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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 12, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines... the taliban captured smart cities, that the us and the united states are sending troops to evacuate embassy staff. record grades for gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland, after exams were cancelled for a second year. some teachers say the assessments are more accurate than exams..... they have been accessed and awarded results on the merits of what they have produced and that cannot be taken away from them. the nhs waiting list in england hits a record high, of almost five and a half million. a change in self isolation rules in northern ireland — the bbc understands fully—vaccinated people who are a close contact of a covid case will no longer
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have to stay at home. the uk economy grows by nearly 5 percent between april and june, after the easing of covid restrictions. and the actress yoona stubbs — famous for her roles in sherlock, worzel gummidge and summer holiday — dies aged 84 at the taliban continues to capture more cities across afghanistan, both the uk and the united states are to send troops back into the country to help evacuate staff from their embassies. the uk less than 600 troops to help british nationality city of afghanistan why the us is sending around 3000 military personnel. the faster rate than
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expected gives me by taliban forces have made it necessary to speed up plans for removing dramatic staff. in the last human minutes the pentagon spokesman gave this assessment of the situation a news conference. the president has ordered the evacuation of personnel and acceleration of the evacuation of afghan special immigrant visa applicants from the country. to applicants from the country. trr enable the safe quarterly reduction, the secretary of defence has directed the department to position temporarily enabling capabilities to ensure the safety and security of us and partner and civilian personnel. i will break this down for you. the first movement will consist of three infantry battalions that are currently in the central command area of responsibility. they will move to the airport in kabul within the next 2a to 48 move to the airport in kabul within the next 24 to 48 hours. two of those italians are united states marines and one is a us army
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battalion. the next movement will consist of a joint us army air force support element of around a thousand personnel. to facilitate the processing of applicants and michelle elements of this movement will arise in the coming days. the third movement is to unearth and to deploy one infantry brigade combat team out of fort bragg calculate where they will be prepared if needed to provide additional security at the airport. we anticipate those voices will reach chelate sometime within the next week. we will stress that these voices will be deployed to support the orderly and safe production of civilian personnel at the request of the state department and to help facilitate federated process of working through sib applicants. it is a temporary mission with a narrow focus. as with all the plantings of troops, our commanders of the inherent right of self—defense and
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any attack on ben kennedy will be met with a forceful and inappropriate response. gary 0'donoghue is in washington. he is very clear that these troops will have a defined temporary remic? it is pretty important for the administration here to emphasise the temporary nature of this mission and had a narrow focus and they will be moving in and the next 24 to 48 hours into kabul airport and into those three infantry battalions. stressing also that the state department was intent on getting it for dramatic personnel out by the end of the month and that would effectively put an end point unpacked the month and that would effectively put an end point on that deployment even though he did not say so specifically. of course, we have heard these things before about the and they have never transpired that a significant change of policy albeit a temporary one because at the moment the americans have only
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around the battalions size 650 people, service people in afghanistan at the moment and they are upping that number significantly in order to ensure that safe evacuation of the embassy personnel down to the discordant dramatic function. ., . , down to the discordant dramatic function. ., ., , , ., ., function. how many people are going to be relocating? _ function. how many people are going to be relocating? if— function. how many people are going to be relocating? if not _ function. how many people are going to be relocating? if notjust - to be relocating? if notjust american nationals are imagining that there may be some afghanistan nationals who are really going to walk —— want assistance as well? yes, they have indicated also that they are going to evacuate those who are applying for a special immigration visas. these are the afghans who have specifically worked with the us military and the us government inside afghanistan who are at race of being targeted by the taliban and others for having worked with the government and them and theirfamilies have with the government and them and their families have already begun to be evacuated. some 1200 have already arrived here in the united states as opposed to processing them in the
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country and they were moved into other areas. country and they were moved into otherareas. he country and they were moved into other areas. he would not say where but obviously they have bases around other parts of the middle east and of course in europe to do that processing. that airlift is also something that the us military will be involved in. john kirby isjust confirming they will secure the airport and make sure people get from the embassy to the airport to get on planes. they will start frying some of these pains out with people on them. frying some of these pains out with peeple on them-— frying some of these pains out with people on them. thank you very much. what ste -s people on them. thank you very much. what steps is — people on them. thank you very much. what steps is the _ people on them. thank you very much. what steps is the uk _ people on them. thank you very much. what steps is the uk taking _ people on them. thank you very much. what steps is the uk taking to - what steps is the uk taking to support its nationals? in what steps is the uk taking to support its nationals?- what steps is the uk taking to support its nationals? in la, very similar to what _ support its nationals? in la, very similar to what you _ support its nationals? in la, very similar to what you just _ support its nationals? in la, very similar to what you just heard - support its nationals? in la, very i similar to what you just heard from gary who in fact we were all poised to report on everything that we received earlier today on british plans and this is all embargo until a few hours of the middle of the night and the americans have gone public with their announcement and british government has followed suit. but we will see if they arrive
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at an deployment of an additional 600 british troops and some of those will already be on the way in a position in positioning coupled by the end of this week. this indicates the end of this week. this indicates the final stages after withdrawal of a number of personnel. some british embassy personnel, the size of the embassy personnel, the size of the embassy is being reduced, other british nationals who are working in afghanistan who have been advised by the british government to leave as soon as they can and that includes all sorts of people working with ngos, security contractors and so forth. and also a number of afghans in a similar situation to what you just heard gary describing, afghans who are eligible for a programme that the british government has two relocate them and their families to the uk. these are people who have been translators or in other some way or another worked with the british authorities and as a result have a claim for their own safety to want to leave the country. all of
