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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 13, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the taliban make their most dramatic gains yet against afghan government forces, taking kandahar — the country's second largest city — and lashkar gar. the us and the uk send troops back to afghanistan, to evacuate their embassies in kabul. a suspected gunman who killed five people — including a child under ten — in a residential area in plymouth has been named locally as jake davison. the gunman is believed to have turned the gun on himself. the incident is the worst mass shooting in britain since 2010. the father of britney spears, has agreed to step down as her conservator after 13 years of controlling her estate and other aspects of her life.
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as intense fires rage across the us western states, we fly over washington state — to see how new technology is being deployed to help the fight on the ground. it almost looks like mushroom cloud from a nuclear bomb covering the state with this thick haze. and a giant iceberg the size of greater london is blocking the british antarctic survey from their research station — we'll have more on that later this hour hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. in a devastating blow
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for the afghan government — five more provincial capitals have fallen to the taliban in the last 2a hours. the militants now control 1a provincial capitals and most of northern afghanistan. britain and the us are sending troops back into afghanistan to help evacuate their nationals. the taliban have made rapid gains sincejuly, taking considerable territory in the past month to look like this today. the militant group's gains have been rapid in the past few days, and indeed the past 2a hours — during which taliban fighters have captured afghanistan's second city of kandahar. the city is the taliban's birthplace and former stronghold — and taking control is a significant prize for the militants. other important cities such as herat and ghazni were captured within hours of each
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other on thursday. and the taliban have also taken lashkar gah, capital of the southern province of helmand, as well as qala—i—naw in the north. there are increasing concerns that the militants will continue their lightning speed offensive toward the capital, kabul, where tens of thousands of civilians have fled violent street fighting. our correspondent in kabul, yogita limaye, gave us this update well, people are in shock and disbelief over what has happened just over a single day. five provincial capitals have fallen to the taliban, among them major cities. kandahar, this country's second largest city, a big economic centre. to the taliban, it is a traditional stronghold, so they will be looking at this as a major victory. herat is in the west of the country, close to the border with iran, so it is important for trade. these are big losses for the afghan government, it leaves them in a very vulnerable position and it has all happened in a span of 12 hours.
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we started the day talking about ghazni, about 100 hours south of kabul, and by the end of the day, it was five provincial capitals, including lashkar gah in the helmand province. that is where some of the fiercest battles were fought over the past 20 years, hundreds of british and foreign troops died, thousands of afghan soldiers were killed there, and now it has been taken over by the taliban. afghan forces have retreated to a military base just outside the city. so people really in a sense of shock here about what has happened and the silence from the leadership of this country, we haven't heard yet from the president or any of his top ministers about the developments yesterday and i think the longer that continues, the more there will be speculation and rumours about what could potentially happen in kabul. we can now speak our south asia regional editor, anbarasan ethirajan, who's following developments from delhi..
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any latest updates before we discuss other things? fist any latest updates before we discuss other things?— other things? at the moment the taliban are _ other things? at the moment the taliban are firmly _ other things? at the moment the taliban are firmly in _ other things? at the moment the taliban are firmly in control - other things? at the moment the taliban are firmly in control of. other things? at the moment the taliban are firmly in control of at| taliban are firmly in control of at least 1a provincial capitals including the big cities of kandahar and herat. heavy fighting is going on in three other provinces and in some places the local elders are trying to mediate between security forces and the taliban so that security forces can withdraw without fighting in the city. people have invested money in building homes and businesses and they do not want them to be destroyed. if fighting erupts in a big city, it damages civilian belongings. the fighting is getting closer and closer, if you hours drive from caple, so it is a big
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victory for the taliban. at the same time the government is watching with concern about what is happening on the battlefield. you concern about what is happening on the battlefield.— the battlefield. you said about negotiations _ the battlefield. you said about negotiations with _ the battlefield. you said about negotiations with the - the battlefield. you said about negotiations with the elders, i the battlefield. you said about i negotiations with the elders, ben wallace has been speaking this morning and he was trying to describe how complicated the situation as in afghanistan. and he started telling us about the tribal divisions. just how difficult is it to bring the country together when you have got the taliban sweeping through and creating fear? the afghanistan — through and creating fear? the afghanistan is _ through and creating fear? tue: afghanistan is divided through and creating fear? tte: afghanistan is divided into through and creating fear? "tt2 afghanistan is divided into many ethnic communities, in the south, and there are other communities in different parts of afghanistan. when the civil war happened in the 1990s, it was split along ethnic lines and many people are fearing this could be a repeat because in the last five
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years, the president was trying to p"°p up years, the president was trying to prop up an afghan national army without allegiance to any community, to defend afghanistan. that was the whole aim of propping up the afghan national army. whole aim of propping up the afghan nationalarmy. but whole aim of propping up the afghan national army. but the complex situation, the regions, they control their own constituencies and command support from those areas, and that is what is happening at the moment. they were sidelined for a long time, now the government is trying to bring them back in the fight against the taliban. maybe it is too late, an herat city, heavy fighting happened, the taliban captured, the local strongmen were driven away from there. it is a complicated situation for the afghan government. at the same time, if they really want to take back any cities in the future, they need the support of these regional strongmen. that is
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fascinating- _ these regional strongmen. that is fascinating. you _ these regional strongmen. that is fascinating. you are _ these regional strongmen. that is fascinating. you are in _ these regional strongmen. that is fascinating. you are in india, - these regional strongmen. that is| fascinating. you are in india, many people are asking why afghanistan matters? we heard ben wallace saying the concern as there is a risk of terrorism being exported. looking at the regional picture, can you paint as a picture of how this has been reported and followed regionally? afghanistan is very strategically located. it is the gateway to central asia in the north and in the west you have iran and in the south you have pakistan. in the east, it borders china and india is not far away. what is happening in afghanistan is being keenly watched in all those countries. to start with in uzbekistan and other central asian countries they have military worried about what is happening once the taliban come to power. there are militant groups operating in those
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countries. that is a big concern for them. as far as iran is concerned, they had a relationship with the taliban when they were in power between 96 and 2001, but the iranians are saying that the diplomats in herat are safe. there is a complicated relationship between iran and the taliban. they need the support of the militant groups because 80 riverflows need the support of the militant groups because 80 river flows from the south—west of the country in afghanistan into iran and iran is keenly watching and they are worrying about islamist militants. pakistan, the main problem would be refugees flowing into the country because of the fighting. thousands of people are being displaced. caple accuses pakistan of supporting the taliban group and providing them a safe haven. that is rejected by
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islamabad. the local taliban group could reassemble in pakistan because they are going to be coming to power in afghanistan. and for india, they are worrying about what will happen in kashmir. the militants can happen insolence. what is happening in afghanistan, it is strategic, it has a huge concern and impact in the region itself. a huge concern and impact in the region itself-— a huge concern and impact in the reuion itself. ., ,, , ., , . the uk defence secretary ben wallace says afghanistan is now heading for civil war, which, he says, will lead to more poverty and create a breedign ground for terrorism. the history of afghanistan — and britain found that out in the 1830s — is that it is a country led by warlords and led by different provinces and tribes and you end up, if you are not very careful, in a civil war, and i think we are heading towards a civil war, initially shown by a taliban with momentum. the taliban is not entirely a single entity, they break down
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underneath the title into all sorts of different interests, but fundamentally, as i said earlier, i have concerned that when states become failed states or warlike states — as it is looking like at the moment in afghanistan — the breeding ground for both poverty, and we shouldn't forget that, both poverty and indeed terrorism grows. and it is why security is the most important thing. 0ur defence correspondent jonathan beale is here. i don't know if you heard ben wallace, he was asked this morning on bbc breakfast about whether. .. wallace, he was asked this morning on bbc breakfast about whether... he was pushed about whether uk forces would be used to help out in afghanistan and he was painting a very complicated picture. what is situation about uk forces engaging
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militarily? taste situation about uk forces engaging militaril ? ~ ~' 2, situation about uk forces engaging militaril ? ~ ~ ., ., ., militarily? we know that most of the british troops — militarily? we know that most of the british troops were _ militarily? we know that most of the british troops were there, _ militarily? we know that most of the british troops were there, 700, - militarily? we know that most of the british troops were there, 700, have already left. 150 to 170 still remain and it was thought they would stay to look after the embassy, we now know they probably will not. a small military presence will be included to protect the ambassador, the british ambassador who will remain in the country with a very small staff and a new location, a more secure location in cabo. that gives an indication of the concerns they have about the taliban. to allow to facilitate the exit of british citizens and there are still 4000 in the country, aid workers, people who work for ngos, security contractors, they are putting in those troops wore a short term to allow them to get flights out of caple. there are still commercial
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flights and to get some of the embassy staff who are not remaining out. and some of those who worked for the embassy over the past 20 years like translators for example, to get them and their families out so they can settle in the uk. this is not a force that is essentially meant to be doing any fighting. there will be the parachute regiment, they will be there, large numbers, 600 will be protection to ensure it goes slow smoothly, but they are not there to fight the taliban. as concerns the longer term, if a terrorist threat, al-qaeda reconstituted was planning attacks, both the americans and the british have said that they have capabilities like aircraft and drones that they can use over the horizon, and other words, out of the
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country. this is essentially the end of both the american and the british military presence. the deadline ends september the 11th, and that was the deadline announced by presidentjoe biden and that will be the end of the military operation that has lasted 20 years.— the military operation that has lasted 20 ears. ~ ., , lasted 20 years. what is the feeling in the uk of — lasted 20 years. what is the feeling in the uk of the _ lasted 20 years. what is the feeling in the uk of the decision _ lasted 20 years. what is the feeling in the uk of the decision to - in the uk of the decision to withdraw? you get a sense, listening to ben wallace today, that it was an unenviable decision to withdraw because they had to because of the us decision. is there widespread support for this move? hot us decision. is there widespread support for this move? not within the ministry _ support for this move? not within the ministry of — support for this move? not within the ministry of defence. - support for this move? not within i the ministry of defence. frustration with the american decision. it was an american decision and there was not much consultation with allies. nato as an organisation, and it was a nato mission has said that we are
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in together and out together so as soon as presidentjoe biden decided that it was very difficult to persuade other countries to stay behind. ben wallace said he tried but there was little interest. it gives you a sense of how difficult it is. they had been there for 20 years, train the afghan security forces, surprise at the pace of the taliban advance and there was hope that the afghan security forces could stand up to the taliban in key cities, but we have seen many of those like kandahar fall. cities, but we have seen many of those like kandaharfall. this is a difficult nut to crack. there is a reason why afghanistan has been called the graveyard of empires and to be honest, look at what happened with the soviets in the 1970s, a similar thing is happening to the us and the uk and other nato countries, leaving essentially without having achieved what they want to do even though ben wallace would say the terrorist threat that was there, the
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reason for and is no longer a problem at this present time. it might change. thank you very much for that. rory stewart is a senior fellow at yale university and former international development secretary, who lived and worked in afghanistan: thank you forjoining us. what is your assessment of what is taking place in afghanistan? we are hearing about humiliation of some people in the uk, abandonment in afghanistan? it is a betrayal. we were not an active combat operations in afghanistan. maybe people do not understand. they are implying we were driven out like the soviet union in the late 80s, but combat operations finished five years ago. we've had very few troops on the
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ground. it has been a question of air support. ground. it has been a question of airsupport. 0n ground. it has been a question of air support. 0n the basis of 2500 soldiers who were there at the early part of this year, we have been able to provide support for the afghan national army to make sure the taliban remained in the rural areas of the south. this is totally heartbreaking and totally unnecessary. there was no reason to do this and we have broken afghanistan in a matter of weeks. ? what has gone wrong? you had spent years, the uk and the united states, training of the military. t5 it years, the uk and the united states, training of the military.— training of the military. is it a failure? the _ training of the military. is it a failure? the whole _ training of the military. is it a failure? the whole thing - training of the military. is it a failure? the whole thing is i training of the military. is it a failure? the whole thing is a | failure? the whole thing is a catastrophic _ failure? the whole thing is a catastrophic failure. - failure? the whole thing is a catastrophic failure. the - failure? the whole thing is a i catastrophic failure. the failure rates with united states and the united kingdom and nato. the trend of the afghan national army that was very dependent on international air support and command are they had not succeeded in creating those enablers that were needed for the afghan
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national army to operate independently and they left without those things in place.— independently and they left without those things in place. should the uk to back those things in place. should the uk go back into — those things in place. should the uk go back into afghanistan? _ those things in place. should the uk go back into afghanistan? would - those things in place. should the uk| go back into afghanistan? would that be the best decision? a military solution? ., ., , ., ., solution? unfortunately, after what has happened _ solution? unfortunately, after what has happened in — solution? unfortunately, after what has happened in the _ solution? unfortunately, after what has happened in the last _ solution? unfortunately, after what has happened in the last few- solution? unfortunately, after what| has happened in the last few weeks, afghanistan is so broken it is impossible to imagine doing that. we were containing a situation, but when you take the lead off and everything explodes, it is very difficult to get back into the pot again. there is not a military option now. there was very recently, but through total carelessness and lack of responsibility, we have squandered 20 years. afghanistan is not a medieval state. the afghanistan of 20 years ago was a miserable place. 0ne afghanistan of 20 years ago was a miserable place. one in five children died before the age of five. adult life expenses —— my
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expectancy was 37. they had transformed people's lives, particularly women. that was being kept going by this support, and all of it has been ruined overnight thoughtlessly. you of it has been ruined overnight thoughtlessly.— of it has been ruined overnight thou~htlessl . ., ~ ., ~ ., , ., thoughtlessly. you know afghanistan. what is it about _ thoughtlessly. you know afghanistan. what is it about the _ thoughtlessly. you know afghanistan. what is it about the country _ thoughtlessly. you know afghanistan. what is it about the country that - what is it about the country that makes it so difficult? it has already been described as a failed state. what is it about afghanistan? i hate all that stuff. they are trying to blame afghans for something that the us and the uk and others have done to them. it is a pure country and like many countries around the world, it faces many problems of corruption, insurgency, inept police force but that's true inept police force but that's true in nigeria, pakistan, indonesia. many wealthier countries have those
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kinds of problems. there are many fragile countries around the world. afghanistan is not unique. what is unique, we went into afghanistan, took responsibility for it, invested an enormous amount and defended the progress we made with limited investment. we could have kept that “p investment. we could have kept that up for many years to come. there have been very few us and uk casualties in the last five years. we talk about this as though it is a vietnam war where we have been losing lives hand overfist vietnam war where we have been losing lives hand over fist for five years. that is not true. in 2016 the combat operations finished. this is not the fault of the afghans, it is the fault of the us, the uk and others. the idea that nato was not able to put together coalition is crazy. and, some people would say it is also the fault of the taliban. how do you tackle the taliban and its ideology? they are extremely
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brutal armed group very practice in guerrilla warfare. expecting afghan civilians to take them on is tough. even expecting the afghan national army to take them on as difficult. it is like the situation in north—west iraq, and what happened in 2014. it feels like that. it is extraordinary what a few hundred armed men can do if they want to do it. sadly, the only way of holding them back was an air because that prevented the taliban to roll utterly into the times and to have a conventional military force. they had to be a guerrilla force. when we remove that air support, we have given them an opportunity to rampage around the country. we are looking at a civil war because although they had taken a lot of the country, they
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are now going to struggle with other areas of afghanistan with different ethnic groups. t5 areas of afghanistan with different ethnic groups-_ ethnic groups. is that it? is it came ethnic groups. is that it? is it game over? _ ethnic groups. is that it? is it game over? is _ ethnic groups. is that it? is it game over? is there - ethnic groups. is that it? is it game over? is there no - ethnic groups. is that it? is it i game over? is there no solution to how to tackle this? the game over? is there no solution to how to tackle this?— game over? is there no solution to how to tackle this? the solution now is to invest — how to tackle this? the solution now is to invest in _ how to tackle this? the solution now is to invest in humanitarian - how to tackle this? the solution now is to invest in humanitarian and i is to invest in humanitarian and development assistance. we now need to put together a package from britain alone which would be hundreds of millions of pounds, £1 billion to support small ngos trying to deliver health care and education to deliver health care and education to millions of desperate afghans. work with neighbouring countries to deal with refugees. and get an international coalition together to make sure that britain, the usa and other stateless refugees into their own countries. it is a great humanitarian disaster. we have created another syria overnight. thank you very much.
