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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 12, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines. oh, my gosh! gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland are awarded record grades after exams were cancelled for a second year. some teachers say the assessments are more accurate than exams. they have been assessed and awarded results on the merits of what they have produced, and that can't be taken away from them. a change in self—isolation rules in northern ireland — the bbc understands fully vaccinated people who are a close contact of a covid case will no longer have to stay at home. the nhs waiting list in england hits a record high of almost 5.5 million. in afghanistan, taliban fighters have captured the city of ghazni — the tenth provincial capital they've seized in recent days —
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but could taliban rule see a return to strict sharia law? we have a special report. complaints of prison—like conditions in mandatory hotels for red—list travellers as the the price increases to nearly £2,300 for the 11—day stay. online retailer boohoo insists its clothing brands are "not throwaway fashion". it says 20% of its ranges will be sustainable this autumn — increasing to 40% by next year. hello, good afternoon. gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland have received another set of record grades, after exams were disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. top grades rose by 2.7% to almost 29%, while the pass rate
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is also slightly up. the government had to cancel exams for a second consecutive year, so pupils�* grades have been based on teacher assessment, drawing some criticism of grade inflation. with the latest, here's our education correspondent, elaine dunkley. the moment anxiety and fear disappears. in their grasp, the gcse results these students need to put a difficultjourney behind them. there's no words for it, really. it's utter relief at this just point. as soon as i opened my paper and i saw the results that i've got, and what i've worked so hard for over the last five years — especially with the disruption we faced — it'sjust the tears ofjoy. i couldn't control it. definitely satisfied, definitely will get me to where i want to be. i'm also a level—nine achieving student and i haven't got any nines today but, like i said before, the sky is the limit, so we go forth. the results mark the end of high school.
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this year's students have felt the most disruption to their studies, with lockdowns and remote learning. i have to be honest, it was hard at times seeing your child cry, saying, "mummy, i don't know what's happening. will we have gcses? " and trying to reassure them, but you know you've got all that turmoil inside. but the children, like i said, i've been humbled by their characters, how they've come out still smiling, and to receive these results, it's just been wow. with exams cancelled and replaced with teacher—assessed grades, this headteacher says the different approach means comparisons with previous years are unhelpful. i just don't think this is a year that we can compare to previous years. it's a very different context. the materials were published online, the students had access to them, they knew what the topics were going to be, and the direction for the revision. you would only expect, therefore, that revision to be more focused and therefore for them to perform better. students in wales and northern ireland also received results today.
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compared to a—levels, grade inflation for gcses has been modest — but there is concern today's results show a further widening of the gap in inequalities. in england, 61% of pupils in independent schools received top grades, compared with 26% in state schools. the pandemic has of course exacerbated and amplified those inequalities, and that's why we were so determined to get young people back into school. schools were the last to close, the first to open as we emerged from the pandemic. labour says, without a more ambitious recovery plan for education, inequality could be the lasting legacy of covid. what i want to see is a first—class education for every child, whoever they are and wherever they come from. what we've seen today is baked—in in equality, is baked—in inequality, the gap between those going to private schools and going to state schools has got bigger rather than smaller. today's results are about more than academic achievement — it's about recognising the struggles
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that many have faced. molly has done a btec in business. unfortunately, i lost my step—grandad and my dad in may and june, so yeah, it'sjust been, like, really tough. anything for me, just being a pass is going to, like, really make me obviously happy, but if i get anything better than a pass, then — considering the year i've had — i'm going to be extremely happy with myself. these students have studied through nearly two years of disruption. in turbulent times, success is all the sweeter. elaine dunkley, bbc news. our correspondent simon ward is at south nottinghamshire academy in radcliffe—on—trent. simon. there has been lots of happy faces here today, _ simon. there has been lots of happy faces here today, as _ simon. there has been lots of happy faces here today, as well. _ simon. there has been lots of happy faces here today, as well. much - simon. there has been lots of happy faces here today, as well. much of i faces here today, as well. much of the national talk over gcses has been about that grade inflation and they have seen that here, although not as much as last year. we were
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here at 8:30am as pupils came here to collect envelopes, lots of excitement here and emotion as they got their results, many of them getting those higher scores of seven and above. it is a very different year. there is home—schooling and lots of online learning, but these pupils say it has all been worth it. all nines, apart from i an eight in english lit! that's fantastic, is that what you were expecting? no, not really. i knew i did well in some subjects, | but not literally all of them, so... | i don't even know what to say! it was amazing, i can't believe it. it's still a bit like... i don't know what to do, almost! chuffed. did not expect it at all. i expected to get some sevens but it's... chuffed, i can't. .. speechless. so good, i'm so proud of myself. throughout this year it's been so hard but i've got a good friendship group, as well, so it's all gone well.
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joyful scenes here today and as we know the formal exams were cancelled for the second year in a row. schools have the option of how they assess pupils. join me as the head teacher, dan philpott how did you do it here? the teacher, dan philpott how did you do it here? , ,, it here? the process with teacher assessed grades _ it here? the process with teacher assessed grades here _ it here? the process with teacher assessed grades here was - it here? the process with teacher assessed grades here was that i it here? the process with teacher| assessed grades here was that we have compiled portfolios of evidence for every _ have compiled portfolios of evidence for every student and what they included — for every student and what they included was some of their previous work, _ included was some of their previous work. some — included was some of their previous work, some course work, mock examination results, practical scores — examination results, practical scores. we did some in—class assessments and then we actually had assessments and then we actually had a final— assessments and then we actually had a final examination week where they sat on_ a final examination week where they sat on seen— a final examination week where they sat on seen exams in exam conditions. and on the basis of that we came _ conditions. and on the basis of that we came to — conditions. and on the basis of that we came to a holisticjudgment and students _ we came to a holisticjudgment and students subsequently have got their grades _ students subsequently have got their arades. , , . ., ., ., grades. this is the microgeneration. how do you — grades. this is the microgeneration. how do you think _ grades. this is the microgeneration. how do you think they _ grades. this is the microgeneration. how do you think they will— grades. this is the microgeneration. how do you think they will be - grades. this is the microgeneration. | how do you think they will be judged in further education and employment? this year is unique and i think there — this year is unique and i think there should be judged on their
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merits — there should be judged on their merits. the grades they have all achieved — merits. the grades they have all achieved is — merits. the grades they have all achieved is absolutely legitimate, it is proven work, evidenced work that they— it is proven work, evidenced work that they have done throughout the very challenging period. it is difficult _ very challenging period. it is difficult to compare, but certainly this is— difficult to compare, but certainly this is unique and this cohort, no subsequent— this is unique and this cohort, no subsequent further cohorts should be disadvantaged either wait. thank subsequent further cohorts should be disadvantaged either wait.— disadvantaged either wait. thank you ve much disadvantaged either wait. thank you very much for— disadvantaged either wait. thank you very much for us. _ disadvantaged either wait. thank you very much for us. we _ disadvantaged either wait. thank you very much for us. we don't _ disadvantaged either wait. thank you very much for us. we don't know- disadvantaged either wait. thank you | very much for us. we don't know when exams will return to normal but they're hoping that school life will be better after the summer holidays in. ~., , be better after the summer holidays in. ~ ., , ., hywel griffith is in cardiff. letter to grades not numbers here but the trend is similar to over the border. 29% of entries at the a o*r a __ border. 29% of entries at the a o*r a —— at border. 29% of entries at the a o*r a -- at a* border. 29% of entries at the a o*r a —— at a* or a.
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border. 29% of entries at the a o*r a —— at a* ora. of border. 29% of entries at the a o*r a —— at a* or a. of course there is a discussion about grade inflation and how well these grades will stand the test of time in future because of course next year plan at the moment is for the class of 2022 to sit exams once again. there is a debate over the longer term changes and make regular changes from september 2022 and some say the idea of sending children into rows of tables in schools is old—fashioned. it is very much down to how they depend on the day. perhaps teacher assessment should be a greater part of it in wales. the person in charge of it in wales. the person in charge of qualification says no, exams should stay because it prepares children for later life. the welsh government says the main focus should be congratulating the class of 2021, given that they spent the majority of the two years in lockdown is, many from home and having to deal with all those challenges that today should be a
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day of celebration, focusing solely on their achievements. maw; day of celebration, focusing solely on their achievements. i'm joined now by natalie perera, ceo of the education policy institute. good afternoon to you. i wonder at what you think about where we are in terms of the way in which young people have been assessed at the end of their years. do you feel that this year is unique, this year and last year, this will be viewed as the covid generation? not too much should be read to the fact that rates have gone up. absolutely. good afternoon. rates have gone up. absolutely. good afternoon- the _ rates have gone up. absolutely. good afternoon. the first _ rates have gone up. absolutely. good afternoon. the first thing _ rates have gone up. absolutely. good afternoon. the first thing we - rates have gone up. absolutely. good afternoon. the first thing we must - afternoon. the first thing we must do is recognise the resilience of young people who have received their results today. as we heard from your earlier vt they have undergone trauma and bereavement in many ways that we cannot imagine over the last year, so well done to all of them. i think in the end having teacher assessed grades was the right thing
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to do for this particular cohort. and we would expect grades to be slightly higher when they are a teacher assessed. we have seen today that the increase for gcse students is a fairly modest, compared to what we saw on tuesday for a—level results but as we heard earlier the really important thing is that we provide any recovery learning for young people who have lost out on learning as a result of the pandemic, and that we focus on closing the gap between disadvantaged young people and their peers. even before the pandemic, that was already starting to widen. that disadvantage has been exacerbated by the pandemic, and you are saying look behind the grades actually what sort of education these children have received, and they have receive considerably less than they should. mil
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they have receive considerably less than they should.— than they should. all lost learning time due to _ than they should. all lost learning time due to lockdown. _ than they should. all lost learning time due to lockdown. i _ than they should. all lost learning time due to lockdown. i don't - than they should. all lost learning | time due to lockdown. i don't think we should be overly worried about them receiving slightly higher grades this year. we have to treat this as a very different year to normal years. what we do need to focus on is making sure that they have the support they need to catch up have the support they need to catch up with any lost learning, and also support with their well being, as well. and we think the government needs to make available around {13.5 billion over the next three years. they have only so far committed to £3.i they have only so far committed to 5.1 billion, which is significantly £3.1 billion, which is significantly short of what we think is needed. there is a recognition that the grades may have been more generous this year and there was reason behind that. next year the regulator is going to have to return to something more like normality, is it, do you think? i something more like normality, is it, do you think?— it, do you think? i think over time we do need _ it, do you think? i think over time
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we do need to _ it, do you think? i think over time we do need to return _ it, do you think? i think over time we do need to return to _ it, do you think? i think over time we do need to return to a - it, do you think? i think over time we do need to return to a system| it, do you think? i think over time l we do need to return to a system of grading that people can feel a bit more confident in and be able to differentiate between different candidates. what is important is that the 2022 pupils who are sitting their exams, and possibly the cohort after that, their exams, and possibly the cohort afterthat, i'm their exams, and possibly the cohort after that, i'm not penalised by going immediately back to the old kind of standard of grading. we need to make sure we are as fair as possible to future pupils as we have been two previous people's. qm. been two previous people's. 0k, thank ou been two previous people's. 0k, thank you so _ been two previous people's. 0k, thank you so much, _ been two previous people's. 0k, thank you so much, natalie perera, the ceo of the education policy institute. thank you. it's understood stormont ministers have agreed to change the rules on self—isolation in northern ireland from next week. let's get more from chris page in belfast. what do we know? well, stormont
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ministers are _ what do we know? well, stormont ministers are meeting _ what do we know? well, stormont ministers are meeting at _ what do we know? well, stormont ministers are meeting at the - what do we know? well, stormont i ministers are meeting at the moment in their regular review of covid restrictions here in northern ireland. 0ver restrictions here in northern ireland. over the course of the summer they have gradually been easing restrictions, for example tourists have come back to this part of the uk, as you can see there are plenty of visitors here at stormont right now, but the bigger picture is the covid regulations here are still more strict than in england, scotland and wales. also the infection rate at the moment is the highest of any uk's devolved nations and the vaccination uptake is the lowest. 85% of people here or thereabouts have had a fistjab. across the uk the figure is 89%. as the background to the discussions today, they have made their first decision and that is they will easing the rules on self isolation from monday. if you come into contact with someone you has tested positive for covid, you don't have to itself isolate as long as you are
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fully vaccinated and you have a negative covid test. that will broadly bring northern ireland into line with the rest of uk, similar measure coming into force on england on monday and measures already in place in scotland and wales. the other items on the agenda, it's believed, include whether to lift the one metre social distancing requirement, which is still in force for indoor hospitality venues, the hospitality industry would like ministers to do away with that restriction. also it is possible that exhibitions and conferences could be given the green light once again. education again being discussed and we understand that ministers have decided to scrap classroom bubbles whenever the new school term is used here in september. but they are going to keep on face coverings for secondary school pupils, post primary pupils, for six weeks from the beginning of the term, that measure will be kept under review. still plenty on the agenda in that meeting of the
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devolved power sharing executive at stormont, there are five parties in the coalition so that decision—making isn't always very quick, but this is a key meeting on northern ireland pot continuing response to the pandemic. no sign that ministers are preparing to go as far as their counterparts in london, cardiff and edinburgh have gonein london, cardiff and edinburgh have gone in terms of lifting all restrictions on.— gone in terms of lifting all restrictions on. the headlines on bbc news... record gcse grades achieved in england wales and northern ireland, after a second year of cancelled exams. in northern ireland — the bbc understands fully—vaccinated people who are a close contact of a covid case will no longer have to stay at home from next week. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a record high. the un warns of an unfolding humanitarian disaster in afghanistan, as taliban fighters say they've captured the strategically important city of ghazni.
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more now on that story. aid agencies have warned of a catastrophe for civilians in afghanistan, as the taliban continues to advance across the country, despite ongoing peace talks. negotiations between the militants and the afghan government, are taking place in doha, in the gulf state of qatar. the taliban delegation says life under its rule will be different for afghan civilians compared to the 1990s, but the fear is the group's strict interpretation of sharia law will return. with more, here's yalda hakim. afghanistan 202i. the taliban are back, taking city after city from government forces. the withdrawal of foreign troops has left a power vacuum the taliban are rushing to fill. if they take power, many people here fear a return to their brutal regime of the �*90s, characterised by public executions, stonings and girls being banned from school.
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despite the historic peace deal that was signed between the us and the taliban in february 2020, and the ongoing peace talks taking place in doha, qatar, between the afghan government and the taliban, no progress has been made. i travelled to doha to meet with suhail shaheen, a member of the taliban peace negotiation team. if you were to return to kabul, how would you govern? there was in the past some mistakes that we have learned from, because at that time we were new to government. to stop education of women and girls, that is not our goal. of course, education is their right, and it is much needed. while suhail shaheen continues to talk about peace, it's clearly not a view shared by taliban commanders closing in on afghanistan's cities.
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back in kabul, a taliban commander from helmand agreed to meet me. what do you want? do you want the taliban regime to come back into power, or do you think there should be a power—sharing deal with the current government, like the discussions that are being had in doha? translation: we would be happy to have a joint government under. the umbrella of islamic sharia, a sharia—based system in afghanistan, like the system the taliban used to have. if we talk about law and order and justice, if someone were to steal or commit adultery, what should happen to them? translation: all this is clearly stated in the koran. _ if someone steals, there is a punishment. for example, for some thefts, the punishment is cutting off the hand and foot.
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and if someone commits adultery, then they should be stoned. and if there isn't a political resolution to this conflict, are you prepared to take kabul by force? translation: | am tryingj to defeat the government. and they are trying to make me disappear. in the end, we'll be compelled to kill one another. increasingly, it appears there is a disconnect between what is being said by the political office in doha and what the taliban commanders and foot soldiers are doing on the ground in afghanistan. but the vice—president of afghanistan remains defiant. this group in doha, they are a deceptive side of a very dark reality called the taliban. so, in your view, have they changed? no, not only they have not changed, they have become more savvy in deceiving.
