants... that kind of answers my question, what have _ wants... that kind of answers my question, what have you - wants... that kind of answers my question, what have you got i question, what have you got planned next? that really tells me! you've done enough of that! anyone who is coming along to the powerhaus, what can they expect? you say you've got some interest... can they expect? you say you've got some interest. . ._ some interest... there will be some videos because _ some interest... there will be some videos because anything _ some interest... there will be some videos because anything that - some interest... there will be some videos because anything that i i some interest... there will be some videos because anything that i do i videos because anything that i do with george, i have videos of me with george, i have videos of me with all the people, with all the stuff i've done, all the legends i've worked with, and i do the songs that i've done with them. it's kind of like a journey. i sort of tell the story in my life —— of my life
9:25 pm
through music. the music kind of does it for me.— does it for me. you talk about all these other— does it for me. you talk about all these other legends. _ does it for me. you talk about all these other legends. you're i does it for me. you talk about all these other legends. you're a i does it for me. you talk about all i these other legends. you're a legend too. people must be clamouring to perform with you. you've enjoyed a really lot of people don't enjoy that. what do you put it down to? can don't enjoy that. what do you put it down to? . ., , down to? i don't know if you can put it down to one _ down to? i don't know if you can put it down to one thing, but _ down to? i don't know if you can put it down to one thing, but obviously, | passionate. i am enthusiastic, i am passionate. it's always been all about the i am enthusiastic, i am passionate. it's alw the jeen all about the i am enthusiastic, i am passionate. it's alw the famous about the i am enthusiastic, i am passionate. it's alw the famous secondary. it's music. the famous secondary. it's not that i wanted to be famous or rich, people say those things and you think, jesus, you don't know what comes with that! i think for me, i love music. # music is my first love and it will be my last! i think that's just the key. be my last! i think that's 'ust the ke . ,, be my last! i think that's 'ust the
9:26 pm
ke _ ,, ., , ., be my last! i think that's 'ust the ke . ,, ., ., key. she was a hoot to interview. lulu, the singing _ key. she was a hoot to interview. lulu, the singing sensation. i key. she was a hoot to interview. lulu, the singing sensation. stay| lulu, the singing sensation. stay with us here on bbc news. much more to come. the weather is looking generally more unsettled as we head for the rest of this week. today, we have some much needed dry weather with some much needed dry weather with some sunshine, making it feel a bit warmer as well. we did have some showers, some of them heavy and thundery across the northeastern parts of the uk. but those are going to fade away for this evening, heading into the north sea. this is where our weather is coming from. this band of cloud coming in from the atlantic, that cloud pushing in from the west. the getting up in northern arlington south western scotland with a little rain here come the end of the night. for many other areas, come the end of the night. for many otherareas, it's come the end of the night. for many
9:27 pm
other areas, it's dry. we'll have some clear spells. temperature is around 11—13 degrees. during wednesday, we start off with brighter weather for eastern areas. it will cloud over. we got rain moving across northern ireland and heading its way steadily eastward to the day. moving in fairly quickly across scotland, so even in the afternoon, we will see rain for easternmost parts. it means western areas could get some sunshine late on in the day. it'll be cooler in scotland. it'll be cooler in northern ireland, but at least we sunshine in the afternoon. heading line in the afternoon. heading its in the afternoon. heading its way he afternoon. heading its way to afternoon. heading its way to the moon. heading its way to the pennines rain heading its way to the pennines in wales, southwest of england, billets or the of england. dry wood sunshine. it could make 25 degrees for the first time this month. the main driver of the weather, the area of low pressure. pushing ahead that weather front, of low pressure. pushing ahead that weatherfront, bringing the rain into england and wales. that largely peters out. there's not much left at all on thursday. some sunshine coming through as well, and we have
9:28 pm
sunshine further north. as a low pressure a lives, we blow brighter weather across northern ireland. in the southeast, where we do get some sunshine coming through, we won't be far off 25 degrees. we end the week with low pressure, still some stronger winds up friday, and we've got bands of showers and a it. mean affecting scotland but we could see showers pushing into england and wales. we got temperatures back down to near normal, 18—22 c.
