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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 11, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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the head of the afghan army has been sacked following a rapid offensive by the taliban, who've taken over nine provincial capitals. tens of thousands of civilians have fleed their homes, and hundreds have died in recent weeks. president ashraf ghani has been rallying beleaguered troops in mazar—i—sharif, a crucial northern city under pressure from the offensive. it's long been a bastion of anti—taliban militias. new charges have been filed against the prominent kremlin critic alexei navalny, who is already serving time in prison. the authorities claim his anti—corruption foundation infringes on people's rights. it investigates corruption among the russian elite. italy may have registered the hottest temperature ever recorded in europe. a reading on the island of sicily registered 48.8 celsius.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the conservative commentator tim montgomerie, and sienna rodgers, who is the editor of labourlist. let's ta ke let's take a look at tomorrow's front pages. let's start with the metro — it leads with the title "return to the dark ages", as taliban forces continue to make rapid advances, seizing territories from afghan government forces. on the front page of the mail, the british man working as a security guard at the british embassy in berlin arrested on suspicion of passing classified documents to russia. the telegraph also leads on this story — it says that the arrest has prompted calls for an urgent review of the government's use of private contractors. a guardian investigation into the state of children's
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services during the pandemic shows councils dealing with a sharp rise in social services referals and soaring costs for mental health support. the i says that the government is planning to use air purifiers and ultraviolet light to keep schools safe from covid. 30 primary schools in bradford will take part in the pilot. the times has more on the us lawsuit against prince andrew. the paper says prince charles fears the case could end up lasting at least two years, overshadowing the queen's platinum jubilee, and that he sees no way back to public life for the duke of york. and in the ft, the us government calls on oil cartel, opec, to increase oil production in an effort to curb high petrol prices that officials say "could harm the global recovery". 0k, ok, let's start with that very stark
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headline on the front page of the metro, tim, and we've been talking about the taliban offensive, we've been talking about the politics behind this story — but the metro cosmic story is very much about the human cost, about the civilian fear as the tele— band takes more and more ground. it’s as the tele- band takes more and more ground-— more ground. it's heartbreaking, isn't it, more ground. it's heartbreaking, isn't it. just _ more ground. it's heartbreaking, isn't it, just reading _ more ground. it's heartbreaking, isn't it, just reading these - more ground. it's heartbreaking, | isn't it, just reading these stories isn't it, 'ust reading these stories -- ., ., 4000 isn't it, 'ust reading these stories at 4000 afghans i isn't it, 'ust reading these stories i "h 4000 afghans very -- taliban and. 4000 afghans very badly injured _ -- taliban and. 4000 afghans very badly injured in _ -- taliban and. 4000 afghans very badly injured in the _ -- taliban and. 4000 afghans very badly injured in the last _ -- taliban and. 4000 afghans very badly injured in the last month - badly injured in the last month alone, 1000 afghans killed, nine provincial towns and cities falling to taliban control. but the number on the front page of the metro tomorrow that will haunt me and probably many people who read it is 12 - probably many people who read it is 12 — and that's the age of young
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girls that the taliban are taking prisoners and turning into sex slaves. the age of 12. we said to the afghan people, as britain, america, nato and the western world, that this time would be different, that this time would be different, that we would stand with them to ensure the taliban and never came back. and i'm afraid we've broken that promise, and i think it's a tragedy for the people involved, on an unimaginable scale. but it's also an unimaginable scale. but it's also a treasury for the west — can the west be trusted to stick by our allies and stick with our promises? and i'm beginning to fearfor a lot of people in the world, the answer to that question will be no. chi, to that question will be no. cni, what do you _ to that question will be no. cni, what do you think, _ to that question will be no. cni, what do you think, is this the west effectively abandoning taliban, or a piece of realism that after 20