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thatis want to leave the country. all of that is going to happen. but the government is saying is that this was all absolutely part of the plan and has been for months. of course everything that is happening right now essentially is inevitable or has been inevitable ever sincejoe biden announced earlier in the year that the decision had finally been taken to withdraw american troops from afghanistan. so, it's all editable but i think the pace of eight is being increased and there is a real sense of urgency because of what we had seen on the ground which had long taliban advance in the past week or two. that is clearly concentrating mind and it's beating up concentrating mind and it's beating up the process and in the case of the british embassy i think it's leading to a reduction in the staff which they had not necessarily expected to do just now. expected to do 'ust now. thank you very much. — expected to do just now. thank you very much- let's — expected to do just now. thank you very much. let's go _ expected to do just now. thank you very much. let's go to _ expected to do just now. thank you very much. let's go to the - expected to do just now. thank you | very much. let's go to the pentagon where the press secretary has been speaking. he is still taking questions from generalists following that announcement about evacuation
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efforts by the us. 0bviously, obviously, no one is pleased to see that the security situation in afghanistan continues to deteriorate. and that the taliban continues to act as if they believe the only path to governance is through violence and brutality and oppression and force. contrary to what they had said previously at the negotiating table. so of course, nobody is happy to see that and as we have said before, with these air strikes, we would provide support to the afghan national security defence force is where and when feasible with the expectation and do not expect it's not always going to be feasible. yourfirst expect it's not always going to be feasible. your first question about the airport, there is no planning and no discussion of using the international airport as a base for conducting air strikes in and around afghanistan. there is a small aviation element airport back is
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military based and explore the facilitation and logistics and movement and that kind of thing. troops black who is in charge of this? what is the chain of command? is there somebody in charge of the military effort or did they report to the embassy security officer or what? figs to the embassy security officer or what? �* , ,., to the embassy security officer or what? �* , ,. ., to the embassy security officer or what? �* , ., ,., ., what? as we said, we have someone in cobble hill has — what? as we said, we have someone in cobble hill has been _ what? as we said, we have someone in cobble hill has been placed _ what? as we said, we have someone in cobble hill has been placed in - cobble hill has been placed in charge by general mckenzie to be the commander of us forces afghanistan forward. ashley? just commander of us forces afghanistan forward. ashley?— forward. ashley? just a follow up on some of the — forward. ashley? just a follow up on some of the other _ forward. ashley? just a follow up on some of the other questions. - forward. ashley? just a follow up on some of the other questions. in - some of the other questions. in addition to any additional aircraft, is there additional equipment that these battalions are going to need? and can you walk us through how you
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arrived with 3000 additional troops? i will not get into it at the liberations of exactly how these particular units were chosen. this was based on consultation by the secretary with the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and general mckenzie based on the mission fact and again it's a narrowly defined mission to safeguard the movement of civilian personnel and to help process at an accelerated pace special immigrant visas and so based on the missions that resource and based on consultations with top military leaders, the secretary decided this was the appropriate amount right now and again to have additional questions available closer into theatre if that was required. i'm sorry, i missed your other question. in required. i'm sorry, i missed your other question.— other question. in a base into otential other question. in a base into potential aircraft _ other question. in a base into potential aircraft being - other question. in a base into potential aircraft being sent l other question. in a base into i potential aircraft being sent into the country to help with the evacuation, a spare base and equipments being sent to help with
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transportation and anything else at this point in time? we transportation and anything else at this point in time?— this point in time? we anticipate the use of additional— this point in time? we anticipate the use of additional military - the use of additional military airlift as required and we are working through the requirements for that right now. and infantry battalions come with some measure of self—defense equipment with martyrs, machine guns, and of course personality carried weaponry so they have defence capabilities and i am not able to be tells specifically what each battalion will be carrying with them but they will obviously have the capabilities they need to defend themselves. fine have the capabilities they need to defend themselves.— have the capabilities they need to defend themselves. one time we heard in the last coursle _ defend themselves. one time we heard in the last couple days _ defend themselves. one time we heard in the last couple days is _ defend themselves. one time we heard in the last couple days is a _ in the last couple days is a noncombatant evacuation operation, 33,000 personnel, another housing in the country, 3000 insight, that is a significant number. a space in noncombatant and why you're cutting it back? we
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noncombatant and why you're cutting it back? ~ ., ., noncombatant and why you're cutting itback? ., ., ..,,_ , it back? we are not classifying this as a noncombatant _ it back? we are not classifying this as a noncombatant evacuation. - it back? we are not classifying this as a noncombatant evacuation. a l as a noncombatant evacuation. a narrowly focused, temporary mission to facilitate safe orderly departure of additional civilian personnel from this department. and to help accelerate and to help the state department colleagues accelerate the processing of siv applicants. we are not classifying base as that at this time. , ., . ., not classifying base as that at this time. , . . ., ., , time. there is a certain irony here that the drawdown _ time. there is a certain irony here that the drawdown was _ time. there is a certain irony here that the drawdown was by - time. there is a certain irony here that the drawdown was by 3500 l time. there is a certain irony here - that the drawdown was by 3500 troops and dressing are sending an additional 3000 to get out civilians and ramping it up quickly. and on top of that, another 3500 inchoate, what is the irony here for people who might be asking, isn't this ironic that you get out 2500 you'll have to ramp up significantly? —— kuwait. i have to ramp up significantly? -- kuwait. ., �* , ., .,
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kuwait. i don't share your view of the irony- — kuwait. i don't share your view of the irony. this _ kuwait. i don't share your view of the irony. this is _ kuwait. i don't share your view of the irony. this is a _ kuwait. i don't share your view of the irony. this is a very _ kuwait. i don't share your view of| the irony. this is a very temporary mission for a very specific purpose. that's a big difference and feeling you are deploying for nine, 12 months, forces to stabilise and secure afghanistan which really had been doing for the last 20 years. it is a narrowly defined temporary mission. , , ., ., , mission. this very narrowly defined mission, mission. this very narrowly defined mission. once _ mission. this very narrowly defined mission, once it's _ mission. this very narrowly defined mission, once it's over, _ mission. this very narrowly defined mission, once it's over, they - mission. this very narrowly defined mission, once it's over, they would j mission, once it's over, they would only be 650 troops to protect the airport staff is not one for this mission is over i will not get into the specific members here. but we antici ate the specific members here. but we anticipate having _ the specific members here. but we anticipate having less _ the specific members here. but we anticipate having less than - the specific members here. but we anticipate having less than a - anticipate having less than a thousand us troops on the ground to support that the chromatic kabul which we all agree we still want to be able to have. share which we all agree we still want to be able to have.— which we all agree we still want to be able to have. are you considering the need for — be able to have. are you considering the need for more _ be able to have. are you considering the need for more troops _ be able to have. are you considering the need for more troops if - be able to have. are you considering the need for more troops if the - the need for more troops if the situation continues to deteriorate and to follow up on the question if there was one event that led to a slight change in the last 24 to 48