9:29 pm
9:30 pm
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the governor of new york — andrew cuomo — is resigning after an independent inquiry found he had sexually harassed eleven women. coronavirus cases in the united states continue to surge in places where vaccination rates are low. scientists have begun trials of an artificial intelligence system that may be able to diagnose dementia in a day. and the charity global citizen have announced a line—up of stars for a concert set to urge world leaders to donate 1 billion covid—19 vaccines to those most in need. we'll speak to co—founder hugh evan and will—i—am a little later.
9:31 pm
hello and welcome back to the program. coronavirus cases in the united states are surging in places where vaccination rates are low— take louisiana, florida, and texas for example — where there are over 12,000 of new infections a day. calls for mask and vaccine mandates have gained popularity throughout the us as a number of private businesses and federal entities are requiring their employees to be fully vaccinated. however, severak republican state leaders are implementing rules against mask mandates and vacccines. here's what the governor of texas had to say last week. in texas they will not be any government imposed shutdowns or a mandates. everyone already knows what to do. everyone can voluntarily implement the mandates that are safest for them and their families and their businesses. i'm joined now by dr 0—ace durrani who is an emergency medicine
9:32 pm
physician in houston, texas. we appreciate you talking to us. it's an extremely busy time. paint a picture for us. what is the covid—19 situation like in texas compared with other parts of the pandemic? thank you for having me. i would say there is situation is grim. we have many weeks of increasing cases and hospitalisations and now i a icus are full. this morning i was looking at some of the reports and 53 of our icus are completely full and those in cities like austin and houston are in the single digits when it comes to how much availability we have. when i walk into the emergency department if he like i am transported back to a year ago. we had patiently admitted who are still stuck in the department because their hospitals are cell phone and they don't have room to move them where they can get the appropriate care they need and we have seen
9:33 pm
study after study showing the emergency department has and i worked in critical access hospitals in rural areas where the job is to get patients and then stabilised and then transfer them out and they can't be transferred out because now hospitals have room for those patients to go to and that's going to lead to suboptimal care because those patients cannot see the cardiologists and other specialists that they need to see. this is all while we have less than half of our population in the state of texas vaccinated and we cannot use mask measures because the governor put into order at that time and things are going —— kids are going back to school starting this week and throughout all that so that will lead to better spread of the search and more issues for us. who lead to better spread of the search and more issues for us.— and more issues for us. who is it that ou and more issues for us. who is it that you are _ and more issues for us. who is it that you are seeing _ and more issues for us. who is it that you are seeing admitted i and more issues for us. who is it that you are seeing admitted to l that you are seeing admitted to hospital? tell us the profile of the average patient. i hospital? tell us the profile of the average patient.— average patient. i think back to a ear auo average patient. i think back to a year ago the _ average patient. i think back to a year ago the profile _ average patient. i think back to a year ago the profile was - average patient. i think back to a year ago the profile was the i average patient. i think back to a i year ago the profile was the nursing home patients and 70 plus and that
9:34 pm
was the profile and now i am seeing a bunch of a0 and 50—year—olds who may have none or one medical condition and becoming short of breath and they meet high levels of oxygen and bacon admitted to the hospital. last year we were seeing almost none of those patients being admitted so it's another testament to how more dangerous and more transmissible this virus is and how important the vaccine is to prevent the amount of patients coming into hospitals right now. haifa the amount of patients coming into hospitals right now.— hospitals right now. how many of those patients _ hospitals right now. how many of those patients tend _ hospitals right now. how many of those patients tend to _ hospitals right now. how many of those patients tend to be - those patients tend to be vaccinated?— those patients tend to be vaccinated? ,., ., , ., those patients tend to be vaccinated? ., , ., ., ., vaccinated? personally i had not had a sinale vaccinated? personally i had not had a single patient _ vaccinated? personally i had not had a single patient that _ vaccinated? personally i had not had a single patient that was _ vaccinated? personally i had not had a single patient that was asked i vaccinated? personally i had not had a single patient that was asked to i l a single patient that was asked to i needed to admit to the hospital. i know there are rare cases where they need to be admitted but the ones me and my colleagues arguing with our unvaccinated and it's unfortunate because vaccines are so widely available now and you can get them at every street corner and pharmacy you go to. at every street corner and pharmacy ou no to. ., ., ., at every street corner and pharmacy ou aoto. ., ., ., ., you go to. you mentioned a mask mandates and _ you go to. you mentioned a mask mandates and how— you go to. you mentioned a mask mandates and how some - you go to. you mentioned a mask. mandates and how some allocations