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years, there has to be a withdrawal? i turned to the view that there had to be _ i turned to the view that there had to be a _ i turned to the view that there had to be a withdrawal, and i can understand whyjoe biden has made this decision, but also as tim has highlighted, i'llalso this decision, but also as tim has highlighted, i'll also draw attention to the fact that the main bit of— attention to the fact that the main bit of the story that is really heartbreaking are these girls being raped, _ heartbreaking are these girls being raped, taken as sex slaves. and it's horrible _ raped, taken as sex slaves. and it's horrible to — raped, taken as sex slaves. and it's horrible to read about, and i think amnesty— horrible to read about, and i think amnesty and other organisations were very critical_ amnesty and other organisations were very critical of the way that victims _ very critical of the way that victims of violence, women, girls weren'i_ victims of violence, women, girls weren't represented in the east talks_ weren't represented in the east talks leading up to this withdrawal, and i talks leading up to this withdrawal, and i think— talks leading up to this withdrawal, and i think that something that neede— and i think that something that needs to — and i think that something that needs to be part of the conversation -- peace— needs to be part of the conversation —— peace talks, just to have some more _ —— peace talks, just to have some more nuance _ —— peace talks, just to have some more nuance in this conversation. i think— more nuance in this conversation. i think a _ more nuance in this conversation. i think a lot — more nuance in this conversation. i think a lot of— more nuance in this conversation. i think a lot of this reflects on just how there — think a lot of this reflects on just how there are lots of questions ahout— how there are lots of questions about what the western forces have actually _ about what the western forces have actually been doing there in these
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past 20 _ actually been doing there in these past 20 years. i was just actually been doing there in these past 20 years. i wasjust reading a bbc report— past 20 years. i wasjust reading a bbc report from a tele— band court session_ bbc report from a tele— band court session that was saying the people there _ session that was saying the people there feared the new punishments that would be imposed by the tallow band, _ that would be imposed by the tallow hand. but _ that would be imposed by the tallow band, but they were saying that at least _ band, but they were saying that at least the _ band, but they were saying that at least the government corruption is on its _ least the government corruption is on its way— least the government corruption is on its way out. there is such a horrific— on its way out. there is such a horrific extent of government corruption that cases would take so long. _ corruption that cases would take so long. and _ corruption that cases would take so long, and then it was all about payoffs. — long, and then it was all about payoffs, basically. the corruption from _ payoffs, basically. the corruption from the — payoffs, basically. the corruption from the afghan government was also on display— from the afghan government was also on display during covid, as well will stop— on display during covid, as well will stop there was completely unequal— will stop there was completely unequal allocation of resources to people _ unequal allocation of resources to people during the pandemic. army generals— people during the pandemic. army generals from the us have said they had no _ generals from the us have said they had no idea — generals from the us have said they had no idea what they were doing over the — had no idea what they were doing over the last 20 years, and bush, ohama. _ over the last 20 years, and bush, obama, trump all failed. so it's completely understandable that joe biden would decide withdrawal. by
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the way— biden would decide withdrawal. by the way this was done, perhaps there's— the way this was done, perhaps there's more discussion to be had about— there's more discussion to be had about that — there's more discussion to be had about that. the there's more discussion to be had about that-— there's more discussion to be had about that. the two of you are not diametrically _ about that. the two of you are not diametrically opposed _ about that. the two of you are not diametrically opposed on - about that. the two of you are not diametrically opposed on this, - about that. the two of you are not| diametrically opposed on this, tim was shaking his head so all allowed him to come back in here. what him to come back in here. what sienna has— him to come back in here. what sienna has said _ him to come back in here. what sienna has said about _ him to come back in here. what sienna has said about the - him to come back in here. twat sienna has said about the corruption of the afghan government is true. this is not the democratic standards we have an western european nations. but over the last 20 years, we haven't turned it into britain's equivalent in the middle east, but girls have been educated in their millions, it's largely a country where people don't have to fear for their basic security compared to the past. it was huge advances compared to what existed before. the median age in afghanistan is only 18—19. these people have never known that, and we are now allowing their