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with the government adamant to defy a new era of sharia law and the taliban making significant gains, afghans now seem to be caught up in a savage war that has taken on a life of its own. yalda hakim, bbc news, kabul. i can now speak to charlie faulkner, a journalist working in kabul. good afternoon to you. i don't know whether you were able to hear that reports what it contained some very chilling words from taliban commander in campbell talking about the reintroduction of sharia law. you are in campbell, the capital, what is the atmosphere like at the moment the climate of fear here is severe, especially following the reports severe, especially following the re ort , , ., , severe, especially following the re ort , , ,y severe, especially following the reort , , ,, ,, severe, especially following the reort , . _ ,, . reports yesterday by us intelligence officials stating _
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reports yesterday by us intelligence officials stating that _ reports yesterday by us intelligence officials stating that there _ officials stating that there estimates are kabul facing attacks within six months is reduced to three. people are becoming increasingly worried and ghazni was taken today, and thatjust means that more... that is south—west of kabul and means more of the surrounding area of the capital city is falling into taliban hands. already in the north and east, it is predominantly alabama controlled. taste predominantly alabama controlled. we have already seen —— predominantly taliban controlled. we have seen people coming into kabulfrom outlying areas as they have taken them, and moving out of afghanistan. do you have some sense of the scale of this and how long it is expected to continue? that of this and how long it is expected to continue?— of this and how long it is expected to continue? �* ., ., to continue? at the moment we are seeinu to continue? at the moment we are seeing huge — to continue? at the moment we are seeing huge influx _ to continue? at the moment we are seeing huge influx of _ to continue? at the moment we are seeing huge influx of afghans - seeing huge influx of afghans pouring into the capital. i was in
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an unofficial idp camp north of kabul a couple of days ago and it is absolutely chaotic. the government seems wholly unprepared for this humanitarian crisis. this camp was just a small patch of parkland sandwich between two busy roads. many people didn't even have tents to sleep in, they were sleeping on the floor. there is no sanitation and no official food the floor. there is no sanitation and no officialfood distribution. they are just relying on the goodwill of wealthier afghans to help deliver food. that was in the north of kabul, on the outskirts. even in the centre there is a park and that is also now filling up with this place afghans who have nowhere to go. their only option is to come to go. their only option is to come to kabul and many have no relatives here, no money, they have no choice but to flee the violence. what here, no money, they have no choice but to flee the violence.— but to flee the violence. what is the feeling _
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but to flee the violence. what is the feeling amongst _ but to flee the violence. what is the feeling amongst afghan - but to flee the violence. what is . the feeling amongst afghan women but to flee the violence. what is - the feeling amongst afghan women at the feeling amongst afghan women at the moment with the threat of the taliban coming?— the moment with the threat of the taliban coming? there is a huge fear around that- — taliban coming? there is a huge fear around that- i _ taliban coming? there is a huge fear around that. i spoke _ taliban coming? there is a huge fear around that. i spoke to _ taliban coming? there is a huge fear around that. i spoke to one - taliban coming? there is a huge fear around that. i spoke to one young i around that. i spoke to one young lady who was in her 20s. she is from a province and she had come into kabulfor training for a a province and she had come into kabul for training for a few days and after a couple of days in that district it fell into the hands of the taliban. she now cannot return home. she has an educated and working women, which means she would be targeted, but also she spent 20 years or so of her life living in a certain way and she is not prepared to go and live under strict taliban rule, having to remain indoors, wearing a burqa if she is outside and having to be chaperoned by e—mail companion. she has carved out a life for herself and she can't
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even see her family because she is too worried about his safety. what too worried about his safety. what about yourself. — too worried about his safety. what about yourself, how _ too worried about his safety. what about yourself, how are _ too worried about his safety. what about yourself, how are you feeling? i mean, it's very different for me. as a foreign person i can leave at any time, which i'm very aware is a very privileged position to be in because so many afghans just do not have the option of leaving this country. as a journalist i think it is important to be covering what is going on, but it is something myself and my colleagues are assessing on a daily basis in terms of the security situation. . , daily basis in terms of the security situation. , , ., ., ., situation. 0k. it is very good to talk to you. _ situation. 0k. it is very good to talk to you, thank _ situation. 0k. it is very good to talk to you, thank you - situation. 0k. it is very good to talk to you, thank you so i situation. 0k. it is very good to| talk to you, thank you so much, charlie faulkner, a british journalist reporting from kabul. thank you. almost 5.5 million people in england were waiting to start routine nhs hospital treatment at the end ofjune. it's the highest number since records began in 2007. here's luxmy gopal. waiting in pain for nearly a year.
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lucy morley williams needs a hip replacement to treat her arthritis. this is limbo. my life is disabled. it's on hold. it's almost like a little grieving process every time it gets worse, so it's psychological as well. joanna crane was told in april she needs surgery to replace a leaky heart valve. she's still waiting. it obviously does get to you. you are kind of living every day hoping that you're going to get that call, because i know that i need that surgery and the more i'm waiting i know that i'm getting more unhealthy because of it. a record number of people are now waiting for routine nhs hospital treatment in england — nearly 5.5 million. there has been a drop in those waiting for more than a year, down to just over 300,000. but the number waiting for more than two years has gone up to nearly 6,000, a 46% increase on the previous month, according to the royal college of surgeons. the organisation says demand for hospital beds and staff shortages from being pinged
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by the covid app are causing a volatile mix of pressures on surgery. i think waiting lists will rise because there will be a huge increase in demand, and i think again people understand that, but the important thing is that we are providing the nhs with the resources that it needs. the government says it's given the nhs a billion pounds this year to clear the backlog, but a leading nhs members' organisation says that isn't nearly enough. what we can't do is magic treatment out of thin air. what we need is money, but we also need to invest that money in a larger workforce and that is fundamental to getting through this backlog. i have an appointment at 2:20pm to collect an ecg monitor. doncaster royal infirmary is trying to drive down waiting lists using a drive—through service. instead of going into the clinic, patients fit heart monitors themselves at home. it's much quicker. the patient experience is better
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and the quality is just the same and that's meant that we've been able to do more tests that we have to do face—to—face on site. while efforts are making some inroads into the backlog, there are warnings that waiting lists could more than double by next year, and many patients must continue their wait without knowing for sure when it will end. luxmy gopal, bbc news. new zealand's borders are to remain shut until at least the end of the year because of the coronavirus pandemic. the prime minister, jacinda ardern, says an elimination strategy against covid is the best way to keep the economy open. new zealand is seen as one of the most successful countries in controlling the virus. a snap one—week lockdown has begun in the australian capital canberra, after its first case of covid—i9 in more than a year. queues formed at supermarkets with people stockpiling, before the lockdown came into force. around 400,000 residents in canberra and the surrounding area will only be able to leave home for essential reasons. large parts of new south wales
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and melbourne are facing similar restrictions. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. hello, there. there's been some decent dry and sunny weather today, but also more cloud — particularly across the south. this area of low pressure, though, has been spoiling things across the north and the west of the country, bringing stronger winds, more cloud and also showery bursts of rain — some of which has been quite heavy in places. now through this evening and overnight it stays windy with further showers or longer spells of rain across western scotland, northern ireland. further south that you are, apart from the odd shower and cloud in the central south west quadrant, it will be mainly dry with clear spells and a relatively mild night to come — certainly milder across the north of the country than the previous night. low pressure, then, for friday affects the north of the country so continues windy with sunshine and showers for scotland, northern ireland. higher pressure further south — so here, mainly dry for much of england, wales. a little bit of cloud in the south, but some decent spells of sunshine, and those temperatures reaching highs of around 22 or 23 celsius. now, as we head on into the weekend,
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it looks like it's going to be quite mixed. there'll be variable amounts of cloud, a few showers, but also some sunshine.
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hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland are awarded record grades after exams were cancelled for a second year. a change in self isolation rules in northern ireland — the bbc understands fully—vaccinated people who are a close contact of a covid case will no longer have to stay at home. the nhs waiting list in england hits a record high, of almost five and a half million. the un warns of an unfolding humanitarian disaster
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in afghanistan, as taliban fighters say they've captured the strategically important city of ghazni complaints of prison like conditions in mandatory hotels for red list travellers as the the price increases to nearly two thousand and three hundred pounds for the 11 day stay. 0nline retailer boohoo insists its clothing brands are "not throwaway fashion". it says 20 percent of its ranges will be sustainable this autumn, increasing to a0 percent by next year sport now, and time for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. england's cricketrers have been frustrated by india's openers — and the rain — on the first day of the second test at lords. it's been a bit stop start so far, the bad weather curtailing most of the morning session. rohit sharma and kl rahul proving
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immovable thus far, rohit�*s just hit a half century. james anderson passed a fitness test and looking to pick up the first wicket of the day. england have brought in moeen ali, haseeb hameed and mark wood. wood in for the injured stuart broad. ishant sharma for shardul thakur is india's only change. another bit of cricket news to bring you — southern brave's smriti mandhana is leaving the hundred after helping them get to the final. the indian star helped them to the final yesterday with 78 runs but will fly home to see her family before her country's tour of australia. she will take no further part in the tournament and will be replaced by ireland's gaby lewis. chelsea fans are still waiting for confirmation of romelu lukaku's move back to stamford bridge. we understand that deal is done forjust under £100 million. and they could recoup some of that money by selling tammy abraham to roma. their general manager — tiago pinto — is in london, hoping to negotiate that move for the england striker. the 23—year—old was left on the bench as chelsea won
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the super cup last night, beating villareal on penalties. arsenal are also said to be interested. arsenal midfielderjoe willock has agreed personal terms with newcastle, and will travel to the north—east for a medical ahead of a permanent move. the 21—year—old spent last season on loan at stjames' park — the deal is expected to be around £25 million. tottenham hotspur stadium has stepped in to host next year's challenge cup final after a clash of dates. the move has come about because rugby league's showpiece final has been scheduled for 28th may and wembley is not available on that date. but it will return to its traditional venue in 2023. jo konta will play coco gauff in the last 16 at the canadian 0pen later. the british number one beat elina svitolina in three sets. konta's missed a lot of tennis after pulling out of wimbledon because she was a close contact of someone who tested positive for covid, and then missed the olympics herself because she tested positive. however, she is back,
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and showing some good form ahead of the us open which starts at the end of the month. motogp rider maverick vinales has been withdrawn from this weekend's austrian grand prix and suspended by his yamaha team. they've accused the spaniard of damaging his bike's engine at last weekend's race and claim he could have caused serious risks to himself and other riders. yamaha have yet to decide his future and won't replace him this weekend. former world heavyweight champion david haye is making a return to the ring three years after retiring at the age of a0. haye officially hung up his gloves in 2018 after back—to—back defeats against tony bellew. haye, on the right of your screen, said on social media that he'll be boxing joe fournier over eight rounds in los angeles, but that it wasn't a comeback. for the last few years, haye's been a manager and promoter. the london marathon has announced their elite line—ups for 0ctober�*s race. world record holder and olympic silver medallist brigid kosgei of kenya will return to action
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to defend her title. the reigning men's champion shura kitata of ethopia will also be back despite failing to finish last weekend's 0lympic marathon because of the conditions. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much. so, after a second summer of no exams, it's turned out to be the record—breaking gcse results day most expected. and while london had the highest number of top grades in england, there are concerns about the growing gap in achievement between independent and state schools. in a moment, mairyaird smith will give us the overview from manchester, but first james waterhouse has spent the morning with some nervous pupils in hounslow. after an unusual year, a familiar site. your mix of shock... d! ,my go
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that was good shock, by the way. and possible dread. science, english language, english literature, i got grade three, and ifailed functional skills. lily is one of half a million people to get their grades through things like cause look at mock exams. to be honest, it wasn't as hard as everyone makes out to be. 0nline, it was just boring. the system has given students the benefit of the doubt after a disruptive couple of years. in 2019, irina could barely speak english after arriving here from ukraine, but has put every exam. my mum is super proud. she was worried about my results, but i'm going to go home and i'm going to say about these results and she's going to be super excited. as expected, another record year for top grades and
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passes, but that's only the national picture for them no pupils are describing their past 18 months is easy and there are concerns about the growing gap between state and independent schools. in england, private once at the top increase in top grades, 61% getting grade seven, what used to be a, compared to 28% in academies like this. it is important to look at measuring their progress and their attainment. nationally, i think there is definitely a divide between people who are well off and those who are not, and i would hope it continues to be a focus. for now, politicians already arguing over how many billions should be spread help some pupils catch up. james waterhouse, bbc london. well, the wait is finally over for the students here at burnage academy for boys in manchester, and they have done exceptionally well. as you might expect, though, the head boy has done particularly well. ibrahim, you have got top marks in every subject. how do you feel?
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thankfully i have done really well, it has been a lot of hard work of course in such an uncertain time, we have had to do a lot of work at home in lockdowns, i am really proud of how i have done and happy with the result. helen, as deputy head here, you have been beaming this morning. you must be very proud. i am delighted for the boys. it is so wonderful to see them, so happy today after what has been such a difficult and turbulent year, they have shown exceptional resilience and independence to battle real adversity. i mean, it has been a horrible year. long periods of self isolation, forced into remote learning and they have just been brilliant. we are so proud of them. how tough has it been for your staff as well? our staff have shown real resilience as well as, it has been difficult for them. they have had obviously periods of self isolation, their own children have had periods of self isolation. it has been a year like no other and one that i would never wish to see repeated. but we are really proud of all of our staff and pupils. rueben, you have done really well and we have talked about being hearing—impaired and how tough that must have been
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for you learning online. can you explain just how difficult it was? i mean, it was much more difficult for me because, for example, i when people wear masks, i cannot lip—read and it. makes communication that little bit harder. i for me it has been difficult. learning in person and online because of that language barrier. but you have done well, you have done better than you needed to continue with your choice. yes, exactly and i am i very proud of my results and very happy with them. well, the sun is certainly shining here at burnage academy for boys some top results and some celebrations to do. a woman and a girl have told bbc news that they were sexually assaulted as children by a former 0lympian from york. stan wild competed for great britain at two olympics and founded and ran a gymnastics club in york. it's emerged that the sport's governing body british gymnastics expelled wild last year, 12 years after a gymnast accused him of sexually assaulting her at his club. stan wild denies the allegations and has never been charged with any offence. here's mark ansell�*s investigation.
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what a good performance. that is one of the best that stan wild has ever produced. stan wild was british gymnastics champion for five years in the 1960s and �*70s. he was given the honour of carrying the olympic torch in york before the 2012 games. but a woman and a girl have told bbc look north that they were sexually assaulted by stan wild at york city gymnastics foundation when he was their coach. he touched my behind, he would touch my chest. he put his hand in between my thighs. nikki o'donnell has waived her right to anonymity. she says she was sexually assaulted multiple times from the age of 9 to ia by stan wild at his gymnastics club. nikki reported the alleged abuse to the police and british gymnastics in 2008, but no action was taken
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and he was allowed to carry on coaching. had they have acted and protected the children, looked after everybody like they are supposed to do, i shouldn't have to be meeting families and victims to offer them support. they should have put a stop to it, but they allowed it to carry on. it wasn't until another girl reported stan wild eight years later in 2016 that british gymnastics temporarily suspended him. the girl and her parents are played by actors to protect their identities. i was sat on a bench and he said, "there will be no more kisses for anyone." and i sort of went, "yes!" because i was happy about it. and he pushed me back onto the floor, with him on top of me, and his chest against my chest, and then pretended to kiss me again in front of everyone. itjust made me feel really
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embarrassed and uncomfortable. wild was suspended from all activities within the gym. the family says the way the club dealt with the matter made them feel as if they were the problem. why should we be punished for something that stan wild has done to us and our family? they actually said that it would be | our fault if stan couldn't return, i because the club i would have to close, and that would be our fault. it's clearly trying to protect their name and reputation. it's the victims that need support now. some things need to change at the head of this club in a statement, york city gymnastics foundation says... meanwhile, british gymnastics says...
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in a statement, solicitors acting on behalf of stan wild say... north yorkshire police say detectives have interviewed a 77—year—old man from york in connection with child—abuse complaints from the 1970s and 2000s. following questioning, he was released under investigation. the two women who made the complaints are receiving specialist support while police enquiries continue. mark ansell, bbc news, york. the economy grew by a.8% between april and june as most businesses emerged from lockdown. the growth was fuelled by retail, restaurants and hotels. it's slightly less than the prediction from the bank of england. the chancellor rishi sunak has been speaking about the figures this morning.