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hours that led to an incredible acceleration of the plans to get out? ., , , ., ., . out? your first question, no. we laid out pretty — out? your first question, no. we laid out pretty clearly _ out? your first question, no. we laid out pretty clearly three - laid out pretty clearly three infantry battalions on the way now and a combat team being brought over into the region as a reserve. they are no plans right now for additionalforces. and i can only say what i said before to david. there was not one precipitating eventin there was not one precipitating event in the last couple of days that led the president and secretary to make decision. it's a confluence of events and as i have been saying for several weeks, we have been watching very closely with concern. the security situation on the ground and far better be prudent about it and far better be prudent about it and be responsible and watching the trend to make the best decisions you can for safety and security of our people think to wait until it's too
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late. so we believe that this is not only the right thing to do about the right time to do it. that only the right thing to do about the right time to do it.— right time to do it. at what point in the fall of— right time to do it. at what point in the fall of kabul— right time to do it. at what point in the fall of kabul inevitable? . right time to do it. at what point in the fall of kabul inevitable? i | in the fall of kabul inevitable? i will not speculate about a hypothetical situations and i will not get into intelligence assessment.— not get into intelligence assessment. ., , ~ �*, assessment. you must think it's close if you _ assessment. you must think it's close if you are _ assessment. you must think it's close if you are evacuating - assessment. you must think it's close if you are evacuating all. assessment. you must think it's close if you are evacuating all ofj close if you are evacuating all of these americans? i'll not speculate about the future of kabul and i will not talk about intelligence assessments. we believe this is the right thing to do and this is the right thing to do and this is the right time to do it and as may state department colleagues said earlier today, there is there a bit dramatic presence in kabul and the intention is to maintain a diplomatic presence in kabul. we have a special envoy who would see me talk to leaders of the taliban in terms of the pursuit of achromatic negotiated settlement. i would refer you to my state
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department colleagues to speak to them about what they're doing. it is insultin: them about what they're doing. it is insulting for— them about what they're doing. it is insulting for americans watching this right now. i insulting for americans watching this right now.— insulting for americans watching this right now. i disagree, i don't think it insulting _ this right now. i disagree, i don't think it insulting and _ this right now. i disagree, i don't think it insulting and i _ this right now. i disagree, i don't think it insulting and i don't- this right now. i disagree, i don'tj think it insulting and i don't think i share that sentiment at all. deploying into mikel antia, you're telling me the marines and filters that will go into mikel antia, this is not combat?— that will go into mikel antia, this is not combat? ~ . ., , ., is not combat? what i am telling you need a name — is not combat? what i am telling you need a name and _ is not combat? what i am telling you need a name and saying _ is not combat? what i am telling you need a name and saying it _ is not combat? what i am telling you need a name and saying it again, - need a name and saying it again, they will have the ability to defend themselves. they will be armed, they are going for a security mission and they're going for a narrowly defined mission to help secure and safe like the movement of civilian personnel as well as the movement of special immigrants, men and women and their families who are applying under that process. that's the goal. find families who are applying under that process. that's the goal.— process. that's the goal. and being clear here and _ process. that's the goal. and being clear here and responding - process. that's the goal. and being clear here and responding to - process. that's the goal. and being i clear here and responding to e-mails clear here and responding to e—mails i'm getting from people in afghanistan. it is a narrowly defined mission to as you just said for our lord diplomatic personnel and does in the siv programme. it's not for any other individuals who
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are not afghans and met with you who may have worked for us agencies or who work for the government and the follow—up question is at some point without speculating, this is a major omission, except possibly the us could work with other nato allies to evacuate other personnel? {lin could work with other nato allies to evacuate other personnel?- evacuate other personnel? on your first question. _ evacuate other personnel? on your first question. i _ evacuate other personnel? on your first question, i think— evacuate other personnel? on your first question, i think that - first question, i think that characterised this mission appropriately and i will leave it at that. on your second question, this is a us decision by the commander—in—chief to reduce civilian personnel and to have us military personnel flow in to help with that reduction so it's not a nato mission. that said, we fully anticipate to be in close consultation with our allies and partners going forward and if we can be of assistance to them, if they desire to make changes in their
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footprints and a secretary fully intends to make it clear to them that we will be ready to help as needed. irate that we will be ready to help as needed. ~ . ., ., needed. we are hearing from the pentauon needed. we are hearing from the pentagon spokesman _ needed. we are hearing from the pentagon spokesman finishing i needed. we are hearing from the| pentagon spokesman finishing off questions from journalists who have gathered there after the united states announced that it was working to relocate its embassy staff in kabul as a result of the data by making significant gains and get more provincial cities across the country. and i have thousand american troops are needed for this mission emulatesjohn kirby said let's very much narrowing its focus on temporary inmates timeframe. saying it's very much focused on getting people out of kabul and to safety. 350 troops remain in the country from the united states because of the drawdown. the uk is also making similar efforts for its embassy staff. we have some breaking
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news to bring your now from plaintiff. we are told that a significant number of emergency service resources are at the scene of an incident in pennetta. the incident has not been described but its ongoing according to the southwestern and getting surveys. it was called just after six o'clock this evening. —— plymouth. in may tweet on social media base at bay send a significant amount of resources, hazardous area result teams, ambulances, airambulances, teams, ambulances, air ambulances, multiple teams, ambulances, airambulances, multiple doctors and senior paramedics, we will provide an update in due course. there has been a reaction from some of the local mps. the neighbour and he has said really worrying me is coming out of plymouth, everyone stay safe and stay indoors and follow our advice. and then plymouth mp has also set on social media he was aware of the tragic incident unfolding in the city. please obey all instruction from police and do not post rumours
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or speculation on social media. i will post the years when i had it. devon and cornwall police in attendance so we will follow what they're saying and bring you news as we have them. more than half a million gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland have achieved another set of record results, with both the proportion of students getting top grades and those achieving pass rates rising slightly from last year. it follows a second year in which exams were replaced with the assessments of teachers. as with a levels a couple of days ago the numbers offer new insights into secondary education. girls moved further ahead of boys with a third of them scoring top grades, while for boys it was roughly a quarter achieving the same grades. there were also some clear regional differences: in london over a third of results were top grades. while in yorkshire & the humber — for example — it was more like a quarter.