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country to fall under taliban control. i have little patience with people who say we didn't achieve anything while we were there. we achieved an awful loft, we didn't achieved an awful loft, we didn't achieve perfection, but we are now throwing it away. i’ll achieve perfection, but we are now throwing it away.— throwing it away. i'll get sienna to re -l to throwing it away. i'll get sienna to reply to that _ throwing it away. i'll get sienna to reply to that - _ throwing it away. i'll get sienna to reply to that - we _ throwing it away. i'll get sienna to reply to that - we didn't _ throwing it away. i'll get sienna to reply to that - we didn't achieve l reply to that — we didn't achieve anything but maybe we didn't achieve anything but maybe we didn't achieve anything lasting? this anything but maybe we didn't achieve anything lasting?— anything lasting? this is the point, i wouldn't anything lasting? this is the point, i wouldn't say _ anything lasting? this is the point, i wouldn't say we _ anything lasting? this is the point, i wouldn't say we didn't _ anything lasting? this is the point, i wouldn't say we didn't achieve . i wouldn't say we didn't achieve anything. — i wouldn't say we didn't achieve anything, certainly not, i completely recognise that violence against _ completely recognise that violence against women and girls was trying to be _ against women and girls was trying to be addressed, absolutely, and the fact that _ to be addressed, absolutely, and the fact that there is progress made on that is_ fact that there is progress made on that is really encouraging and heartening. but ultimately what's the alternative? we just stay there indefinitely? to me, the common sense _ indefinitely? to me, the common sense approach would say that that's wrong, _ sense approach would say that that's wrong, and _ sense approach would say that that's wrong, and the changes we need to make _ wrong, and the changes we need to make need — wrong, and the changes we need to make need to be long—lasting, as soon _ make need to be long—lasting, as soon as— make need to be long—lasting, as soon as the — make need to be long—lasting, as soon as the withdrawal happens, that's— soon as the withdrawal happens, that's a _ soon as the withdrawal happens, that's a damning indictment. let�*s that's a damning indictment. let's move on, that's a damning indictment. let's move on. m _ that's a damning indictment. let's move on, i'm sure _ that's a damning indictment. let's move on, i'm sure we'll— that's a damning indictment. let's move on, i'm sure we'll be - that's a damning indictment. let�*s move on, i'm sure we'll be talking about that story for many weeks to
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come. let's go to the front page of the mirror, although this story is actually on several front pages, "russian spy sold secrets" — you can see that they are, i also want to take you to the front page of the times which has the same story, which fears that the uk embassy spy sold tear intelligence to russia —— terrace intelligent. i’m sold tear intelligence to russia -- terrace intelligent.— terrace intelligent. i'm of a certain age _ terrace intelligent. i'm of a certain age fortunately - terrace intelligent. i'm of a l certain age fortunately where terrace intelligent. i'm of a i certain age fortunately where i terrace intelligent. i'm of a - certain age fortunately where i was able to go and visit berlin when it was still divided between east and west, and it's always had thatjohn le carre feel to me. we don't know the individual specifics of the story, how much highly sensitive material this david s character might�*ve given away — it seems to be largely about british counterterrorism intelligence. buti think what underlines is how much
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germany is still on the front lines in the battle to contain russia. i'm talking to you tonight from salisbury, a place that was attacked by the nova truck poisoning. russia is always on the offensive —— novichok. we are lucky that we seem to have foiled this latest attempt by russia to spy on us and harm us. sienna, are you intrigued by the story? i sienna, are you intrigued by the sto ? . �* , story? i am, there's some interesting _ story? i am, there's some interesting details - story? i am, there's some interesting details in - story? i am, there's some interesting details in the | story? i am, there's some - interesting details in the times right— interesting details in the times right up. — interesting details in the times right up, it says that sources suggest _ right up, it says that sources suggest his motivation was money rather— suggest his motivation was money rather than ideological links. obviously i think tim was saying we don't _ obviously i think tim was saying we don't quite — obviously i think tim was saying we don't quite know what information he might've _ don't quite know what information he might've been able to pass on, which is certainly _ might've been able to pass on, which is certainly the case. i think the british— is certainly the case. i think the british will— is certainly the case. i think the british will try to play down what he was _ british will try to play down what he was able to pass on if there was anything _ he was able to pass on if there was anything particularly sensitive, i think— anything particularly sensitive, i think there were sensitive