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today's figures show the economy is recovering very strongly, the fastest quarterly growth in the g7 group of countries, and evidence that our plan forjobs is working. but i'm not complacent. the shock that our economy and public finances have experienced is significant and it will take us time to fully recover. that is why we are not done supporting businesses or people, most importantly giving them the skills and the opportunities they need to find great, well paid jobs. for more on this, we can speak to our business presenter, alice baxter. . ~' , ., our business presenter, alice baxter. ., ,, , ., , our business presenter, alice baxter. ., ,, , ,, .,~ baxter. thank you. rishi sunak, the chancellor. — baxter. thank you. rishi sunak, the chancellor, seeing _ baxter. thank you. rishi sunak, the chancellor, seeing he _ baxter. thank you. rishi sunak, the chancellor, seeing he is _ baxter. thank you. rishi sunak, the chancellor, seeing he is pleased i chancellor, seeing he is pleased with that figure for the second quarter, april tojune, with that figure for the second quarter, apriltojune, but with that figure for the second quarter, april tojune, but he's not complacent because in the first quarter we saw the economy shrink and we were all expecting growth for this period because this was the
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period when the world started to open up again, people could get back into the shops, cafes, schools, but it was still slightly below the 5% prediction from the bank of england. let's speak to head off foreign exchange at rolo bank. does the strong number mean that fears of the delta variant and the so—called pingdemic were unfounded? the delta variant and the so-called pingdemic were unfounded? the data refers to the — pingdemic were unfounded? the data refers to the second _ pingdemic were unfounded? the data refers to the second quarter. - pingdemic were unfounded? the data refers to the second quarter. we i refers to the second quarter. we probably— refers to the second quarter. we probably haven't heard much of the delta _ probably haven't heard much of the delta variant. a lot of these fears are quite — delta variant. a lot of these fears are quite new. we got nice strong growth _ are quite new. we got nice strong growth in — are quite new. we got nice strong growth in the second quarter, and decent _ growth in the second quarter, and decent growth forjune which was released — decent growth forjune which was released separately, there are some fears about — released separately, there are some fears about what july could bring. whilst _ fears about what july could bring. whilst we — fears about what july could bring. whilst we still have the reopening on the _ whilst we still have the reopening on the economy, there are concerns about— on the economy, there are concerns about the _ on the economy, there are concerns about the amount of people forced to self—isolate because of the kings
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from _ self—isolate because of the kings from the — self—isolate because of the kings from the nhs app, but also that people — from the nhs app, but also that people might have been staying at home _ people might have been staying at home instead of going out because they were — home instead of going out because they were fearful —— ping two. indeed — they were fearful —— ping two. indeed so _ they were fearful —— ping two. indeed. so many of the habits from last year people are keeping. i am still working from home, for example. the question now is, well that growth continued when and if the economy will ever get back to pre—pandemic levels? the economy will ever get back to pre-pandemic levels?— the economy will ever get back to pre-pandemic levels? well, actually, i think pre-pandemic levels? well, actually, i think most — pre-pandemic levels? well, actually, i think most people _ pre-pandemic levels? well, actually, i think most people in _ pre-pandemic levels? well, actually, i think most people in the _ pre-pandemic levels? well, actually, i think most people in the city - pre-pandemic levels? well, actually, i think most people in the city and i i think most people in the city and pins -- _ i think most people in the city and pins —— anticipating we'll be back to pre—pandemic levels by the end of the year _ to pre—pandemic levels by the end of the year. some forecasts suggest that perhaps by october. at the moment. — that perhaps by october. at the moment, we are about a.a% below where _ moment, we are about a.a% below where we _ moment, we are about a.a% below where we were at the tail end of 2019. _ where we were at the tail end of 2019. but— where we were at the tail end of 2019, but we must bear in mind that some _ 2019, but we must bear in mind that some economies and the us in particular— some economies and the us in particular are already there. they
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are back— particular are already there. they are back above pre—pandemic levels. australia. _ are back above pre—pandemic levels. australia, although they are suffering from lockdowns at the moment — suffering from lockdowns at the moment again. we are a bit of a lie guard. _ moment again. we are a bit of a lie guard. i'm— moment again. we are a bit of a lie guard, i'm afraid, when it comes to recovering — guard, i'm afraid, when it comes to recovering pre—pandemic levels. we are now— recovering pre—pandemic levels. we are now on — recovering pre—pandemic levels. we are now on the right course. we recovering pre-pandemic levels. we are now on the right course. we are, but as the chancellor _ are now on the right course. we are, but as the chancellor said, _ are now on the right course. we are, but as the chancellor said, there i are now on the right course. we are, but as the chancellor said, there is l but as the chancellor said, there is no room for complacency. jane, very good to talk to you. there we have it. growth for the second quarter coming in at a.8% today, courtesy of the office for national statistics. back to you. alice, many thanks. two children have been injured after a rollercoaster malfunctioned at an adventure park in the scottish highlands. emergency services were called to the landmark adventure park in carrbridge this morning, after reports of a mechanical failure. police say two children were treated at the scene for minor injuries and officers are continuing to investigate how the incident occurred. the government is today raising
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the price of mandatory hotel quarantine for red list travellers from £1,750 to £2,285 per adult. but some have complained of prison—like conditions in these hotels, and said the scheme is not fit—for—purpose. gaggan sabherwal reports. it's soul destroying in here. a slug. it's soul destroying in here. a slug- the _ it's soul destroying in here. a slug. the bbc _ it's soul destroying in here. a slug. the bbc has _ it's soul destroying in here. a slug. the bbc has received i it's soul destroying in here. a i slug. the bbc has received reports of conditions _ slug. the bbc has received reports of conditions described _ slug. the bbc has received reports of conditions described as - of conditions described as prisonlike in uk quarantine hotels. since february, arrivals from red list countries have to pay to quarantine and government approved facilities, but someone unhappy at their treatment and the price tag. over £2000 per adult. their treatment and the price tag. over £2000 peradult. if their treatment and the price tag. over £2000 per adult. if someone wants— over £2000 per adult. if someone wants an _ over £2000 per adult. if someone wants an experienced _ over £2000 per adult. if someone wants an experienced going - over £2000 per adult. if someone wants an experienced going to i wants an experienced going to prison. — wants an experienced going to prison. then _ wants an experienced going to prison, then they— wants an experienced going to prison, then they can - wants an experienced going to prison, then they can come i prison, then they can come in quarantine _ prison, then they can come in quarantine i— prison, then they can come in quarantine. i can _ prison, then they can come in quarantine. i can find - prison, then they can come in quarantine. i can find room i prison, then they can come in . quarantine. i can find room with windows— quarantine. i can find room with windows that _ quarantine. i can find room with windows that doesn't _ quarantine. i can find room with windows that doesn't open. i quarantine. i can find room with| windows that doesn't open. one official— windows that doesn't open. one official knocked _ windows that doesn't open. one official knocked on _ windows that doesn't open. one official knocked on my _ windows that doesn't open. one official knocked on my door- windows that doesn't open. one official knocked on my door andl
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windows that doesn't open. one i official knocked on my door and give me timings — official knocked on my door and give me timings for— official knocked on my door and give me timings for my— official knocked on my door and give me timings for my brakes. - official knocked on my door and give me timings for my brakes. they i official knocked on my door and give i me timings for my brakes. they made our stay— me timings for my brakes. they made our stay in _ me timings for my brakes. they made our stay in fear — me timings for my brakes. they made our stay in fear. if— me timings for my brakes. they made our stay in fear-— our stay in fear. if you are lucky, our stay in fear. if you are lucky, ou will our stay in fear. if you are lucky, you will get _ our stay in fear. if you are lucky, you will get a — our stay in fear. if you are lucky, you will get a good _ our stay in fear. if you are lucky, you will get a good hotel, i our stay in fear. if you are lucky, i you will get a good hotel, otherwise you will get a good hotel, otherwise you will get one with not so good reviews. ., ., ., , reviews. the food was appalling. half cooked. _ reviews. the food was appalling. half cooked, have _ reviews. the food was appalling. half cooked, have not _ reviews. the food was appalling. half cooked, have not cooked. . reviews. the food was appalling. i half cooked, have not cooked. there are days _ half cooked, have not cooked. there are days i _ half cooked, have not cooked. there are days ijust couldn't eat it. this— are days ijust couldn't eat it. this man _ are days ijust couldn't eat it. this man returned to leicester after a family funeral in pakistan. a muslim, he was repeatedly served pork. i muslim, he was repeatedly served ork. �* . ., pork. i didn't eat until the doctor saw me. pork. i didn't eat until the doctor saw me- he _ pork. i didn't eat until the doctor saw me. he provided _ pork. i didn't eat until the doctor saw me. he provided me - pork. i didn't eat until the doctor| saw me. he provided me mashed pork. i didn't eat until the doctor- saw me. he provided me mashed potato and vegetables — saw me. he provided me mashed potato and vegetables. this _ saw me. he provided me mashed potato and vegetables-— and vegetables. this mother of five sent over and vegetables. this mother of five spent over £5,000 _ and vegetables. this mother of five spent over £5,000 on _ and vegetables. this mother of five spent over £5,000 on a _ and vegetables. this mother of five spent over £5,000 on a stay i and vegetables. this mother of five spent over £5,000 on a stay for i and vegetables. this mother of five | spent over £5,000 on a stay for her family. we spent over £5,000 on a stay for her famil . ~ . ., , spent over £5,000 on a stay for her famil . ~ . . , ., ., family. we have family there who are either d in: family. we have family there who are either dying or _ family. we have family there who are either dying or ill— family. we have family there who are either dying or ill and _ family. we have family there who are either dying or ill and we _ family. we have family there who are either dying or ill and we have - family. we have family there who are either dying or ill and we have no i either dying or ill and we have no choice, we have to go. this woman returned to — choice, we have to go. this woman returned to the _ choice, we have to go. this woman returned to the uk _ choice, we have to go. this woman returned to the uk to _ choice, we have to go. this woman returned to the uk to renew- choice, we have to go. this woman returned to the uk to renew a i choice, we have to go. this womanl returned to the uk to renew a south african visa. she had to stay 20 days and believes she caught covid at the hotel. i’m days and believes she caught covid at the hotel-— at the hotel. i'm absolutely convinced _ at the hotel. i'm absolutely convinced it _ at the hotel. i'm absolutely convinced it had _ at the hotel. i'm absolutely convinced it had somethingj at the hotel. i'm absolutely i convinced it had something to do with the — convinced it had something to do with the cleanliness of the room and the air— with the cleanliness of the room and the air conditioning unit. and when
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one of— the air conditioning unit. and when one of the — the air conditioning unit. and when one of the guard took me out on one of the _ one of the guard took me out on one of the days. — one of the guard took me out on one of the days, he admitted to me that i of the days, he admitted to me that i was _ of the days, he admitted to me that i was not _ of the days, he admitted to me that i was not the only case in the hotel — i was not the only case in the hotel. they wanted to keep me in my room _ hotel. they wanted to keep me in my room for— hotel. they wanted to keep me in my room for ten — hotel. they wanted to keep me in my room for ten days. i said, that's not happening. i had three guards in front of— not happening. i had three guards in front of me — not happening. i had three guards in front of me and i had one guard behind — front of me and i had one guard behind me, spraying the very carpet i behind me, spraying the very carpet i walked _ behind me, spraying the very carpet i walked on— behind me, spraying the very carpet i walked on that had not been hoovered. that's what made me feel like a _ hoovered. that's what made me feel like a leper — hoovered. that's what made me feel like a leper. the hoovered. that's what made me feel like a leper-— like a leper. the department of health and _ like a leper. the department of health and social— like a leper. the department of health and social care - like a leper. the department of health and social care said... l the boss of fast fashion
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online retailer boohoo has insisted its clothing brands are not throwaway. speaking to our business correspondent sean farringdon, john lyttle said boohoo had a clear strategy for being more sustainable. boohoo chief executivejohn lyttle is rolling out hundreds of millions of pounds of investment across factories, offices and distribution centres like this one in burnley. this is where your order gets put together. when the picker is picking, picking out an order but actually it's a different customer, different brands. creating thousands of jobs but almost more crucially for his business, installing more automation. customers shopping online demand it. consumer habits have changed to wanting to buy online but equally the immediacy of when they want that order. so if you think of it today, a package can be ordered 10:55pm, it can be picked, it can be packed, it can go to the courier and it can be in your home by tomorrow. that's probably one
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of the biggest trends we've seen in the last sort of 18 months. that's only getting greater and greater is what i would say. so will same—day delivery become important? absolutely. not quite yet. at the moment, it's all about next day. is that a target for you? i think without a doubt it's to happen. boohoo isn't a business that can only look forward as it still deals with the fallout from revelations about poor conditions and illegal pay for workers making clothes for the retailer in leicester. one investigation found mr lyttle was personally very aware of what was going on. shouldn't you have resigned? i think my role is to make sure if there's a problem, to fix it. if i had resigned at the time, it would have set us back in terms of the time it would have taken to do what we needed to do. so for me i don't recognise that as the answer. i think the answer is always to, if you've got a problem, fix it. it's notjust the treatment of workers that make these packages that's an issue for the industry. in a week where we've had a code red warning for humanity,
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the fashion world has big questions to answer about making these products sustainable. can the industry work for the planet and the workers in it? yes, is my answer to that. if i look across all our brands and i look at the number of items and the average number of times a year that somebody buys, we don't see that as a throwaway. sometimes fast fashion is seen as i'd buy it, wear it once and then i throw it away. that's certainly from the data we have, we wouldn't correlate with that. looking at all this we have here, this is here because people want to keep buying, buying, buying. even if they're keeping it, they're buying, buying, buying. that's not good for a planet we need to get on top of, is it? the reality is we all have to wear clothes. i'm joined now by noelle hatley, senior lecturer at manchester fashion institute.
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good afternoon. lots to discuss. what you make ofjohn little's clear strategy to be sustainable? i what you make of john little's clear strategy to be sustainable?- strategy to be sustainable? i think it's aood strategy to be sustainable? i think it's good they _ strategy to be sustainable? i think it's good they are _ strategy to be sustainable? i think it's good they are focusing - strategy to be sustainable? i think it's good they are focusing on i it's good they are focusing on sustainability. it is clearly a reaction to increased societal interest and from their customers interest and from their customers interest in sustainability. it is following what other fast fashion brands are already doing, such as zara and h&m. they already have products which have some sustainable characteristics, which is whatjohn proposing they should do. the problem is that the fast fashion business model is based on low cost and high speed and that is basically unsustainable. i challenge the comment that some products are worn only once. i think dresses are
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likely to be worn once, posted on instagram and not warrant again. fine instagram and not warrant again. one wonders really — instagram and not warrant again. one wonders really what is the meaning of the word sustainable within the fashion industry? ok. of the word sustainable within the fashion industry?— fashion industry? ok, so this lack of an agreed _ fashion industry? ok, so this lack of an agreed definition _ fashion industry? ok, so this lack of an agreed definition is - fashion industry? ok, so this lack of an agreed definition is actually| of an agreed definition is actually one of the main problem is that there is as a society and as an industry. and it is how some fast fashion brands have got away with declaring certain products or actions are sustainable because there is no agreed definition. for example, there is nothing stopping a brand saying something sustainable when it mightjust be that it was made from organic cotton. it could be that it's made in a factory that doesn't treat its workers fairly. for me, my definition of sustainability has been a product has been made without any exploitation, either of the environment or of the people directly within the industry, sorry,
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within the supply chain or the business itself. that means customers are paying a true cost, rather than an artificially low cost. i would also add that transparency is an important part of sustainability and i thinkjohn did touch on this, so it really depends how far they are prepared to go in terms of declaring which country products are being made and, naming the factories and a lot of other details like that. and finally, i think i would say for sustainability and fashion is that when the businesses start to measure success not just businesses start to measure success notjust by economic factors but also by social and ethicalfactors as well. also by social and ethical factors as well. �* , ., , ., ~ ., also by social and ethical factors as well. �* , ., ~ ., ., as well. briefly, i was talking to a ollin: as well. briefly, i was talking to a polling exoert _ as well. briefly, i was talking to a polling expert the _ as well. briefly, i was talking to a polling expert the other - as well. briefly, i was talking to a polling expert the other day i polling expert the other day who said that young people want to be more green, they want to buy sustainably, but they don't necessarily want to talk their pockets. are those things incompatible? to pockets. are those things incompatible?— pockets. are those things incomatible? ., ., incompatible? to some extent, and that's art incompatible? to some extent, and that's part of _ incompatible? to some extent, and that's part of the _ incompatible? to some extent, and
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that's part of the problem. - incompatible? to some extent, and that's part of the problem. they i incompatible? to some extent, and that's part of the problem. they are bombarded with images, aspirational images which they can try to achieve by buying inexpensive clothing, they can shop 20 a7 and they are encouraged by fashion brands to shop with buy now and last chance to buy and all the sorts of things. and of course, yes, they have limited budgets, so it's quite understandable why they're understandable why they�* re considering understandable why they're considering these clothes. finally, i think there is a complete disconnection with many people about how clothes are made, how many human hands are actually involved in producing clothes, so there is a complete disconnection between them paying £5 for a product and actually what has been involved in getting that product to market. ok. what has been involved in getting that product to market. ok, thank ou ve that product to market. ok, thank you very much- — that product to market. ok, thank you very much. fascinating - that product to market. ok, thank. you very much. fascinating subject. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. hello, there. there's been some decent dry and sunny weather today, but also more cloud — particularly across the south. this area of low pressure, though,
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has been spoiling things across the north and the west of the country, bringing stronger winds, more cloud and also showery bursts of rain — some of which has been quite heavy in places. now through this evening and overnight it stays windy with further showers or longer spells of rain across western scotland, northern ireland. further south that you are, apart from the odd shower and cloud in the central south west quadrant, it will be mainly dry with clear spells and a relatively mild night to come — certainly milder across the north of the country than the previous night. low pressure, then, for friday affects the north of the country so continues windy with sunshine and showers for scotland, northern ireland. higher pressure further south — so here, mainly dry for much of england, wales. a little bit of cloud in the south, but some decent spells of sunshine, and those temperatures reaching highs of around 22 or 23 celsius. now, as we head on into the weekend, it looks like it's going to be quite mixed. there'll be variable amounts of cloud, a few showers, but also some sunshine.