9:35 pm
have banned the requirements they made by government entities and large employers. 0ne made by government entities and large employers. one of the governors in arkansas seems to regret these mask dining mandates. any sign that the governor of texas might yield similarity now? i any sign that the governor of texas might yield similarity now?- might yield similarity now? i hope he comes around _ might yield similarity now? i hope he comes around to _ might yield similarity now? i hope he comes around to that - might yield similarity now? i hope he comes around to that similar i he comes around to that similar sentiment and doesn't allow masks in schools and public places that are crowded. it's the one tool that we have had for the past year and a half that works. it's only second to vaccines at this point and we all know you cannot vaccinate yourself out of surgery and he had seen that in many countries so all while we catch up on the vaccinations we need social distancing and masking to mitigate the spread of the virus even more and save lives. i hope he takes the leap from that governor and he changes his mind on this. thank you very much.
9:36 pm
prince andrew declined to comment on a civil case filed by a woman who claimed she was sexually assaulted by the duke when she was 17. the duke of york has consistently denied the allegations, here to discuss is former chief assistant district attorney in manhattan, karen agnifilo. thank you for being here with us for some legal insight into the case. why has she brought the case now? fin why has she brought the case now? 0“! august 14 which is only a few days august 1a which is only a few days away, that is when her opportunity to bring this case in —— aims. in 2019 ironically this governor andrew cuomo of new york who announced his resignation today signed into law the ability for people to bring charges against sexual abuse as long
9:37 pm
into the future because what has happened in the past is it expired the time limit and this extended that period so that you can bring them now up until this saturday. could she have brought the case in england? could she have brought the case in encland? , ., ., . england? first of all, the conduct she is an agent _ england? first of all, the conduct she is an agent did _ england? first of all, the conduct she is an agent did not _ england? first of all, the conduct she is an agent did not occur i england? first of all, the conduct she is an agent did not occur in l she is an agent did not occur in england so i'm not familiar with english law but in the united states typically you bring the action where the conduct occurred or where somebody resides and she resides in the united states and she's a citizen of the united states and i don't know if there's an equivalent law in england. don't know if there's an equivalent law in england-— law in england. you're a former chief assistant _ law in england. you're a former chief assistant da _ law in england. you're a former chief assistant da in _ law in england. you're a former| chief assistant da in manhattan. law in england. you're a former i chief assistant da in manhattan. you are perfectly placed to tell us what powers does the court have with respect to prince andrew.- powers does the court have with respect to prince andrew. there are two es respect to prince andrew. there are two types of — respect to prince andrew. there are two types of cases- _ respect to prince andrew. there are two types of cases. there _ respect to prince andrew. there are two types of cases. there are i respect to prince andrew. there are two types of cases. there are civil. two types of cases. there are civil cases and criminal cases. this is a
9:38 pm
civil case and the powers are limited. for example in civil cases they are something called expeditions which if this is a felony criminal matter where the punishment was up to a year or over a year you could seek to extradite prince andrew but in this particular instance it's civil so extradition was not applied. however, if he is served property that he can either respond to the action or the court would issue a defaultjudgment against him and then it's just a matter of enforcing the default judgment reach there are agreements between the united states and the uk on how to enforce civiljudgment. said that would then be brought before the court in england and enforce but we are a long way away from that. there's a whole that has to occur. thank you for your time.