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documents. look, things kind of like security— documents. look, things kind of like security protocols at the embassy are the _ security protocols at the embassy are the things that are very useful, even _ are the things that are very useful, even things— are the things that are very useful, even things like the wi—fi network, you know. — even things like the wi—fi network, you know, what passwords are and what _ you know, what passwords are and what the _ you know, what passwords are and what the timetable of staff are. perhaps — what the timetable of staff are. perhaps even the names of m16 officers — perhaps even the names of m16 officers stationed there in berlin, it would — officers stationed there in berlin, it would be interesting to find out a bit more — it would be interesting to find out a bit more of information he could have _ a bit more of information he could have passed on. idon't know whether he will, _ have passed on. idon't know whether he will, but _ have passed on. idon't know whether he will, but it— have passed on. idon't know whether he will, but it will be interesting -- we _ he will, but it will be interesting -- we will _ he will, but it will be interesting -- we will-— he will, but it will be interesting -- we will. ., ,, y., ., -- we will. tim, can i take you to another story _ -- we will. tim, can i take you to another story on _ -- we will. tim, can i take you to another story on the _ -- we will. tim, can i take you to another story on the front - -- we will. tim, can i take you to another story on the front page i another story on the front page of the times, about costly covid tests for travellers — the time saying the watchdog has failed to act. in what way? watchdog has failed to act. in what wa ? �* . ., ., , ., ., way? i've decided not to try and go abroad this — way? i've decided not to try and go abroad this summer, _ way? i've decided not to try and go abroad this summer, just - way? i've decided not to try and go abroad this summer, just the - abroad this summer, just the prospect of quarantine and rules changes scared me off this year. but another thing that scared me off is these high costs of covid tests.
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there seems to be an estimate that it should only really be costing about £30— 35. but as many travellers will be all too aware, they are charging 3—4 times as much as the justifiable cost for top huge profits are being made, that's bad for travellers who may notjust be going to the beach, but reconnecting with family abroad that they've not seen since the pandemic. but it's also bad for the travel industry, which employs a lot of people in the uk, it's important to a lot of people's livelihoods, and these extra costs being compiled onto these families and that industry if there is a lot ofjobs. so it's a serious issue and authorities are calling to the times that they are not serving us very well and getting those costs under control.— those costs under control. sienna, some interesting _ those costs under control. sienna, some interesting detail _ those costs under control. sienna, some interesting detail in - those costs under control. sienna, some interesting detail in this - some interesting detail in this report, there's been complaints over those refusing to give refunds
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despite failing to deliver results on time. . . , despite failing to deliver results on time. , �*, ., , on time. exactly, there's all these re orts of on time. exactly, there's all these reports of thousands _ on time. exactly, there's all these reports of thousands of _ on time. exactly, there's all these reports of thousands of people - reports of thousands of people failing — reports of thousands of people failing to be properly tested — there — failing to be properly tested — there have been these photos posted online _ there have been these photos posted online of— there have been these photos posted online of boxes, you know, the brand quoted _ online of boxes, you know, the brand quoted in_ online of boxes, you know, the brand quoted in this storyjust overflowing with unprocessed swabs, testing _ overflowing with unprocessed swabs, testing companies clearly not coping with the _ testing companies clearly not coping with the demand. and there has been anger— with the demand. and there has been anger the _ with the demand. and there has been anger the government for basically allowing _ anger the government for basically allowing eight scam to happen, because — allowing eight scam to happen, because you have to get these pcr tests done —— a scam. some of them have been— tests done —— a scam. some of them have been going for even like £500 or more _ have been going for even like £500 or more full topmost of them are not in that— or more full topmost of them are not in that range, but other countries — france, _ in that range, but other countries — france, there's no cost at all for this pcr — france, there's no cost at all for this pcr test when you're doing international travel. italy increase