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five people have been killed in a residential area of plymouth in the worst mass shooting in britain since 2010. the suspected gunman — named locally as jake davison then turned the gun on himself. police say the incident is not terror—related. just after six o'clock last night, devon and cornwall police were called to biddick drive in the keyham area of the city. police and ambulance crews attended the scene and a critical incident was declared just before 9.30. the victims were three females & two males — 0ne thought to be a child. all are thought to have died from gunshot wounds. the prime minister borisjohnson says his thoughts are with the family and friends of the victims of the shooting. 0ur reporter, jon kay has more. police worked through the night, securing the scene one mile from the centre of plymouth.
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it was here on biddick drive in the keyham area of the city that the incident started around six o'clock yesterday evening. neighbours told the bbc they heard shouting at one property, a door slamming, then gunshots. other residents said the gunman then continued shooting in the surrounding streets. we sat in the back garden having a cup of coffee and heard four gunshots. then we seen obviously the ambulance, helicopters, trying to land in the park. i heard a shot, walked round the corner, bumped into a shotgun — a bloke with a shotgun — seen a woman on the doorstep, walked over and helped her. four people died at the scene, two were male and two were female. anotherfemale died in hospital a short time later. but they all died from gunshot wounds. police said the sixth person killed was believed to be the offender. he also died at the scene. 0fficers said the shootings were not thought to be terror—related. after speaking to the chief constable of devon and cornwall police,
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the home secretary priti patel said on twitter that she was shocked by the incident. she urged the community to remain calm. devon and cornwall police have told people in this area not to speculate on social media about what might have happened here or why and not to share any distressing images on social media. there's lots of people who were literally in their homes, on the street, opening their doors to the commotion, to see people on the pavement, having been shot outside their home, so there's an awful lot of people for whom access to the emergency support, which is necessary to make sense of it and to make sure that they're.. what they saw is shared with the police as soon as possible today. a local school and church will open today for the community to come together, as they try to understand why a summer's evening in devon turned into a mass shooting. jon kay, bbc news, plymouth.
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earlier i spoke to the leader of plymouth city council, nick kelly. this is unprecedented in plymouth. we are in a state of shock, six people losing their lives in our city. we have no words, a state of shock and mourning. an absolute tragedy. none? what do we know about what happened? as has been mentioned, there is speculation about what has and have happened. the police will issue a statement later today. we know that six people including the gunman have lost their lives in tragic circumstances. plymouth is a large city but we do not have this type of crime so the reverberations are huge this morning. t reverberations are huge this morninu. 2.
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reverberations are huge this morning-— morning. i can imagine that residents — morning. i can imagine that residents are _ morning. i can imagine that residents are very - morning. i can imagine that residents are very upset. i morning. i can imagine that i residents are very upset. what morning. i can imagine that - residents are very upset. what have they said to you? tt is residents are very upset. what have they said to you?— they said to you? it is a close-knit community — they said to you? it is a close-knit community and — they said to you? it is a close-knit community and residents - they said to you? it is a close-knit community and residents saw i community and residents saw and heard the commotion. cars backfiring or fireworks, heard the commotion. cars backfiring orfireworks, it is not heard the commotion. cars backfiring or fireworks, it is not that, heard the commotion. cars backfiring orfireworks, it is not that, it heard the commotion. cars backfiring or fireworks, it is not that, it is a reality that someone has gone out with a weapon and taken people's lives. we are not prepared for this. there is confusion and concern. the emergency services responded very quickly and we pay tribute to those involved. we asked the council are now coordinating multi agency approach to support the local community and get some semblance of understanding about what has happened to put the correct measures and do our best to bring the community and the city back together after this tragic event. the metropolitan police here in london say a 14—year—old boy has been charged with the murder ofjames markham —— who was stabbed after confronting a group of teenagers in chingford
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in east london, on monday evening. two other teenagers are being questioned. algeria has observed the first of three days of national mourning as wildfires continue to burn across the north of the country. fanned by strong winds and searing heat, the fires have killed 69 people since monday. tanya dendrinos has the story. flames licking at the tree tops. a wall of fire quickly swells. it's a devastating scene, villagers on the front line armed only with branches and shovels. translation: we have been fighting this fire for five days. _ there is no electricity, no water, no gas, no network. there is nothing here. we are tired. 0n the tarmac at algiers airport, a lifeline. two water bombing planes chartered by the algerian government from the eu,
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with another two arriving from france. but for those already firmly in the grip of this battle, the government support seems nonexistent. translation: the people of algeria are alone. i we have received nothing from the government except threats. people are acting together as one and we have received aid from everywhere. across algeria, volunteers and aid organisations are gathering supplies. translation: in each village, each city, there are partner associations. with whom we work directly. we coordinate and give them i the donations and they distribute them to the families. appeals are under way in paris too. translation: we came - here to possibly lend a hand, to do some voluntary work to help with all the sorting and may be to see what is missing in terms of medicine, clothes or other things. these fires are some of the worst in the country's history and officials believe in many instances, arson is to blame,
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with the president confirming more than 20 suspects have been arrested so far. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. with yet more intense heat in the us this week, forest fires in many western states can be seen from space. the dixie fire in california started a month ago. it's the second biggest fire in the state's history, and is still raging. oregon is also battling one of the largest fires it's ever faced. to combat these historic blazes, new technology is being deployed. our north america tech reporter james clayton has been flying over washington state to see how infra—red mapping allows those in the sky, to help the fight on the ground. this is the dixie fire in northern california. it has been blazing since the middle ofjuly and has continued to grow. it is now the second—largest
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wildfire in state history. it has already consumed an entire town, yet it is just one of the many fires americans have faced this year. the weather outlook is bad too, with drought and heat waves across many western states. some experts worry that this could go on for months. this aerial scanning team has been making intense night—time reconnaissance trips over forest fires for two months now. mike murphy's mission is to get as close to the fires as possible to scan them and then send detailed maps to firefighters on the ground. these are intense flights between eight and ten hours long, and i have been allowed tojoin them. tonight's flight is over the state of washington. after 15 minutes, the clouds become thicker until we see a huge plume of smoke, the first fire of the day. it is only really when you are up in the air that you get a sense of the scale ofjust how big these forest fires are. they almost look like mushroom
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clouds from a nuclear explosion, they carpet the state with this thick haze. it is really difficult to know what is going on on the ground which is why firefighters want the scans of the fire. mike uses infrared cameras to see through the smoke. this is a live fire and it is building right now. this is all the front of the fire. all the red is areas of intense heat. from this height, everywhere you look, you can see fires, big and small. the sun is just setting now and we have been over five fires. you can see how far the haze goes, all the way into the distance. afterfour hours, we refuel and mike takes the chance to send the scans to the forestry service. when we find these fires, we try to pass this information off to the forestry service as fast as fast as we can so they can respond to it as fast as they can. then, it is back up again, surveying the burning terrain well into the night. this is what we can see from the plane, and this is what mike can see
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as he scans the fires. this technology is not going to prevent forest fires, but it is a crucial tool in battling against them. and with more scorching summer days ahead, firefighters need all the help they can get. the headlines on bbc news... the taliban make their most dramatic gains yet against afghan government forces, taking kandahar — the country's second largest city — and lashkar gar. the us and the uk send troops back to afghanistan, to evacuate their embassies in kabul. a suspected gunman who killed five people — including a child under 10 — in devon has been named locally as jake davison. the gunman is believed to have turned the gun on himself. the incident is the worst mass shooting in britain since 2010. as intense fires rage
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across the us western states, we fly over washington state to see how new technology is being deployed to help the fight on the ground. it almost looks like mushroom clouds from a nuclear bomb and they carpet the state with this thick haze. and a giant iceberg the size of greater london is blocking the british antarctic survey from their research station. we'll have more on that later this hour. the father of britney spears, has agreed to step down as her conservator, after 13 years. the pop star has been mounting a series of legal challenges to the court agreement that gave her father control over her estate and other aspects of her life. a lawyer representing britney says it's "another step toward justice". our correspondent barbara plett usher has more. this has been quite a year for britney spears.
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she finally began to speak out about the arrangement that controls her life. the target of that anger was herfather, jamie, the man who became her conservator after she apparently suffered a breakdown 13 years ago. it is a sort of guardian role to handle all of her affairs. during recent court hearings, the singer accused him of using her money for himself and of abusing his power. speaking directly to the judge, she said she wanted more control of her finances and her body. she even alleged that the conservatorship was forcing her to use birth control when she wanted to have a baby. mr spears has also become a focus of anger for fans in the free britney movement. he says the attacks are unjustified and that there are no grounds for removing him but that he is now willing to step down to avoid a public battle with his daughter, when the time is right. the singer still can't spend her vast fortune as she pleases. it's likely her father
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will eventually be replaced by a professional accountant. but her fans and her lawyer are hailing what they see as a vindication of her position and an important step towards setting her free. barbara plett usher, bbc news, los angeles. i'm joined now by hannah fernando, an entertainmentjournalist and editor of woman magazine. thank you for speaking to us and bbc news. this is quite a significant step for britney. tt’s news. this is quite a significant step for britney.— news. this is quite a significant step for britney. it's huge. i don't think anyone _ step for britney. it's huge. i don't think anyone of _ step for britney. it's huge. i don't think anyone of us _ step for britney. it's huge. i don't think anyone of us saw _ step for britney. it's huge. i don't think anyone of us saw this i step for britney. it's huge. i don'tl think anyone of us saw this coming either the step she made a huge amount of allegations and they were quite disturbing, and on the other side, we never heard from really, just that they were upset, and then her father stepping just that they were upset, and then herfather stepping down in this manner, it raises and lot of questions, but for the free britney movement, this is the step in the right direction, they want her out of the conservatorship completely but it is a step in the right
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direction do you think his father —— herfather removing direction do you think his father —— her father removing herself, direction do you think his father —— herfather removing herself, the agreement is still in place, do you think that takes some of the pressure off regarding the public supporting her? pressure off regarding the public sopporting her?— pressure off regarding the public su--ortin~ her? �* , ~ , supporting her? because i think they are very much _ supporting her? because i think they are very much seeing _ supporting her? because i think they are very much seeing this _ supporting her? because i think they are very much seeing this also i supporting her? because i think they are very much seeing this also of- supporting her? because i think they are very much seeing this also of a i are very much seeing this also of a family battle being played out in public. family battle being played out in ublic. , , , ., public. yes, hugely played out in ublic public. yes, hugely played out in public and _ public. yes, hugely played out in public and we — public. yes, hugely played out in public and we have _ public. yes, hugely played out in public and we have seen - public. yes, hugely played out in public and we have seen so i public. yes, hugely played out in | public and we have seen so many allegations disturbing to hear. but of course that didn't make them accurate. i think that is important, i try to be non—biased because it is easy to listen to something that was so impassioned from britney herself and veer towards standing by her, which the free britney movement has done all the way along. but i think this will stop, the very public battle initially, but i don't think her new lawyer who is very dug it in their approach, stopping from trying
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to relieve her completely of the conservatorship. i think their main allegations against her father, he has stepped back, but he says he will do it in the right way. it needs to be done correctly, through the right person and he says, i'm not even convinced it is the right thing to do for her, but he is doing it. so by doing that it has taken the pressure off everyone and this real pressure point, the climax we saw from the britney, free britney campaign. to saw from the britney, free britney camaiun. ., ~' saw from the britney, free britney camaiun. ., ~ , campaign. to think we could see other people _ campaign. to think we could see other people come _ campaign. to think we could see other people come and - campaign. to think we could see other people come and go i campaign. to think we could see other people come and go in i campaign. to think we could see i other people come and go in terms of the management of the conservatorship? there were some strong allegations she in that hearing and one of her lawyers has said he is looking forward to the investigation being carried out into jamie spears' conduct. fiend investigation being carried out into jamie spears' conduct.— investigation being carried out into jamie spears' conduct. and again, it will depend — jamie spears' conduct. and again, it will depend on _ jamie spears' conduct. and again, it will depend on their— jamie spears' conduct. and again, it will depend on their approach, i will depend on their approach, whether they will continue to get
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some justice. whether they will continue to get somejustice. i have said this is a very institution set up to look after people, she had a breakdown 13 years ago, a very public meltdown, it was terrible to see and this was the institution set up to help people like her. if it has been abused, thenjustice people like her. if it has been abused, then justice should people like her. if it has been abused, thenjustice should happen. therefore i suppose the lawyers will seek the justice if they believe it to be accurate. but in the meantime they will see this as a massive wind for them, that the person has stepped away or will be stepping away. being a guardian like this, you are in charge of lots of parts of her life and you could abuse that very, very easily, so it needs to be the right person 19 is to be sure the right person 19 is to be sure the people around her are protecting her and she does have the right
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person in place. her and she does have the right person in place-— person in place. jamie actually stood down — person in place. jamie actually stood down from _ person in place. jamie actually stood down from being - person in place. jamie actually stood down from being the i person in place. jamie actually i stood down from being the personal conservative back in 2019, he has just been in charge of her finances since. him stepping down further, are we likely to see britney back on the stage again? she are we likely to see britney back on the stage again?— are we likely to see britney back on the stage again? she said she didn't want to whilst _ the stage again? she said she didn't want to whilst he _ the stage again? she said she didn't want to whilst he was _ the stage again? she said she didn't want to whilst he was around, i the stage again? she said she didn't want to whilst he was around, she i want to whilst he was around, she felt the allegations where she felt pressure to do lots of things she won didn't —— she didn't want to do. i don't think we have seen the last of britney, i don't think she will run away and have a quiet life, she is someone born and bred into the showbiz world and knows how to do it and she is a performer and loves to be on stage was to buy don't think we have seen the last of her. now he will not have anything to do with her eventually. there is also the dynamic of her mother who has not
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been present in her life are quite a long time and she has suddenly joined forces with her daughter. find joined forces with her daughter. and ou onl joined forces with her daughter. and you only bring that in the conversation now, hannah! at the end of our time! conversation now, hannah! at the end of ourtime! thank conversation now, hannah! at the end of our time! thank you. a study has suggested middle—aged spread can't be blamed on a slowing metabolism. more than 6000 people — aged between eight days old and 95 — in 29 countries took part in the project. they found the fastest calories are burned is at one—year—old, the rate slows until the age of 20 and then remains steady for the next a0 years. this suggests that weight gain in middle age has more to do with the amount of calories eaten than how quickly they are burned. i'm joined now by our health and science correspondent james gallagher. as you can imagine, there are lots
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of disappointed sounds with this. this is an absolutely fascinating study and has done something that hasn't been done before, able to track what happens to our metabolism throughout the totality of life, from eight days old up to 95 years old. it is fantastically complicated to that depth of analysis so it is the first time we have had the picture. we have seen the spiky metabolism in the early years and shows how important it is, why childhood malnutrition can have lifelong consequences. one really big surprise there was an expectation, in puberty, so much is going on that there would be a spiky metabolism, but it is not there, it keeps coming down until 20 and then from personal experience, so many would go, metabolism is slowing down once i hit 30, that is why i am putting on a little bit of weight,
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and the study says that is not as what is going on, it is completely solid, rock—solid though your 20s, 30s, fighters and 50s and it is not until you hit 60 that your metabolism starts declining. if you are thinking about weight, you need to think about what you are eating rather than watch our body is doing. but there are so many interesting implications about the study. {ould implications about the study. could ou exand implications about the study. could you expand on _ implications about the study. could you expand on that _ implications about the study. could you expand on that for _ implications about the study. could you expand on that for us? - implications about the study. could you expand on that for us? this - implications about the study. could you expand on that for us? this is i you expand on that for us? this is the first really _ you expand on that for us? this is the first really detailed _ you expand on that for us? this is the first really detailed look - you expand on that for us? this is the first really detailed look at - the first really detailed look at metabolism and it raises a really big questions. once you reach old age and metabolism starts to file, it is the moment when you start to see lots of other long—term diseases like weak bones or failing hearts. is there a way you can tap into the metabolism, alter it, other medicines to boost it that would have an impact across a whole wide range of diseases? and another thing
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is if you have a headache, you take pain relief like two pills and the reason you need to do that is because young metabolism is breaking the medicines down. do we need to understand the differences in different people's metabolism under different people's metabolism under different stages of life to tailor their medicines must specifically rather than having a general dose? that is another idea. to do this really big piece of fundamental work that has expired and allowed us to see what happens to our metabolism in greater detail than ever before, it opens the opportunities for using the knowledge to improve our health. what is it then say about health supplements? if you are using a specific exercise, which claims it will speed up your metabolism, is that all now debunked?— will speed up your metabolism, is that all now debunked? pretty much.