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from leeds, our eduction editor branwen jeffreys reports on the results and the implications going forward. thank you forjoining us, let's celebrate. huge amounts of disruption over the last 18 months, these children have done remarkably well. �* , ,., , these children have done remarkably well. �* , , ., these children have done remarkably well. ., , ., these children have done remarkably well. absolutely, for young people who not well. absolutely, for young people who got their _ well. absolutely, for young people who got their results _ well. absolutely, for young people who got their results on _ well. absolutely, for young people who got their results on tuesday i well. absolutely, for young people| who got their results on tuesday or their results today, from people of all ages taking these exams and the teachers and the groups who support that damn, this is a big gate i it's absolutely a cause for celebration for lots of individuals who have got what they wanted and needed to go to the next stage. what they wanted and needed to go to the next stage-— the next stage. however, a number of .a .s the next stage. however, a number of cas- in the next stage. however, a number of aa -s in at the next stage. however, a number of gaps in at have _ the next stage. however, a number of gaps in at have been _ the next stage. however, a number of gaps in at have been exposed, - the next stage. however, a number of gaps in at have been exposed, not - gaps in at have been exposed, not just between state schools and private schools but in other markers as well. ~ ,,., , private schools but in other markers as well. ~ , ,., , ., ., as well. absolutely. the headline of an increase — as well. absolutely. the headline of an increase in _ as well. absolutely. the headline of an increase in price _ as well. absolutely. the headline of an increase in price is _ as well. absolutely. the headline of an increase in price is an _ as well. absolutely. the headline of an increase in price is an increase i an increase in price is an increase in top grades and it looks like... a
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gap between state school and school pupils is really quite large. 60% of private school pupils got their top grades and it was only just over a quarter of state school pupils. if you are on free school meals, lots of young people we support are on free school meals and there is a i2% drop in at the met between their results and young people who are not an act you identified there is a big regional disparity in yorkshire and in the northeast end of top grades are not where young people in their london and southeast. we are not seeing the leavening up we talked about when it comes to the top grades. what leavening up we talked about when it comes to the top grades.— comes to the top grades. what is the wa out of comes to the top grades. what is the way out of this? _ comes to the top grades. what is the way out of this? the _ comes to the top grades. what is the way out of this? the government - way out of this? the government appointed a educational recovery so he put a plan forward and been resigned because he did not think the government was committing enough money and resources to it. what is happening with regard to recovery and closing this gap?—
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and closing this gap? there is no wa out and closing this gap? there is no way out of _ and closing this gap? there is no way out of this. _ and closing this gap? there is no way out of this. the _ and closing this gap? there is no way out of this. the government| and closing this gap? there is no - way out of this. the government has put forward for in education recovery and that is good news and those resources that help but it's really significantly not enough. i think of what they recommended and index put together a plan and he recommended this is not a quick fix. we need the resources to be spread across the country and targeted in those areas that need it most and we need to recognise that education recovery is a long—term game to support children and young people notjust support children and young people not just to get support children and young people notjust to get back into school, notjust to get back into school, notjust to get back into school, not just a focus notjust to get back into school, notjust a focus on those narrow academics but to support their well—being and their enrichment in sports and music and their confidence which is to be damaged during this period. the plan that had been put together, the 50 million he recommended we still think that the answer when it comes to the spending review this autumn
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and we would like to see the chancellor and prime minister put leavening up education right at the heart of that. leavening up education right at the heart of that-— heart of that. very briefly, some teachers are _ heart of that. very briefly, some teachers are saying _ heart of that. very briefly, some teachers are saying their- teachers are saying their assessments are not an accurate reflection of accountability and progress exams, how likely is it that that might be factored in the future? i that that might be factored in the future? ~ . �* , that that might be factored in the future? ~ ., �* , ., that that might be factored in the future? ~ . �* , ., , future? i think that's a big question _ future? i think that's a big question about _ future? i think that's a big question about the - future? i think that's a big l question about the purpose future? i think that's a big - question about the purpose of future? i think that's a big _ question about the purpose of exams and assessments and i don't think any quick fixes off the back of what we have seen this year but it does raise questions about notjust what a young person has achieved during this deceptive time but what they're able to achieve and what their potential and is and that's really what we need to have recognition of. thank you very much. the number of people waiting for nhs treatment in england is now the highest since records began
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in 2007, according to figures out today. nearly five and a half million people are on the list. of those, more than 300,000 have been waiting more than a year, although that's slightly down on previous figures. but research also shows that 5,700 patients in england have now been waiting two years or more. here's our health editor, hugh pym, on what the numbers mean for those still waiting for treatment. thank you forjoining us. how much of this is down to the pandemic? we have of this is down to the pandemic? - have certainly seen big increases in rating over the pandemic but we need to remember their waiting list is already over 4 million back in february 2020 and have been increasing for some time. the nhs went into the kind that make with worsening waiting lists a number of long—term changes so staffing, for example, being a problem for some time. it example, being a problem for some time. , ., , , ., time. it is not 'ust in terms of operations — time. it is notjust in terms of operations that _ time. it is notjust in terms of operations that people - time. it is notjust in terms of operations that people have l time. it is notjust in terms of - operations that people have been