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have _ international travel. italy increase have capped prices. that's what people — have capped prices. that's what people are expecting from sajid javid, _ people are expecting from sajid javid, some action. it seems as if the competition and markets authority will not look at this until— authority will not look at this until after the summer break. so like tim, — until after the summer break. so like tim, i've given up on the idea of going— like tim, i've given up on the idea of going away this summer, i'll definitely— of going away this summer, i'll definitely be going on a staycation. tim, can _ definitely be going on a staycation. tim, can i — definitely be going on a staycation. tim, can i take you to the front page of the guardian? you are not travelling abroad and i think people might think twice about travelling to italy with the reports of extreme temperatures of a potential record temperatures of a potential record temperature in sicily? i’m temperatures of a potential record temperature in sicily?— temperature in sicily? i'm a really borin: temperature in sicily? i'm a really boring englishman, _ temperature in sicily? i'm a really boring englishman, not _ temperature in sicily? i'm a really boring englishman, not only - temperature in sicily? i'm a really boring englishman, not only am i | temperature in sicily? i'm a really i boring englishman, not only am i not travelling abroad, but if the temperature gets higher than 25 celsius, i start grumbling. i'm always glad when the weather forecast says that hot temperatures are coming to an end. but seriously, this level of temperature, even for
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people who like heat, is unbearable. it's just the latest illustration that something really is happening to our climate. and i'm probably less optimistic than cni about the possibility of western governments and western populations more particularly making the necessary sacrifices to combat climate change will stop but this does seem to be further evidence, if we needed such evidence, that we are living through times where flooding and hot temperatures, and other extreme weather events will dog us for more and more of our lives. civil, weather events will dog us for more and more of our lives.— and more of our lives. cni, give us and more of our lives. cni, give us a more optimistic _ and more of our lives. cni, give us a more optimistic slant _ and more of our lives. cni, give us a more optimistic slant on it. -- i a more optimistic slant on it. -- sienna. a more optimistic slant on it. -- sienna- l — a more optimistic slant on it. -- sienna. ithink— a more optimistic slant on it. —— sienna. i think people are more willing — sienna. i think people are more willing to — sienna. i think people are more willing to make sacrifices, but there — willing to make sacrifices, but there is — willing to make sacrifices, but there is that slogan in the climate
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movement, extension real belly and says tell— movement, extension real belly and says tell the truth, and i don't think— says tell the truth, and i don't think governments are telling the truth _ think governments are telling the truth of— think governments are telling the truth of the moment. —— extinction rebellion — truth of the moment. —— extinction rebellion. there's a lot of setting very ambitious targets and no policy to bring _ very ambitious targets and no policy to bring them up. so we need to see that _ to bring them up. so we need to see that. . ~ to bring them up. so we need to see that. ., ,, , ., ., ,, , ., that. 0k, thank you. let me take you to the front — that. 0k, thank you. let me take you to the front page _ that. ok, thank you. let me take you to the front page of— that. 0k, thank you. let me take you to the front page of the _ that. 0k, thank you. let me take you to the front page of the express - - to the front page of the express — rishi sunak warned on ditching pension pledge." this is about the trip a lot, could you remind us what that is? , ., ., that is? there is a commitment that the conservative _ that is? there is a commitment that the conservative party _ that is? there is a commitment that the conservative party made - that is? there is a commitment that the conservative party made in - that is? there is a commitment that the conservative party made in a - the conservative party made in a number of recent manifestos which basically means that pensioners get a guaranteed increase in the basic state pension that's either consistent with wages, growth, growth in prices, or a flat percentage. so it's really meant to help accelerate the huge improvement in welfare and britain. and up until