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i was chatting — that all now debunked? pretty much. i was chatting to _ that all now debunked? pretty much. i was chatting to a _ that all now debunked? pretty much. i was chatting to a researcher - that all now debunked? pretty much. i was chatting to a researcher and - i was chatting to a researcher and they said what it shows really is how fundamental the metabolism is, how fundamental the metabolism is, how immutable it is, it is a fixed thing in life, we think about all of the things, i will do something to boost my metabolism, having breakfast, if you really think about it, i don't know what that means. it is that where we have so many personal experiences of metabolism that haven't been based on research because we think of metabolism as how energetic we feel or something as our diet or how much exercise we are doing. our metabolism is every chemical process going on in your body to keep you alive. it is going out for a run but it is also growing, repairing damage to your cells. it is all of the things i did together so as ordinary nonscientists talk about metabolism,
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we are talking about that much, metabolism is that much, so we're only focusing on the small bits, really. only focusing on the small bits, reall . ., ., ., , ., really. you are loving this one! i've spent _ really. you are loving this one! i've spent a — really. you are loving this one! i've spent a year— really. you are loving this one! i've spent a year and _ really. you are loving this one! i've spent a year and i - really. you are loving this one! i've spent a year and i half- really. you are loving this one! | i've spent a year and i half only talking about covid, so talk about something a little bit different, and probably finding it too exciting! and probably finding it too excitina! . ~ and probably finding it too excitina! ., ~ , ., , and probably finding it too excitina! . ~ , . after the euphoria of the olympics and the success of team gb, news has emerged that c] ujah — part of the men's lixioom relay team that won silver just last week — has tested positive for a banned substance. he's been suspended from competition and if upheld, it would be the most high—profile doping offence by a british athlete at any olympics. he and the rest of the relay team all face being stripped of their medals. the former olympic silver medallist
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kriss akabussi says he feels for the other three. dumbfounded, disbelief, denial. some sort of, is there a way that i can keep my medal, it wasn't me? you know. i guess you, it's praying or meditating or some sort of, can this all go away? i reallyjust can't imagine what those other three chaps are going through. analysis of the spread of covid within uk hospitals has shown that during the first wave, more than one in ten patients caught the virus after being admitted for an unrelated illness. the transmission rates vary considerably depending on where the patients were treated — which the authors of the study say demands urgent investigation. our health correspondent, naomi grimley, has more. falling ill with covid while in hospitalfor something else
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was one of the most worrying features of the first wave of the pandemic. a new study from a group of uk universities has examined the numbers to see how common it was. the researchers found that at least one in ten hospital patients with covid were infected after admission. at the peak, this rose to more like one in five. overall, this research suggests 11,800 people may have been infected this way and possibly more because early data is unclear. crucially, there were big variations between similar types of hospital and that's down to different preventative measures. even at the peak of the outbreak, we saw that some busy hospitals still managed to maintain good infection prevention and control. that meant that there was good hand washing, there was good testing of patients so the right patients were tested and kept separately from non—infected patients,
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better ventilation on some of the wards would have helped and access to plentiful supply of ppe would have helped. but these are all counsels of perfection, we didn't know all that at the start of the outbreak. we know there were challenges around testing and challenges around the availability of ppe. the researchers say the levels of hospital acquired infections for covid are now much lower, thanks to the vaccination programme and a better understanding of how the virus spreads. thousands of migrants have illegally crossed into lithuania, over the belarusian border, this year. that's compared to just 81 during all of last year. lithuania blames belarus for encouraging the migrants to cross as retaliation against eu sanctions. the eu has summoned belarus' representative in brussels to demand an end to what it calls the "instrumentalisation"
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of migrants crossing into lithuania. the bbc�*s oksana antonenko went to meet people at hastily erected camps on the lithuanian side of the border. on the eu's eastern frontier, lithuania is spending a0 million euros to strengthen its border. but 4000 people have still arrived, 50 times more than a year ago. they have been held in centres. some are economic migrants, others say they have fled far worse. translation: | escaped _ from afghanistan and ended up here. i was shot at, lost a leg. people shot and killed my father and uncle, the rest of the family's pakistan and i'm here. some come over land and others on flights, but all via belarus. it leads lithuania to accuse its neighbour of deliberately arranging the influx. we sometimes use the term as hybrid
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aggression towards lithuania, using irregular migrants as a weaponry. a weapon used, they say, in retaliation for their political opposition to the belarusian regime. and they accuse belarus of permitting extra flights from iraq, allowing even more people to arrive, something belarus denies. translation: it's as if lukashenko carries migrants to lithuania - on his shoulders, but if anyone thinks that we will now close the border with poland, lithuania, latvia and ukraine and turn into a retention centre for those running from afghanistan, iran, iraq, libya, syria, tunisia, they are mistaken. unmistakable are the conditions at these migrant centres. they are so bad, migrants started a riot recently, over them and the refusal of refugee status to one migrant.
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guards responded with rubber bullets, but they are only the immediate difficulties migrants face. parliament injuly ruled that the government could immediately deport migrants after they refused asylum. even if an appeal is made. so those helping migrants are worried for their safety. there are really concerns if those amendments of the law are in correspondence with both human rights, documents and the eu law. the procedures should be applied in such a way that we are not sending back people who are actually coming and asking for asylum because of the persecution. persecuted or not, they are now in a limbo. and no one wants to claim responsibility. olympic athlete and transgender reality tv star caitlyn jenner has launched her campaign to become california's next governor. jenner is among a crowded field trying to unseat the incumbent, democrat gavin newsome.
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the vote takes place on september 14th and was triggered after the governor's opponents collected enough signatures to try to recall him. the british antarctic survey says it doesn't know when scientists can return to one of its research stations. it's because of the danger posed by a giant iceberg that's almost the size of greater london. experts are tracking the mass from space as it circles the antarctic coastline. jonathan amos reports. it was the briefest and gentlest of icy kisses. a colossal iceberg, a74, weighing billions of tonnes, scrapes past a region of the antarctic known as the brunt ice shelf. it was the moment the british antarctic survey had been anticipating for months. the expectation was the berg would knock into and dislodge another vast and unstable piece of ice that is sitting in front of the survey�*s halley research station.
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we've been tracking the progress of the cracks that will eventually cause it to carve for a long time. when it does eventually go, the fact that it's not attached by a very large section of ice means it is quite unlikely to influence the remaining section of the ice shelf, where halley is. we will be interested in the drift patterns. the fact that nothing was dislodged this time will be a frustration for the british antarctic survey. until the unstable ice in front of halley comes away, the base must close every winter on safety grounds, and this impacts the world—leading science that can
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be done at this important location. it's at halley, for example, that they discovered and continue to monitor the hole in the ozone layer. icebergs the size of a74 are impressive, but they are not necessarily an indicator of climate change. the antarctic balances the amount of snow falling on the interior of the continent by routinely discharging blocks of ice at its margins. it is hard to tell if the frequency of these events is increasing. we do know that ice fronts in parts of the antarctic peninsula are further back than some of the historical locations. given the rarity of these carving events, it is quite hard to know whether we are seeing more at the moment or whether we are just getting better and better satellite data.
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the survey will continue to track a74 and the behaviour of the brunt ice shelf. it is entirely possible the big berg's gentle embrace delivered some unseen damage. if that's the case, the expected breakaway of unstable ice could yet happen in the days ahead. jonathan amos, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen. hello. the heat continues across southern europe and the north of africa, temperatures well in excess of where they should be for this time of year because the high pressure here is trapping the heat underneath. unfortunately it is exacerbating the wildfires we see. a very different picture closer to home, low pressure with us as we head through friday and through the weekend. it means with the low pressure close to scotland, it is here we will see probably most
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of the showers clustering together to give lengthy spells of quite heavy and at times thundery rain and with a brisk wind close to gale force in the west, it will push the showers across into eastern scotland, although here they will be fewer and further between. similar in northern ireland, plenty of showers with sunny spells, some in north—western parts of england and wales, but further south it is a mixture of sunny spells and cloud. the cloud is a leftover weather front from yesterday giving some drizzly showers. it is breezier across england and wales but still 2i—23 degrees with sunny spells. tempered the feel of things because of that brisk wind in the north. the wind does tend to ease overnight, even close to that area of low pressure as that continues to migrate north—eastwards. still lots of showers here, slightly drier skies, clearer skies further south, winds falling light and here down to single figures in rural areas. notice the next batch of rain, the next area of low pressure — still some uncertainty on the detail for the weekend, but it is firming up
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we will see some cloud as that low pressure approaches western parts of england and wales, northern ireland, eventually northern england. we will see some spots of rain while further east, more likely to see increasing cloud and stay dry. the rain potentially turning heavier into the afternoon. low pressure still close to scotland but far fewer showers. drier spells here with sunshine also, but come sunday the next area of rain will approach the north and east of scotland as well as our weather fronts and low pressure still with us to the south. but you see the weather fronts becoming weaker, areas of cloud, some rain potentially across the north and east of scotland, turning chilly behind that with the northerly breeze. but still quite a lot of dry and settled weather. as ever, you can stay up—to—date on our website.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: a suspected gunman who killed five people — including a child under ten — in a residential area in plymouth has been named locally as jake davison. the gunman is believed to have turned the gun on himself. the incident is the worst mass shooting in britain since 2010. the taliban make their most dramatic gains yet against afghan government forces, taking kandahar — the country's second largest city — and lashkar gar. the us and the uk send troops back to afghanistan, to evacuate their embassies in kabul. the father of britney spears, has agreed to step down as her conservator after 13 years of controlling her estate and other aspects of her life. new research shows more than a third
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of english councils support policies that could increase carbon emissions, despite having declared a "climate emergency." and a giant iceberg the size of greater london is blocking the british antarctic survey from their research station. we'll have more on that later this hour. five people have been killed in a residential area of plymouth in the worst mass shooting in britain since 2010. the suspected gunman — named locally as jake davison — then turned the gun on himself. police say the incident is not terror—related. just after six o'clock last night, devon and cornwall police were called to biddick drive in the keyham area of the city. police and ambulance crews attended the scene and a critical incident
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was declared just before 9.30pm. the victims were three females and two males, one thought to be a child. all are thought to have died from gunshot wounds. the prime minister borisjohnson says his thoughts are with the family and friends of the victims of the shooting. our reporter, jon kay has more. police worked through the night, securing the scene one mile from the centre of plymouth. it was here on biddick drive in the keyham area of the city that the incident started around six o'clock yesterday evening. neighbours told the bbc they heard shouting at one property, a door slamming, then gunshots. other residents said the gunman then continued shooting in the surrounding streets. we sat in the back garden having a cup of coffee and heard four gunshots. then we seen obviously the ambulance, helicopters, trying to land in the park. i heard a shot, walked round the corner, bumped into a shotgun — a bloke with a shotgun — seen a woman on the doorstep, walked over and helped her.
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four people died at the scene, two were male and two were female. anotherfemale died in hospital a short time later. but they all died from gunshot wounds. police said the sixth person killed was believed to be the offender. he also died at the scene. officers said the shootings were not thought to be terror—related. after speaking to the chief constable of devon and cornwall police, the home secretary priti patel said on twitter that she was shocked by the incident. she urged the community to remain calm. devon and cornwall police have told people in this area not to speculate on social media about what might have happened here or why and not to share any distressing images on social media. there's lots of people who were literally in their homes, on the street, opening their doors to the commotion, to see people on the pavement, having been shot outside their home, so there's an awful lot of people for whom access
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to the emergency support, which is necessary to make sense of it and to make sure that they're. .. what they saw is shared with the police as soon as possible today. a local school and church will open today for the community to come together, as they try to understand why a summer's evening in devon turned into a mass shooting. jon kay, bbc news, plymouth. earlier we spoke to the leader of plymouth city council, nick kelly. he said the community is in a state of shock. it is a close—knit community and, as you've heard, the residents did see and hear a commotion and it's not cars backfiring on fireworks, it's the reality that somebody has gone out with an armed weapon and taken people's lives and we're just not prepared for that in any way, shape or form here in this city, so there is confusion, there is concern, but what i would say is the emergency services responded very, very quickly and i'd like to pay tribute to all of those involved.
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we at plymouth city council are now coordinating a multi—agency approach to try to support the local community and get some semblance of understanding of exactly what has happened to put the correct measures in place and do our best to bring the community and the city back together after this tragic event. police are expected to give an update on their investigation in plymouth. we'll be there live at around 1130 this morning. in a devastating blow for the afghan government, five more provincial capitals have fallen to the taliban in the last 24 hours. the militants now control 14 provincial capitals and most of northern afghanistan. britain and the us are sending troops back into afghanistan to help evacuate their nationals. in the past month, the taliban has taken considerable territory and this is the picture today. the militant group's gains have been rapid in the past few days, and indeed the past 24 hours, during which taliban fighters have captured afghanistan's
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second city of kandahar. the city is the taliban's birthplace and former stronghold and taking control is a significant prize for the militants. other important cities such as herat and ghazni were captured within hours of each other on thursday. and the taliban have also taken lashkar gah, capital of the southern province of helmand, as well as qala—i—naw in the north. there are increasing concerns that the militants will continue their lightning speed offensive toward the capital, kabul, where tens of thousands of civilians have fled violent street fighting. our correspondent in kabul, yogita limaye, gave us this update. well, people are in shock and disbelief over what has happened just over a single day. five provincial capitals have fallen to the taliban, among them major cities. kandahar, this country's second largest city, a big economic centre. to the taliban, it is a traditional stronghold, so they will be looking at this as a major victory. herat is in the west of the country,
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close to the border with iran, so it is important for trade. these are big losses for the afghan government, it leaves them in a very vulnerable position and it has all happened in a span of 12 hours. we started the day talking about ghazni, about 100 hours south of kabul, and by the end of the day, it was five provincial capitals, including lashkar gah in the helmand province. that is where some of the fiercest battles were fought over the past 20 years, hundreds of british and foreign troops died, thousands of afghan soldiers were killed there, and now it has been taken over by the taliban. afghan forces have retreated to a military base just outside the city. so people really in a sense of shock here about what has happened and the silence from the leadership of this country, we haven't heard yet from the president or any of his top ministers about the developments yesterday and i think the longer that continues, the more there will be speculation and rumours about what could potentially happen in kabul.