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waiting to have, is it even a&e departments that are overwhelmed at times? , ~ ., ., departments that are overwhelmed at times? , ~ . ., ., times? yes, i think that what we are seeinu at times? yes, i think that what we are seeing at the — times? yes, i think that what we are seeing at the moment _ times? yes, i think that what we are seeing at the moment is _ times? yes, i think that what we are seeing at the moment is a _ seeing at the moment is a combination of really challenging circumstances so we have got this backlog of people that are waiting for treatments but often they are having a big impact on them and affecting their quality of life and at the same time we have got real pressure on emergency services so we have got people waiting a long time in a&e and making a really long time for ambulances and even when they have cut into hospital and they need to be admitted waiting a long time for a bed so we have got some combination of different things going on and alongside that of course covid—i9 is still here cell thatis
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course covid—i9 is still here cell that is almost 5000 people in england in hospital at the moment with covid—i9 and it's having a big impact on health services and how they are organised so hospitals for example needing to keep beds mp or keep areas clear to reduce risk of infection and so on.— infection and so on. what is the solution and _ infection and so on. what is the solution and how— infection and so on. what is the solution and how did _ infection and so on. what is the solution and how did you - infection and so on. what is the solution and how did you get i infection and so on. what is the i solution and how did you get these rating race down? i solution and how did you get these rating race down?— rating race down? i think unfortunately _ rating race down? i think unfortunately it's - rating race down? i think unfortunately it's going l rating race down? i think| unfortunately it's going to rating race down? i think- unfortunately it's going to be a long time trying to sell i think we are talking about potentially year is rather than months so we know historically when that happens a very high waiting list he did take a lot of investments and a lot of time to get the rating race down and i think that what we really need to be thinking about a plan over several years to have the levels of investment and addressed some of
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these long—standing challenges as well with the nhs. these long-standing challenges as well with the nhs.— well with the nhs. thank you very much. well with the nhs. thank you very much- here _ well with the nhs. thank you very much. here is— well with the nhs. thank you very much. here is the _ well with the nhs. thank you very much. here is the weather - well with the nhs. thank you very l much. here is the weather forecast. hello there. low pressure passing through the north of the uk is going to bring a fairly breezy and, at times, wet night for scotland, perhaps parts of northern ireland, too. further south you are, closer to the area of high pressure, it should be quieter and there'll be lengthy clear spells, maybe just one or two showers around. a breezy night for all, but certainly windy for much of scotland and northern ireland. it's here where we'll have the most of those showers, some of which could be quite heavy. a fairly mild night to come across the south and a milder night across the north than what we had the previous night. so, here's the picture for friday. you can see low pressure to the north, higher pressure to the south. it means that much of england and wales should have a fine day with quite a bit of sunshine around. more sunshine across southern england than what we had on thursday, maybe just the odd shower. further north you are, it will be windier closer to that low pressure.
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there'll some scattered showers for northern ireland, certainly for western scotland. high teens here. it could make 22 or 23 further south. the weekend looks quite mixed. there'll be variable cloud, maybe a few this is bbc news. the headlines: as the taliban captures more cities, both the uk and the united states send troops back into afghanistan to evacuate staff from their embassies. record grades for gcse students in england, wales and northern ireland, after exams were cancelled for a second year. some teachers say the assessments are more accurate than exams. they have been assessed and awarded results on the merits of what they have produced, and that can't be taken away from them. the nhs waiting list in england hits a record high of almost 5.5 million. a change in self isolation rules in northern ireland. the bbc understands fully—vaccinated people who are a close contact of a covid case will no longer have to stay at home.
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and the actress yoona stubbs, famous for her roles in sherlock, worzel gummidge and summer holiday, dies aged 84. it's a case study in what happens when religion her career spanned seven decades and included roles in a wide range of british tv classics such as sherlock, eastenders, til death us do part and worzel gummidge, as well as appearing in films like summer holiday with sir cliff richard. lizo mzimba looks back at her life. there is plenty of room to pass! una stubbs could hardly have asked for a better big—screen debut. cast opposite the country's biggest box office star, cliff richard. we are not going on a london bus if that's what you had in mind! well, you're not going to get very far on your holiday in this thing!
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we're not going on a holiday, we're on our way to engagement! born in hertfordshire, she always wanted to perform. at 16 she joined the chorus at the london palladium, her talent won her the role in summer holiday leaving chorus work behind. although it was a good life, it is the most underpaid, hard—working and least respected really, or it was then. and just to break away was fantastic. like so many multi—talented performers of the time, she could dance... singing. she could sing... ..she could sing... singing. ..and she could act. you don't half talk some rubbish. she was cast in what went on to be one of tv�*s biggest shows as the daughter of the bigoted alf garnett in till death us do part. it won't be your lot who will be revolting.
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it'll be us bloody tories who will be revolting. well, you're certainly revolting. in the 1970s and 80s, she was a fearsome aunt sally. i don't wish to impose upon you. 0pposite jon pertwee's worzel gummidge. 20 years later, she was still delighting children in the worst witch. as you know, in three weeks it will be her birthday. now, her birthday falls on the same date every year. and most recently, she won millions of fans across the world as mrs hudson. boys, you've got another one! ..in the award—winning sherlock. did you bring me tea in the morning? when you think it came from? i don't know, ijust thought it sort of happened. your mother has a lot to answer for. still showing she had a true star quality right to the end.