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very recently, pensioners were worse off on average than people of working age. and measures like this have changed that. i oversimplify, but in britain we have twice as many older people as younger people, they are twice as likely to vote. . so they are very hard to break promises to, so they keep promising pensioners more and more, and people are really losing out, the people of working age. if we had a government that was —— or any poetical party that was —— or any poetical party that was —— or any poetical party that was interested in doing what's right for the fight against... we would be abandoning this pensions pledge and focusing resources on younger families who are still struggling to pay the household bills. ,, ., ., , ., ~ struggling to pay the household bills. ,, ., ., ~ , , bills. sienna, do you think this is a ledue bills. sienna, do you think this is a pledge that _ bills. sienna, do you think this is a pledge that should _ bills. sienna, do you think this is a pledge that should be - bills. sienna, do you think this is a pledge that should be broken? | a pledge that should be broken? know, so we will disagree yet again
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- this _ know, so we will disagree yet again - this time — know, so we will disagree yet again - this time is — know, so we will disagree yet again — this time is particularly ironic because — — this time is particularly ironic because at— — this time is particularly ironic because at 27, iwon't be benefiting from the _ because at 27, iwon't be benefiting from the triple—lock anytime soon. but our— from the triple—lock anytime soon. but our state pension still not as generous— but our state pension still not as generous as other countries you could _ generous as other countries you could compare the uk to. this is kind _ could compare the uk to. this is kind of— could compare the uk to. this is kind of regarded as a tricky one electorally, but also, i mean, it's seen— electorally, but also, i mean, it's seen often— electorally, but also, i mean, it's seen often as this question of intergenerational fairness, and that's— intergenerational fairness, and that's what tim was touching on, that's what tim was touching on, that older— that's what tim was touching on, that older people are benefiting at the expense of younger people — we have a _ the expense of younger people — we have a much— the expense of younger people — we have a much worse situation in terms of our— have a much worse situation in terms of our housing costs spiralling out of our housing costs spiralling out of control, — of our housing costs spiralling out of control, we have insecure work, etc - _ of control, we have insecure work, etc - i_ of control, we have insecure work, etc — i completely support all those arguments, but in the end we need to look towards the future, and hopefully my generation will benefit from the _ hopefully my generation will benefit from the triple—lock eventually. so no, i_ from the triple—lock eventually. so no, i would — from the triple—lock eventually. so no, iwould not from the triple—lock eventually. so no, i would not recommend breaking thism _ no, i would not recommend breaking this... ., �* ., ., ., .,
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this... you've got a while to wait, sienna, this. .. you've got a while to wait, sienna. ill— this... you've got a while to wait, sienna, i'lljust _ this... you've got a while to wait, sienna, i'lljustjump _ this... you've got a while to wait, sienna, i'lljustjump in _ this... you've got a while to wait, sienna, i'lljustjump in there. - sienna, i'lljustjump in there. finally, it can i take you both back to the guardian, "williamson should 90, to the guardian, "williamson should go, starmertells to the guardian, "williamson should go, starmer tells p:m.." to the guardian, "williamson should go, starmertells p:m.." not to the guardian, "williamson should go, starmer tells p:m.." not a great history of the prime minister doing with the leader of the opposition says, is there? fir with the leader of the opposition says, is there?— with the leader of the opposition says, is there? or what i say, iwas a boris johnson _ says, is there? or what i say, iwas a boris johnson adviser but - says, is there? or what i say, iwas a boris johnson adviser but i - says, is there? or what i say, iwas a boris johnson adviser but i left i a borisjohnson adviser but i left because he wouldn't take stock of what i said. perhaps we can and on a note of agreement, because i think he's been about the most incompetent cabinet minister of recent time. so i agree with keir starmer, and maybe i agree with keir starmer, and maybe i can agree with sienna on this last issue, as well.