9:39 pm
facebook has announced that they're to suspend a network of russian accounts that it has linked to a marketing firm, which aimed to enlist influencers to push anti—vaccine content about the covid—19 jabs. false claims and conspiracy theories about covid—19 and its vaccines have proliferated on social media sites in recent months. major firms like facebook have been criticized by us lawmakers who say the spread of online lies about vaccines is making it harder to fight the pandemic. the move came after a bbc investigation let's talk to one of those behind it, charlie haynes, who is from our disinformation unit. how did this group target social influences?— how did this group target social influences? 1, . ~ ., , ., , influences? back to me, this group not in influences? back to me, this group got in touch — influences? back to me, this group got in touch with _ influences? back to me, this group got in touch with a _ influences? back to me, this group got in touch with a number - influences? back to me, this group got in touch with a number of i got in touch with a number of influences in germany and france and he offered them money to spread false claims about the pfizer vaccine. now, these influences in france and germany decided not to take it up and they blew the whistle
9:40 pm
and this became the basis of our investigation and we looked up her legs behind it and it was a russian company who had me base company to get in touch with people and we found that people had been successful in offering money to people and appearing to offer money for people to push these and in india and we were looking at who is behind it. ~ ., ., , behind it. what links to the company have with the — behind it. what links to the company have with the uk? _ behind it. what links to the company have with the uk? the _ behind it. what links to the company have with the uk? the company i behind it. what links to the company have with the uk? the company was| have with the uk? the company was claimin: to have with the uk? the company was claiming to be _ have with the uk? the company was claiming to be uk _ have with the uk? the company was claiming to be uk based _ have with the uk? the company was claiming to be uk based and - have with the uk? the company was claiming to be uk based and a i have with the uk? the company was claiming to be uk based and a you i have with the uk? the company was claiming to be uk based and a you a | claiming to be uk based and a you a director who told us the company was being shut down but fundamentally it was a russian company and it was moscow—based and it was not a uk company. we visited addresses that with links to it and there was no one there. with links to it and there was no one there-— with links to it and there was no one there. ~ ., ., ,., .., one there. what extent of political ressure one there. what extent of political pressure is — one there. what extent of political pressure is for _ one there. what extent of political pressure is for space _ one there. what extent of political pressure is for space but _ one there. what extent of political pressure is for space but to i one there. what extent of political pressure is for space but to make | pressure is for space but to make this decision?— pressure is for space but to make this decision? facebook is under a hue this decision? facebook is under a huge amount _ this decision? facebook is under a huge amount of— this decision? facebook is under a huge amount of criticism - this decision? facebook is under a huge amount of criticism to i this decision? facebook is under a huge amount of criticism to the i this decision? facebook is under a l huge amount of criticism to the way they approach the rating approach that they can use about a very
9:41 pm
high—profile 2016 election when they were criticised but facebook is now much more trying to take these things on the front foot so they have been investigating this and they called a press conference where my colleague linked in endless to them and they were saying they are building on the reporting that you guys and your generalists are doing and we are investigating this and we want to find out who is behind it and they had suspended more than 300 accounts linked to leaks.— accounts linked to leaks. facebook have referenced _ accounts linked to leaks. facebook have referenced the _ accounts linked to leaks. facebook have referenced the work - accounts linked to leaks. facebook have referenced the work that i accounts linked to leaks. facebook have referenced the work that the | have referenced the work that the bbc has done and referenced it multiple times when he talked about this decision.— this decision. there is actually a whole ecosystem _ this decision. there is actually a whole ecosystem of _ this decision. there is actually a whole ecosystem of generalists| this decision. there is actually a i whole ecosystem of generalists who have been looking at this so we were really lucky to have genetics in russia and germany in the united states who are also looking at this in addition to myself and my colleagues and the disinformation team silly really is a team effort and we were lucky to have our colleagues in russia and brazil and india who were getting in touch with
9:42 pm