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i'm joined now by mark gatiss, who was one of the writers of the hit bbci drama "sherlock. he also starred in it as sherlock's brother, mylock. una stubbs played mrs hudson. mark, thank you forjoining us. it's hard to imagine we be grown up with una stubbs always being there, to imagine she's not going to any longer. imagine she's not going to any loner. ~ , ,, �*, imagine she's not going to any loner. , ,, �*,, imagine she's not going to any loner. , ,, h, longer. absolutely. she's been so much a part _ longer. absolutely. she's been so much a part of — longer. absolutely. she's been so much a part of everyone's - longer. absolutely. she's been so much a part of everyone's life - much a part of everyone's life for so long and so many different ways. till death was one of the first movies till death was one of the first movie ., till death was one of the first movie . ., , movies and it took... i always thou . ht movies and it took... i always thought she _ movies and it took... i always thought she was _ movies and it took... i always thought she wasjust - movies and it took... i always thought she wasjust amazing j movies and it took... i always i thought she wasjust amazing in movies and it took... i always - thought she wasjust amazing in that thought she was just amazing in that part. heartbreaking, crueland she was very underrated. and a really wonderful person.— wonderful person. what she is deli . htful wonderful person. what she is delightful in — wonderful person. what she is delightful in person _ wonderful person. what she is
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delightful in person as - wonderful person. what she is delightful in person as she - wonderful person. what she is i delightful in person as she always appeared? i’m delightful in person as she always a- eared? �* . . delightful in person as she always aueared? �* . ., delightful in person as she always l appeared?_ laughter appeared? i'm afraid so. laughter she was amazingly _ appeared? i'm afraid so. laughter| she was amazingly self-deprecating. she was amazingly self—deprecating. she was amazingly self—deprecating. she was amazingly self—deprecating. she was very insecure about her own abilities. she never really thought she was good enough, but she had the most amazing grace as a dancer, and she brought to every part. she was very naughty. i can't tell you most of the stories.— of the stories. laughter they were _ of the stories. laughter they were so _ of the stories. laughter they were so funny. - of the stories. laughter they were so funny. shel of the stories. laughter . they were so funny. she was of the stories. laughter - they were so funny. she wasjust they were so funny. she was just such a big heart and everyone in sherlock absolutely adored her. she just had a marvellous human quality. mrs hudson in the sherlock holmes book wouldn't be featured as largely as she did in your series. which came first? did you have the idea of
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those lines of four una stubbs, or did you write the lines and think she would deliver them brilliantly? when she auditioned, a lot of great people came in — there was a moment when everybodyjust people came in — there was a moment when everybody just went, people came in — there was a moment when everybodyjust went, that people came in — there was a moment when everybody just went, that would be great. i suppose she was doing a lot on stage and a lot of wonderful stable to work, but no one had seen her in a while. someone you could tap into that maternal thing as well that mrs hudson was like, everybody�*s mother and landlady. 0nce everybody�*s mother and landlady. once you know was cast, you have to write more than more. —— una. the more una stubbs brought to it the more una stubbs brought to it the more we had to give her. she was proud to have that late joy, a
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career of being such a big picture and getting this whole new fan base. is it true that she knew benedict cumberbatch from being a baby? yes. cumberbatch from being a baby? yes, i believe cumberbatch from being a baby? yes, i believe she's — cumberbatch from being a baby? yes, i believe she's a _ cumberbatch from being a baby? yes, i believe she's a very _ cumberbatch from being a baby? ya: i believe she's a very old friend cumberbatch from being a baby? 12: i believe she's a very old friend of his parents. i think she probably did look after him! it's some sort of karma. 0ne did look after him! it's some sort of karma. one day, i will play landlady. of karma. one day, i will play landlad . �* of karma. one day, i will play landlady-— of karma. one day, i will play landlady. of karma. one day, i will play landlad. , ., _ , ., landlady. but she obviously is now known to a — landlady. but she obviously is now known to a new _ landlady. but she obviously is now known to a new generation - landlady. but she obviously is now known to a new generation of- landlady. but she obviously is now- known to a new generation of people, but i've heard interviews where she said there were mean patch is in her career when she would take things, try them and hope they paid her a few quid, and that made her extremely versatile.- few quid, and that made her extremely versatile. that's very true and she — extremely versatile. that's very true and she talked _ extremely versatile. that's very true and she talked a _ extremely versatile. that's very true and she talked a lot - extremely versatile. that's very true and she talked a lot to - extremely versatile. that's very true and she talked a lot to me | true and she talked a lot to me about that. there were times when she was very low and raising her children, and shejust she was very low and raising her children, and she just tried so she was very low and raising her children, and shejust tried so many
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different... then she sort of reinvented herself as a stage actress as part of that process. 0bviously, actress as part of that process. obviously, we know her very well from give us a clue, and she was incredibly versatile. there are people who are just, notjust have an incredible range of talents. her secret was to keep under the radar, as opposed to being hot and then cold. she was always welcome whenever we saw her again. i’m whenever we saw her again. i'm deliahted whenever we saw her again. i'm delighted that she was just what you would imagine. that pleases me, i can tell you. thank you very much.
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police say two children were treated at the scene for minor injuries and officers are continuing to investigate how the incident occurred. in a statement, the parks at the ride would remain closed while investigations take place. let's remind you of the breaking news that we're hearing from plymouth. a significant number of emergency service resources are at the scene of an incident in the city. the southwestern annual in—service said they were called after six o'clock this evening to an ongoing accident. they responded to the incident with a significant number of resources. they will provide an update in due course. two of the local mps have been talking about a serious and tragic incident. luke pollard tweeted, "really
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worrying news come. can everyone stay indoors and follow police advice?" johnny mercer from plymouth also tweeted, "i'm aware of an incident unfolding in plymouth. please obey all police instructions and do not post rumour or speculation on social media." devon and cornwall police in attendance, and cornwall police in attendance, and we will bring you more when they make some statements. ministers at stormont have decided to ease rules on self—isolation, to bring northern ireland into line with the rest of the uk on monday. the devolved government is also lifting restrictions on social gatherings in private gardens. but social distancing requirements remain in force in all indoor workplaces. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardy sent this update from stormont. northern ireland has been behind other parts of the uk when it comes to lifting those remaining reflections. the biggest change
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agreed today is from monday, people in close contact with someone who was covid positive will no longer have to self—isolate for those ten days. as long as they have been double jabbed and as long as they receive a negative covid test. this will be a great relief to many employers who've been facing problems with lots of staff having to go off all at once and getting pinged by the app and leading to big gaps. that being said, there were some disappointment from people who did hope that the executive was going to go further today. what they do decide to do is keep in place those rules around social distancing indoors and the guidance around home working. that is a big frustration for the hospitality industry because that industry had been pushing very hard for social distancing roles to be relax indoors so they could get more people in pubs and restaurants. nightclubs also will remain closed where they've opened in other parts of the uk. 0ne where they've opened in other parts of the uk. one of the reasons for
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the more cautious reproach is northern ireland had some of the highest infection rates in the uk, and there's been a lower update in the vaccines to other parts of the despite —— which is still causing concerns of white emma vardy assortment. just over 5900 people are in hospital with coronavirus. 94 deaths with recorded when the last 24 hours. 0n with recorded when the last 24 hours. on average, there have been 84 deaths a day in the last week. over 89% of adults have now had their first coronavirus jab, and over 40 million of that both.