— issue, as well. she's certainly noddin: issue, as well. she's certainly nodding vociferously, - issue, as well. she's certainly nodding vociferously, ten - issue, as well. she's certainly - nodding vociferously, ten seconds to agree. i nodding vociferously, ten seconds to auree. . ., , y nodding vociferously, ten seconds to auree. , ,~ �*, nodding vociferously, ten seconds to auree. , agree. i completely agree, he's been ti ed for agree. i completely agree, he's been tipped for the — agree. i completely agree, he's been tipped for the sack. _ agree. i completely agree, he's been tipped for the sack. hopefully - agree. i completely agree, he's been tipped for the sack. hopefully keir. tipped for the sack. hopefully keir starmer— tipped for the sack. hopefully keir starmer calling for him to be sacked won't _ starmer calling for him to be sacked won't but _ starmer calling for him to be sacked won't but the prime minister from actually— won't but the prime minister from actually doing it, because he's been actually doing it, because he's been a terrible _ actually doing it, because he's been a terrible education secretary, 1
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think— a terrible education secretary, 1 think everyone agrees with that stuff— think everyone agrees with that stuff but — think everyone agrees with that stuff but we have to leave it there, thank _ stuff but we have to leave it there, thank you — stuff but we have to leave it there, thank you both very much, really good _ thank you both very much, really good to— thank you both very much, really good to talk to you. that's it for the papers this evening. thank you to tom and sienna. coming up next is the weather and newsday at midnight. goodbye. hello, i'm marc edwards, thanks forjoining us. it's the transfer that has sent shock waves around the football community — lionel messi leaving barcelona and signing for psg. and the six—time ballon d'or winner has been talking to the world for the first time as a paris saint—germain player. laura scott reports. their life was in barcelona. now it's in paris. it's a move no—one, including the messi family, saw coming this time a week ago. behind the smiles, how's it been for the man at the centre of one
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of the biggest football transfers in history? translation: it was hard to sleep. it was hard to rest. these past days, i was anxious about the uncertainty, and the change for the family was complicated until we could get things going and make progress on the agreement with paris. from there, it was about thinking ahead — a new chapter, a new experience that will be really nice for my family — so now i'm looking forward for it to start. it helps that he's joining an already formidable psg squad — among them, his former barcelona team—mate, neymar, and world cup winner killian mbappe. manager maurizio pochettino, a fellow argentinian, will know that with the addition of messi, the club has fewer excuses if they don't win the champions league — the prize the club's owners and fans so badly crave. there's a lot of people wondering how you can afford to have such an amazing squad and stick within ffp. can you tell us, please? we follow the financial fair play
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regulation from day one that we started. if you see that we're signing leo, that means that we could, we have the capacity to sign him. messi has the world's attention on him today. what the fans want to know is when he'll make his first appearance for his new club — and when he does, the focus will be on whether he can translate the success and the trophies he achieved with barcelona to his new home here at the parc des princes. already, the fans are treating him like a club legend, many rushing to the shop to have his name on their backs. for me, he's the best player in the world. i always said that when he played with garza, and i watched every game from him. so for me, he's the biggest player in the world. translation: it's a crazy moment. it's incredible. it's a childhood dream. he's the best player in the whole world. what a difference a few days and a lucrative new contract makes. enjoying a kickabout
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with his children on this, his new lawn, messi already looks to be making himself at home. laura scott, bbc news, paris. chelsea have won the uefa super cup for the second time in their history after beating villareal on penalties. the annual match contested by the reigning champions of the two main european club competitions saw champions league winners chelsea take the lead through hakim ziyech just before the half—hour mark, slotting home after kai havertz�* cross. but the europa league winners equalised in the second half through spanish international gerard moreno. and after extra time, it was still 1—1. their save giving chelsea their second uefa super cup win since 1998. the premier league starts on friday, and champions manchester city are looking to retain their title.