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with us now is charlie faulkner, a freelance journalist in kabul. welcome. thank you forjoining us. what is the latest from there? figs what is the latest from there? as ou what is the latest from there? is you said, we have seen further provincial capitals taken in the last 24—hour is and obviously they are pretty significant provincial capitals. it is now raising the question over the future of kabul. there is a huge climate of fear in the city and, you know, i think people are now bracing themselves for the taliban to head here in the coming days. for the taliban to head here in the coming days-_ coming days. what is visible there in the terms _ coming days. what is visible there in the terms of _ coming days. what is visible there in the terms of defences. - coming days. what is visible there in the terms of defences. i - coming days. what is visible there in the terms of defences. i mean, | in the terms of defences. i mean, there is certainly _ in the terms of defences. i mean, there is certainly an _ in the terms of defences. i mean, there is certainly an increased - there is certainly an increased presence in terms of the military and whatnot. i think they're more
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dramatic sign really of their being an issue actually is the influx of people that are heading into kabul you are fleeing the violence. that is kind of bringing traffic to a standstill. because of the crowded areas now where people are taking refuge in parks and whatnot, and it is quite clear to see that there is a crisis unfolding here. and is quite clear to see that there is a crisis unfolding here.— is quite clear to see that there is a crisis unfolding here. and so when ou talk a crisis unfolding here. and so when you talk about _ a crisis unfolding here. and so when you talk about an _ a crisis unfolding here. and so when you talk about an influx _ a crisis unfolding here. and so when you talk about an influx of— a crisis unfolding here. and so when you talk about an influx of people i you talk about an influx of people into kabul, what is the scale of movement and others leaving the city? movement and others leaving the ci ? , , , ., , ., city? yes, my understanding is that there are thousands _ city? yes, my understanding is that there are thousands of— city? yes, my understanding is that there are thousands of people - city? yes, my understanding is that there are thousands of people at i city? yes, my understanding is that| there are thousands of people at the passport office everyday trying to sort out their documentation to be able to get out of the country and, i mean, nowhere near the number of people who idea be processed, but in terms of violence, in terms of displaced people in the country, i visited an unofficial camp in the
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north of kabul a few days ago and it was just north of kabul a few days ago and it wasjust a piece north of kabul a few days ago and it was just a piece of parkland is sitting between two busy roads and people are putting up tents to sleep in, there were no bathrooms, no proper food deliveries, in, there were no bathrooms, no properfood deliveries, no infrastructure, they were relying on the goodwill of local wealthy afghans and more people are coming everyday. along the highway from the north, there are videos servicing on social media of these laden trucks filled with people's belongings and cars with allsorts of belongings tied to their roofs. people are just desperately now fleeing the conflict and heading into kabul. what desperately now fleeing the conflict and heading into kabul.— and heading into kabul. what about the normal stuff _ and heading into kabul. what about the normal stuff of _ and heading into kabul. what about the normal stuff of life, _ and heading into kabul. what about the normal stuff of life, supplies i the normal stuff of life, supplies and supermarkets, people doing their work? what is life like right now? at the moment, supermarkets are businesses usual. there is no sort
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of clear indication right now. one thing i would say, though, you can see that there are a lot of second—hand shops here where people sell furniture and these shops have been filling up in the last few weeks due to the amount of people who are leaving and i spoke to a local tailor in my neighbourhood who says that he had had no work in the last month or so. he said, because people are leaving, no one is making any plans, if they can leave, they are leaving and if they are stuck here, the making preparations for the worst, really. tell]! here, the making preparations for the worst, really.— the worst, really. tell us more about the _ the worst, really. tell us more about the taliban _ the worst, really. tell us more about the taliban tactics - the worst, really. tell us more about the taliban tactics and l the worst, really. tell us more i about the taliban tactics and what they are bringing to the areas they have overrun and what the feeling is in other areas where there is a fear that the same could happen there. so that the same could happen there. 5;r i that the same could happen there. 55 i was in herat may be a couple of weeks ago now and i saw the front lines with government troops and the
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local people. at the time, the taliban tactics were to just completely surround the city's periphery and enter the city. one official told me that originally they had been trying to protect the surrounding districts and trying to reclaim the ones that had been claimed by the taliban, but at the time, they said that the tell a man tactics to keep them busy, was how he put it, has meant that they had then just to concentrate on trying to secure the city which, unfortunately, as we saw last night, was not possible in the end. [30 was not possible in the end. do people talk much about how they feel about the withdrawal of the international forces?- about the withdrawal of the international forces? yes, it is interesting- — international forces? yes, it is interesting. there _ international forces? yes, it is interesting. there are - international forces? yes, it is interesting. there are quite i interesting. there are quite clear—cut opinions about that. certainly, there are people who think it is about time that afghanistan was standing on its own
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two feet, however, what is a uniting opinion is that the timing of the withdrawal and the way in which it has been conducted is failing afghanistan, essentially, and the work that has been done over the last couple of decades, as we can quite clearly see, is being very much undone.— quite clearly see, is being very much undone. ., ., ~ ., ~ much undone. charlie faulkner, thank ou ve much undone. charlie faulkner, thank you very much — much undone. charlie faulkner, thank you very much ado — much undone. charlie faulkner, thank you very much ado for _ much undone. charlie faulkner, thank you very much ado forjoining - much undone. charlie faulkner, thank you very much ado forjoining us - you very much ado forjoining us from kabul. thank you. the uk defence secretary ben wallace says afghanistan is now heading for civil war, which, he says, will lead to more poverty and create a breeding ground for terrorism. the history of afghanistan — and britain found that out in the 1830s — is that it is a country led by warlords and led by different provinces and tribes and you end up, if you are not very careful, in a civil war, and i think we are heading towards a civil war, initially shown by a taliban with momentum. the taliban is not entirely a single entity, they break down underneath the title into all sorts of different interests, but fundamentally, as i said
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earlier, i have concerned that when states become failed states or warlike states — as it is looking like at the moment in afghanistan — the breeding ground for both poverty, and we shouldn't forget that, both poverty and indeed terrorism grows. and it is why security is the most important thing. earlier i spoke to our defence correspondent, jonathan beale who gave us this update. well, we know that most of the troops, the british troops who were there, about 700, have already left. i think about 150—170 still remain. there was some thought that they would stay in the country to look after the embassy. we now know they probably won't. there probably will be a very small military presence included to protect the ambassador, the british ambassador, who will remain in the country with a very small staff in a new location, and more secure location in kabul. that gives you an indication of the concerns they have about the advance of the taliban, but in addition, to facilitate
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the exit of british citizens and there are still around 4000 in the country, people like aid workers, people who work for ngos, security contractors, they are putting in those troops for a short—term to allow them to get flights out of kabul. there are still commercial flights in kabul. it will also be used to get some of the embassy staff who will not be remaining out and also some of those afghans who worked for the british over the past 20 years like translators, for example, to get them and their families out so they can resettle in the uk, those that have been allowed, so this is not our force that is essentially meant to be doing any fighting. there will be members of the parachute regiment. they will be there in large numbers. of that, 600 will be force protection to ensure that goes smoothly, but they are not there to fight the taliban.
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as to the sort of longer term what happens, if, for example, a terrorist threat, al-anda, reconstituted, was able to plan attacks, but the americans and the british have said that they have capabilities, they have assets like aircraft, for example, drones, that they could use over the horizon, in other words, out of the country. but, you know, this is essentially the end of both the american first, they made the decision to leave, and the british military presence. that deadline is september 11th. that is the deadline that was announced by presidentjoe biden and that will be essentially the end of the military operation which has lasted 20 years. as the taliban continues its advance, there's also concern this morning about the fate of afghans who worked for the british and us military in the country. with me now is rehana popal, a british—afghani barrister who has campaigned for the rights of afghan interpreters to settle
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in uk after serving with british forces. welcome, thank you very much for joining us. so, british nationals are being airlifted out of afghanistan. what about the interpreters who work for them? unfortunately, the interpreters are being left behind at the moment and, as far as my knowledge is concerned, there has been absolutely no effort by the british government to also lift out those interpreters who are not only eligible but may be potentially eligible. find not only eligible but may be potentially eligible. and what are our potentially eligible. and what are your concerns — potentially eligible. and what are your concerns for _ potentially eligible. and what are your concerns for them _ potentially eligible. and what are your concerns for them if - potentially eligible. and what are your concerns for them if they i potentially eligible. and what are | your concerns for them if they stay in the country? we your concerns for them if they stay in the country?— your concerns for them if they stay in the country? we know from past exoeriences _ in the country? we know from past exoeriences of _ in the country? we know from past experiences of previous _ in the country? we know from past experiences of previous individuals j experiences of previous individuals who have been directly targeted by the taliban. the taliban, as far as they are concerned, consider those individuals who assisted international forces by way of either interpreters or people working with the british council, for example, or those working in the embassy in any form of rule, those
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individuals are traitors and they have a target on their back. these individuals' lives are in danger in afghanistan and the policy introduced by the british government is one in which these individuals are supposed to be protected by it, in other words, they are eligible to be relocated to the united kingdom, but we know many of these individuals have been applying but have been refused. tell]! individuals have been applying but have been refused.— have been refused. tell us more, then, have been refused. tell us more, then. about _ have been refused. tell us more, then, about that. _ have been refused. tell us more, then, about that. why _ have been refused. tell us more, then, about that. why would - have been refused. tell us more, | then, about that. why would they have been refused. tell us more, i then, about that. why would they be refused and have many been in touch with you to say they do want to be able to come and are not able to? absolutely. one of the reasons for the refusal is that in recent months, and credit to ben wallace, there have been a further broadening of the policy, but this has not translated into individuals' applications, so we see many people who have applied to based on the policy would be eligible under this change, however, their applications have been refused incorrectly and
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thatis have been refused incorrectly and that is because of the decision—making happening in the british embassy in kabul. serra; decision-making happening in the british embassy in kabul.- british embassy in kabul. sorry to interru t, british embassy in kabul. sorry to interrupt, what _ british embassy in kabul. sorry to interrupt, what you _ british embassy in kabul. sorry to interrupt, what you are _ british embassy in kabul. sorry to interrupt, what you are saying - british embassy in kabul. sorry to interrupt, what you are saying is i interrupt, what you are saying is that the government actually does agree with you in terms of the latest policy that anybody who wants to come should be able to, but the situation on the ground has not cutup with it, is that the situation?— cutup with it, is that the situation? ~ ., ., , ., , , cutup with it, is that the situation? . ., ., , ., , , , situation? what has happened is the british government _ situation? what has happened is the british government broadened - situation? what has happened is the british government broadened its i british government broadened its policy to include those who were also contractors. before, the policy was quite tight and restricted. the broadening of the policy, which we are fully on—board with and encourage and we believe should go further, that broadening of that policy has not been implemented and is not translating into decisions on the ground by those who are making those decisions in kabul. hose the ground by those who are making those decisions in kabul.— those decisions in kabul. how many --eole those decisions in kabul. how many people would _ those decisions in kabul. how many people would you — those decisions in kabul. how many people would you say _ those decisions in kabul. how many people would you say are _ those decisions in kabul. how many people would you say are cut - those decisions in kabul. how many people would you say are cut up i those decisions in kabul. how many people would you say are cut up in l people would you say are cut up in this? it people would you say are cut up in this? , ., , this? it will be in the thousands. it is not tens _ this? it will be in the thousands. it is not tens of _ this? it will be in the thousands. it is not tens of thousands i this? it will be in the thousands. it is not tens of thousands as i this? it will be in the thousands. it is not tens of thousands as farj it is not tens of thousands as far as our knowledge is, or certainly my knowledge is, but it is thousands. the reality is we are not talking about a floodgate argument, we are
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talking about a very number of individuals who put their lives on the line to work directly with british soldiers and in the same way that a british soldier would be targeted if, for example, he walks the streets of kandahar today, these afghan interpreters will have a target on their backs. rehana popal, thank you forjoining us. a 14—year—old boy has been charged with the murder of a man in chingford in north east london. james markham, who was 45, was stabbed outside his home on monday evening after confronting a group of youths. two other teenagers are being questioned. analysis of the spread of covid within uk hospitals has shown that during the first wave, more than one in ten patients caught the virus after being admitted for an unrelated illness. the transmission rates vary considerably depending on where the patients were treated, which the authors of the study say demands urgent investigation. our health correspondent, naomi grimley, has more.
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falling ill with covid while in hospitalfor something else was one of the most worrying features of the first wave of the pandemic. a new study from a group of uk universities has examined the numbers to see how common it was. the researchers found that at least one in ten hospital patients with covid were infected after admission. at the peak this rose to more like one in five. overall, this research suggests 11,800 people may have been infected this way and possibly more because early data is unclear. crucially, there were big variations between similar types of hospital and that's down to different preventative measures. even at the peak of the outbreak, we saw that some busy hospitals still managed to maintain good infection prevention and control. that meant that there was good hand washing, there was good testing of patients so the right patients
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were tested and kept separately from non—infected patients, better ventilation on some of the wards would have helped and access to plentiful supply of ppe would have helped. these are all counsels of perfection, we didn't know all that at the start of the outbreak. we know there were challenges around testing and challenges around the availability of ppe. the researchers say the levels of hospital acquired infections for covid are now much lower, thanks to the vaccination programme and a better understanding of how the virus spreads. naomi grimley, bbc news. more than a third of english councils support policies that could increase carbon emissions despite having declared a "climate emergency" according to bbc research. road building and airport expansion are among examples provided by 45 out of 121 questionnaire respondents who say they have passed climate motions. our energy and environment analyst roger harrabin has more.
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the residue of our consumerist lives. truckload after truckload of stuff we wanted once but want no more. our waste generates lots of planet eating greenhouse gases, but in leeds, they're turning it into something useful. heat. burning waste is controversial, but this giant plant, with its searing temperatures, generates electricity, and provides hot water to warm people's homes through a network of pipes. so we will extract over 100,000 megawatt hours of electricity here and export that to the local area network. over 25,000 megawatt hours of heat energy, which feeds over 2000 homes and tens of businesses. even the lorries that collect the waste are going electric. leeds has a reputation as one of the uk's greenest cities. but what about this?
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green leeds wants to expand its airport, even though flying damages the climate. it's extremely difficult to get that balance right, and there are always going to be competing factors. if we don't expand, the fear is that somebody else will and that economic growth will go elsewhere. similar economic arguments are made about roads. councils backing road schemes include those in wiltshire, in shropshire, and also in london. even though councillors declared a climate emergency. we need to see changes in government policy and government planning policy so it's actually a legal obligation for every development to be in line with the climate change targets. in leeds, the airport expansion is widely opposed. i don't like it in a certain way because it means that more planes have got to come in. you know, and it's making more pollution. really important, it's the future of everything, isn't it? - if we are not green, i if we are not sustainable, then everything is going to fall
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apart i guess in the future. i i mean, there's so much fuel used with the aeroplanes, _ there's so much, so many resources required for an airport _ for everybody to fly around. it has to be as green as possible. i don't really think about it that much but my grandma goes on about it a lot. what kind of world will we live in in 20 years' time? all these things are happening already, what kind of world will be left for our children and our grandchildren? politicians on the doorstep and around the world are making decisions that will help to determine the future. roger harrabin, bbc news. with me now is bristol green councillor carla denyer. welcome, thank you very much for joining us and you are part of a group of green councillors there in bristol who, after the recent local elections, are the joint biggest party along with labour. so, have you been able to make a difference yet? in
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you been able to make a difference et? �* , ., ., ., ., yet? in bristol, although we have the same number _ yet? in bristol, although we have the same number of _ yet? in bristol, although we have the same number of councillors l yet? in bristol, although we have| the same number of councillors as labour, because we have a directly elected mayor who is for the labour party, we are unfortunately still in the opposition in bristol for the time being, so we do not have much direct power to make change, but we have still managed to use our soft power to persuade the administration on some issues and back in 2018, i was delighted to be able to persuade my fellow bristol councillors from all political parties to unanimously vote for the first climate emergency declaration in europe. 50. vote for the first climate emergency declaration in europe.— vote for the first climate emergency declaration in europe. so, have they held true to — declaration in europe. so, have they held true to that? _ declaration in europe. so, have they held true to that? obviously - declaration in europe. so, have they held true to that? obviously the i held true to that? obviously the story today is about inconsistencies in local councils with signing up to that but then on the other hand pushing through policies which are at odds with it.— at odds with it. yes, and unfortunately, _ at odds with it. yes, and unfortunately, your i at odds with it. yes, and i unfortunately, your research at odds with it. yes, and - unfortunately, your research rings true with my experience in bristol. it shows that we have a huge problem. there is a massive gap between the promises that some politicians are making and the urgent action that we know is necessary, so, for example, in
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bristol, the labour mayor will in one breath try to claim credit for the climate emergency motion that i proposed and then in the next breath will champion the expansion of bristol airport. will champion the expansion of bristolairport. he will champion the expansion of bristol airport. he submitted a comment to the planning application saying that they counsel supported it and he congratulated bristol airport for its claims that they are climate neutral even though those claims, conveniently, did not include any of the emissions from the actual aeroplanes. fin include any of the emissions from the actual aeroplanes.— the actual aeroplanes. on that, it is progress. _ the actual aeroplanes. on that, it is progress, isn't _ the actual aeroplanes. on that, it is progress, isn't it, _ the actual aeroplanes. on that, it is progress, isn't it, that - the actual aeroplanes. on that, it is progress, isn't it, that bristol l is progress, isn't it, that bristol airport has said that it will become carbon neutral by the end of this year and net zero by 2030? as you say, not everything is included in the accounting of emissions on that, but it is still ahead of other airports in the country. it is ositive airports in the country. it is positive that _ airports in the country. it is positive that the _ airports in the country. it s positive that the airport are feeling the pressure that they need to show they are decarbonising, but honestly, and airports that is only going to be carbon neutral from the
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buildings and not from the planes flying in and out or even the vehicles driving to and from the airport is really missing the point. the projected emissions from the expansion that they are proposing would dwarf the decarbonisation efforts that bristol airport and the surrounding local authorities are trying to make, so it is really undoing all the good work that others are doing in the region. you said that you _ others are doing in the region. you said that you are disappointed with the stance of the mayor of bristol on the expansion. the council has refused the expansion and it is therefore now at the inquiry stage, so it is an ongoing situation and as far as i understood it, actually, the mayor had started to say that he was opposed to the expansion. it is complicated- _ was opposed to the expansion. it s complicated. the airport is actually just over the border in north somerset so it was the neighbouring council which refused permission and the mayor has come out with a
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variety of different comments on the airport, seeming to acknowledging some comments that expansion must not go ahead but then in others championing the airport, so i think his position is not clear on that, but there is a very strong voice. i recently presented a letter by to the inquiry on behalf of 35 green and independent councillors across the west of england who represent nearly a quarter of the population of our region saying that the expansion must not go ahead, so there is a strong democratic mandate there. . ~ there is a strong democratic mandate there. ., ~' ,, , . there is a strong democratic mandate there. ., ~ , . ., there. thank you very much for 'oinin: there. thank you very much for joining us- _ there. thank you very much for joining us- we _ there. thank you very much for joining us. we are _ there. thank you very much for joining us. we are expecting i there. thank you very much for joining us. we are expecting a| there. thank you very much for i joining us. we are expecting a news conference from devon and cornwall police shortly about last night's shooting in plymouth in which five people were killed. you can see there the journalists are lined up ready for the news conference to begin and we will bring it to you live as it happens. now it's time for a look
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at the weather with helen willetts. hello. it is a breezy day ahead for many. we have already had showers this morning. they are more prevalent across the northern half of the uk but they cannot be ruled out further south. in southern areas we have the remnants of yesterday's weather front. a band of cloud, the odd spot of rain or drizzly showers which should ease away. for england and wales, very few showers. but they will be heavy and frequent in north—western parts of scotland and northern ireland. heavy and thundery, fewer showers east of the grampians and across the eastern side of northern ireland. but that brisk wind, close to gale force in the north west, will temper the feel of things, 23 in the south. it will be cooler overnight under clearing skies. low pressure is still with us across the north of scotland so plenty of showers here. in the suburbs, on the cool side. at the weekend, some uncertainty. that rain creeping into the west, so more cloud for western parts of the uk. but still some dry
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weather this weekend. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... a suspected gunman who killed five people — including a child under ten — in a residential area in plymouth has been named locally as jake davison. the gunman is believed to have turned the gun on himself. we're expecting a press conference from devon and cornwall police this half—hour. the taliban make their most dramatic gains yet against afghan government forces, taking kandahar — the country's second largest city — and lashkar gar. the us and the uk send troops back to afghanistan, to evacuate their embassies in kabul. the father of britney spears has agreed to step down as her conservator — after 13 years of controlling her estate and other aspects of her life. new research shows more than a third of english councils support policies that could increase carbon emissions — despite having declared a "climate emergency".