people on our behalf as well. thank ou ve people on our behalf as well. thank you very much- _ let's look at some of the day's other news. the boyfriend of a british woman who went missing while hiking in the pyrenees has found her body and belongings. esther dingley, from durham, vanished on a solo trek in november sparking major searches by french and spanish police and her partner daniel colegate. a fragment of bone found injuly was confirmed to be the 37—year—old's. ethiopia's prime minister has called on civilians tojoin the army in its fight against rebels in the tigray region. abiy ahmed asked "all capable ethiopians" to "show their patriotism" byjoining the war, which is raging across the north of the country. fighting has escalated sincejune when the rebels, led by the tigray people's liberation front, recaptured much of tigray in an offensive. in china, coronavirus cases have hit a seven—month high after a cluster at a test site helped drive up numbers. the country has seen rising cases of the highly
9:43 pm
infectious delta variant. state media describes the current outbreak which has sparked local lockdowns, mass testing and travel restrictions as the most severe, since the virus first emerged in the central city of wuhan. amc, the us cinema chain that owns the 0deon in the uk, says it will allow customers in the us to pay for movie tickets and concessions in bitcoin by the end of the year. boss adam aron said it has been exploring the technology for some time. the firm, which is the largest us cinema chain, has not said whether it will apply to its cinemas in europe. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: we'll talk to the black eyed peas will—i—am about a new 2a hour concert set to urge world leaders to donate 1 billion covid—19 vaccines to the world's poorest.
9:44 pm
the health secretary has warned that the impact of the pandemic means that more than 13 million people could be waiting for routine operations and hospital treatment in england within the next couple years. here's our health editor, hugh pym. the two new leaders of the health system in england here at milton keynes university hospital. and the health secretary and the head of nhs england are having to face up to a growing waiting list for nonurgent operations. the patient would know in advance of the surgery... they heard about new initiatives, including robotic surgery, but sajid javid acknowledged the waiting list could more than double. no—one knows what the final number will be. i've said it could go as high as 13 million, but ijust want to do is make sure if it does grow, it grows at the lowest possible rate, that we are seeing as many people as possible as quickly as possible, and that will require notjust new investment but also new ways of doing things. the blue area shows the total number waiting for routine operations in england. from march 2020 — during the pandemic —
9:45 pm
it soared, with 5.3 million now on the list. the orange area shows the number waiting more than 18 weeks, with a sharp increase during the pandemic. labour said a rescue plan was urgently needed. behind every number is a patient�*s story, like hilary's. she's been waiting more than a year and half for hip replacement. 0bviously heavily reliant on painkillers. the pain can be anything from just a constant ache to a stabbing pain. it can disturb my sleep, even with painkillers. my frustration, i think, is over not knowing how much longer i'm going to have to wait. there are many unknowns for the nhs. although covid pressures on hospitals are less than feared at one stage, what might happen in the months ahead and what could happen if there's a severe winter flu season? those challenges will come on top of the drive to reduce the backlog of routine operations. another task for the nhs will be the continued roll—out
9:46 pm
scientists have begun trials of an artificial intelligence system that may be able to diagnose dementia in a day. the researchers say their system could lead to much earlier identification of the onset of dementia. 0ur science correspondent, pallab ghosh, has this exclusive report. careful over here. penelope clark noticed that her husband, dennis, began to forget things last year. they were concerned he was developing some form of dementia. the couple, from hertfordshire, are taking part in trials of a new dementia but how quickly it is likely to develop. have you got any questions about it at all? _ no, i think it's fantastic. if you had a diagnosis that gave you some indication of the progression, would that be of help? well, then we could,
9:47 pm
you know, plan financially as well as, as a couple to be able to perhaps have a few holidays before things got bad that i couldn't take dennis on holiday. it makes me more comfortable because you are not waiting for a diagnosis and you have someone saying they know what it is now. dennis's brain scan will be analysed by an artificial intelligence computer programme. it compares his scan with those of thousands of other dementia patients. in preclinical tests, it's been able to diagnose dementia years before symptoms develop. you have a diagnosis of dementia, and that is a big thing to take on board, so when i'm delivering this diagnosis, anything i can do to be more confident about that and to give people more information and to help them plan their lives is a great thing to be able to do. and the new technique can give results much faster.