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they spent £100 million bringing jack grealish to the club in a british transfer record, and city forward phil foden is looking forward to lining up with his new pal. it's really nice to have jack here at man city. when we were in england, we got along so well. i know how much of a great player he is and what he will bring to the team. so i am looking forward to getting back on the pitch, and hopefully we can play together. england bowler stuart broad has said he is gutted he will miss the rest of the series against india. james anderson is also a doubt for the second test, which starts tomorrow at lord's. a scan has revealed broad sustained a tear to his right calf in a warm—up session yesterday, while anderson missed practice today with a quad muscle problem. saqib mahmood here has been called—up as cover. moeen ali's also been brought back into the squad, posing another challenge to virat kohli's side. we will have to be at our best, going up against moeen. yeah, i mean, he's a great guy. so whenever we take the field,
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obviously with skills, we compete. but it's always mutual respect, and a really, really nice environment when he is playing on the field. whether with or against, he has always been a pleasure to share the field with. it was another double header in the cricket. in the men's hundred, welsh fire were elimated as southern brave go top of the table after another victory. fire batted first and set a target of 144. tom banton was the standout, hitting three sixes off 20 balls. but a little too late from them — half centuries from james vince and quinton de kock were enough to send brave straight to the top of the standings. and it shows them well—placed to go all the way. and it was more success for brave's women, who booked their place in the final. brave powered to a tournament high 166—3. smitri mandhana topscored with 78. fire didn't really come close, reaching 127—4. brave are now five points clear at the top and can't be caught, so they will be in the lords final,
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while fire are eliminated. and that's all the sport for now. from me, marc edwards, and the rest of the team, bye—bye. hello. we provisionally saw a brand—new temperature record in europe set on wednesday — 48.8 celsius recorded in sicily. the exceptional heat shown by the red colours here in this chart transfer a bit westwards across the med into the weekend, with record—breaking heat for spain and portugal. cast your eyes further north, though, across the uk, the blues appearing back on the charts. temperatures dropping below normal once again — so a cooler end to the week across the uk, and it will be blustery at times, mainly because of this area of low pressure — out to the west at the moment, but it will track across the north. through the night and into the morning, though, this weather front will bring some cloud and patchy rain into southern areas, keeping temperatures up in the mid—teens for some. but a much fresher start across many parts in the uk, but a sunny start for the vast majority. and for many, we'll see some good, sunny spells throughout the day,
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but cloud amounts will increase at times in the south, spreading into wales, the midlands, and through the day, northern ireland, western scotland seeing batches of showers pushing in, some of those becoming heavy and thundery. only the odd one reaching eastern scotland and northern parts of england, as well as the isle of man. temperatures here in the teens into maybe the low mid—20s again across the south and east. but it will be a windy end to the day across parts of scotland, northern ireland, winds close to gale force across these coastal districts. further heavy, thundery showers rattling in notjust through the evening, but overnight, as well. head further south, most places will be dry, some clear skies around, and a slightly fresher night across some southern areas compared to what we'll have to start thursday morning. so, into friday we go, temperatures widely still in double figures, so not desperately cold. but it's another story of sunshine and blustery showers across scotland and northern ireland. a bit windierfor england and wales on friday, too, and we will still see the chance of some lingering cloud, especially towards southern counties of england, bringing the odd spot of light rain. but temperatures dropping relative
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to what we've seen on thursday — even in the south, low 20s, but still pleasant enough where you've got the sunshine out. then, as we go into the weekend, our area of low pressure pushes eastwards, allowing the cold air in, and just a chance we could see some other weather systems working their way in from the west, bringing outbreaks of rain at times. this is how we see saturday at the moment — just be aware, though, it is liable to change, maybe a brighter day for scotland and northern ireland, less breezy but rather cool with sunny spells. but a bit more cloud across england and wales, and it's the north and west where we could see some rain at times brightening up again towards the south and the east. bye for now.
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�*welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. afghanistan in meltdown, us officials say the taliban could be in the capital, kabul within weeks, as thousands flee the advancing militants. many of those we have met here have run once, twice, multiple times. and now, they come here to afghanistan's capital kabul. from here, they say, there's nowhere else to go. our reporter interviews some of the insurgents as the bbc�*s granted rare access to newly taken taliban territory. we came through here a little earlier this year. back then, it was still under government
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control. now it is around two

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