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and — a giant iceberg the size of greater london is blocking the british antarctic survey from their research station. we'll have more on that later this hour. algeria has observed the first of three days of national mourning as wildfires continue to burn across the north of the country. fanned by strong winds and searing heat, the fires have killed 69 people since monday. tanya dendrinos has the story. flames licking at the tree tops. a wall of fire quickly swells. it's a devastating scene, villagers on the front line armed only with branches and shovels. translation: we have been fighting this fire for five days. _ there is no electricity, no water, no gas, no network. there is nothing here. we are tired. on the tarmac at algiers
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airport, a lifeline. two water bombing planes chartered by the algerian government from the eu, with another two arriving from france. but for those already firmly in the grip of this battle, the government support seems nonexistent. translation: the people of algeria are alone. i we have received nothing from the government except threats. people are acting together as one and we have received aid from everywhere. across algeria, volunteers and aid organisations are gathering supplies. translation: in each village, each city, there are partner associationsl with whom we work directly. we coordinate and give them i the donations and they distribute them to the families. appeals are under way in paris too. translation: we came - here to possibly lend a hand, to do some voluntary work, to help
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with all the sorting and maybe to see what is missing in terms of medicine, clothes or other things. these fires are some of the worst in the country's history and officials believe in many instances arson is to blame, with the president confirming more than 20 suspects have been arrested so far. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. 27 people are now known to have died in flash floods along turkey's black sea coast. ten were confirmed dead overnight, after floods brought chaos to northern provinces, just as rescuers reported bringing hundreds of wildfires under near control in the south of the country. turkey has suffered from a rapid series of natural disasters that world scientists warn are becoming more frequent and intense due to climate change. the bbc has uncovered new evidence about the teenage killer of bibaa henry and nicole smallman, the two sisters murdered last summer in a wembley park in london. danyal hussein, who is due to be sentenced for their murders, was a member of a web forum run by an american self—styled black magician whose instructions about demonic pacts mirror the steps he took. the bbc�*s daniel de simone reports.
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sisters bibaa henry and nicole smallman were brutally murdered last summer in a knife attack by a stranger while celebrating bibba's birthday in a wembley park. their misogynistic killer, danyel hussein, will be sentenced next month. you are under arrest, all right? when officers arrested him, they found a demonic pact in his bedroom in which he promised to sacrifice only women in return for money and power. we have investigated what might have generated his beliefs. hussain was part of a forum devoted to certain forms of satanism and the occult. he wrote that he was a psychic vampire and sought advice on demonic pacts. the forum was run by an american self—styled black magician called ea koetting. hussain wrote, i absolutely love ea and his work. he last logged on to the forum
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only before his arrest. koetting's real name is matthew lawrence from utah. he has previously been convicted of drug and weapon possession charges. we found hussein's beliefs mirror ideas promoted by koetting. the killer's murderous agreement was addressed to the mighty king, lucifuge rofocale, believed by hussein to be a powerful demon. koetting promotes the idea that people can enter into pacts with lucefuge, but says that real—world action will be required required if their requests are to succeed. if you want to make a pact with the powers of darkness as a whole, lucefuge is the guy you need to talk to. there are parallels between koetting's public instructions and what hussein did. he instructs people to sign the pact in blood, something done by hussein, but that lucefuge's signature will be visible only to you, a blank space was on the killer's document. koetting says the final pact should be made lit only by candlelight. hussein bought candles at the same time he purchased the knife used
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to murder bibaa and nicole. koetting says, include in your pact the attainment of wealth. hussein asked for wealth and a lottery win. some of koetting's other writings openly discuss and encourage murder, such as how to kill with a knife in a ritual sacrifice. one text quotes the moors murderer ian brady and advocates terrorist methods. it was written for an american nazi satanist group that influenced seven young men recently convicted of neo—nazi terror offences in the uk. the academic expert in all seven cases says the ideology is a threat, whether or not there is a terrorist motive to any criminal offending. these ideas can directly lead to violence and i think that we recognise with other forms of extremism that ideas can lead to terrorism and to violence, and i think it is no different in this case. we wrote to koetting setting out our findings. we did not receive a response. the motive for the murders of bibaa and nicole seemed beyond belief. but how the killer came to hold his beliefs may
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be becoming clearer. the chairman of the british olympic association, sir hugh robertson, has said it is "intensely disappointing" that a team gb sprinter has tested positive for a banned substance. cj ujah was part of the team that finished second in the men's 4x100m relay in tokyo. he's been suspended from competition and if upheld, it would be the most high—profile doping offence by a british athlete at any olympics. he and the rest of the relay team all face being stripped of their medals. the former olympic silver medallist kriss akabussi says he feels for the other three. dumbfounded, disbelief, denial. some kind of, is there a way that i can keep my medal, it wasn't me? you know. i guess you, it's praying or meditating or some sort of,
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can this all go away? i reallyjust can't imagine what those other three chaps are going through. the family of a teenager who drowned in loch lomond have pleaded for lessons to be learned from his death. connor markward was one of seven people killed in scotland's waters in a single weekend last month. his loved ones say he was oblivious to the dangers of the deep water. they've been speaking to the bbc�*s connor gillies. loch lomond. these waters may be beautiful, but they can be lethal. a place where memories are made and lives are lost. 16—year—old connor markward was out enjoying the sun three weeks ago with his friends when he drowned. ijust feel it every day, it is... ijust miss him dearly. he was only 16 but he really packed so much into his wee life, he really did. he was one in a million.
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i was just numb. i'll be honest, ijust went numb. i couldn't... i couldn't process it at all. i feel as though my heartjust collapsed. and he was only my brother, my baby brother. yes, so sad, i can't believe he walked out this door and didn't come back in. this was the moment rescue teams on the banks of the loch battled to save connor, one of seven people in a single week last month to be killed in scotland's waters. connor's family want better education on the subject in schools. it would at least make kids aware. think twice about what you're doing. i didn't even know until after connor passed that when you get in difficulty in water, you're just supposed to not panic, and go into a starfish, i didn't know that. they're protecting kids from going into buildings that are being pulled down because it is dangerous. what is the difference with water?
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there are just as many people losing their lives. so what would you like to see happening in schools? i would like there to be talks about swimming, and learning to swim. the royal lifesaving society says it's aware of more than 50 incidents of people losing their lives in uk waters in the last month alone. and that figure could be even higher. officials here on the loch say new life belts and safety equipment is on order in light of recent tragedies. the scottish government — who this week chaired an emergency meeting on improving awareness and protection — said its thoughts are with connor's family and are determined to reduce deaths. connor gillies, bbc news, glasgow. the british antarctic survey says it doesn't know when scientists can return to one of its research stations — because of the danger posed by a giant iceberg that's almost the size of greater london. experts are tracking the mass from space as it circles the antarctic coastline — as our science correspondent jonathan amos reports.
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it was the briefest and gentlest of icy kisses. a colossal iceberg, a74, weighing billions of tonnes, scrapes past a region of the antarctic known as the brunt ice shelf. it was the moment the british antarctic survey had been anticipating for months. the expectation was the berg would knock into and dislodge another vast and unstable piece of ice that is sitting in front of the survey�*s halley research station. we've been tracking the progress of the cracks that will eventually cause it to carve for a long time. when it does eventually go, the fact that it's not attached by a very large section of ice means it is quite unlikely to influence the remaining section of the ice shelf, where halley is. the fact that nothing was dislodged this time will be a frustration for the british antarctic survey. until the unstable ice in front of halley comes away, the base must close every winter
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on safety grounds, and this impacts the world—leading science that can be done at this important location. it's at halley, for example, that they discovered and continue to monitor the hole in the ozone layer. icebergs the size of a74 are impressive, but they are not necessarily an indicator of climate change. the antarctic balances the amount of snow falling on the interior of the continent by routinely discharging blocks of ice at its margins. throughout the coming hours and days we will release more information for the public and for your information as well so that we can explain to the members of the media but more importantly the people of plymouth what has happened in the preceding
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hours. an event like this and touches all communities no matter where you are, and the events i will tell you are particularly traumatic. we would say for anyone who witnessed the events of last night or are affected by them to contact the victim support national helpline on the number we will share with you. that is not just today but over the coming days. last night police received multiple calls at 6:11am to an address in biddick drive. the number of calls were considerable and were assessed and it was later revealed shots were being fired. that is i say came in from multiple calls from the public. officers arrived at the scene within six minutes, including both unarmed and armed officers. it is our
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understanding and i confirm a man known as jake davison aged 22 had murdered a woman at an address in biddick drive, using a firearm. i will not reveal that address as we are still contacting the members of the family of the lady who has died. we will reveal that the dress later in more detailfor you. mr davison then left that address, entered biddick drive where he immediately shot and killed a very young girl. he also shot and killed the male relative of that girl. this was a truly shocking event, and was witnessed by members of the public. further along biddick drive, he aimed and shot at two local residents, a man and a woman who have received significant but we understand at present not life—threatening injuries. they are
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currently being treated at a local hospital, and supported by specialist officers. again there are witnesses to this. from there, mr davison entered adjacent park land where he immediately shot a man who died at the scene. and thereafter he moved to henderson place where he shot a woman who, despite the best endeavours of first aid is at the scene, later died at derriford hospital. eye witnesses have told us that then mr davison turned the gun upon himself taking his own life. they have described that firearm is a pump action shotgun. i can confirm that a firearm has been retrieved from that scene and will be forensically examined. we are not yet describing that as a pump action firearm but clearly as i have said multiple shots had been fired from a
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firearm during that six minutes also period. there are some 13 scenes and potentially more scenes. overnight you will have heard we evacuated members of the public. that evacuation was primarily to ensure that there were not the other persons who had been shot, injured or killed in the neighbouring premises. as i repeat, there were therefore five people of plymouth who have lost their lives overnight, and mr davison himself, including a particularly young child. we are not at this time naming the details of those people because not only are we working with the families, but each one of them has widerfamilies families, but each one of them has wider families throughout the united kingdom, many of those people have work colleagues as well within plymouth and we will want to ensure those businesses as far as possible are supported. the community of plymouth is strong and right this morning we have had
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many meetings with community partners and all of them have commented on the strength of community but the response of the blue light agencies overnight, particularly colleagues from the opulence service air ambulance at derriford hospital, and responding officers, and the councillors at plymouth city council. the police and crime commissioner and home secretary were updated overnight and the police and crime commissioner is here in plymouth this morning. i would ask people not to contact police within devon and, unless it is truly now an emergency as we are very, very busy as i am sure you understand. in respect to this investigation, there is a casualty bureau number of 01752 487880. if anyone has any information about
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the investigation and a repeat if people are traumatised and they inevitably will be, then to contact that other number. clearly i will take some questions and answer as best i can. if i can't answer, i will explain why and we will seek to answer those questions for you over the coming hours and days. do you know if the gunman had a licence, — do you know if the gunman had a licence, and _ do you know if the gunman had a licence, and what _ do you know if the gunman had a licence, and what was _ do you know if the gunman had a licence, and what was the - do you know if the gunman had a j licence, and what was the motive do you know if the gunman had a i licence, and what was the motive for the attack? — the attack? we - the attack? we can i the attack? i we can confirm the attack? - we can confirm mr the attack? _ we can confirm mr davison the attack? — we can confirm mr davison is a firearms license owner, i am not able to confirm whether that was the firearm used. the second question was? you have ruled out terrorism. there — you have ruled out terrorism. there is— you have ruled out terrorism. there is no _ you have ruled out terrorism. there is no motive _ you have ruled out terrorism. there is no motive as - you have ruled out terrorism. there is no motive as we i you have ruled out terrorism. l there is no motive as we know you have ruled out terrorism. i there is no motive as we know at present. again that will be subject to inquiry but we are at the moment not considering terrorism or a relationship with any far—right group or any such other group. but clearly he is on social media and
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that will be passed to the investigation. can you say how long he has had that licence? _ licence? '- licence? i can get that detailed to ttcencea — i can get that detailed to you, suddenly he was a licence holder in 2020 but i will get it out you if it was held before that time. will there be a review of the process? _ process? as - process? as part of an process? — as part of an investigation into any shooting we will look at where the licence holder was licensed. that will be an independent review and we are making contact with agencies or whether it is conducted by another force. i will take this one here. the question was what he receiving treatment for mental health issues? again we will investigate that. this is an unusual response by a fellow human being. whether there were
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mental health issues i cannot say at this time but we will be informing yourself. and working with the coroner who will ask us to explore those avenues of inquiry. can you tell us anything at the moment i have nothing — anything at the moment i have nothing in _ anything at the moment i have nothing in terms _ anything at the moment i have nothing in terms of _ anything at the moment i have nothing in terms of him - anything at the moment i have nothing in terms of him saying| nothing in terms of him saying anything _ anything. clearly i anything. i clearly he has anytttng. — clearly he has pointed a firearm, whether anything was said, i will find out. i think most people at the moment ijust find out. i think most people at the moment i just shocked find out. i think most people at the moment ijust shocked at find out. i think most people at the moment i just shocked at what was unfolding before them so we do have specialist officers with all the witnesses and clearly if there is any video footage we would ask for that to be passed to us. for the moment i am not aware of any conversation. did any offices fire shots. conversation. did an offices fire shots. ., did any offices fire shots. no, he had taken _ did any offices fire shots. no, he had taken his _ did any offices fire shots. no, he had taken his life _ did any offices fire shots. no, he had taken his life before. - had taken his life before. i cannot confirm but i am aware that
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there is communication on social media. not to hide anything from you but if we get that we will tell you that in the fullness of time. did he have any convictions? again, — did he have any convictions? again, we _ did he have any convictions? again, we will put that over the coming hours and days. i want to focus on the incident but we will get back to you if it is appropriate. again, i won't confirm where members, where people who lost their lives worked or were at school because we need to work with those companies. why was there such a big window before _ why was there such a big window before residents were told about the emergency being over. we _ emergency being over. we were investigating whether there were other individuals, this was a fast developing scene. was this a
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loan agent? we were not clear weather it was a terrorist incident. we wanted to keep the public safe until we were totally sure. how long did that take? it was several hours. the, how long did that take? it was several hours. �* , t, it was several hours. a number of tteole it was several hours. a number of people lost _ it was several hours. a number of people lost their _ it was several hours. a number of people lost their lives _ it was several hours. a number of people lost their lives in - it was several hours. a number of people lost their lives in a - it was several hours. a number of people lost their lives in a short i people lost their lives in a short space _ people lost their lives in a short space of— people lost their lives in a short space of time _ people lost their lives in a short space of time. how _ people lost their lives in a short space of time. how confident i people lost their lives in a short. space of time. how confident are people lost their lives in a short i space of time. how confident are you in the _ space of time. how confident are you in the actions — space of time. how confident are you in the actions of _ space of time. how confident are you in the actions of your— space of time. how confident are you in the actions of your offices - space of time. how confident are you in the actions of your offices in - in the actions of your offices in getting — in the actions of your offices in getting to _ in the actions of your offices in getting to the _ in the actions of your offices in getting to the scene _ in the actions of your offices in getting to the scene quickly i in the actions of your offices in - getting to the scene quickly enough? as confident — getting to the scene quickly enough? as confident as _ getting to the scene quickly enough? as confident as i _ getting to the scene quickly enough? as confident as i can— getting to the scene quickly enough? as confident as i can be _ getting to the scene quickly enough? as confident as i can be right - getting to the scene quickly enough? as confident as i can be right now, i as confident as i can be right now, response time was six minutes on a warm summers evening from the time of call. i would believe that is very quick. it is very clear. i will be very clear i am extraordinarily proud of my offices in their response. if something comes later that we could have done more, but i think six minutes is a pretty good response. (inaudible).