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it might not be time to pop the champagne but it's beginning to look like the uk is catching up with other major economies as it bounces out of the pandemic — that's after shrinking faster than many last year. official figures for the latest three month period show that the economy expanded by nearly 5%, boosted by more spending in shops and hospitality. as our economics editor faisal islam explains, the growth shows the economy on the mend, but not yet fully recovered. the wheels of the economy turning again and pretty fast too across the nation and here at mount street printers, using these refurbished decades—old machines to create and decorate envelopes, invites and greeting cards. in 40 years, we've never made a loss and this was devastating. it could have sunk us. but you're here, you're invested and the customers are starting to come back. the customers are starting to come back and we're firing up the machine again. it's not like flipping a switch. you know, a lot of our staff are highly skilled and
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some of those processes, they take time to get back to how they were before. business here had ground to a halt but helped by the furlough scheme, it's now back at 70% of normal. so, yet to fully recover, a little like the economy generally. the economy is re—bounding from those pandemic lows and spectacularly so, but that doesn't mean it's made a full recovery just yet. and there are some sources of caution in industry about the amount of debt that's been incurred over the past year. difficulties in recruiting and the slow withdrawal of some of the government's support measures. at 4.8% up over the past three months, the uk has been growing faster than any major economy. the rise of the delta variant�*s having little impact. but the uk economy is still smaller than before the pandemic. over 4% smaller, reflecting a sharper hit last year. the us, for example,
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already has a bigger economy than before the pandemic. today's figures show that the economy's recovering very strongly, exceeding many people's expectations and the fastest growth in the g7. from a low base, though? but i think the clear evidence is that our plan's working but i'm not complacent. the economy and our public finances have experienced a significant shock. it is going to take us time to fully recover from that and that's why i'm not done supporting businesses or people and, most importantly, giving them the skills and the opportunities they need to find well—paid jobs. as fast as the economy is growing right now, the past year will continue to cast a long shadow as this independent restaurateur suggests. there's a lot of optimism there. as a restaurateur, it's a relief. i mean, we had i think1300 bookings in five hours, you know, _ when we started opening up all the other dates. - so, it's really, it is... you know, you need this after the crushing long l pandemic and the lockdowns, - you need to know there's optimism that people will book, -
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people will return and, yes, i'm hopeful that we will come out of this, you know, intact. - back at the printers, they are investing for the future. christmas cards and restaurant menus are in hot demand. the shop has been refurbished and print capacity doubled. now, after a very tough year, the wait for something like economic normality. faisal islam, bbc news. you more details on the breaking news we've been bringing you from plymouth. emergency services are responding to an incident in devon. southwestern ambulance said it has since four hello helicopters. doctors and paramedics were on board —— four helicopters. we'll bring you more dude don't i details as soon as we get them. both the uk in the
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united states are to send troops into the country. the us is sending around 3000 personnel. let's speak to tobias ellwood from the event —— defence select committee. what's your view of these relocation operations that the us and the uk are having to mount? this operations that the us and the uk are having to mount?— operations that the us and the uk are having to mount? as brief as the defence secretary, _ are having to mount? as brief as the defence secretary, and _ are having to mount? as brief as the defence secretary, and this - are having to mount? as brief as the defence secretary, and this is - are having to mount? as brief as the defence secretary, and this is the i defence secretary, and this is the protocol that was planned. when the decision was made as to how to get our existing personnel working safely. these troops are going in,
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they'll be moving embassy personnel from, and many will return back to the uk. all countries that are there want to avoid the scenes from the in 19705. want to avoid the scenes from the in i970s. given the fact the taliban has taken much of the world areas. they're making it very clear that this is a narrow focus mission and of a temporary basis. how likely is it they can stick to that idea and not be sucked into something greater? not be sucked into something creater? , , , greater? there will be unless there is a ma'or greater? there will be unless there is a major engagement. _ greater? there will be unless there is a major engagement. -- - greater? there will be unless there is a major engagement. -- there i greater? there will be unless there i is a major engagement. -- there want is a major engagement. —— there want to be. like i said, this has been planned a number of months ago, and they're now executed —— executing
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that plan. we are now handing the country back to the very insurgency we went in to defeat, and when you hear these phrases such as global britain or president biden saying america is back, you have a question the resolve of the west. what we're willing to defend the next ten years. it's going to get evermore dangerous. and here we are departing afghanistan after two decades after forming the biggest technological and military alliance ever seen. defeated by insurgency armed with landmines, rpg �*s and ak—47s. this is not ourfinest landmines, rpg �*s and ak—47s. this is not our finest hour. we shouldn't agree what's going on. we're giving up agree what's going on. we're giving up on 40 million afghans. essen agree what's going on. we're giving up on 40 million afghans.— up on 40 million afghans. even at this late stage. — up on 40 million afghans. even at this late stage, how _ up on 40 million afghans. even at this late stage, how feasible - up on 40 million afghans. even at| this late stage, how feasible would it be for the uk to turn this around and say we've made a mistake, we need to go back, when president biden made it clear he was withdrawing his troops? let's put
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that into context. _ withdrawing his troops? let's put that into context. firstly, - withdrawing his troops? let's put that into context. firstly, it - withdrawing his troops? let's put that into context. firstly, it isn'tl that into context. firstly, it isn't britain that can do this alone. we got sucked into this decision by an american presidential election, by donald trump, who released thousands of taliban presidents. that didn't help matters at all. we see the fact that both president biden and trump saying we have to return our trip home. what we're going... giving up on afghan forces. 0ur departure means they can't manage the situation which also means the afghan government can operate as well. these are our problems and decisions we made 15 years ago. not talking to the taliban and training up talking to the taliban and training up afghan forces, but most critically, imposing western solutions on a country that wasn't ready for it by any means. we're now departing, it's a massive
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humanitarian disaster. we will see huge migration programmes and terrorism raise its ugly head again because of now become a safe haven for them to regroup and retrain. tobias ellwood, thank you very much forjoining us. sicily may have register the highest temperature ever recorded in europe — 48.8 celsius. the average maximum temperatures for this time of year are normally around 35 degrees there. 0ur rome correspondent, mark lowen, has more on the heatwave sweeping much of southern europe. after fires and floods, a biblical heatwave. sicily with what's believed to be the highest temperature ever recorded in europe, 48.8 degrees. much of southern europe is sweltering and its people are sweating. translation: it's a strange summer but we have always had _ the desire to travel. our children had to stay home all the winter because of covid—i9 lockdowns, so now we're doing
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everything to make them happy. red alerts are in force in 15 italian cities. those who can try to cool off. but in this ageing country, there's concern about the vulnerable. spain too is scorching. with temperatures set to hit the mid to high 40s, the shady squares are the best spots. thermometers from the pandemic are put to other use. it's been prompted by this, an anticyclone, an area of high pressure sat across north africa and southern europe. this one is nicknamed lucifer, — apt for those in its wake. and it's stoking the wildfires, around 500 new blazes ravaging italy last night — the worst in the south. at least four people have died over the past week. translation: this year's been difficult for us - because of the intense heat. next year, we hope to be able to start our prevention works earlier, so that we can prevent fires, especially in woods and particularly here in etna park.