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over this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines. gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland are awarded record grades after exams were cancelled for a second year. some teachers say the assessments are more accurate than exams. they have been assessed and awarded results on the merit of what they have produced, and that can't be taken away from them. a change in self—isolation rules in northern ireland — the bbc understands fully vaccinated people who are a close contact of a covid case will no longer have to stay at home. the nhs waiting list in england hits a record high, of almost 5.5 million. the un warns of an unfolding humanitarian disaster in afghanistan, as taliban fighters capture the strategically important city of ghazni. two children are injured after a rollercoaster malfunctions at an adventure park in scotland.
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and calls for the dangerous dogs act to be reviewed. critics say the 30—year—old law doesn't work, and dog attacks are up — we'll hearfrom one of them gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland have received another set of record grades, after exams were disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. top grades rose by 2.7% to almost 29%, while the pass rate is also slightly up. the government had to cancel exams for a second consecutive year, so pupils�* grades have been based on teacher assessment, drawing some criticism of grade inflation. with the latest, here's our education correspondent, elaine dunkley.
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the moment anxiety and fear disappears. in their grasp, the gcse results these students need to put a difficultjourney behind them. there's no words for it, really. it's just utter relief at this point. as soon as i opened my paper and i saw the results that i've got, and what i've worked so hard for over the last five years — especially with the disruption we faced — it'sjust the tears ofjoy. i couldn't control it. definitely satisfied, definitely will get me to where i want to be. i'm also a level—nine achieving student and i haven't got any nines today but, like i said before, the sky is the limit, so we go forth. the results mark the end of high school. this year's students have felt the most disruption to their studies, with lockdowns and remote learning. i have to be honest, it was hard at times seeing your child cry, saying, "mummy, i don't know what's happening. will we have gcses? " and trying to reassure them, but you know you've got
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all that turmoil inside. but the children, like i said, i've been humbled by their characters, how they've come out still smiling, and to receive these results, it's just been wow. with exams cancelled and replaced with teacher—assessed grades, this headteacher says the different approach means comparisons with previous years are unhelpful. i just don't think this is a year that we can compare to previous years. it's a very different context. the materials were published online, the students had access to them, they knew what the topics were going to be, and the direction for the revision. you would only expect, therefore, that revision to be more focused and therefore for them to perform better. students in wales and northern ireland also received results today. compared to a—levels, grade inflation for gcses has been modest — but there is concern today's results show a further widening of the gap in inequalities. in england, 61% of pupils in independent schools received top grades,
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compared with 26% in state schools. the pandemic has of course exacerbated and amplified those inequalities, and that's why we were so determined to get young people back into school. schools were the last to close, the first to open as we emerged from the pandemic. labour says, without a more ambitious recovery plan for education, inequality could be the lasting legacy of covid. what i want to see is a first—class education for every child, whoever they are and wherever they come from. what we've seen today is baked—in inequality, the gap between those going to private schools and going to state schools has got bigger rather than smaller. today's results are about more than academic achievement — it's about recognising the struggles that many have faced. molly has done a btec in business. unfortunately, i lost my step—grandad and my dad in may and june, so, yeah, it'sjust been, like, really tough. anything for me, just
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being a pass is going to, like, really make me obviously happy, but if i get anything better than a pass, then — considering the year i've had — i'm going to be extremely happy with myself. these students have studied through nearly two years of disruption. in turbulent times, success is all the sweeter. elaine dunkley, bbc news. earlier i spoke to our correspondent simon ward, who has been at south nottinghamshire academy in radcliffe—on—trent. there has been lots of happy faces here today, as well. much of the national talk over gcses has been about that grade inflation and they have seen that here, although not as much as last year. we were here at 8:30am as pupils came here to collect those envelopes — lots of excitement here and emotion as they got their results, many of them getting those higher scores of seven and above. it is a very different year. there's home—schooling and lots of online learning, but these pupils say it has all been worth it. all nines, apart from i
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an eight in english lit! that's fantastic, is that what you were expecting? no, not really. i knew i did well in some subjects, | but not literally all of them, so... | i don't even know what to say! it was amazing, i can't believe it. it's still a bit like... i don't know what to do, almost! chuffed. did not expect it at all. i expected to get some sevens but it's... - chuffed, i can't. .. speechless. so good, i'm so proud of myself. throughout this year it's been so hard but i've got— a good friendship group, i as well, so it's all gone well. joyful scenes here today and as we know the formal exams were cancelled for the second year in a row. schools had the option of how they assess pupils. joining me is the head teacher, dan philpotts. dan, how did you do it here? the process with teacher—assessed grades at sna was that we have
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compiled a portfolio of evidence for every student and what they included was some of their previous work — so course work, mock examination results, practical scores. we did some in—class assessments and then we actually had a final examinations week where they sat unseen exams in exam conditions. and on the basis of that we came to a holisticjudgement, and students subsequently have got their grades. this is the covid generation — how do you think they will be judged in further education and employment now? well, this year is unique and i think they should be judged on their merits. the grades they have all achieved is absolutely legitimate — it's proven work, evidenced work that they have done throughout a very challenging period. so i think it's difficult to compare, but certainly this is unique and this cohort, nor subsequent or further cohorts should be disadvantaged either way.
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thank you very much forjoining us. we don't know when exams will return to normal but certainly they're hoping that school life will be better after the summer holidays. i'm joined now by grainne hallahan, a senior content writer at the online education platform tes — who is herself a former teacher. good afternoon. with gcses, an increase in the top grades, although not as stark as four a—levels. what else have you made of the results we have seen today? tithe else have you made of the results we have seen today?— have seen today? one of the things we can see — have seen today? one of the things we can see from _ have seen today? one of the things we can see from the _ have seen today? one of the things we can see from the results - have seen today? one of the things we can see from the results as i have seen today? one of the things we can see from the results as we | we can see from the results as we have a widening of that long—standing results gap between the free school meals students and other students. that is quite disappointing and when we look at this school by school we can see the independent schools and private schools have improved by four percentage points, whereas in state
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schools it is more around 2.2. this is a great shame and sad to say and hard to tell whether this is from the impact of the pandemic or because of the nature in which these assessments have been conducted this year. assessments have been conducted this ear. . ., , ,., year. hard to tell but we reported re eatedl year. hard to tell but we reported repeatedly during _ year. hard to tell but we reported repeatedly during the _ year. hard to tell but we reported repeatedly during the months i year. hard to tell but we reported repeatedly during the months of. year. hard to tell but we reported i repeatedly during the months of the pandemic about the inequalities of educational opportunities. is it the case that this may be a depressing finding but maybe not so surprising? it is definitely not surprising. we see this difference every single year and you're completely right. we saw all through the pandemic that state schools struggle to get the technology. they didn't have online learning platforms in the same way they do with the private sector so ten to switch to go to online mining and it was easier for those skills who already had it setup. it is understandable but something we now need to address and consider as we move forward because just to accept
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it and shrug and say this is just what happens is not good enough for the students most vulnerable in our society. we need to make social change and make sure every student has the same opportunities and same chances when they go to school. [30 chances when they go to school. do ou chances when they go to school. do you also worry that this particular cohort of young people, for those who didn't do that well, they may be a tendency in future years to think those were bumpy years because they were covid yet but this person hasn't done that well? it is were covid yet but this person hasn't done that well?- were covid yet but this person hasn't done that well? it is a real shame. hasn't done that well? it is a real shame- the _ hasn't done that well? it is a real shame. the problem _ hasn't done that well? it is a real shame. the problem with - hasn't done that well? it is a real shame. the problem with this i hasn't done that well? it is a real i shame. the problem with this year and 2020 grades is that the results were not made from exams. you cannot judge assessments in the same way because they were not assessed in the same way and therefore when they go out into the workplace, people who are from more disadvantaged backgrounds and don't have the same advantage as we see from more affluent parts of society, by which i mean you may get a job because your dad's friend has got you an interview somewhere and you can use your family connections and people
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who are more wealthy and have that opportunity to do. exams mean more students from disadvantaged backgrounds because it opens doors that were otherwise closed to them. so you would not be a fan, i take it, of replacing exams with assessment, because there is talk of that. b. assessment, because there is talk of that. . ., assessment, because there is talk of that. �* ., ., assessment, because there is talk of that. r ., ., ., ~' assessment, because there is talk of that. ., ., ., ,, , , that. a lot of talk. i can see why eo - le that. a lot of talk. i can see why people are _ that. a lot of talk. i can see why people are defending _ that. a lot of talk. i can see why people are defending the - that. a lot of talk. i can see why | people are defending the teacher assessed grades. today should be a day of celebration, we should not be talking down rates that mean an awful lot to these young people. however we have to caution that we are not going to move towards a system that would further disadvantage people already vulnerable in society. we know exams give equal and fair chance to all students and that is what we should move back to, i think talk about going back to complete the teacher assessed race at this point when we are still coming out a pandemic and their own has already been so much
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disruption, we don't need that back, teachers teaching as normal and if we want to question that way we do gcses that is something we could consider in the future but now it is not the time. consider in the future but now it is rrot the time-— consider in the future but now it is not the time. thank you very much. grainne hallahan _ not the time. thank you very much. grainne hallahan from _ not the time. thank you very much. grainne hallahan from the - not the time. thank you very much. grainne hallahan from the online i grainne hallahan from the online platform tes. thank you. it's understood stormont ministers have agreed to change the rules on self—isolation in northern ireland from next week. fully—vaccinated people who are a close contact of a covid case will no longer have to stay at home — but are advised to be tested — bringing northern ireland in line with the rest of the uk — as our ireland correspondent, chris page explains. well, stormont ministers are meeting at the moment in their regular review of covid restrictions here in northern ireland. over the course of the summer they have gradually been easing restrictions — for example, tourists have come back to this part of the uk, as you can see there are plenty
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of visitors here at stormont right now, but the bigger picture is that covid regulations here are still more strict than in england, scotland and wales. also the infection rate at the moment is the highest of any of the uk's devolved nations and the vaccination uptake is the lowest. 85% of people here or thereabouts have had a fistjab. across the uk the figure is 89%. as the background to the discussions today, they have made their first decision and that is they will be easing the rules on self—isolation from monday. if you come into contact with someone who has tested positive for covid, you don't have to self—isolate as long as you are fully vaccinated and you have a negative covid test. that will broadly bring northern ireland into line with the rest of uk, similar measure coming into force on england on monday and measures already in place in scotland and wales. the other items on the agenda, it's believed, include whether to lift the one—metre social distancing requirement,
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which is still in force for indoor hospitality venues — the hospitality industry would like ministers to do away with that restriction. also it is possible that exhibitions and conferences could be given the green light once again. education again being discussed and we understand that ministers have decided to scrap classroom bubbles whenever the new school term resumes here in september. but they are going to keep on face coverings for secondary school pupils, post—primary pupils, for six weeks from the beginning of the term, though that measure will be kept under review. still plenty on the agenda in that meeting of the devolved power sharing executive at stormont, there are five parties in the coalition so that decision—making isn't always very quick, but this is a key meeting on northern ireland pot continuing quick, but this is a key meeting on northern ireland's continuing response to the pandemic. no sign that ministers are preparing to go as far as their counterparts in london,
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cardiff and edinburgh have gone in terms of lifting nearly all restrictions. the headlines on bbc news... record gcse grades achieved in england wales and northern ireland, after a second year of cancelled exams. in northern ireland, fully vaccinated people who are a close contact of a covid case will no longer have to stay at home from next week. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a record high. aid agencies have warned of a catastrophe for civilians in afghanistan, as the taliban continues to advance across the country, despite ongoing peace talks. negotiations between the militants and the afghan government, are taking place in doha, in the gulf state of qatar. the taliban delegation says life under its rule will be different for afghan civilians compared to the 1990s, but the fear is the group's strict interpretation
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of sharia law will return. with more, here's yalda hakim. afghanistan 2021. the taliban are back, taking city after city from government forces. the withdrawal of foreign troops has left a power vacuum the taliban are rushing to fill. if they take power, many people here fear a return to their brutal regime of the �*90s, characterised by public executions, stonings and girls being banned from school. despite the historic peace deal that was signed between the us and the taliban in february 2020, and the ongoing peace talks taking place in doha, qatar, between the afghan government and the taliban, no progress has been made. i travelled to doha to meet with suhail shaheen, a member of the taliban peace negotiation team. if you were to return to kabul, how would you govern? there was in the past some mistakes that we have learned from,
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because at that time we were new to government. to stop education of women and girls, that is not our goal. of course, education is their right, and it is much needed. while suhail shaheen continues to talk about peace, it's clearly not a view shared by taliban commanders closing in on afghanistan's cities. back in kabul, a taliban commander from helmand agreed to meet me. what do you want? do you want the taliban regime to come back into power, or do you think there should be a power—sharing deal with the current government, like the discussions that are being had in doha? translation: we would be happy to have a joint government under. the umbrella of islamic sharia, a sharia—based system in afghanistan, like the system the taliban used to have.
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if we talk about law and order and justice, if someone were to steal or commit adultery, what should happen to them? translation: all this is clearly stated in the koran. _ if someone steals, there is a punishment. for example, for some thefts, the punishment is cutting off the hand and foot. and if someone commits adultery, then they should be stoned. and if there isn't a political resolution to this conflict, are you prepared to take kabul by force? translation: | am tryingj to defeat the government. and they are trying to make me disappear. in the end, we'll be compelled to kill one another. increasingly, it appears there is a disconnect between what is being said
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by the political office in doha and what the taliban commanders and foot soldiers are doing on the ground in afghanistan. but the vice—president of afghanistan remains defiant. this group in doha, they are a deceptive facade of a very dark reality called the taliban. so, in your view, have they changed? no, not only they have not changed, they have become savvier in deceiving. with the government adamant to defy a new era of sharia law and the taliban making significant gains, afghans now seem to be caught up in a savage war that has taken on a life of its own. yalda hakim, bbc news, kabul. earlier we heard from our correspondent in kabul, yogita limaye. she had more detail on the tenth provincial capital that is currently under taliban control. the taliban are continuing an aggressive offensive
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in the south of this country. they already control most of the north of afghanistan. in the south today, we've seen that they've taken over ghazni, which is the provincial capital of the ghazni province, it's only about 150 kilometres south of kabul, it's a strategically important city between kabul and kandahar. the taliban made the claim in the morning, a provincial council member from the afghan government has told the bbc that all of the city has been captured by the insurgent group, except a police base on the outskirts of the city. in kandahar, which is afghanistan's second largest city, there is a fierce battle raging between government forces and the taliban. yesterday, they broke into the city's centraljail and freed more than 1,000 prisoners. in lashkar gar, which is the capital of the helmand province, yesterday they took over the police headquarters which the taliban would see as a major victory for them.
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the afghan government is saying that the are fiercely defending all of the major cities of afghanistan, they do still control them, but violence is intensifying in them, as the taliban push to try to gain control of strategically important economic centres and cities. morale is low among afghan troops. in some areas, the taliban walked in and took over, no fight was put up. while this was done for strategic reasons in some areas, we also know that afghan forces didn't receive ammunition or even basic food supplies in some parts of the country. president ashraf ghani knows that he needs to change that if he wants to stand a chance against the taliban, and so he has been trying to rally support, rally pro—government forces against the taliban. yesterday, he went to mazar—i—sharif, which is a hugely important city for afghanistan. if that falls, it will be a major setback for the afghan government. what he will also be thinking of is that at the end of august
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all international troops will withdraw from this country. they have been relying on significant air support from the us military. it is unclear whether that will continue after the end of august. earlier i spoke to charlie faulkener, a journalist working in kabul. she described the current mood in the city. at the moment the climate of fear here is severe, especially following the reports yesterday by us intelligence officials stating that their estimates of kabul facing attacks within six months is reduced to three. people are becoming increasingly worried and ghazni was taken today, and thatjust means that more... that is south—west of kabul and means more of the surrounding area of the capital city is falling into taliban hands. already in the north and east, it is predominantly
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taliban controlled. we have seen a major movement of people coming into kabul from outlying areas as the taliban have taken land, and moving out of afghanistan. do you have some sense of the scale of this and how long it is expected to continue? at the moment we are seeing huge influx of afghans pouring into the capital. i was in an unofficial idp camp in the north of kabul a couple of days ago and it is absolutely chaotic. the government seems wholly unprepared for this humanitarian crisis. this camp was just a small patch of parkland sandwiched between two busy roads. many people didn't even have tents to sleep in, they were sleeping on the floor. there is no sanitation and no official food distribution. they are just relying on the goodwill of wealthier afghans
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to help deliver food. that was in the north of kabul, on the outskirts. even in the centre there is a park and that is also now filling up with displaced afghans who have nowhere to go. their only option is to come to kabul and many have no relatives here, no money, they have no choice but to flee the violence. what is the feeling amongst afghan women at the moment with the threat of the taliban coming? there is a huge fear around that. i spoke to one young lady who was in her 20s. she is from badakhshan province and she had come into kabul for training for a few days and after a couple of days in that district it fell
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into the hands of the taliban. she now cannot return home. she is an educated and working woman, which means she would be targeted, but also she spent 20 years or so of her life living in a certain way and she is not prepared to go and live under strict taliban rule, having to remain indoors, wearing a burqa if she is outside and having to be chaperoned by a male companion. she has carved out a life for herself and she can't even see her family because she is too worried about his safety. the actress una stubbs has died at the age of 8a. it is understood she has been ill for a few months. her death was confirmed this afternoon by her agent. lizo mzimba looks back at her life.