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the question was, how we disregarded terrorism? we have an open mind but thatis terrorism? we have an open mind but that is not the focus at the moment due to the information we have which i am not able to reveal now. if that changes, we are in liaising with scotland yard and counterterrorism command, they will guide us on that. three more questions. you said your offices it took six minutes — minutes. i (inaudible). so. _ (inaudible). so. we- (inaudible). so, we have i (inaudible). i so, we have got (inaudible). _ so, we have got roughly, (inaudible). — so, we have got roughly, roughly a matter of minutes between the taking of the life of the lady at the address, and the gentleman taking his own life. we are talking minutes. but in those minutes, five other people lost their lives. sorry, this gentleman here. i am trying to help as much as i can.
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(inaudible). more details about mr davison will come out. i know all of you work in social media but i will only confirm the facts as i understand them. how many people were in the address? was he _ how many people were in the address? was he known — how many people were in the address? was he known to— how many people were in the address? was he known to police _ how many people were in the address? was he known to police at _ how many people were in the address? was he known to police at all— how many people were in the address? was he known to police at all and - was he known to police at all and what _ was he known to police at all and what he _ was he known to police at all and what he carry more than one firearm? he was— what he carry more than one firearm? he was known to police because he was a licensed firearms officer. i will come back on that with more detail. whether we had encounters with him earlier in his life that is something we are researching. we have only recovered one firearm at this time. how long did it take for armed officers to arrive? they were arriving at roughly the same time. mf has a number of armed response units as you know. it is a
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major city, and a naval city. we'll get the details out to you as soon as we can. in essence, if one looks at all the terrorist incidents we have seen, any kind of police response of six minutes is a phenomenal response. only the coroner will tell us whether we could have done more. but at the moment think that kind of response in any city is extremely, extremely responsive. but the firearms officers, this is a major city, that is a quick response. what was his relationship to the women, — what was his relationship to the women, and how many people were in the address? — the address? as _ the address? as i - the address? as i said, i wouldn't touch on the relationship. there is a familial relationship. there is a familial relationship as we understand but we are looking to confirm that. that is the first lady i assume you are referring to. but suddenly the individuals were known to each other. in terms of the other
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individuals, we don't yet know whether they were known to each other. there is some staycation it was his nrother_ there is some staycation it was his mother at— there is some staycation it was his mother at the _ there is some staycation it was his mother at the address, _ there is some staycation it was his mother at the address, is - there is some staycation it was his mother at the address, is that i mother at the address, is that correct? — correct? was - correct? was it. correct? i was it his correct? _ was it his mother? i ccttect? — was it his mother? i am not going to confirm any familial relationship at this stage. let me confirm that we believe the lady at the first address was known to him. and there is a view that there is a familial relationship which your colleague asked, i am not going to confirm or deny that other than they knew each other. in terms of the other people who tragically lost their lives, whether he knew them by acquaintance we do not know of any formal relationship between them. he knew people on that street, whether he had more than one address we are waiting to find out. two more. we are waiting to find out.
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two more-— we are waiting to find out. two more. ,., . ,, ., ., two more. going back to the terror issue (inaudible). _ nothing has changed, in policing, you keep an open mind and go on the facts which is why i have waited as long as i could before i spoke to you. at the moment, is terrorism a potential? c what is on his hard drive, his computer, on social media, but right now we have nothing to say that is the case. we believe we have an incident that is domestically related, that has into the street and seen several people within plymouth losing their lives in an extraordinarily tragic circumstance. the address, is that the shooter's home _ the address, is that the shooter's home address. i won't be able to confirm or deny that at this time. the present at
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that at this time. the present at that address mad stad was known to him. -- l him. —— at that address was known to him. i do not know yet whether the gun was used are there any other address is being searched? is being searched ? we is being searched? we have 13 different scenes. those were searched overnight to make sure were searched overnight to make sure we had no other victims or other persons who may be harmed. as we discover more about mr davison's life, we may find other address as we might wish to search but at the moment we have no other address as we are seeking to search. i will come back to you because there will be multiple addresses in that area.
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i will not answer questions about the injuries due to issues of trauma and respect, iam the injuries due to issues of trauma and respect, i am son question, but thatis and respect, i am son question, but that is not somewhere i will go. i will close with one more. hope that is not somewhere i will go. i will close with one more. how many others were — will close with one more. how many others were injured? _ will close with one more. how many others were injured? there - will close with one more. how many others were injured? there were i will close with one more. how many| others were injured? there were two others were in'ured? there were two tteole others were injured? there were two people injured. _ others were injured? there were two people injured. so — others were injured? there were two people injured, so those _ others were injured? there were two people injured, so those were - others were injured? there were two people injured, so those were the i people injured, so those were the two people that mr davison confronted, aimed and shot at them. they are local residents. both received significant injuries and we have to be careful with this term not life—threatening because if someone looks at you, shoots you and you are short, it is life changing and it is life changing for all the people who have witnessed those events overnight and it will be something that will show the resilience of the people of plymouth over the coming days of weeks and i will ask that, as you have done this morning, please show them the respect in how we treat their lives as they come to terms with this.
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thank you so very much. the as they come to terms with this. thank you so very much. the chief of devon and cornwall _ thank you so very much. the chief of devon and cornwall police _ thank you so very much. the chief of devon and cornwall police updating i devon and cornwall police updating the media on what happened yesterday when just in a matter of minutes, jake davison took the lives of five people in plymouth and then killed himself with his own shotgun which was described by witnesses and we heard there from the chief there were many witnesses to the shootings. they called it a pump action shotgun. he said he believed the first person killed, a lady at an address in biddick drive, was known to jake davison. he refused to confirm whether there was a familial relationship, but he said at this time, they believe it was an incident which was domestically related which then spilled into the streets and he described how jake
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davison, having killed that woman in that house, left the address and shot and killed a very young girl and shot a male relative who was with her. he then went further along biddick drive and shot two people, a man and a woman. he said their injuries are not life—threatening but said they are life changing. he then went further to adjacent parklands, shot a man who died at the scene and then a woman was shot who died of her injuries later in hospital and then he turned the gun on himself and killed himself. he said police responded, in his view, very quickly, six minutes from the first call being received and they were at the scene. by then, jake davison had already killed himself but he says it will be for the coroner to look at whether they could have done more. he said that jake davison was a licensed gun all about whether that particular weapon was licensed, they need to check. as a result of him being a licensed firearm holder, he was known to the
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police. there were a lot of questions there about social media because jake davison appears in a number of social media videos where he talks about his life and that is an area that at this point the chief said he would not speculate on. he said he would not speculate on. he said it is not clear whether there were any mental health issues or whether there was any motivation, what's the motivation was for these shootings but that is all being looked at and he said that the police will be investigating what is on his computer now as they try to work out exactly what led to jake davison killing five people in plymouth yesterday and then killing himself. i'm joined now by the police and crime commissioner for devon and cornwall, alison hernandez. thank you very much forjoining us. well, we heard there from the chief talking about many, many witnesses to go shootings and saying it is, of course, traumatic for those who have
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witnessed what happened here and it was shocking to be talked through the brutality of how quickly those events unfolded. what are your thoughts and feelings today? i think at the moment _ thoughts and feelings today? i think at the moment we _ thoughts and feelings today? i think at the moment we probably - thoughts and feelings today? i think at the moment we probably have i thoughts and feelings today? i in “it; at the moment we probably have a community which is feeling a little bit helpless as soon this incident occurred yesterday, i am down in plymouth now and the community are rallying around, helping each other, offering support, we have even had people wishing to volunteer. we have leaflets printed about victim support because people can access that 20 47 for anyone who has been directly or indirectly affected by this absolutely disgusting tragedy in devon and cornwall today. what in devon and cornwall today. what are the questions _ in devon and cornwall today. what are the questions in _ in devon and cornwall today. what are the questions in your - in devon and cornwall today. what are the questions in your mind right now? i are the questions in your mind right now? ~' ., , are the questions in your mind right now? ~ ., , ., ., ., now? i think for us, one of the main thins are now? i think for us, one of the main things are we _ now? i think for us, one of the main things are we want _ now? i think for us, one of the main things are we want to _ now? i think for us, one of the main things are we want to really - things are we want to really understand, as to the public, who
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was this individual, this jake davison, why did he do what he did? our thoughts are with the families of those affected who have lost loved ones who are in this community and we heard from the chief that there is talk that there is a child who has been murdered in this way on the streets of plymouth. this is absolutely devastating. our thoughts are with the family and friends of those and all their colleagues who we will know some of those people who have been killed today. we heard to their 30 is — who have been killed today. we heard to their 30 is a — who have been killed today. we heard to their 30 is a firearms _ who have been killed today. we heard to their 30 is a firearms licence - to their 30 is a firearms licence holder. it is not clear whether the weapon that was used was licensed. he was known to police as a result of being a licensed firearm holder. the weapon itself was described as a pump action shotgun, do you have questions around that? i pump action shotgun, do you have questions around that?— questions around that? i have lots of questions _ questions around that? i have lots of questions already, _ questions around that? i have lots of questions already, but - questions around that? i have lots of questions already, but we i questions around that? i have lots of questions already, but we have | questions around that? i have lots l of questions already, but we have to wait until the details have come through from them looking at the facts and understanding on the systems that we have, fully what it has actually been happening, the
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forensic examination of the firearm, all these things. i have asked lots of questions from last night right into this morning and i am waiting for some of that information already. i probably know a little bit more than i can tell you at the moment, but we need to wait until things are confirmed so we can be really clear and factual about what has happened, but the chief, has done a press conference just now trying to be as helpful as he can be at this point. i trying to be as helpful as he can be at this point-— at this point. i understand, obviously. _ at this point. i understand, obviously, that _ at this point. i understand, obviously, that you - at this point. i understand, obviously, that you know i at this point. i understand, i obviously, that you know things at this point. i understand, - obviously, that you know things you do not want to share at the moment, but does that relate to the licensing of the weapon or does it relate to motivation? that licensing of the weapon or does it relate to motivation?— licensing of the weapon or does it relate to motivation? at the moment, we do not know _ relate to motivation? at the moment, we do not know anything _ relate to motivation? at the moment, we do not know anything about - relate to motivation? at the moment, we do not know anything about the i we do not know anything about the motivation as far as i am aware. the issuer is at the moment is understanding the individual, understanding the individual, understanding who else has been involved, who the victims were. as you can hear, we have not been able to be fully in contact with those who have been affected, so we have some real challenges here to try to
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get information out quickly whilst also being respectful of families who have been affected and the community in plymouth, i want to see a huge thank you to you who could not get into your homes last night, thank you to the emergency services on site dealing with people who had been shot and those injuries are horrific. i was even shared footage from the community in plymouth last night of some really horrendous scenes, so i do not want people to be sharing footage on social media. please hold onto it until the police ask if they need it. fin please hold onto it until the police ask if they need it.— ask if they need it. on that point, the chief said _ ask if they need it. on that point, the chief said they _ ask if they need it. on that point, the chief said they do _ ask if they need it. on that point, the chief said they do need i ask if they need it. on that point, the chief said they do need it, i ask if they need it. on that point, i the chief said they do need it, they want to be sent it stop it is obvious the all parts of the picture they are going to be building. in they are going to be building. in the fullness of time, they do not need it exactly today so what i would suggest to people is to hold onto the footage and when we needed, it will be very clear how you can share that with the force. thank you ve much share that with the force. thank you very much indeed _ share that with the force. thank you very much indeed for— share that with the force. thank you very much indeed forjoining - share that with the force. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. i this morning it's emerged that 22—year—old jake davison has appeared
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in a number of social media videos where he talks about his life — let's have a listen to one example. i'm so beaten down and defeated by bleep _ i'm so beaten down and defeated by bleep life. that drive that i had is gone, _ bleep life. that drive that i had is gone, it's— bleep life. that drive that i had is gone, it's literally gone. i do not have _ gone, it's literally gone. i do not have the — gone, it's literally gone. i do not have the power any more. that was him on social media. we heard from the chief that they are aware of those videos, but at this time, they do not have any information on motive and that is obviously something they are exploring. he also engages with what's known as "incel" subculture — incel standing for involuntary celibate — which is known for its misogyny and hostility to women. police say there is currently no motive for the murders but they are investigating his social media videos. let's talk more about this with eleanor penny, a writer who specialises in online hate groups. thank you very much forjoining us. what are your thoughts at this point?
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what are your thoughts at this toint? ~ ., _, , .,, point? well, of course, as the otlice point? well, of course, as the police were — point? well, of course, as the police were saying, _ point? well, of course, as the police were saying, it - point? well, of course, as the police were saying, it is i point? well, of course, as the police were saying, it is too i point? well, of course, as the i police were saying, it is too early to have a definitive idea of what his particular motivations are, but if we put what we know about his online activities and the kinds of things that we just heard in the youtube clip there, together with the pattern of violence, we get a tragically familiar story which has been happening all over the world in recent years and has been ramping up which is incel linked attacks both on intimate partners, family members and members of the public as a kind of expression of what incel culture sort of teaches young men, the way it prays off a sense of alienation and despairand it prays off a sense of alienation and despair and gives them this incredibly cruel and violent way of supposedly taking the power back for themselves. flan supposedly taking the power back for themselves. . , ., , ., , themselves. can you tell us a bit more about _ themselves. can you tell us a bit more about that? _ themselves. can you tell us a bit more about that? incel - themselves. can you tell us a bitj more about that? incel originally was set up by a woman, wasn't it, where she was looking at her own life and those of others and she
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wanted there to be an online forum where people who found themselves unable, for whatever reason, to get into relationships to be able to share that, but it has taken a turn. just explain, when you say teaching people, what is... i mean, how? what are the teachings of it?— are the teachings of it? well, yes, it is a funny _ are the teachings of it? well, yes, it is a funny historical— are the teachings of it? well, yes, it is a funny historical coincidence | it is a funny historical coincidence that a movement that is so animated at its core by misogyny and a deep mistrust of women was, in fact, started by a woman, but now the vast majority of people who identify as incels, who participate in this kind of broad network of online sub cultures and are unified under that umbrella are largely men, largely young white men. and what can broadly be taken from the ideologies, the kind of animating heart of it, the thing that draws a
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lot of people to it, is this idea of taking people who have a sense of alienation, have a sense of powerlessness within their own lives and giving them a next relation for it, giving them away to solve it and the excellent nation they give is that there once was this social contract where every man had a right to a wife he could dominate and who would take care of him and then the mixture of feminist gains for female emancipation and other kinds of social progress have fractured that social progress have fractured that social contract and leaving a lot of men feeling isolated and feeling deprived of what they consider their birthright, they are rights to dominate women, their right to dominate women, their right to dominate female bodies. and that has, unfortunately, inspired multiple attacks which some people call terrorism. we see the police are hesitant to give it that label and a lot of people have been speculating on why that might be.