9:48 pm
currently it can take several scans and many other tests to find out whether someone has dementia. the new artificial intelligence system can potentially pick it up with just one scan and it can pick it up much earlier in the progression of the disease. the researcher who led the development of the system believes that early and accurate diagnosis of dementia will make treatments much more effective. the treatments can kick in early and slow down the progression, and at the same time avoid happening to the brain. and it's likely that the symptoms might occur later in life or they may actually never occur. the system is currently being tested to see if it works just as well in a clinical setting as it has in the lab. if so, it will make a big difference to dennis and millions like him.
9:49 pm
the charity global citizen have announced a round the world 2a hour concert to be held in late september. the live eight style event has signed on a host of stars including jennifer lopez, ed sheeran, and wil.i.am. the organisers hope that the concert will urge world leaders and corporations to donate one billion covid—19 vaccines to the world's poorest by the end of september. and if we look at the stats we can see why it's so urgently needed, whilst over half of citizens in high income countries have been vaccinated, just over one percent have been in low income countries. it's a shocking statistic, leaving the poorest more vulnerable to surges and new variants. hugh evans, founder of global citizen, and will—i—am joined me earlier to explain how they hoped the concerts, which will be aired across the world, would encourage world leaders to act. i performed the 31st global citizen and then i beat a couple of things, one in dc and then black—eyed peas
9:50 pm
did it virtual one last year so we are big fans of the work that you and global citizen team does to help solve problems in the area of global warming and ending poverty and he's a great manifesting of dreams to help solve problems. i a great manifesting of dreams to help solve problems.— a great manifesting of dreams to help solve problems. i know you have a concert earlier in _ help solve problems. i know you have a concert earlier in the _ help solve problems. i know you have a concert earlier in the year _ help solve problems. i know you have a concert earlier in the year and i help solve problems. i know you have a concert earlier in the year and to i a concert earlier in the year and to try to hold global leaders to account over vaccine inequality. how do you measure the success of that and what difference it makes? earlier this year, global citizen produced _ earlier this year, global citizen produced the concept to reunite the world _ produced the concept to reunite the world and _ produced the concept to reunite the world and jay leno together with artists _ world and jay leno together with artists like selena they artists like selena gomez and they did then _ artists like selena gomez and they did then thatjust in did then that just in sussex and prince — did then that just in sussex and prince harry and megan hosted this get there and we were campaign to get there and we were thrilled _ campaign to get there and we were thrilled that of a 26 were
9:51 pm
campaign to get there and we were thrilled in it of a 26 were campaign to get there and we were thrilled in the a 26 were campaign to get there and we were thrilled in the worlds vere campaign to get there and we were thrilled in the worlds poorest connected in the worlds poorest nations— connected in the worlds poorest nations but we atfif’"’ to get nations but we were also able to get over 302 _ nations but we were also able to get over 302 dollars from over 302 million dollars from private — over 302 million dollars from private sector partners as well as governments towards the campaign to be written _ governments towards the campaign to be written able to measure it for dollars _ be written able to measure it for dollars and doses but we know right now the _ dollars and doses but we know right now the world is not on track to deliver— now the world is not on track to deliver enough vaccines to the poorest— deliver enough vaccines to the poorest nations while the us and europe _ poorest nations while the us and europe and kingdom across the 50% of their population fully vaccinated and only— their population fully vaccinated and only 3% of those across africa received _ and only 3% of those across africa received covid—19 vaccines and self this is— received covid—19 vaccines and self this is one — received covid—19 vaccines and self this is one of our urgent pushes to -et this is one of our urgent pushes to get a _ this is one of our urgent pushes to get a billion— this is one of our urgent pushes to get a billion vaccine doses to the worlds _ get a billion vaccine doses to the worlds poorest nations by the end of september. worlds poorest nations by the end of se tember. ~ , . ., , worlds poorest nations by the end of setember. ~ , . ., , ., worlds poorest nations by the end of setember. ~ , . . , ., ., , , september. musicians and artists have a long _ september. musicians and artists have a long tradition _ september. musicians and artists have a long tradition of— september. musicians and artists have a long tradition of getting i have a long tradition of getting involved in anything like this which are highly political. how do you stop it from sounding preachy? you can aet stop it from sounding preachy? ym. can get caught up in learning about what sounds preachy or not then you have something burning in your heart and mind and your spirit to map out