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the firefighters are still battling to keep the flames at bay, but man versus lucifer takes a superhuman effort. mark lowen, bbc news. little more information on the incident in plymouth that some thought to have involved a number of victims, but not terror related. the suspect on the run is not —— the suspect is not on the run. there has been an update posted by luke pollard, saying awaiting confirmation of a number of victims, but this looks like a grim day for our city and community. can i ask you think of the families in our community and not share any images or videos?" this is an incident that all of the emergency services have been called to in considerable
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numbers four helicopters have attended the scene with paramedics and doctors on board. we will keep you up—to—date when we have more details. animal welfare charities say the dangerous dogs act needs a complete overhaul, on this the 30th anniversary of it coming into force. four breeds can currently be seized by police and either be put down or kept under strict conditions, but campaigners argue the law is too broad, and that each individual animal's temperament should be the deciding factor. with more, here's charlotte gallagher. meet alex. he's ten years old. in dog years, a senior citizen. but his life is very different to that of most other dogs. that's because he has beenjudged to be a pit bull—type animal, a banned breed in the uk. his owner sian is only allowed to keep him if she sticks to certain conditions. his life is very restricted and it's up to us, as his owners, myself and my husband, to ensure that he has
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a full and active life. he has to be muzzled and on a restricted length lead, held by someone over the age of 16 at all times in a public place. that includes the car. he can't run free unless he is in a secure area. people ask questions, but if anyone backs away or makes the dangerous dogs act bans four different breeds — pit bull terrier, dogo argentino, fila brasileiro and japanese tosa. the dangerous dogs act bans four different breeds— pit bull dogs suspected of being a banned type can be seized by the police. they will either be put down or returned to the owner and, like alex, be kept under strict conditions. the rspca and other charities say the law discriminates against dogs like alex because of what they look like and doesn't work, because the number of dog attacks has actually gone up. in the 20 years from 1999 to 2019, hospital admissions for dog bites increased by 154% —
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from 3,454 to 8,775. in the last five years, the rspca, battersea and blue cross have destroyed 482 dogs that were judged to be a banned breed. many of those had never attacked anyone. eight—year—old poppy was attacked by a staffordshire bull terrier this is fudge, her owner believed she was a staffordshire bull terrier, but like alex, she was judged to be a pit bull—type animal. she was taken by police and put down. it was surreal that that many police had come for a puppy. the next day i started to get angry, thinking, "she never did anything, she never bit anyone, she has never growled at anyone, why is she dead?" if you want to protect public safety, _ if you want to protect public safety, you need to focus on individual— safety, you need to focus on individual dogs. as opposed to how they look — individual dogs. as opposed to how they look. the individual dogs. as opposed to how the look. ., , they look. the government says the aim of the dangerous _ they look. the government says the aim of the dangerous dogs - they look. the government says the aim of the dangerous dogs act - they look. the government says the aim of the dangerous dogs act is i they look. the government says the aim of the dangerous dogs act is to j aim of the dangerous dogs act is to ensure the safety of the public,
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adding its commissioned research on the effectiveness of existing measures and on how to address behavioural problems and long dogs. charlie gallagher, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. hello there. low pressure's continuing to bring windy conditions for scotland and northern ireland, plenty of blustery showers further south. we've had quite a bit of cloud across southern england particularly, but that's mostly broken up to allow for some late sunshine. through the evening, though, that area of low pressure continues to pass the north of scotland. that's going to bring further windy weather here and further showers, particularly western scotland into parts of northern ireland. some heavy showers at that, too. further south, a lot of clear skies and a bit of cloud here and there, just one or two showers, perhaps. a breezy day to come across the board, windy in the northwest. these are mean wind speeds — gusts could be up to 30—40 mph in exposure. a fairly mild night to come and a milder night certainly across the north of the uk than what we've had previous night. so, for friday, we've got that low pressure still to the north of the uk, higher pressure further south,
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so it does mean we'll see a north—south divide through the day. again, a fairly breezy day across the board, but windy again for scotland in particular, where we'll have lots of showers piling in, particularly to western areas. best of any sunshine will be towards the east. for northern ireland, but certainly for england and wales, a dry and bright day with some sunny spells around a brighter day in the south compared to thursday. temperatures respond — we could see 23, maybe 24 degrees. for the weekend, it looks fairly mixed. we've got an area of low pressure working its way in from the atlantic. doesn't look like it's going to get very far, though, eastwards, and also, it's going to weaken through the weekend. so, some uncertainty to the amounts of rain we're going to see from this weather front, which will push across the irish sea area. but at the moment, it looks like more central parts of the country which could see some splashes of rain. up to the south of it and to the north, it should stay dry with some sunny spells. 22—23 degrees in the south given some sunshine, high teens in the north. and then, for sunday, the weather
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fronts spread their way eastwards, but it is a weakening feature, so i think we'll see variable amounts of cloud through sunday. could see some showery rain for northern scotland, perhaps northern england and southern scotland, and a few showers, perhaps, for southern england as well through the day, in between some good spells of sunshine. the details of this could change, so stay tuned to the forecast. but in some sunshine, in the south, it could feel fairly warm. a few showers are likely across northern and eastern parts of the uk into the start of the new week, but generally, i think we should see a lot of fine weather with some sunshine, but feeling cool.
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this is bbc news — i'm martine croxall — our top stories, the taliban captures herat, afghanistan's third biggest city, and are closing in on kandahar — the second largest. the us says it's sending 3000 troops to kabul to help evacuate some staff from the american embassy. from the pulpit to politics — the anti—vaxxers who refuse to change their tune as the delta variant sweeps through america's south. the us homeland security chief heads to the mexico border as the the number of attempted migrant crossings hits a 21—year high.
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and another year of record high gcse grades here in the uk, with teacher assessments instead

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