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there is plenty of room to pass! una stubbs could — there is plenty of room to pass! una stubbs could hardly have asked for a better big—screen debut. cast opposite the country's biggest box office star, cliff richard. we are not going under boss! sign of how you would get very far on your holiday on this. we are on our way to an engagement stops and she always wanted to perform. at 16 she joined the chorus at the london palladium, she left coursework behind for some holiday. although it was a aood behind for some holiday. although it was a good life. _ behind for some holiday. although it was a good life, it _ behind for some holiday. although it was a good life, it is _ behind for some holiday. although it was a good life, it is the _ behind for some holiday. although it was a good life, it is the most i was a good life, it is the most underpaid, hard—working and least respected really, or it was then. and just to break away was fantastic.— and just to break away was fantastic. ~ . , fantastic. like so many multi talented performers - fantastic. like so many multi talented performers of i fantastic. like so many multi talented performers of the l fantastic. like so many multi i talented performers of the time, fantastic. like so many multi - talented performers of the time, she could dance... she could sing... sam
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and she could act. you don't half talk some _ and she could act. you don't half talk some rubbish. _ and she could act. you don't half talk some rubbish. she - and she could act. you don't half talk some rubbish. she was i and she could act. you don't half talk some rubbish. she was cast | and she could act. you don't half. talk some rubbish. she was cast in what went on _ talk some rubbish. she was cast in what went on to _ talk some rubbish. she was cast in what went on to be _ talk some rubbish. she was cast in what went on to be one _ talk some rubbish. she was cast in what went on to be one of- talk some rubbish. she was cast in what went on to be one of tv's - what went on to be one of tv�*s biggest shows as the daughter of the bigoted alf garnett in till death us do part. it bigoted alf garnett in till death us do part. , , ., , do part. it will be us tories he will be revolting. _ do part. it will be us tories he will be revolting. in _ do part. it will be us tories he will be revolting. in the - do part. it will be us tories he will be revolting. in the 1970s| do part. it will be us tories he - will be revolting. in the 1970s and 80s, she will be revolting. in the 1970s and 80s. she was _ will be revolting. in the 1970s and 80s. she was a — will be revolting. in the 1970s and 80s, she was a fearsome - will be revolting. in the 1970s and 80s, she was a fearsome aunt - will be revolting. in the 1970s and i 80s, she was a fearsome aunt sally. 805, she was a fearsome aunt sally. i don't wish to impose upon you. oppositejon pertwee's wenzel opposite jon pertwee's wenzel gummidge. oppositejon pertwee's wenzel gummidge. 20 years later she was still delighting children in the west which sentence. three weeks it will be in this capital's birthday. it falls on the same day every year. recently she won millions of fans across the world as mrs hudson.
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boys, you've got another one! in the award-winning _ boys, you've got another one! in the award-winning sherlock _ boys, you've got another one! in the award-winning sherlock star - boys, you've got another one! in the award—winning sherlock star did you bring me tea in the morning? iwhen bring me tea in the morning? when ou think bring me tea in the morning? when you think it— bring me tea in the morning? when you think it came _ bring me tea in the morning? when you think it came from? _ bring me tea in the morning? when you think it came from? your - bring me tea in the morning? when you think it came from? your mother has a _ you think it came from? your mother has a lot_ you think it came from? your mother has a lotto _ you think it came from? your mother has a lot to answer for. still showin: has a lot to answer for. still showing she _ has a lot to answer for. still showing she had _ has a lot to answer for. still showing she had a - has a lot to answer for. still showing she had a true - has a lot to answer for. st ll showing she had a true star has a lot to answer for. st ii showing she had a true star quality rights to the end. the actress una stubbs, who has died at the age of 8a. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. hello, there. there's been some decent dry and sunny weather today, but also more cloud — particularly across the south. this area of low pressure, though, has been spoiling things across the north and the west of the country, bringing stronger winds, more cloud and also showery bursts of rain — some of which has been quite heavy in places. now through this evening and overnight it stays windy with further showers or longer spells of rain across western scotland, northern ireland. further south that you are, apart from the odd shower and cloud in the central south west quadrant, it will be mainly dry with clear spells and a relatively mild night to come — certainly milder across the north of the country than the previous night. low pressure, then, for friday affects the north of the country
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so continues windy with sunshine and showers for scotland, northern ireland. higher pressure further south — so here, mainly dry for much of england, wales. a little bit of cloud in the south, but some decent spells of sunshine, and those temperatures reaching highs of around 22 or 23 celsius. now, as we head on into the weekend, it looks like it's going to be quite mixed. there'll be variable amounts of cloud, a few showers, but also some sunshine.
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hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: oh my gosh. gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland are awarded record grades after exams were cancelled for a second year. some teachers say the assessments are more accurate than exams. a change in self isolation rules in northern ireland. the bbc understands fully—vaccinated people who are a close contact of a covid case will no longer
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have to stay at home. actress una stubbs has died at the age of 84, after an age—related illness. the nhs waiting list in england hits a record high, of almost 5.5 million. the un warns of an unfolding humanitarian disaster in afghanistan, as taliban fighters capture the strategically important city of ghazni. and calls for the dangerous dogs act to be reviewed. critics say the 30—year—old law doesn't work, and dog attacks are up. we'll hear from one of them. sport centre with chetan. good afternoon.
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england's cricketrers have been frustrated by india's openers — and the rain — on the first day of the second test at lords. it's been a bit stop start so far, the bad weather curtailing most of the morning session. opening the batting, rohit sharma and kl rahul have reached a 100 run partnership. india are currently 108—0. james anderson passed a fitness test and looking to pick up the first wicket of the day. england have brought in moeen ali, haseeb hameed and mark wood. wood in for the injured stuart broad. ishant sharma for shardul thakur is india's only change. another bit of cricket news to bring you — southern brave's smriti mandhana is leaving the hundred after helping them get to the final. the indian star helped them to the final yesterday with 78 runs but will fly home to see her family before her country's tour of australia. she will take no further part in the tournament and will be replaced by ireland's gaby lewis. chelsea fans are still waiting for confirmation of romelu lukaku's move back to stamford bridge. we understand that deal
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is done forjust under £100 million. and they could recoup some of that money by selling tammy abraham to roma. their general manager — tiago pinto — is in london, hoping to negotiate that move for the england striker. the 23—year—old was left on the bench as chelsea won the super cup last night, beating villareal on penalties. arsenal are also said to be interested. arsenal midfielderjoe willock has agreed personal terms with newcastle, and will travel to the north—east for a medical ahead of a permanent move. the 21—year—old spent last season on loan at stjames' park. the deal is expected to be around £25 million. eight—time paralympic equestrian champion sophie christiansen said she is absolutely heartbroken she will miss the tokyo games, due to a minor veterinary
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issue with her horse. christiansen, who has cerebral palsy, has won ten medals across the last four games, including three golds at both london 2012 and rio 2016. she will be replaced by 2019 european gold medallist georgia wilson, who will make her games debut. christiansen said she is already looking ahead to the paralympics in paris. it's always the case with equestrian sport. you are working with an animal and anything could go wrong. with my horse, there was this little veterinary issue that we just couldn't get right on time. you know, that sport. —— that's. jo konta will play coco gauff in the last 16 at the canadian open later. the british number one beat elina svitolina in three sets. konta's missed a lot of tennis after pulling out of wimbledon because she was a close contact of someone who tested positive
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for covid, and then missed the olympics herself because she tested positive. however, she is back, and showing some good form ahead of the us open which starts at the end of the month. motogp rider maverick vinales has been withdrawn from this weekend's austrian grand prix and suspended by his yamaha team. they've accused the spaniard of damaging his bike's engine at last weekend's race and claim he could have caused "serious risks" to himself and other riders. yamaha have yet to decide his future and won't replace him this weekend. the london marathon hs announced their elite line ups for october's race. world record holder and olympic silver medallist brigid kosgei of kenya will return to action to defend her title. the reigning men's champion shura kitata of ethopia will also be back despite failing to finish last weekend's olympic marathon because of the conditions. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. almost 5.5 million people in england were waiting to start routine nhs hospital
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treatment at the end ofjune. it's the highest number since records began in 2007. here's luxmy gopal. waiting in pain for nearly a year. lucy morley williams needs a hip replacement to treat her arthritis. this is limbo. my life is disabled. it's on hold. it's almost like a little grieving process every time it gets worse, so it's psychological as well. joanna crane was told in april she needs surgery to replace a leaky heart valve. she's still waiting. it obviously does get to you. you are kind of living every day hoping that you're going to get that call, because i know that i need that surgery and the more i'm waiting i know that i'm getting more unhealthy because of it. a record number of people are now waiting for routine nhs hospital treatment in england — nearly 5.5 million. there has been a drop in those waiting for more than a year, down to just over 300,000. but the number waiting
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for more than two years has gone up to nearly 6,000, a 46% increase on the previous month, according to the royal college of surgeons. the organisation says demand for hospital beds and staff shortages from being pinged by the covid app are causing a volatile mix of pressures on surgery. i think waiting lists will rise because there will be a huge increase in demand, and i think again people understand that, but the important thing is that we are providing the nhs with the resources that it needs. the government says it's given the nhs a billion pounds this year to clear the backlog, but a leading nhs members' organisation says that isn't nearly enough. what we can't do is magic treatment out of thin air. what we need is money, but we also need to invest that money in a larger workforce and that is fundamental to getting through this backlog. i have an appointment at 2:20pm to collect an ecg monitor.
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doncaster royal infirmary is trying to drive down waiting lists using a drive—through service. instead of going into the clinic, patients fit heart monitors themselves at home. it's much quicker. the patient experience is better and the quality is just the same and that's meant that we've been able to do more tests that we have to do face—to—face on site. while efforts are making some inroads into the backlog, there are warnings that waiting lists could more than double by next year, and many patients must continue their wait without knowing for sure when it will end. luxmy gopal, bbc news. two children have been injured after a rollercoaster malfunctioned at an adventure park in the scottish highlands emergency services were called to the landmark adventure park in carrbridge this morning, after reports of a mechanical failure. police say two children were treated at the scene for minor injuries and officers are continuing to investigate how the incident occurred. animal welfare charities say
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the dangerous dogs act needs a complete overhaul, on this the 30th anniversary of it coming into force. four breeds can currently be seized by police and either be put down or kept under strict conditions, but campaigners argue the law is too broad, and that each individual animal's temperament should be the deciding factor. with more, here's charlotte gallagher. meet alex. he's ten years old. alex. in dog years, a senior citizen. but his life is very different to that of most other dogs. that's because he's beenjudged to be a pit bull—type animal — a banned breed in the uk. his owner sian is only allowed to keep him if she sticks to certain conditions. his life is very restricted and it's up to us as his owners — myself and my husband — to ensure that he has a full and active life. so, he has to be muzzled and on a restricted length lead,
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held by someone over the age of 16 at all times in a public place, and that includes the car. he can't run free unless he's in a secure area. the dangerous dogs act bans four different breeds — pit bull terrier, dogo argentino, fila brasileiro, and japanese tosa. dogs suspected of being a banned type can be seized by the police. they'll either be put down or returned to the owner and, like alex, be kept under strict conditions. the rspca and other charities say the law discriminates against dogs like alex because of what they look like, and doesn't work because the number of dog attacks has actually gone up. in the 20 years from 1999 to 2019, hospital admissions for dog bites increased by 154%, from 3,454 to 8,775.
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in the last five years, the rspca, battersea and blue cross have destroyed a82 dogs that were judged to be a banned breed. many of those had never attacked anyone. this is fudge. her owner believed she was a staffordshire bull terrier, but, like alex, she was judged to be a pit bull type animal. she was taken by police and put down. it was surreal, that that many police came for a puppy. she never did anything, she never hit anyone, she never growled at anyone. why is she dead? if you do actually want to be able to effectively protect public safety you need to very much be focusing on individual dogs and having legislation in place that allows you to tackle dogs based on their behaviour as opposed to how they look. the government says the aim of the dangerous dogs act is to ensure the safety of the public, adding it's commissioned research on the effectiveness of existing measures and on how to address behavioural problems among dogs. charlotte gallagher, bbc news. becky thwaites is
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from the blue cross. good afternoon to you, becky. you are campaigning against the act because you think it is to blunt? definitely. blue cross, along with other charities, have been campaigning against us for many years. this legislation has failed to bring down the number of dog attacks. this legislation is resulting in animal charities like ourselves having to put to sleep perfectly healthy animals. we need legislation based on deed, not breed. that's what we are pushing for today. breed. that's what we are pushing for toda . ~ ., ., for today. what sort of reception have ou for today. what sort of reception have you had? — for today. what sort of reception have you had? is _ for today. what sort of reception have you had? is this _ for today. what sort of reception have you had? is this something| for today. what sort of reception - have you had? is this something you might be able to make progress? we are might be able to make progress? , are frustrated with the response from government. the government had
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been looking at evidence, the statistics which show the current act is not working and that's why part of our campaign is around promoting this with members of parliament, but also around changing public perceptions about these breeds. i think we need to get the public on board to be able to push government in the right direction, to change a piece of law which has sat there for 30 years and been ineffective. sat there for 30 years and been ineffeetive-_ sat there for 30 years and been ineffective. , , a ,y ., ., ineffective. very struck by one of the voices _ ineffective. very struck by one of the voices in _ ineffective. very struck by one of the voices in the _ ineffective. very struck by one of the voices in the report, - ineffective. very struck by one of the voices in the report, it - ineffective. very struck by one of| the voices in the report, it should be about deeds and not looks. presumably when that law was drafted 30 years ago, there was a sense that these four breeds were particularly dangerous. d0 these four breeds were particularly dancerous. ,, ~ ., .,, dangerous. do you think that was wron: ? dangerous. do you think that was wronu? i dangerous. do you think that was wrong? ithink— dangerous. do you think that was wrong? i think when _ dangerous. do you think that was wrong? i think when this - dangerous. do you think that was i wrong? i think when this legislation was originally put on it was after a number of serious dog attacks and there was a belief that breed was a determining factor in those attacks, but actually the science shows that breed is not a determining factor. in fact, it's to do with ownership.
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any dog can potentially be a lovely family pet, but any dog can also potentially be dangerous. it's all to do with the way it is treated, trained, and ensuring you are a responsible owner means your dog is way less likely to pose a risk to public safety. reid is not a factor and science has moved on. we want the government to look again at this and make sure this legislation is based on the evidence out there. it's very interesting because one would imagine that if certain breeds are banned or subject to particular restrictions, people may not want to own them? what you're saying that's not necessarily the case? i own them? what you're saying that's not necessarily the case?— not necessarily the case? i think the problem _ not necessarily the case? i think the problem with _ not necessarily the case? i think the problem with the _ not necessarily the case? i think the problem with the legislation | not necessarily the case? i think i the problem with the legislation as it is based on type. people often don't even realise that they own one of these types of dogs. it's based on a series of arbitrary measurements. you can have a litter of puppies from a staffordshire bull terrier and a labrador. one of those puppies may well be typed and end up
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subject to restrictions and another p°ppy subject to restrictions and another poppy would not have to face up to those restrictions. people don't realise there are potentially owning a band breed. it's quite a complex system for members of the public to understand. . ~ system for members of the public to understand-— understand. thank you very much indeed. thank— understand. thank you very much indeed. thank you. _ the headlines on bbc news... record gcse grades achieved in england wales and northern ireland, after a second year of cancelled exams. in northern ireland, fully—vaccinated people who are a close contact of a covid case will no longer have to stay at home from next week. the un warns of an unfolding humanitarian disaster in afghanistan, as taliban fighters capture the strategically important city of ghazni. the government is today raising the price of mandatory hotel
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quarantine for red list travellers from £1,750 to £2,285 per adult. but some have complained of prison—like conditions in these hotels, and said the scheme is not fit—for—purpose. gaggan sabherwal reports. it's soul destroying in here! a slug! slug, yeah. it's a slug. the bbc has received reports of conditions described as prisonlike in uk's quarantine hotels. since february, arrivals from red—list countries have to pay to quarantine in these government—approved facilities, but some are unhappy with their treatment and the price tag. £2,285 per adult. if somebody wants an experience of going to prison, then - they can come in quarantine. it's such a confined room. the windows won't even open.