9:52 pm
and mind and your spirit to map out and solve a problem and that's the wrong thing to worry about when there is real problems to worry about. where is the love where we preachy on that? to write those words and sing that song and people peeling and people dying and children parenting, would you practice what you preach, would you turn the other cheek, is that preachy? it all depends on who is receiving the message and sometimes you have to take them to church. you are certainly — you have to take them to church. you are certainly good at doing that. i know you have got events planned for a new york and paris and legalists, how is it important to have other cities involved to make this a global phenomenon? irate cities involved to make this a global phenomenon? we know this is an absolutely — global phenomenon? we know this is an absolutely urgent _ global phenomenon? we know this is an absolutely urgent issue _ global phenomenon? we know this is an absolutely urgent issue right i global phenomenon? we know this is an absolutely urgent issue right nowl an absolutely urgent issue right now and we did this in time to coincide
9:53 pm
may be you general assembly meeting that he intended that there meeting in glasgow as well as the g20 summit and we are going bigger than ever to reflect the scan and severity of theseissues reflect the scan and severity of these issues that we face when there is climate change, extreme poverty that has now rescinded to covid—19 i the fact that vaccine equity remains an issue. , . ,, , ., an issue. these are issues that affect all corners _ an issue. these are issues that affect all corners of— an issue. these are issues that affect all corners of the - an issue. these are issues that affect all corners of the globe i an issue. these are issues that i affect all corners of the globe and that's— affect all corners of the globe and that's why— affect all corners of the globe and that's why we are taking up to six continents— that's why we are taking up to six continents while we will be in regulus _ continents while we will be in regulus nigeria and paris in front of the _ regulus nigeria and paris in front of the eiffel tower and london overlooking the river thames and saved _ overlooking the river thames and saved me — overlooking the river thames and saved me in front of the opera house and new— saved me in front of the opera house and new york city and rio de janeiro and new york city and rio de janeiro and paris _ and new york city and rio de janeiro and paris we are bringing this all around _ and paris we are bringing this all around the — and paris we are bringing this all around the world because these issues _ around the world because these issues affect all of us and we need a worldwide movement to call on one leaders _ a worldwide movement to call on one leaders and _ a worldwide movement to call on one leaders and caught on to and the private _ leaders and caught on to and the private sector to respond because as secretary _ private sector to respond because as secretary of state john kerry says this could — secretary of state john kerry says this could be our last best hope to
9:54 pm
achieve _ this could be our last best hope to achieve major negotiations on climate — achieve major negotiations on climate change and a night of the un report— climate change and a night of the un report we _ climate change and a night of the un report we know this is an urgent issue _ report we know this is an urgent issue that — report we know this is an urgent issue that needs to be addressed i’ilht issue that needs to be addressed right now— issue that needs to be addressed right now and that's why we are focused — right now and that's why we are focused so _ right now and that's why we are focused so much on taking this to all corners — focused so much on taking this to all corners of the globe. before we go —— we've covered the threat that plastic pollution poses to the world's oceans many times on the bbc. but it seems one species is also having quite the unexpected reaction to the waste. researchers at the university of hull say the plastic is releasing an additive which may be "sexually exciting" hermit crabs. the chemical known as oleamide was found to increase the respiration rate among the hermit crab population in robin hood's bay in north yorkshire an indicator of their sexual excitement. and that's not the only consequence of these plastics oleamide is also being mistaken for food due to its smell encouraging the critters to travel to what they think is a meal only to discover its in fact plastic.