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but it is clear that it has been linked, by certain estimates, to up to 50 deaths in recent years which is, obviously, i hugely concerning social phenomenon.— social phenomenon. sorry to interruption, _ social phenomenon. sorry to interruption, is _ social phenomenon. sorry to interruption, is it _ social phenomenon. sorry to interruption, is it designated social phenomenon. sorry to i interruption, is it designated as social phenomenon. sorry to - interruption, is it designated as a group of concern that is monitored by the authorities? it group of concern that is monitored by the authorities?— by the authorities? it varies from lace to by the authorities? it varies from place to place. — by the authorities? it varies from place to place. very _ by the authorities? it varies from place to place, very broadly, - by the authorities? it varies from place to place, very broadly, but| by the authorities? it varies from | place to place, very broadly, but i think more urgently, what we need to be thinking about is the fact that, yes, this is an online subculture and these attacks are extreme and they are obviously incredibly shocking and tragic, but we can see the hallmarks of these kinds of ideologies in our culture more broadly, for instance, the idea that when men act violently, it is the women around them or society more generally which is to blame. just a cuick generally which is to blame. just a quick thoughts. — generally which is to blame. just a quick thoughts, i _ generally which is to blame. just a quick thoughts, i know _ generally which is to blame. just a quick thoughts, i know you - generally which is to blame. just a quick thoughts, i know you are - generally which is to blame. just a quick thoughts, i know you are not a specialist on gun licensing, but when people get a gun licence, they are looked into by the police. would
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you expect issues like this to be a part of that picture? i you expect issues like this to be a part of that picture?— part of that picture? i am not an exert, part of that picture? i am not an exaert. as _ part of that picture? i am not an exuert. as you _ part of that picture? i am not an expert, as you say, _ part of that picture? i am not an expert, as you say, but - part of that picture? i am not an expert, as you say, but what - part of that picture? i am not an expert, as you say, but what i l part of that picture? i am not an - expert, as you say, but what i would say is that we have consistently seen a link between intimate partner violence and domestic violence, violence and domestic violence, violence gets women more generally and violence against strangers in these kinds of tragic ways and we know that kind of thing can take place with or without a firearm, so i think instead of focusing on the particularity of firearms policy, we need to ask serious questions about misogyny in our culture and the stories we tell our young men, how we give them other paths to dignity and to a sense of connection to society that do not take them down these parts. just society that do not take them down these parts-— these parts. just briefly, sorry, how big is _ these parts. just briefly, sorry, how big is this _ these parts. just briefly, sorry, how big is this community, - these parts. just briefly, sorry, how big is this community, do | these parts. just briefly, sorry, i how big is this community, do you think, in this country? i how big is this community, do you think, in this country?— think, in this country? i mean, it is certainly _ think, in this country? i mean, it is certainly a _ think, in this country? i mean, it is certainly a global— think, in this country? i mean, it| is certainly a global phenomenon think, in this country? i mean, it. is certainly a global phenomenon on and it is a growing phenomenon and it is hard to define the source of
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hard edges of incel communities because this is a broad, disparate, porous network, so it is hard to get estimates which is part of the concerning thing right now. thank ou ve concerning thing right now. thank you very much — concerning thing right now. thank you very much for _ concerning thing right now. thank you very much forjoining - concerning thing right now. thank you very much forjoining us. - in a devastating blow for the afghan government, five more provincial capitals have fallen to the taliban in the last 2a hours. the militants now control iii provincial capitals and most of northern afghanistan. britain and the us are sending troops back into afghanistan to help evacuate their nationals. in the past month the taliban has taken considerable territory and this is the picture today. the militant group's gains have been rapid in the past few days, and indeed the past 2a hours during which taliban fighters have captured afghanistan's second city of kandahar. the city is the taliban's birthplace and former stronghold and taking control is a significant prize for the militants. other important cities such as herat and ghazni were captured within hours of each other on thursday. and the taliban have also taken lashkar gah, capital of the southern province of helmand, as well as
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qala—i—naw in the north. there are increasing concerns that the militants will continue their lightning speed offensive toward the capital, kabul, where tens of thousands of civilians have fled violent street fighting. our correspondent in kabul, yogita limaye, gave us this update. well, people are in shock and disbelief over what has happened just over a single day. five provincial capitals have fallen to the taliban, among them major cities. kandahar, this country's second largest city, a big economic centre. to the taliban, it is a traditional stronghold, so they will be looking at this as a major victory. herat is in the west of the country, close to the border with iran, so it is important for trade. these are big losses for the afghan government, it leaves them in a very vulnerable position and it has all happened in a span of 12 hours. we started the day talking about ghazni, about 100 hours south of kabul, and by the end of the day, it was five provincial capitals, including lashkar gah in the helmand province. that is where some of the fiercest
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battles were fought over the past 20 years, hundreds of british and foreign troops died, thousands of afghan soldiers were killed there, and now it has been taken over by the taliban. afghan forces have retreated to a military base just outside the city. so people really in a sense of shock here about what has happened and the silence from the leadership of this country, we haven't heard yet from the president or any of his top ministers about the developments yesterday and i think the longer that continues, the more there will be speculation and rumours about what could potentially happen in kabul. earlier i spoke to charlie faulkner, a freelance journalist in kabul. she gave us an insight in to the scene in kabul as fears grow for an imminent talban invasion. i mean, there is certainly an increased presence in terms of the military and whatnot. i think the more dramatic sign
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really of their being an issue actually is the influx of people that are heading into kabul who are fleeing the violence. that is kind of bringing traffic to a standstill because of the crowded areas now where people are taking refuge in parks and whatnot, and it is quite clear to see that there is a crisis unfolding here. my understanding is that there are thousands of people at the passport office everyday trying to sort out their documentation to be able to get out of the country and, i mean, nowhere near the number of people who idea be processed, the uk defence secretary ben wallace says afghanistan is now heading for civil war, which, he says, will lead to more poverty and create a breeding ground for terrorism. the history of afghanistan — and britain found that out in the 1830s — is that it is a country led by warlords and led by different provinces and tribes and you end up,
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if you are not very careful, in a civil war, and i think we are heading towards a civil war, initially shown by a taliban with momentum. the taliban is not entirely a single entity, they break down underneath the title into all sorts of different interests, but fundamentally, as i said earlier, i have concerned that when states become failed states or warlike states — as it is looking like at the moment in afghanistan — the breeding ground for both poverty, and we shouldn't forget that, both poverty and indeed terrorism grows. and it is why security is the most important thing. johnny mercer is a former defence minister, who also served in afghanistan. he's condemned the political actions of both the us and the uk. the political will to see through ensuring support of afghanistan has not been there and a lot of people are going to die because of that and, for me, that is extremely
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humiliating, it's a tragedy, a world tragedy, and we are going to read the repercussions of this over many, many years to come in my thoughts are with all those who lost people overin are with all those who lost people over in afghanistan. imagine if that was your son or daughter killed and you see what is happening today and the sort of weakness from the politicians to allow it to happen. we have allowed this defeat. it has notjust happen, we have allowed it because we have taken the rug out from the afghan people. wendy rayner�*s husband sergeant peter anthony rayner — was killed while serving in helmand province in afghanistan in 2010. wendyjoins me now from bradford. thank you very much forjoining us. i'm not sure if you could hear the former defence minister there, but he said his thoughts are with those of you who lost someone in afghanistan. how are you feeling today as you see what is unfolding there? ., today as you see what is unfolding there? . �* , , today as you see what is unfolding there? . �*, , ,, ., there? yeah, it's very upsetting to see what is — there? yeah, it's very upsetting to see what is going _ there? yeah, it's very upsetting to see what is going on. _ there? yeah, it's very upsetting to see what is going on. obviously, l there? yeah, it's very upsetting to l see what is going on. obviously, the governments and powers that be have
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not given a thought to anybody either who has lost somebody or the civilians who have to live in afghanistan, so it's absolutely appalling, it really is. i’m afghanistan, so it's absolutely appalling, it really is. i'm pretty disgusted. _ appalling, it really is. i'm pretty disgusted. to — appalling, it really is. i'm pretty disgusted, to be _ appalling, it really is. i'm pretty disgusted, to be fair. _ appalling, it really is. i'm pretty disgusted, to be fair. your - appalling, it really is. i'm pretty- disgusted, to be fair. your husband made the greatest sacrifice was serving his country in afghanistan and, obviously, a tragic loss for all of those who knew him. do you know way that against what is happening today? i do know way that against what is happening today?— know way that against what is happening today? i do not weigh it auainst it, happening today? i do not weigh it against it. no. _ happening today? i do not weigh it against it, no, because _ happening today? i do not weigh it against it, no, because he - happening today? i do not weigh it against it, no, because he went. against it, no, because he went because the government sent him. his purpose was to bring a more civilised lifestyle for afghanistan civilians, so they could live a nice life like we do here in england and to stop terrorists from being able to stop terrorists from being able to invade any other countries or anything else is what we were led to believe. when i heard about the taliban talks with the government and america, because al-anda, isis, the taliban, they are all in the
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same bracket. they do not want to read the country for the people, they want to lead it for their own purposes. any leader of any country should lead it for other people, to make it a better place for everyone to live. and by letting the taliban takeover, they have had nothing in contingency to support the afghan government. i think it has just been done and no one really cares and it isjust done and no one really cares and it is just really, done and no one really cares and it isjust really, really done and no one really cares and it is just really, really sad. these people are left to be slaughtered like lambs because the american government and our government to havejust said, we government and our government to have just said, we can government and our government to havejust said, we can pack up government and our government to have just said, we can pack up and go home. i would like nothing more than two cr troops still there, but i would not like to see any more deaths for no reason, so it is really hard is a situation. like the previous speaker said, afghanistan has been in a conflict, warfor a longtime. it would take along has been in a conflict, warfor a longtime. it would take a longtime to change it, so we have pulled out way too soon. find
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to change it, so we have pulled out way too soon-— way too soon. and do you feel like the work that _ way too soon. and do you feel like the work that was _ way too soon. and do you feel like the work that was done _ way too soon. and do you feel like the work that was done has - way too soon. and do you feel like the work that was done has been l the work that was done has been undone now because of the withdrawal?— undone now because of the withdrawal? ~ , , , ., withdrawal? well, yes, it is going to quebec to _ withdrawal? well, yes, it is going to quebec to how _ withdrawal? well, yes, it is going to quebec to how it _ withdrawal? well, yes, it is going to quebec to how it was. - withdrawal? well, yes, it is going to quebec to how it was. the - withdrawal? well, yes, it is going i to quebec to how it was. the taliban will enforce showery law, women will again be put in the dark out of the way, only allowed out of their homes with a man. people in this country, i come from bradford, a multiracial town here in bradford city, and there are families here who have family out there who are going to be devastated, frightened to death not knowing what will happen to their families and does our government really care? because where are they? where are they speaking out saying this is not right? what are they going to do about it? you this is not right? what are they going to do about it?— this is not right? what are they going to do about it? you have a hue going to do about it? you have a huge amount — going to do about it? you have a huge amount of— going to do about it? you have a huge amount of empathy - going to do about it? you have a huge amount of empathy for - going to do about it? you have a huge amount of empathy for the j huge amount of empathy for the people in afghanistan, you are not talking about yourself and your own loss. it seems your feelings are very much directed towards those who
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are in that country, where as you describe your husband wanted to make it a better place. mr; describe your husband wanted to make it a better place-— it a better place. my husband died to live it a better place. my husband died to give them _ it a better place. my husband died to give them a _ it a better place. my husband died to give them a better _ it a better place. my husband died to give them a better life - it a better place. my husband died to give them a better life and - it a better place. my husband died to give them a better life and buy| to give them a better life and buy them not having a better life, it's taken away his fight. 50 i think this government need to stand up and be counted for, same as the american government, because they went in, they had plenty to say when they went in and now what are they saying now? what's going on? you do not hear much being said, do you? like i said, there was no contingency put in there. the p stock they had with the taliban, where were the talks about the people who will be left living in those countries with the taliban? you know? where were the talks of if it did go back to this how we would feel as families who lost loved ones? my son was seven years old when his father was killed and it was the father ristic make one of the hardest things we ever had to go through and what they have done now is going to create a lot of
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hatred towards america and england. all these young people in afghanistan who have their families slaughtered and killed because nobody cares because we have just left them in the lurch, it is just going to create another sort of terror threats because they are going to hate us and i do not blame them. , , .,, going to hate us and i do not blame them. , , ., ., them. many people can turn away from them. many people can turn away from the news like — them. many people can turn away from the news like what _ them. many people can turn away from the news like what is _ them. many people can turn away from the news like what is happening - the news like what is happening there because it is far away, it does not affect them and it is difficult to watch. i'm issuing its deeply personal for you. can you ever turn away from it? wt} deeply personal for you. can you ever turn away from it? imo angry, i'm sad and — ever turn away from it? imo angry, i'm sad and it _ ever turn away from it? imo angry, i'm sad and it does _ ever turn away from it? imo angry, i'm sad and it does hurt _ ever turn away from it? imo angry, i'm sad and it does hurt deeply, - i'm sad and it does hurt deeply, trust me, very deeply. when i first saw what was going on with the taliban, it made me quite emotional thinking, well, you know, my husband gave those kids suites on the streets because he wanted to give them a better life. he died for that reason and he truly believed, the same as all his comrades, that they
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were making a difference. it is easy to say that they were like that before, leave them to it, they will never change. change does not happen overnight to countries like afghanistan. they have been like that for a long time, it takes patience, time and a lot of talking and i do not think enough talking has gone on and i think the process of pulling out the way they have done is going to do more harm in the long run. done is going to do more harm in the lona run. ., ~ done is going to do more harm in the lona run. . ~ i. , done is going to do more harm in the lona run. ., ~ ,, , . ., long run. thank you very much for talkin: to long run. thank you very much for talking to us. _ long run. thank you very much for talking to us, wendy. _ long run. thank you very much for talking to us, wendy. really- talking to us, wendy. really appreciate your time this morning, thank you. analysis of the spread of covid within uk hospitals has shown that during the first wave, more than one in ten patients caught the virus after being admitted for an unrelated illness. the transmission rates vary considerably depending on where the patients were treated which the authors of the study say demands urgent investigation. our health correspondent, naomi grimley, has more. falling ill with covid while in hospitalfor something else was one of the most worrying
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features of the first wave of the pandemic. a new study from a group of uk universities has examined the numbers to see how common it was. the researchers found that at least one in ten hospital patients with covid were infected after admission. at the peak this rose to more like one in five. overall, this research suggests 11,800 people may have been infected this way and possibly more because early data is unclear. crucially, there were big variations between similar types of hospital and that's down to different preventative measures. even at the peak of the outbreak, we saw that some busy hospitals still managed to maintain good infection prevention and control. that meant that there was good hand washing, there was good testing of patients so the right patients were tested and kept separately from non—infected patients, better ventilation on some of the wards would have helped and access to plentiful supply
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of ppe would have helped. these are all counsels of perfection, we didn't know all that at the start of the outbreak. we know there were challenges around testing and challenges around the availability of ppe. the researchers say the levels of hospital acquired infections for covid are now much lower, thanks to the vaccination programme and a better understanding of how the virus spreads. naomi grimley, bbc news. i'm joined now by dr vishal sharma, the british medical association consultants committee chair. welcome, thank you very much for joining us. what do you think was going on in hospitals where the rate of transmission within the hospital was won in 100 versus others where the rate of transmission was one in four? ~ , ., ., , four? well, first of all, it is trauic four? well, first of all, it is tragic that _ four? well, first of all, it is tragic that patients - four? well, first of all, it is tragic that patients were i
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four? well, first of all, it is - tragic that patients were getting covid in hospital. all patients need to know they are going to a place of safety when they are not well, but we know that all health care workers across the board have done everything in their power to try to reduce infection but they have been badly let down by the system and are big variations across the country in terms of access to testing at the time, especially in the first way. in many places, they could not test patients or staff very easily, so that was a big problem. there were big variations in levels of ppe. in some places, the hospital real estate is incredibly old and very poorly ventilated which is quite a big problem and we know that some hospitals are incredibly overcrowded. one third less than france and one quarter less then germany and all that makes courting patients very difficult if they have covid, so we could not separate them as well in some hospitals as in others. it as well in some hospitals as in others. , , others. it is entirely understandable - others. it is entirelyj understandable that others. it is entirely - understandable that mistakes others. it is entirely _ understandable that mistakes are made at the beginning of something which no one has seen the like of before and everyone is running to ketchup, but it is such a stark
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difference, isn't it? one in four patients being infected in hospitals at the worse end of the spectrum and one in 100 at the other end. absolutely, and i think that does come down to different infrastructure in places and, as i say, testing and real estate because some hospitals are new, they are modern, they have the ability to isolate, so modern hospitals, for example, will have single rooms, single ensuite rooms in some cases, so you can actually isolate patients much better whereas some of the older hospitals have the old—fashioned bays with nightingale wards in some cases and those are often poorly ventilated as well and all of these things make a big difference. one thing we know now that we probably did not know at the start of the pandemic is the importance of airborne spread as well, the importance of ventilation, these things came to light later whereas when it first started, we thought it was all delivered by droplets and full contact and that is not the case. 50
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droplets and full contact and that is not the case.— droplets and full contact and that is not the case. so now, when we look at where _ is not the case. so now, when we look at where the _ is not the case. so now, when we look at where the infection - is not the case. so now, when we look at where the infection rate i is not the case. so now, when we j look at where the infection rate is now, between 12 into cases transmitted in hospitals despite the delta variant being more infectious, have structural changes been brought into the hospital?— into the hospital? well, from the start, we into the hospital? well, from the start. we have — into the hospital? well, from the start, we have tried _ into the hospital? well, from the start, we have tried to _ into the hospital? well, from the start, we have tried to do - into the hospital? well, from the start, we have tried to do the - into the hospital? well, from the | start, we have tried to do the right things in all cases. it has not been a conscious decision at the start. we focused strictly on hand washing across the board, the vaccination has made a big difference, but i think the biggest difference probably is testing, so we can now get testing done very rapidly so we can identify a patient who has covered, identifying staff member who has covid very rapidly and we are reducing the ability for them to pass that on and the other thing we are trying to do, is that one of the problems in hospitals is that there is often no good communal space, so in terms of staff and mixing together, we have tried to reduce that as well to minimise the spread
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of covid. ., ~ , ., , that as well to minimise the spread of covid. ., ~ ,, , . ., of covid. thank you very much for 'oinin: of covid. thank you very much for joining us- _ some breaking news — a man who posed as an nhs worker in order to trick an elderly woman into paying for a fake covid vaccine in south—west london has been jailed for three—and—a—half years. david chambers pretended to inject her, charged her £140 and returned five days later to demand a further £100. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz shafernaker. let us see how the weather is looking for the rest of the day. there is certainly some decent sunshine, from lincolnshire, across the midlands, northern wales and the southern counties especially in the land which had been cloudy. the
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showers will continue this evening across scotland, quite breezy as well. not a cold night, 15 degrees, but quite misty. if you live in cornwall and devon, that is coming in tomorrow. many areas across western parts of the uk will be cloudy with outbreaks of rain, reaching possibly northern ireland. the best chance of sunshine tomorrow across parts of scotland and later in the afternoon along the channel coast. forthe in the afternoon along the channel coast. for the rest of the weekend, it will change a little but overall for most of us, it will be dry. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... a suspected gunman who killed five people — including a very young child — in a residential area in plymouth has been named as jake davison. the 22—year—old was
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a licensed firearms holder — the incident is the worst mass shooting in britain since 2010. there are therefore five people of plymouth who have lost their lives overnight, and mr davison himself, including a particularly young child. the taliban make their most dramatic gains yet against afghan government forces, taking kandahar — the country's second largest city — and lashkar gar. the us and the uk send troops back to afghanistan, to evacuate their embassies in kabul. the father of britney spears, has agreed to step down as her conservator — after 13 years of controlling her estate and other aspects of her life. new research shows more than a third of english councils support policies that could increase carbon emissions — despite having declared a "climate emergency" and — a giant iceberg the size of greater london is blocking the british antarctic survey from their research station — we'll have more on that later this hour.