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one official knocked on my door- and gave me timings for my breaks. they made us stay in fear. if you are lucky, you will get a good hotel, otherwise you will get a hotel with not so good reviews. the quality of the food was appalling. half cooked, half not cooked. there were days ijust couldn't eat it. this man returned to leicester after his father's funeral in pakistan. a muslim, he was repeatedly served pork. the last three days, i didn't eat until the doctor saw me. - he provided me mashed potato and vegetables. i this mother of five spent over £5,000 on a stay for her family. we are going because we've got people ill. we have family there who are either dying or are ill and we have no choice, we have to go. jocelyn returned to the uk to renew her south african visa. she had to stay 20 days and believes she caught covid at the hotel. i'm absolutely convinced it had something to do with the cleanliness of the room
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and the air—conditioning unit. and when one of the guards took me out on one of the days, he admitted to me that i was not the only case in the hotel. they wanted to keep me in my room for ten days. i said, "that's not happening." so i had three guards in front of me and i had one guard behind me, spraying the very carpet i walked on that has not been hoovered. now that's what made me feel like a leper. the department of health and social care said...
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gaggan sabherwal, bbc news. the boss of fast fashion online retailer boohoo has insisted its clothing brands are not throwaway. speaking to our business correspondent sean farringdon, john lyttle said boohoo had a clear strategy for being more sustainable. boohoo chief executivejohn lyttle is rolling out hundreds of millions of pounds of investment across factories, offices and distribution centres like this one in burnley. this is where your order gets put together. when the picker is picking, picking out an order but actually it's a different customer, different brands. creating thousands of jobs but almost more crucially for his business, installing more automation. customers shopping online demand it. consumer habits have changed to wanting to buy online but equally the immediacy of when they want that order. so if you think of it today, a package can be ordered 10:55pm, it can be picked, it can be packed, it can go to the courier and it can
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be in your home by tomorrow. that's probably one of the biggest trends we've seen in the last sort of 18 months. that's only getting greater and greater is what i would say. so will same—day delivery become important? absolutely. not quite yet. at the moment, it's all about next day. is that a target for you? i think without a doubt it's to happen. boohoo isn't a business that can only look forward as it still deals with the fallout from revelations about poor conditions and illegal pay for workers making clothes for the retailer in leicester. one investigation found mr lyttle was personally very aware of what was going on. shouldn't you have resigned? i think my role is to make sure if there's a problem, to fix it. if i had resigned at the time, it would have set us back in terms of the time it would have taken to do what we needed to do. so for me i don't recognise that as the answer. i think the answer is always to, if you've got a problem, fix it. it's notjust the treatment of workers that make these packages that's an issue for the industry. in a week where we've had a code red warning for humanity,
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the fashion world has big questions to answer about making these products sustainable. can the industry work for the planet and the workers in it? yes, is my answer to that. if i look across all our brands and i look at the number of items and the average number of times a year that somebody buys, we don't see that as a throwaway. sometimes fast fashion is seen as i'd buy it, wear it once and then i throw it away. that's certainly from the data we have, we wouldn't correlate with that. looking at all this we have here, this is here because people want to keep buying, buying, buying. even if they're keeping it, they're buying, buying, buying. that's not good for a planet we need to get on top of, is it? the reality is we all have to wear clothes. among those getting their gcse results this morning werejessica and jennifer gadirova, the twins who won bronze
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in the team gymnastics event at the tokyo olympics. matt graveling spent the morning in aylesbury with them. these teenagers are used to handling their nerves. jessica and jennifer gadirova won bronze medals in tokyo, but even olympians get butterflies on gcse results day. good morning. what is your name? jennifer. i did have a bit of nerves opening the results but it's a bit different nerves. definitely the olympics are more nervous because not many people do the olympics and everyone sees it. for years, the 16—year—old twins have been juggling studies and sports at aylesbury vale academy. we worked out a programme where they were able to train and have that freedom, but we also have the
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experience of remote learning that every teenager in the country has had. so we had our model already of how they could successfully learn remotely and we were able tojuggle that. the pandemic meant this year's students didn't sit traditional exams, something which could have helped with olympic success. the lead—up we had, like, prep camps at the sport, the national sports centre, and i think during that time it would have been our exams so it would have been quite difficult and it would have been very distracting but i also think it has been quite helpful to not have that distraction, just do, like, loads of different things to get our grades. so how did they do? well, they both passed six gcses and it's probably no surprise that the olympic bronze medallists both got top marks in health and fitness. matt graveling, bbc south today. the highest temperature ever recorded in europe, may have been registered in italy. a reading from the island
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of sicily, registered 48.8 degrees celsius yesterday. it has yet to be verified. here's richard galpin. here in southern sicily it's only 9:45am in the morning but the temperature is already 38 celsius. and it's continuing to rise, hitting 47 degrees, and then 48.8 by early afternoon. this reported to be the highest temperature ever recorded in europe, beating the previous record of 48.5 celsius, which had stood since 1977. the searing heat sparking wildfires across the region and other parts of southern italy. firefighters have been trying to battle the blazes day and night in many parts of sicily and calabria. at least three people have been killed.
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translation: this year has been difficult because - of the intense heat. next year we hope to start prevention work earlier so we can prevent fires, especially in woods and particularly here in etna park. the italian authorities are now issuing red alerts for extreme heat in several regions. and the number of cities facing the highest health risk is expected to rise, from eight, to 15 by friday. richard galpin, bbc news. if you're just if you'rejustjoining us, the if you're justjoining us, the sad news we have been reporting this afternoon as the death of the actress una stubbs who has died at the age of 84 of an aids —related illness. una stubbs was best known for her roles in summer holiday and bbc sitcoms like till death do us part and in sickness and in health. there have been tributes being paid
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to her. it has been a family statement from her three sons. they say, our mother passed away quietly today with her family around her in edinburgh and we ask for privacy and understanding at this most difficult and sad of times. rebecca blonde, the agent and friend who represented una stubbs for more than 20 years said, we are desperately sad to have lost not only a wonderful actress whose screen and stage career spanned over 50 years and with so extraordinarily varied, as well as memorable performances on stage. she was also a wickedly funny, elegant, stylish, graceful, gracious and kind and constant friend. she was highly
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respected artist. rebecca blonde goes on to say, we will miss her enormously and remember her always. just to let you know that we do in fact hope to be able to speak to rebecca blonde in the coming hour. and to let you know there are other tributes to una stubbs being paid on social media. joanna lumley says... gyles brandreth describes una stubbs as... sarah lancashire has tweeted... some of the tributes they are to una stubbs. i'm sure there will be many
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more during the course of the afternoon. for now, let's take a look at the weather. hello, there. there's been some decent dry and sunny weather today, but also more cloud — particularly across the south. this area of low pressure, though, has been spoiling things across the north and the west of the country, bringing stronger winds, more cloud and also showery bursts of rain — some of which has been quite heavy in places. now through this evening and overnight it stays windy with further showers or longer spells of rain across western scotland, northern ireland. further south that you are, apart from the odd shower and cloud in the central south west quadrant, it will be mainly dry with clear spells and a relatively mild night to come — certainly milder across the north of the country than the previous night. low pressure, then, for friday affects the north of the country so continues windy with sunshine and showers for scotland, northern ireland. higher pressure further south — so here, mainly dry for much of england, wales. a little bit of cloud in the south, but some decent spells of sunshine, and those temperatures reaching highs of around 22 or 23 celsius.
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now, as we head on into the weekend, it looks like it's going to be quite mixed. there'll be variable amounts of cloud, a few showers, but also some sunshine.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland are awarded record grades after exams were cancelled for a second year. some teachers say the assessments are more accurate than exams. they have been assessed and awarded results on the merits of what they have produced and that can't be taken away from them. actress una stubbs — famous for her roles in sherlock, worzel gummidge and summer holiday — dies aged 84 after an age—related illness. the nhs waiting list in england hits a record high, of almost five and a half million. the un warns of an unfolding humanitarian disaster in afghanistan, as taliban fighters capture the strategically important city of ghazni.
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two children are injured after a rollercoaster malfunctions at an adventure park in scotland. gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland, have received another set of record grades, after exams were disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. top grades rose by 2.7 percent to almost 29 per cent, while the pass rate is also slightly up. the government had to cancel exams for a second consecutive year, so pupils�* grades have been based on teacher assessment, drawing some criticism of grade inflation. with the latest, here's our education correspondent, elaine dunkley. the moment anxiety
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and fear disappears. in their grasp, the gcse results these students need to put a difficult journey behind them. there is no words for it. it's just utter relief at this point. as soon as i opened my paper i saw the results i got and what i worked so hard for over the last five years. especially the disruptionary phase, it's the tears ofjoy and i could not control it. definitely satisfied. they will get me to where i want to be. and a level nine achieving student and the skies the limit so we will go forth. the results marked the end of high school. this years students have felt the most disruption to their studies with lockdown and promote learning. with lockdown and remote learning. i have to be honest, it was hard at times seeing your child cry saying mummy, i don't know what's happening. i'm trying to reassure
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them but you know you've got all that turmoil inside. but the children, like i said i have been have humbled by their character and still smiling and to receive these results has been great. with exams cancelled and replaced with teacher assessed grades, this head teacher said a different approach means comparisons to previous years are unhelpful. i don't think this is a year we can compare to previous years. it is a very different context. the materials were published online, the students access to them and they knew what the topics where going to be and the direction of their revision and you would only expect that revisions have been more focused and therefore for them to perform better. students in wales and northern ireland also received results today. compared to a levels, grade inflation for gcse has been modest. but there is concern today's results show a further widening of the gap in inequalities. in england, 61% of pupils in independent schools
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received top grades compared with 26% in state schools. the pandemic has exacerbated those and amplified those inequalities and that's why we were so determined to get young people back into school. schools were the last to close and the first to open as we emerge from the pandemic. labour says without a more ambitious recovery plan for education, inequality could be the lasting legacy of covid—19. what i want to see is a first—class education for every child whowever they are and wherever they come from. what we see today is baked in inequality. the gap between those going to private schools and going to state schools has got bigger rather than smaller. today's results are about more than academic achievement. it's about recognising the struggles that many have faced. molly has done a btech in business. unfortunately i lost my stepgrandfather and my father in may and june so it's been pretty tough. anything for me being
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a pass is going to make me happy but if i get anything better than a pass considering the year i've had i will be extremely happy with myself. these students have studied through nearly two years of disruption, in turbulent times, success is all the sweeter. our political correspondent nick eardley is at westminster. the opposition seems to be concentrating on the gap between young people from more advantaged backgrounds and those from more deprived backgrounds rather than on the rise in higher grades? that deprived backgrounds rather than on the rise in higher grades?— the rise in higher grades? that is riuht. in the rise in higher grades? that is right- in a _ the rise in higher grades? that is right. in a message _ the rise in higher grades? that is right. in a message from - the rise in higher grades? that is right. in a message from most i right. in a message from most politicians is starting with a congratulations to everybody. we got the results this week but there is a petty political well drilling over this. on the one hand you have the government seeing this as a unique
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year and a unique set of circumstances and the most important thing was to get children able to be in a position where they can progress with their education but that issue of the attainment gap particularly brooklyn children who get free school meals and those who don't is something the labour party is raising concerns about. a5 don't is something the labour party is raising concerns about. as you heard there in the peace and more this morning, keir starmer has been raising questions about that saying it's basically a failure of government policy and who gave the education secretary a tapping inequality. there are a couple of things to bear in mind when you hear that criticism. one is that there has been a bit of an increase in the gap across the uk including in labour or lead whales. labour is not completely off the hook in that sense. there are also some in government who would say to you if you had exams this year, there is a good chance that gap would have been
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even wider because kids from poor backgrounds did not have as much chance to do zumba lessons i did not have as much chance to catch up with their education. so potentially, that could have been worse. but it's worth bearing in mind, boris johnson's big slogan of his government is wrapping up and if this government is serious about living up there are some who say it would have to come up with a serious plan over the next couple of years to allow children from disadvantaged backgrounds to make up the ground they have lost during the pandemic. thank you. the actress una stubbs has died at the age of 84. her career spanned seven decades and included roles in a wide range of british tv classics such as sherlock, eastenders, til death us do part and worzel gummidge as well as appearing in films like summer holiday with sir cliff richard. lizo mzimba looks back at her life.
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she could never have asked for a better debut cast next to the biggest box office star. we are not going on a london bus if that's what you had in mind. we are not going on a holiday on our way an engagement. she always wanted to perform. at 16 she joined the chorus. her talent won her the role in summer holiday leaving chorus work behind. although it was a good life it's the most underpaid, hard—working and least respected where it was down and just to break away from it was fantastic. like so many multi talented
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performers of the time, she could dance... singing. she could sing... singing. and she could act... she was cast in what went on to be one of tvs biggest shows as the daughter of the bigoted garnet on till death us do part. in the 705 and 805, she was that there are some on she was the fearsome aunt sally. 20 years later, she was still delighting children in the worst witch. as you know, in three weeks it would be her birthday. now, her birthday falls on the same day every year at... and most recently,
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she won millions of fans across the world as mrs hudson. boys! you've got another one. in the award—winning sherlock. still showing she had true star quality right to the end. the actress una stubbs who had died at the age of 84. david sillito is our media and arts correspondent. we got a sense of how versatile una stubbs was. she we got a sense of how versatile una stubbs was-— stubbs was. she is one of those actresses for _ stubbs was. she is one of those actresses for whom _ stubbs was. she is one of those actresses for whom and - stubbs was. she is one of those actresses for whom and there i stubbs was. she is one of those i actresses for whom and there are different generations who will remember different una stubbs today. starting as sandy in summer holiday and rita in till death do us part.
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for ten years she was the daughter of garnet and of course many viewers of garnet and of course many viewers of atp will remember give us a clue where she was a dancer back in the late 505 and early 605 when she was starting off before her acting career. and of course on saturday. for my generation she is on saturday and for more recently mrs hudson and sherlock. it is a career in which they have been the standout roles in decade after decade and that does not happen very often with careers especially mtv. so today people are remembering someone who has really touched them going back over that generation and the broadcaster said he first met her in 1972 when she was and had a special style in an
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inpatient sense of humour. and her agent also said she was an exempt, stylish, graceful, gracious, kind and also wickedly funny. we stylish, graceful, gracious, kind and also wickedly funny. we hope to be talkin: and also wickedly funny. we hope to be talking to — and also wickedly funny. we hope to be talking to rebecca _ and also wickedly funny. we hope to be talking to rebecca a _ and also wickedly funny. we hope to be talking to rebecca a bit _ and also wickedly funny. we hope to be talking to rebecca a bit later- be talking to rebecca a bit later this afternoon. you went through all that small screen programmes that she was on and she is somebody that one fear that one has gone up with. ifirst remember herfrom one fear that one has gone up with. i first remember herfrom summer holiday which was 1960? not that i was watching them. 1963. still early for me but it was one of my first films. �* , ,., , for me but it was one of my first films. �* ,,., , ~ ., for me but it was one of my first films. �* , , �* ., ., for me but it was one of my first films. �* , , ~ ., ., ., films. absolutely. and then to go on to the till death — films. absolutely. and then to go on to the till death do _ films. absolutely. and then to go on to the till death do us _ films. absolutely. and then to go on to the till death do us part. - films. absolutely. and then to go on to the till death do us part. it - films. absolutely. and then to go on to the till death do us part. it was i to the till death do us part. it was an incredibly popular tv series. very difficult to repeat these days with the abuse that were being expressed but she was there as the
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foil to garnet, her husband who was listening to all of those opinions and a were the view is saying this is a more intimate say these things. the views of people watching till death do us part, how many were appalled and some of them might have had some sympathy with him so he was an interesting time. and then to go straight through on saturday. much love tv programme is her children around miniseries and for me, she's always going to that character. so one of those actresses for whom people of different generations all have their own experience and standout roles.— aid agencies have warned of a catastrophe for civilians in afghanistan, as the taliban continues to advance across the country, despite ongoing peace talks. there's reports the western city of herat is now
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on the verge of collapse. negotiations between the militants and the afghan government, are taking place in doha, in the gulf state of qatar. the taliban delegation says life under its rule will be different for afghan civilians, compared to the 19905, but the fear is the group's strict interpretation of sharia law will return. with more, here's yalda hakim. afghanistan 2021. the taliban are back taking city after city from government forces. the withdrawal of foreign troops has left a power vacuum that taliban are rushing to fail. are rushing to fill. if they take power, many people here fear a return to the brutal regime of the 905. characterised by public executions, stonings, and girls being banned from school.