9:55 pm
is the definition of disappointing. you are watching bbc news. next week there will be more summer weather on the way. mind you, tuesday wasn't bad. most of the storm clouds were in the northeast of the uk, moving away, and instead, we're looking out to the atlantic to bring more unsettled weather and over the next couple of days. this band of cloud due to this weather front here, and that will bring rain eastwards to many parts of the country during wednesday. probably a bright enough start for the eastern side of the uk on wednesday. it will cloud over more. rain in the morning for northern ireland, followed by some sunshine in the afternoon. that rain pushes further across scotland and we'll see some rain coming into wales and some western
9:56 pm
parts of england as well. eventually after the rain, some sunshine in western scotland as well. but it's ahead of the rain that we'll see the highest temperatures. could make 25 degrees for the first time this month. that rain moves away from scotland, then we'll see dribs and drabs of rain pushing down towards the midlands, the weather front weakening and the rain tending to peter out on that weather front there, but it's going to stick around in some parts of england during thursday. this is the main driver, though, this deeper area of low pressure, which will bring some wet and windy weather towards the northwest. no pressure will be in charge to end the week. we have still got strong ratings for northern areas as well. they will be showers wrapped around on the main one here bringing light to the antenna northern ireland and
9:57 pm
scotland. we could see another band of showers affecting the meetings towards whales and into northern england as well. temperatures will be back down to normal by friday so around 18 or 22 celsius. into the weekend, we have got no pressure sitting in the north of scotland. it will move away slowly. this feature will move away slowly. this feature will cause if few headaches. not quite sure how the north it will get. most of the cloudiness lead heading to the english channel and to the north we have got sunshine and showers. the bulk of the chalets across the northern half of scotland where there is still a cold breeze blowing as well. temperatures will not change too much on saturday. for the second half of the weekend that might assistant in the south will pull away and the low pressure will move from the north of scotland but we have but a cool northwest wind blowing on sunday and it will bring more cloudiness and showers to the north and half of scotland. it will blow more cloudiness into my southern parts of the uk but there
9:58 pm
should be sunshine around as well and a brighter day fire southern counties of england. it will be cooler at 17 to 21 degrees. next week the promise of something more like summer. we will have a cool northwest wind on monday and we could see showers along with rain and later in the date on the north sea coast. that's the position of the jet stream. it will move to the north of the uk. it means high pressure will start to build up from the atlantic and the southwest. it is not going to be a heat wave next week by any means but we never tap into warm airfrom week by any means but we never tap into warm air from the south. we have but normal temperature is after monday and a lot of dry weather and we should be seeing some spells of sunshine as well.
9:59 pm
10:00 pm
tonight at 10 — a record number of top grades for a level students after exams are cancelled for the second year running. woo! oh, my god! almost a5% of students achieved a or a stars in england, wales and northern ireland — their grades were assessed by teachers not formal exams. i know my family are going to be incredibly proud of what i've done and all the work that i've put in. our results came from tests that were done under exam conditions. itjust wasn't in an exam hall. in scotland, a record number of a grades, too, in highers and advanced highers — though the overall pass rate

85 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on