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despite the historic peace deal that was signed between the us and the taliban in february 2020, and the ongoing peace talks taking place in delhi or qatar between the afghan government and the taliban, no progress has been made. i travelled to dohar to meet with this member of the taliban peace negotiation team. if you like to return to kabul, how would you govern? there was, in the past some mistakes that we have learned from because at that time we were new to the government. to stop education and women and girls, that is not our goal. of course education is their right and it's much needed. while he continued to talk about peace, it's clearly not a view shared by taliban commanders closing in on afghanistan city. back in kabul, taliban commanderfrom helmont agreed to meet me. what do you want? do you want the taliban regime to come back into power or do
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you think there should be a power—sharing deal with the current government like the discussions like the discussions that are being had in dohar? we would be happy to have a joint government under the umbrella of islamic sharia. a sharia—based system in afghanistan by like the taliban used to have. if we talk about law and order and justice, if someone were to steal or commit adultery what should happen to them? all this is clearly stated in the quran, if someone steals, there is a punishment. for example, for some thefts the punishment is cutting off the hand and foot. if someone commits adultery, then they should be stoned. and if there is not a political
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resolution to this conflict are you prepared to take kabul by force? i'm trying to defeat the government and they are trying to make me disappear. in the end we will be compelled to kill one another. increasingly it appears there is a disconnect between what is being said back in the political office in delhi and what the taliban commanders and foot soldiers are doing on the ground in afghanistan. but the vice president of afghanistan remains defiant. this group in dohar, they are a deceptive facade. of a very dark reality called the taliban. in your view, have they changed? no, not only have they not changed, it had become savvier and deceiving. with the government adamant to defy a new era of sharia law and the taliban
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making significant gains, afghans now seemed to be caught up in a savage war that has taken on a life of its own. i can now speak to dr nassim majidi, co—founder and co—director of samuel hall, an organisation which conducts research in places affected by displacement and migration and has an office in kabul. the taliban has taken ten provincial capitals. there are reports that it may have thought a town in the west. it is a terrifying situation for civilians? it it is a terrifying situation for civilians?— civilians? it is. people are completely _ civilians? it is. people are completely panicked - civilians? it is. people are| completely panicked when civilians? it is. people are - completely panicked when there is civilians? it is. people are _ completely panicked when there is in the are in urban areas. people are being forced to flee their homes with no one to protect them. kabul safety has become an enormous camp for people freaking wire and it's
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the last safe place for people to go and for people to access services but for how long, no one knows. the highway at the moment coming from that north connecting to kabul is filled with buses of people. of women and children mainly leaving and escaping at night—time to checkpoints. families are separated. children are travelling alone. i remember that the situation was already had before the conflict started because of the pandemic and because of the political instability. many husbands and fathers had already left to find work elsewhere. so you are facing and we are talking to women who are making life or death decisions in split seconds with no one to inform them and no one to guide them. the second issue is afghans feel trapped at the moment facing the taliban alone. they say something that could have been avoided.— have been avoided. where is the afu han have been avoided. where is the afghan government _ have been avoided. where is the afghan government and - have been avoided. where is the afghan government and all - have been avoided. where is the afghan government and all of i have been avoided. where is the i
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afghan government and all of this? has the documentary showed, the deal that was made was between the us government and the taliban. let's not forget the government of afghanistan was never really at the same table as the us government and the taliban. they were not involved in the decision to negotiate with the taliban. donald trump made it taliban the winner in this chapter of history. they called on all warlords to support team which shows the government is overwhelmed at the military is incapable to respond to the threats but it also shows we are back to an ethnic agenda and people with wire lines that used to fight each other now have to save the country together. so the government has a military response and it has draughted a six month plan to push back the taliban but there is no plan on how to protect the civilians and civilians have no information. all they have is propaganda from both sides. ~ .
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all they have is propaganda from both sides-— both sides. what can be done in terms of helping _ both sides. what can be done in terms of helping to _ both sides. what can be done in terms of helping to protect i terms of helping to protect civilians on an international level? i think the key message is that it's not too late to defer some of the decisions that have been taken. putting out all of the troops all at once from all countries was not a wise decision. it is an interest and some were forced to keep stability at least of the country and of the cities. european governments there only response is whether to continue or not. the response should be how to build humanitarian corridor and how to get people legal opportunities to leave in dignity. there is a moral duty and obligation toward afghans and other refugees who are feeding their homes to protect them. this is the geneva convention. we have to save the people and save them from death. what are your fear is particularly about women because there is of
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course this great concern that the taliban is set on reintroducing sharia law although its representatives in qatar as we saw deny that. at}! representatives in qatar as we saw den that. _, , representatives in qatar as we saw den that. , ., deny that. of course, last month when i was _ deny that. of course, last month when i was in — deny that. of course, last month when i was in kabul— deny that. of course, last month when i was in kabul women i deny that. of course, last month when i was in kabul women were already telling me they are not leaving the four walls of their homes. so they feel physically and mentally trapped and it is their reality. in the provincial capitals with the taliban have come in, that taliban are coming to take children sally, the girls away, boys only if the site, the girls to marry, and mothers are left to recount the story. and furthermore in kandahar the executive director was learning that public school staff are leaving and soon they will no longer be features for children and children would have to find a way to adapt learning with children. the accounts
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are very clear. the taliban are coming in and terrorising the population and let's not forget the young people. the majority of the population is under 30 years of age and they believe in a narrative of human rights and human rights and freedom of the international community brought. we cannot leave them alone. their hopes and pretension is at stake. young people are crying that they cannot finish their degrees and they don't have access to universities any more and they can't become doctors and we should be providing more opportunities for some of them to come study abroad or provide other legal recourses to save some of these people and to deliver on the premises be made to them. two children have been injured after a rollercoaster malfunctioned at an adventure park in the scottish highlands emergency services were called
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to the landmark adventure park in carrbridge this morning, after reports of a mechanical failure. police say two children were treated at the scene for minor injuries and officers are continuing to investigate how the incident occurred. in the past few minutes we've had the latest government coronavirus figures which show there were 33,074 covid cases recorded today up slightly from wednesday's figure of 29,612. there were also 94 deaths reported within 28 days of a positive test for covid—19. that compares to 104 deaths recorded yesterday. almost five and a half million people in england were waiting to start routine nhs hospital treatment at the end ofjune. it's the highest number since records began in 2007.
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gail is one of the many thousands who has been waiting for an operation. she has two collapsed discs in her neck and an osteophyte growing on her spinal column; the pressure from which is causing her pain and impacting her ability to walk. she was first referred in 2019. the procedure was finally scheduled forjune this year. but it was cancelled. i have been making an awful long time. they knew there was something seriously wrong with my spine about two years ago. i had an mri scan last summer which showed a saw steel fights and the collapsed desks. osteophyte is a growth of some sort? yes, it is like a bone spur. so i think what happens when the disc collapsed my buddy tried to stabilise may and so it's grown at
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this extra bone pain which unfortunately in my case is growing inside my spinal cord and pressing on my spinal cord. find inside my spinal cord and pressing on my spinal cord.— on my spinal cord. and you are in ain on my spinal cord. and you are in pain because _ on my spinal cord. and you are in pain because of _ on my spinal cord. and you are in pain because of age? _ on my spinal cord. and you are in pain because of age? i _ on my spinal cord. and you are in pain because of age? i am. i- on my spinal cord. and you are inj pain because of age? i am. i take on my spinal cord. and you are in l pain because of age? i am. i take a lot of pain — pain because of age? i am. i take a lot of pain medication _ pain because of age? i am. i take a lot of pain medication including i pain because of age? i am. i take a lot of pain medication including a i lot of pain medication including a patch that they had just given me recently that i wear 24/7. in my life consists of sitting here on the sofa. i can't walk very far. i am frost fine motor skills in my hands. celebrating, or doing small tasks are virtually impossible. getting dressed is difficult. i can no longer wash my hair myself. i cannot shower myself. there's always the danger of falling in the shower as well. and the whole thing and i was given a base to have the surgery on the 22nd ofjune that cancelled the day before.
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the 22nd ofjune that cancelled the da before. . , ., the 22nd ofjune that cancelled the da before. . , . , day before. that must have been terrible, how— day before. that must have been terrible, how did _ day before. that must have been terrible, how did you _ day before. that must have been terrible, how did you cope i day before. that must have been terrible, how did you cope with i terrible, how did you cope with that? i did not. to terrible, how did you cope with that? l did not.— terrible, how did you cope with that? i did not.— terrible, how did you cope with that? i did not. ., , ., , that? i did not. to be honest i went into a decline _ that? i did not. to be honest i went into a decline after _ that? i did not. to be honest i went into a decline after that. _ into a decline after that. everything had been done. i had the preop assessment and they had the artest and isolated for two weeks, myself, my daughter, my husband, i signed the admission, i arrange transportation and i had to cancel. the rest of that week i pretty much just right. because i worked myself up just right. because i worked myself up to finally having this surgery and getting some of my life back and then to have it cancelled at the last minute was devastating. i know why they did it. it some special equipment they need pets only available at the hospital because i was being shipped to a clinic for the procedure.— was being shipped to a clinic for the procedure. was being shipped to a clinic for the rocedure. . . . ., the procedure. that cancellation was in late june. — the procedure. that cancellation was in late june. we _ the procedure. that cancellation was in late june, we are _ the procedure. that cancellation was in late june, we are now— the procedure. that cancellation was in late june, we are now in _ the procedure. that cancellation was in late june, we are now in the i in latejune, we are now in the middle of august, do you have any
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sense of when you might get this operation? i sense of when you might get this 0 eration? , ., sense of when you might get this operation?— sense of when you might get this 0 eration? , . ., operation? i started e-mailing them because i have _ operation? i started e-mailing them because i have not _ operation? i started e-mailing them because i have not heard _ operation? i started e-mailing them because i have not heard anything. l operation? i started e-mailing them because i have not heard anything. i believe it would be sometime around the beginning of september but again i heard nothing. i believe the admission team had been giving many details and supposed to be contacting me but as of today i have heard nothing. contacting me but as of today i have heard nothing-— heard nothing. absolutely nothing. in the meantime _ heard nothing. absolutely nothing. in the meantime your _ heard nothing. absolutely nothing. in the meantime your life - heard nothing. absolutely nothing. in the meantime your life is - heard nothing. absolutely nothing. in the meantime your life is on i in the meantime your life is on hold? ' :: :: , in the meantime your life is on hold? ' :: :: f ., in the meantime your life is on hold? ' i: i: , ., ., in the meantime your life is on hold? ' :: :: , . ., , ., in the meantime your life is on hold? ' i: i: , . ., , ., ., hold? 100%. i have not been out of the house hold? 10096. i have not been out of the house in _ hold? 10096. i have not been out of the house in nine _ hold? 10096. i have not been out of the house in nine weeks. _ hold? 10096. i have not been out of the house in nine weeks. apart i hold? 10096. i have not been out of| the house in nine weeks. apart from when i was out once spot my husband had to take me when i was with my mother but i have been in the house for nine weeks. i can't drive any more. i can't turn my head because it's locked solid because of its growth. my life is completely on hold and it's awful. we growth. my life is completely on hold and it's awful.— growth. my life is completely on hold and it's awful. we are sorry to hear that you're _ hold and it's awful. we are sorry to hear that you're having _ hold and it's awful. we are sorry to hear that you're having to - hold and it's awful. we are sorry to hear that you're having to suffer i hold and it's awful. we are sorry to hear that you're having to suffer in | hear that you're having to suffer in this way and we hope that operation does go ahead in september. thank you for talking to us and sharing all of that with us.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. hello, there. there's been some decent dry and sunny weather today, but also more cloud — particularly across the south. this area of low pressure, though, has been spoiling things across the north and the west of the country, bringing stronger winds, more cloud and also showery bursts of rain — some of which has been quite heavy in places. now through this evening and overnight it stays windy with further showers or longer spells of rain across western scotland, northern ireland. further south that you are, apart from the odd shower and cloud in the central south west quadrant, it will be mainly dry with clear spells and a relatively mild night to come — certainly milder across the north of the country than the previous night. low pressure, then, for friday affects the north of the country so continues windy with sunshine and showers for scotland, northern ireland. higher pressure further south — so here, mainly dry for much of england, wales. a little bit of cloud in the south, but some decent spells of sunshine,
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and those temperatures reaching highs of around 22 or 23 celsius. now, as we head on into the weekend, it looks like it's going to be quite mixed. there'll be variable amounts of cloud, a few showers, but also some sunshine. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines — gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland are awarded record grades, after exams were cancelled for a second year. actress una stubbs —
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famous for her roles in sherlock, worzel gummidge and summer holiday — dies, aged 84, after an age—related illness. the nhs waiting list in england hits a record high, of almost 5.5 million. the un warns of an unfolding humanitarian disaster in afghanistan, as taliban fighters capture the strategically important city of ghazni. two children are injured, after a rollercoaster malfunctions at an adventure park in scotland. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's chetan. good afternoon. england have finally made the breakthrough they needed on the opening day of the second test at lords. rain had held up play, and then a stubborn century stand between rohit sharma and kl rahul had put india in charge rohit
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was nearing his first overseas test 100 — hitting 11 fours and this six, as england's bowlers struggled to contain him. butjames anderson, who passed a late fitness test, is the man who got him in the end. rohit out for 83, and anderson then got his second wicket, picking off cheteshwar pujara for nine. india are 157—2 at tea. ahead of their premier league opener away to manchester united on saturday, leeds head coach marcelo bielsa says his contract situation has been "resolved". after winning promotion to the top flight, bielsa lead the club to a ninth place finish last season. he'd been out of contract, but speaking through a translator this afteroon, he said he's committed himself to another season at elland road. but didn't give any more details about the deal. chelsea fans are still waiting for confirmation of romelu lukaku's move back to stamford bridge.
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we understand that deal is done forjust under a £100 million. and they could recoup some of that money by selling tammy abraham to roma. their general manager — tiago pinto — is in london, hoping to negotiate that move for the england striker. the 23—year—old was left on the bench last night during chelsea's super cup win. arsenal midfielderjoe willock has agreed personal terms with newcastle, ahead of a permanent move. the 21—year—old spent last season on loan at stjames' park — the deal is expected to be around £25 million. leicester city have released plans for the development of the king power stadium, which would see it's capacity increase to 40,000. the expansion plans also include a hotel and multi—purpose arena. a public consultation will now follow. manager brendan rodgers has backed the plans and says he is pleased the club �*wants to constantly improve.�* eight—time paralympic equestrian champion sophie christiansen said she�*s "absolutely heartbroken" she will miss the tokyo games,
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due to a "minor veterinary issue" with her horse. christiansen — who has cerebral palsy — won ten medals across the last four games, including three golds at both london 2012 and rio 2016. she�*ll be replaced by 2019 european gold medallist georgia wilson, who�*ll make her games debut. christiansen is already looking ahead to the paralympics in paris. my my friend will be able to come with me and watch a lot easier. i think paris will bejust me and watch a lot easier. i think paris will be just as big as london, so how can i miss that?— tennis. jo konta will play coco gauff in the last 16 at the canadian open later. the british number one beat elina svitolina in three sets. konta�*s missed a lot of tennis, after pulling out of wimbledon because she was a close contact of someone who tested positive for covid, and then missed the olympics herself, because she tested positive.
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however, she is back, and showing some good form ahead of the us open which starts at the end of the month. the london marathon hs announced their elite line ups for october�*s race. world record holder and olympic silver medallist brigid kosgei of kenya will return to action to defend her title. the reigning men�*s champion shura kitata of ethopia will also be back, despite failing to finish last weekend�*s olympic marathon because of the conditions. that�*s all the sport for now. ministers in northern ireland�*s devolved government have made some more decisions to ease covid restrictions from monday. let�*s get more from emma vardy in belfast. emma, what have they decided? bring us up—to—date. bring us up-to-date. well, look, northern ireland _ bring us up-to-date. well, look, northern ireland has _ bring us up-to-date. well, look, northern ireland has been i bring us up-to-date. well, look, northern ireland has been in i bring us up-to-date. well, look, northern ireland has been in the | northern ireland has been in the frustrating position really of being behind the rest of the uk, where
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nick has come to lifting some of those remaining restrictions. what has been decided today, most significantly, is that people who have become a close contact of someone who has tested positive with covid will no longer have to isolate from monday. that is subject to them having a negative pcr test, which they will have to take on day two and day eight, and that they must have been double jabbed as well. that will make a big difference for businesses. we�*ve had businesses saying they have been hugely disruptive because of close contact people getting pinged by the outcome and then a whole tranche of staff having to go off work. a couple of other things to bring you up—to—date on. the number of people who can gather in a private garden, the limit on that has been scrapped. conferences and exhibitions will be able to go back ahead, but there were one or two things that the executive here is holding back on, and that particularly as the rules for social distancing indoors. they will remain here in northern ireland, much to the frustration of the hospitality industry. they were hoping to get more people through the doors. and pupils wearing masks and schools. that�*s also staying but
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will be reviewed at the end of august. will be reviewed at the end of auuust. ., ~ will be reviewed at the end of auuust. . ~ ,, will be reviewed at the end of auuust. ., ~' ,, , will be reviewed at the end of auuust. . ~ ,, , . will be reviewed at the end of auuust. ., ~ ,, , . ., will be reviewed at the end of auuust. ., ~ , . ., . august. thank you very much for that u date. august. thank you very much for that update- emma _ august. thank you very much for that update. emma vardy _ august. thank you very much for that update. emma vardy reporting i august. thank you very much for that update. emma vardy reporting for. august. thank you very much for that update. emma vardy reporting for us| update. emma vardy reporting for us from belfast. let�*s get more now on the sad news that the actress, una stubbs, has died, at the age of 84. she was a regular on television in the sitcom, till death us do part, and on the game show, give us a clue. more recently she was on "sherlock" on bbc one. tributes to una stubbs are being paid on social media. joanna lumley has tweeted this, she says, "devastated to hear about the passing of the brilliant una stubbs. my thoughts go out to her family & friends at this very sad time". actor and broadcaster, gyles brandreth describes una stubbs as "such a funny and gifted lady — a marvellous actress with a special style & a great (and impish) sense of humour". and the musician paul weller.
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"with deepest sympathy on the passing of una stubbs? a wonderful & talented lady." i�*m joined now by una�*s agent and friend, rebecca blond. thank you for talking to us, rebecca. a very sad day for you, of course. tell us about how you will remember your friend, course. tell us about how you will rememberyourfriend, una course. tell us about how you will remember yourfriend, una stubbs. course. tell us about how you will rememberyourfriend, una stubbs. i think! rememberyourfriend, una stubbs. i think i would just remember her for being not only a wickedly funny and very, very clever actress, butjust from the varied work that she did. i think of her life has having two sections, really, starting when she was young and she was a dancer, and did summer holiday with cliff richard, and then till death us do part and worzel gummidge, and that really launched. then she went on working on things changed when she started doing some theatre with the director michael brand itch, and she went on to do some wonderful roles, from rattigan�*s deep blue sea to mariah in 12th night, and then more recently in the curious incident of the dog in the night time at the national, and her last role at the
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darma. but i think what was lovely was that she was a household name but she belonged to so many different generations, and i think sherlock, which was the best present that she could ever have been given. she said, you know, she was in her 705 unmarked gators had ridden this wonderful, wonderful role her, and shejust had a ball —— and mark gratis. and she was always so grateful for what she had gratis. and she was always so gratefulfor what she had been given, and she was used to say sorry about everything. and i would say, you have nothing to apologise for. she almost didn�*t think she deserved it. and yet if i was with her in the street having said goodbye and turned and walked away, she walked like a dancer, she was endlessly being stopped by people of all ages to say hello and how much they loved her, she never took that for granted. she was very humble and
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sort of hopelessly self—deprecating, because she just thought she was very lucky, and it wasjust because she just thought she was very lucky, and it was just all a bit wonderful. 50 very lucky, and it was 'ust all a bit wonderful.i very lucky, and it was 'ust all a bit wonderful. so interesting what ou sa bit wonderful. so interesting what you say about _ bit wonderful. so interesting what you say about her _ bit wonderful. so interesting what you say about her appeal- bit wonderful. so interesting what you say about her appeal to i you say about her appeal to different generations, because i would know her from different generations, because i would know herfrom summer holiday and till death us do part, and my children would know her from sherlock. ~ , ,., , children would know her from sherlock. ~ , . , , sherlock. absolutely, absolutely, and i think that's _ sherlock. absolutely, absolutely, and i think that's what's - sherlock. absolutely, absolutely, and i think that's what's so i and i think that�*s what�*s so brilliant, because it really does show you her range. you know, to go from little damage to sherlock and everything in between, itjust shows you she was a very, very clever, unique and unusual actress, and to work from when you are in your early 205 to your late 705, how many actresses are lucky enough to have that? not very many, and she was one of them. , , . ., , ., . of them. very unusual. you put out a ve fond of them. very unusual. you put out a very fond and — of them. very unusual. you put out a very fond and loving _ of them. very unusual. you put out a very fond and loving statement i of them. very unusual. you put out a very fond and loving statement a i very fond and loving statement a little bit earlier, and you said she was also highly respected and exhibited artist. that is something not very much known. tell us. she
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was. she not very much known. tell us. ’sia: was. she painted not very much known. tell us. 5ia: was. she painted in not very much known. tell us. 5“ia: was. she painted in watercolour, always, untilvery, was. she painted in watercolour, always, until very, very recently, she regularly exhibited at a gallery in shepard�*s market. they were always quite small, just a few lines, she did a picture of marilyn monroe in watercolour which was literally four lines, and it was her. she also exhibited at a summer exhibition at the royal academy every effort is that last ten years, i think she would come into my office because she couldn�*t work her computer, and she would have pictures regularly there, she had one of benedict cumberbatch and martin freeman, she did one bill you, and they were always for sale, they always got snapped up. i said to her that they are always going to because you paint beautifully everyone loves you.- because you paint beautifully everyone loves you. very difficult to sum up — everyone loves you. very difficult to sum up somebody _ everyone loves you. very difficult to sum up somebody you - everyone loves you. very difficult to sum up somebody you have i everyone loves you. very difficult i to sum up somebody you have known for a long time but i am going to ask you to. what sort of legacy does una stubbs leave? i
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ask you to. what sort of legacy does una stubbs leave?— ask you to. what sort of legacy does una stubbs leave? i think she leaves a lea una stubbs leave? i think she leaves a legacy that — una stubbs leave? i think she leaves a legacy that you _ una stubbs leave? i think she leaves a legacy that you can _ una stubbs leave? i think she leaves a legacy that you can keep _ una stubbs leave? i think she leaves a legacy that you can keep doing i una stubbs leave? i think she leaves a legacy that you can keep doing the | a legacy that you can keep doing the job of an actress brilliantly for as long as you want to do it. she was dedicated, she was hard—working, she was highly respected, but also she had a side to her that not many people saw, which is that she had a dark and wicked sense of humour, and she was elegant and graceful, and she was elegant and graceful, and she was elegant and graceful, and she was a little pocket rocket. she would never let go, and she would come into the room, work hard, and she loved everyone and they loved her as well. is a she loved everyone and they loved her as well-— her as well. is a very nice to talk to ou, her as well. is a very nice to talk to you, rebecca _ her as well. is a very nice to talk to you, rebecca blonde. - her as well. is a very nice to talk to you, rebecca blonde. una i her as well. is a very nice to talk i to you, rebecca blonde. una stubbs's agent and good friend. thank you. thank you very much. the uk economy grew by a.8% in the second quarter of the year, as coronavirus restrictions were lifted. the retail sector, hotels and restaurants helped growth. however, the figure is slightly below the 5% the bank of england had predicted. here's andy verity.
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for restaurant founder and owner asma khan, the last 18 months have been filled with insecurity and fear, forced, like thousands of other firms, to borrow her way through the pandemic. i'm very grateful for the furlough, it allowed me to keep my staff on furlough, but there was no support for me. i was still liable for all the rents and all the financial costs mounted up. watching with dismay as independent restaurants went under, she took a big chance, borrowing to buy the flagship covent garden outlet of a well—known chain that had collapsed, and now customers are surging back. it's a relief. i mean, we had i think 1,300 bookings in five hours when we started opening up all the other dates, so it's really, it is, you know, you need this. the economy has been on a roller—coaster ride since the start of the pandemic, plummeting in the spring of last year, before surging back as restrictions were lifted, and then going into a double dip at the start of this year when restrictions were reimposed.
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since then, it's been recovering, but still not quite back up to its pre—pandemic level. today's figures show the economy is recovering very strongly, fastest quarterly growth in the g7 group of countries and evidence that our plan forjobs is working, but i'm not complacent. the shock that our economy and public finances have experienced is significant and it will take us time to fully recover. injune, as the summer began, some sectors like exports of cars slowed down, hit by a shortage of parts and also staff, as the pingdemic, and nervousness about the virus kept them at home. i think that nervousness might stay with us a bit as we go _ into the winter and that in turn will hold back the recovery, . the final stages of the recovery of consumer spending. - even after growth of a.8%, the economy remains a.a% below where it was at the end of 2019. business may be recovering, but it's not yet fully recovered. andy verity, bbc news. new zealand's borders
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are to remain shut until at least the end of the year, because of the coronavirus pandemic. the prime minister, jacinda ardern, says an 'elimination strategy�* against covid is the best way to keep the economy open. new zealand is seen as one of the most successful countries in controlling the virus. a snap one—week lockdown has begun in the australian capital canberra, after its first case of covid—19 in more than a year. queues formed at supermarkets with people stockpiling, before the lockdown came into force. around 400,000 residents in canberra and the surrounding area will only be able to leave home for essential reasons. large parts of new south wales and melbourne are facing similar restrictions. the headlines on bbc news... record gcse grades achieved in england wales and northern ireland, after a second year of cancelled exams. actress una stubbs — famous for her roles in sherlock, worzel gummidge and summer holiday — dies, aged 84, after an age—related illness.
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the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a record high. the highest temperature ever recorded in europe may have been registered in italy. a reading from the island of sicily registered 48.8 degrees celsius yesterday. here's richard galpin. here in southern sicily, it's only 9:45am in the morning but the temperature is already 38 celsius. and it's continuing to rise, hitting 47 degrees, and then 48.8 by early afternoon. this reported to be the highest temperature ever recorded in europe, beating the previous record of 48.5 celsius, which had stood since 1977.
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the searing heat sparking wildfires across the region and other parts of southern italy. firefighters have been trying to battle the blazes day and night in many parts of sicily and calabria. at least three people have been killed. translation: this year has been difficult because - of the intense heat. next year we hope to start prevention work earlier so we can prevent fires, especially in woods and particularly here in etna park. the italian authorities are now issuing red alerts for extreme heat in several regions. and the number of cities facing the highest health risk is expected to rise, from eight, to 15 by friday. richard galpin, bbc news. animal welfare charities say the dangerous dogs act needs a complete overhaul, on this, the 30th anniversary
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of it coming into force. four breeds can currently be seized by police, and either be put down, or kept under strict conditions, but campaigners argue the law is too broad, and that each individual animal's temperament should be the deciding factor. with more, here's charlotte gallagher. meet alex. he's ten years old. alex. in dog years, a senior citizen. but his life is very different to that of most other dogs. that's because he's beenjudged to be a pit bull—type animal — a banned breed in the uk. his owner sian is only allowed to keep him if she sticks to certain conditions. his life is very restricted and it's up to us as his owners — myself and my husband — to ensure that he has a full and active life. so, he has to be muzzled and on a restricted length lead, held by someone over the age of 16 at all times in a public place,
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and that includes the car. he can't run free, unless he's in a secure area. the dangerous dogs act bans four different breeds — pit bull terrier, dogo argentino, fila brasileiro, and japanese tosa. dogs suspected of being a banned type can be seized by the police. they'll either be put down or returned to the owner and, like alex, be kept under strict conditions. the rspca and other charities say the law discriminates against dogs like alex because of what they look like, and doesn't work because the number of dog attacks has actually gone up. in the 20 years from 1999 to 2019, hospital admissions for dog bites increased by is4%, from 3,454 to 8,775. in the last five years, the rspca, battersea and blue cross have destroyed 482 dogs that were judged
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to be a banned breed. many of those had never attacked anyone. this is fudge. her owner believed she was a staffordshire bull terrier, but, like alex, she was judged to be a pit bull type animal. she was taken by police and put down. it was surreal, that that many police came for a puppy. she never did anything, she never bit anyone, she never growled at anyone. why is she dead? if you do actually want to be able l to effectively protect public safety you need to very much be focusing on individual dogs and having - legislation in place that allows you to tackle dogs based - on their behaviour as - opposed to how they look. the government says the aim of the dangerous dogs act is to ensure the safety of the public, adding it's commissioned research on the effectiveness of existing measures and on how to address behavioural problems among dogs. charlotte gallagher, bbc news. the boss of fast fashion
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online retailer boohoo has insisted its clothing brands are "not throwaway". speaking to our business correspondent sean farringdon, john lyttle said boohoo had a "clear strategy" for being more sustainable. boohoo chief executivejohn lyttle is rolling out hundreds of millions of pounds of investment across factories, offices and distribution centres, like this one in burnley. this is where your order gets put together. as the picker is picking, they're picking in an order, but actually it's a different customer, different brands. creating thousands of jobs but almost more crucially for his business, installing more automation. his customers shopping online demand it. consumer habits have changed to wanting to buy online, but equally the immediacy of when they want that order. so if you think of it today, a package can be ordered 10:55pm, it can be picked, it can be packed, it can go to the courier and it can be in your home by tomorrow. that's probably one of the biggest trends we've seen
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in the last sort of 18 months. that's only getting greater and greater, is what i would say. so will same—day delivery become important? absolutely. but not quite yet. at the moment, it's all about next day. is that a target for you? i think without a doubt it's going to happen. boohoo isn't a business that can only look forward as it still deals with the fallout from revelations about poor conditions and illegal pay for workers making clothes for the retailer in leicester. one investigation found mr lyttle was personally very aware of what was going on. shouldn't you have resigned? i think my role is to make sure if there's a problem, to fix it. if i had resigned at the time, it would have set us back, in terms of the time it would have taken to do what we needed to do. so for me, i don't recognise that as the answer. i think the answer is always to, if you've got a problem, fix it. it's notjust the treatment of workers that make these packages that's an issue for the industry. but in a week where we've had a code
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red warning for humanity, the fashion world has big questions to answer about making these products sustainable. can the industry work for the planet and the workers in it? yes, is my answer to that. if i look across all our brands, and i look at the number of items and the average number of times a year that somebody buys, we don't see that as a throwaway. sometimes, fast fashion is seen as, i'd buy it, wear it once and then i throw it away. that's certainly from the data we have, we wouldn't correlate with that. looking at all this we have here, this is here because people want to keep buying, buying, buying. even if they're keeping it, they're buying, buying, buying. that's not good for a planet that we need to get on top of, is it? but the reality is we all have to wear clothes. among those getting their gcse results this morning werejessica and jennifer gadirova, the twins who won bronze
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in the team gymnastics event at the tokyo olympics. matt graveling spent the morning in aylesbury with them. these teenagers are used to handling their nerves. jessica and jennifer gadirova won bronze medals in tokyo, but even olympians get butterflies on gcse results day. good morning. what is your name? jennifer. i did have a bit of nerves opening the results but it's a bit different nerves. definitely the olympics are more - nervous because not many people do the olympics and everyone sees it. for years, the 16—year—old twins have been juggling studies and sports at aylesbury vale academy. we worked out a programme where they were able to train and have that freedom, but we also have the experience of remote learning that every teenager in the country has had. so we had our model already of how they could successfully learn remotely and we were able to juggle that. the pandemic meant this
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year's students didn't sit traditional exams, something which could have helped with olympic success. the lead—up we had, like, prep camps at the sport, the national sports centre, and i think during that time it would have been our exams so it would have been quite difficult and it would have been very distracting but i also think it has been quite helpful to not have that distraction, just do, like, loads of different things to get our grades. so how did they do? well, they both passed six gcses and it's probably no surprise that the olympic bronze medallists both got top marks in health and fitness. matt graveling, bbc south today. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaous. hello again. low pressure is continuing to sweep into the north—west of the country, bringing stronger winds, areas of rain but also some blustery showers.
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quite a few isobars on the chart across northern and western areas will be windy. the further south you are, closer to an area of high pressure, it should stay largely dry but there will be variable amounts of cloud. this evening and night, many places dry, it will continue windy across the north and west of the uk with further showers or longer spells of rain, some of which will be quite heavy. further south, variable cloud but lengthy clear spells. a breezy night for all but windy in the north—west, gusts of 30 to 40 mph, may be a bit stronger than that. double figure values for all and a milder night to come across the north of the uk compared to the previous night. so friday, no pressure to the north of the uk, higher pressure to the south. still this weather front across southern areas will bring patchy cloud that will tend to fizzle out. for much of england and wales, friday will look decent with some good, lengthy spells of sunshine. scotland, northern ireland, windy, with further showers, sunny spells in between, some of the showers can be heavy or thundery particularly for western scotland. temperatures, high
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teens in the north but we could make a mid—20s in the warmer spots across the south. the weekend looks pretty mixed. looks like we will have low pressure trying to edge in from the west, so that will spoil things a little bit, ithink west, so that will spoil things a little bit, i think introduce more cloud, we could see a bit of rain at times, here it is, slowly nudging in from the west. so this is the picture for the south—east. some uncertainty to this. we could see the rain a little further northwards affecting northern ireland as well, but it does look like it could bring more in the way of cloud for england and wales, may be some spots of rain, but they will still be some sunshine in places, and i think scotland looking better, with sunny spells. temperatures in the high teens in the north. we could make the low 20s in the south, given some sunshine. bit of a mixed picture again into sunday, still some uncertainty with a forecast. looks like this area of low pressure could introduce again a bit more cloud, one or two showers around, particularly across the far north of the country, through central areas and perhaps a few showers in the south, and in between there will be some sunshine. when you get that sunshine, it will feel quite warm, the low to mid 20 celsius, something
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a bit cooler though in the north. into next week, it looks like high pressure wants to build in. that will settle things down, with some sunshine, but it will feel rather cool with our wins coming in from the north—west.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines. record grades for gcse students in england, wales or northern ireland after exams were cancelled for a second year. some teachers say the assessments are more accurate than exams. they have been assessed and awarded results on the merits of what they have produced and that can't be taken away from them. the nhs waiting list in england hits a record high, of almost 5.5 million. the uk economy grows by nearly 5% between april and june — following the easing of restrictions. the un warns of an unfolding humanitarian disaster in afghanistan, as the taliban appear to be on the verge of capturing the country's second and third biggest cities, kandahar and herat.
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two children are injured after a roller—coaster malfunctions

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