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let's bring you more on our top story — that five people have been killed in a residential area of plymouth in the worst mass shooting in britain since 2010. the gunman — 22—year—old jake davison — who was a licensed firearms holder — shot and killed a woman in a house before shooting dead a "very young" girl, her male relative and two others yesterday. another two people are also in hospital. after the shooting — davison turned the gun on himself before firearms officers could engage him. police were called to the scene just after six o'clock — following mulitple 999 calls — they were on the scene in six minutes. the prime minister borisjohnson says his thoughts are with the family and friends of the victims of the shooting. in the last hour, devon and cornwall police chief constable shaun sawyer gave this briefing. last night police received multiple calls at 6:11am
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to an address in biddick drive. the number of calls were considerable and were assessed and it was later revealed shots were being fired. that is, as i say, came in from multiple calls from the public. officers arrived at the scene within six minutes, including both unarmed and armed officers. it is our understanding and i confirm a man known as jake davison aged 22 had murdered a woman at an address in biddick drive, using a firearm. i will not reveal that address as we are still contacting the members of the family of the lady who has died. we will reveal that address later in more detailfor you. mr davison then left that address, entered biddick drive where he immediately shot and killed a very young girl.
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he also shot and killed the male relative of that girl. this was a truly shocking event, and was witnessed by members of the public. further along biddick drive, he aimed and shot at two local residents, a man and a woman, who have received significant but we understand at present not life—threatening injuries. they are currently being treated at a local hospital, and supported by specialist officers. again there are witnesses to this. from there, mr davison entered adjacent parkland where he immediately shot a man who died at the scene. and thereafter he moved to henderson place where he shot a woman who, despite the best endeavours of first aiders at the scene, later died at derriford hospital. eye witnesses have told us that then mr davison turned the gun upon himself taking his own life.
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they have described that firearm as a pump action shotgun. i can confirm that a firearm has been retrieved from that scene and will be forensically examined. we are not yet describing that as a pump action firearm but clearly as i have said multiple shots had been fired from a firearm during that six minute or so period. there are some 13 scenes and potentially more scenes. overnight you will have heard we evacuated members of the public. that evacuation was primarily to ensure that there were not other persons who had been shot, injured or killed in the neighbouring premises. as i repeat, there were therefore five people of plymouth who have lost their lives overnight, and mr davison himself, including a particularly young child.
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we are not at this time naming the details of those people because not only are we working with the families, but each one of them has wider families throughout the united kingdom, many of those people have work colleagues as well within plymouth and we will want to ensure those businesses as far as possible are supported. the community of plymouth is strong and this morning we have had many meetings with community partners and all of them have commented on the strength of community but the response of the blue light agencies overnight, particularly colleagues from the air ambulance and at derriford hospital, and responding officers, and the councillors at plymouth city council. the police and crime commissioner and home secretary were updated overnight and the police and crime commissioner is here in plymouth this morning.
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i would ask people not to contact police within devon and cornwall unless it is truly now an emergency as we are very, very busy as i am sure you will understand. in respect to this investigation, there is a casualty bureau number of 01752 487880. if anyone has any information about the investigation and i repeat if people are traumatised and they inevitably will be, then to contact that other number. clearly i will take some questions and answer as best i can. if i can't answer, i will explain why and we will seek to answer those questions for you over the coming hours and days. do you know if the gunman had a licence, and what was the motive for the attack? we can confirm mr davison is a firearms licence holder.
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i am not able to confirm whether that was the firearm used. the second question was? the motive? you have ruled out terrorism. there is no motive as we know at present. again that will be subject to inquiry but we are at the moment not considering terrorism or a relationship with any far—right group or any such other group. but clearly he is on social media and that will be passed to the investigation. according to bbc research, more than a third of english councils support policies that could increase carbon emissions despite having declared a "climate emergency". road building and airport expansion are among examples provided by 45 out of 121 questionnaire respondents who say they have passed climate motions. our energy and environment analyst roger harrabin has more. the residue of our consumerist lives. truckload after truckload of stuff we wanted once but want no more.
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our waste generates lots of planet—eating greenhouse gases, but in leeds, they're turning it into something useful. heat. burning waste is controversial, but this giant plant, with its searing temperatures, generates electricity, and provides hot water to warm people's homes through a network of pipes. so we will extract over 100,000 megawatt hours of electricity here and export that to the local area network. over 25,000 megawatt hours of heat energy, which feeds over 2,000 homes and tens of businesses. even the lorries that collect the waste are going electric. leeds has a reputation as one of the uk's greenest cities. but what about this? green leeds wants to expand its airport. even though flying damages the climate. it's extremely difficult to get that balance right, and there are always
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going to be competing factors. if we don't expand, the fear is that somebody else will and that economic growth will go elsewhere. similar economic arguments are made about roads. councils backing road schemes include those in wiltshire, in shropshire, and also in london. even though councillors declared a climate emergency. we need to see changes in government policy and government planning policy so it's actually a legal obligation for every development to be in line with the climate change targets. in leeds, the airport expansion is widely opposed. i don't like it in a certain way because it means that more planes have got to come in. you know, and it's making more pollution. really important, it's the future of everything, isn't it? - if we are not green, - if we are not sustainable, then everything is going to fall apart i guess in the future. - i mean, there's so much fuel used with the aeroplanes, _ there's so much, so many resources required for an airport _ for everybody to fly around. it has to be as green as possible.
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i don't really think about it that much but my grandma goes on about it a lot. what kind of world will we live in in 20 years' time? all these things are happening already, what kind of world will be left for our children and our grandchildren? politicians on the doorstep and around the world are making decisions that will help to determine the future. roger harrabin, bbc news. sandra bell is policy analyst at friends of the earth. how important our councils in the fight against climate change? we have heard the stark warnings this week, there is no time to lose, we had to act now to cut climate emissions. friends of the earth has always said councils are a key part because they have key roles in transport, planning and housing, so it is crucial they play their part in moving to a zero carbon future.
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we know most councils really want to do that, they are trying to develop climate action plans but at the moment they are not backed by the national government. so you heard planning policy, it is to contradictory, so councils do not have the confidence to say no to high carbon developments. that needs to be set in dorset every development has to meet climate targets. aren't they singing from the same hymn sheet with the national government which also has policies that to tackle climate change and targets? there are targets, the policies are not strong enough to meet those targets right now. that is why some councils are struggling to meet their ambitions. we want every council to step up, they need to be
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a part of this. but they need support from government. the leadership from government, for example, roads, the government has set out a budget for £27 billion for new roads, in the middle of a climate emergency where it is vital we cut traffic growth. we need to instead have the government investing in making it saferfor us, for people to cycle, walk, use more reliable public transport. local councils are best placed to make that happen but they need the resourcing and backing from national government. the resourcing is very fragmented, often competitive. so it is hard for councils particularly after a decade of cuts to put these plans into place. so how would you envisage it working because you talk about government setting aside money for local road
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schemes, often money does not end up coming forward because of changes. in an instance where a council is told, we will give you this money for an infrastructure project which we think the community will benefit from, what would you like the council to do? the government has to set up funding for the right actions. it is about enabling councils to put those actions into place. about cutting the need to use cars. sorry to interrupt, you mentioned specifically about the government putting money aside for road expansion for instance. are you saying councils should say, we would like that money but we will spend it on something else, we do not want to use it for the roads as you are telling us to. councils don't always have a choice over what to spend the money on. this is part of the problem, there
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are multiple different pots of money the government might make available to councils for specific things, but there is a lack ofjoining that up to add up to a plan for tackling the climate emergency. so there needs to be clear, long—term funding strategies to enable councils to spend the money in the right way. the good news is if you invest in climate friendly practices, then, it is a boost to our quality of life and potentially to the economy as well. for example, nottingham found they raised money by putting a levy on parking for example. and businesses that were originally against black found it has been good for business to have less congestion, less pollution in the city. we are looking at a win — win situation where investment in climate action can also boost the
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local economy, improve our quality of life, cutting air pollution, increasing green spaces. so it is time for the government to act and sort out it's resorting to councils, and councils to take that action. thank you. the family of a teenager who drowned in loch lomond have pleaded for lessons to be learned from his death. connor markward was one of seven people killed in scotland's waters in a single weekend last month. his loved ones say he was oblivious to the dangers of the deep water. they've been speaking to the bbc�*s connor gillies. loch lomond. these waters may be beautiful, but they can be lethal. a place where memories are made and lives are lost. 16—year—old connor markward was out enjoying the sun three weeks ago with his friends when he drowned. ijust feel it every day, it is... ijust miss him dearly. he was only 16 but he really packed
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so much into his wee life, he really did. he was one in a million. i was just numb. i'll be honest, ijust went numb. i couldn't... i couldn't process it at all. i feel as though my heartjust collapsed. and he was only my brother, my baby brother. yes, so sad, i can't believe he walked out this door and didn't come back in. this was the moment rescue teams on the banks of the loch battled to save connor, one of seven people in a single week last month to be killed in scotland's waters. connor's family want better education on the subject in schools. it would at least make kids aware. think twice about what you're doing. i didn't even know until after connor passed that when you get in difficulty in water, you're just supposed to not panic, and go into a starfish,
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i didn't know that. they're protecting kids from going into buildings that are being pulled down because it is dangerous. what is the difference with water? there are just as many people losing their lives. so what would you like to see happening in schools? i would like there to be talks about swimming, and learning to swim. the royal lifesaving society says it's aware of more than 50 incidents of people losing their lives in uk waters in the last month alone. and that figure could be even higher. officials here on the loch say new life belts and safety equipment is on order in light of recent tragedies. the scottish government — who this week chaired an emergency meeting on improving awareness and protection — said its thoughts are with connor's family and are determined to reduce deaths. connor gillies, bbc news, glasgow. the father of britney spears has agreed to step down as her conservator, after 13 years. the pop star has been mounting a series of legal challenges to the court agreement that
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gave her father control over her estate and other aspects of her life. a lawyer representing britney says it's "another step toward justice". our correspondent barbara plett usher has more. this has been quite a year for britney spears. she finally began to speak out about the arrangement that controls her life. the target of that anger was her father, jamie, the man who became her conservator after she apparently suffered a breakdown 13 years ago. it is a sort of guardian role to handle all of her affairs. during recent court hearings, the singer accused him of using her money for himself and of abusing his power. speaking directly to the judge, she said she wanted more control of her finances and her body. she even alleged that the conservatorship was forcing her to use birth control when she wanted to have a baby. mr spears has also become a focus of angerforfans in the free britney movement. he says the attacks are unjustified and that there are no grounds
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for removing him but that he is now willing to step down to avoid a public battle with his daughter, when the time is right. the singer still can't spend her vast fortune as she pleases. it's likely her father will eventually be replaced by a professional accountant. but her fans and her lawyer are hailing what they see as a vindication of her position and an important step towards setting her free. barbara plett usher, bbc news, los angeles. entertainmentjournalist kj matthews says the move isn't as straightforward as it seems. it's like anything else. you have to read the fine print. you know, a lot of the people in the free britney movement were elated when they heard today that her father, jamie spears, was going to step down from his role as co—conservator, particularly over her finances. but what they didn't realise is that he said he would only step down when there is a smooth transition. in other words, yes, eventually, he will step down, but not right now.
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the next hearing is september the 29th. britney spears's attorney had filed paperwork to try and rush the hearing and speed it up, so to speak, have it a little bit earlier. however, thejudge said no. i think the next hearing, what they'll have to do is all come together and decide kind of what the next step is. immediately she wants to have her father taken off being co—conservator, but ultimately, remember, britney spears wants this conservatorship after 13 years to end. that is her ultimate goal. recently it has been unearthed that the attorney, not the attorney, the judge in the case is now receiving death threats on twitter. so now we have the local sheriff department looking into that. there is so much weirdness in this case, and so many different angles at play. we'lljust have to see what happens and take step—by—step, but, you know, these things take time. you don'tjust end a conservatorship, especially when you haven't had a psychiatric evaluation. there are so many things at play, so even if the
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conservatorship were to end, it probably will not be immediately and it might not even be this year. the british antarctic survey says it doesn't know when scientists can return to one of its research stations. it's because of the danger posed by a giant iceberg that's almost the size of greater london. jonathan amos reports. it was the briefest and gentlest of icy kisses. a colossal iceberg, a74, weighing billions of tonnes, scrapes past a region of the antarctic known as the brunt ice shelf. it was the moment the british antarctic survey had been anticipating for months. the expectation was the berg would knock into and dislodge another vast and unstable piece of ice that is sitting in front of the survey�*s halley research station. we've been tracking the progress of the cracks that will eventually cause it to carve for a long time. when it does eventually go, the fact that it's not attached by a very large section of ice means
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it is quite unlikely to influence the remaining section of the ice shelf, where halley is. the fact that nothing was dislodged this time will be a frustration for the british antarctic survey. until the unstable ice in front of halley comes away, the base must close every winter on safety grounds, and this impacts the world—leading science that can be done at this important location. it's at halley, for example, that they discovered and continue to monitor the hole in the ozone layer. icebergs the size of a74 are impressive, but they are not necessarily an indicator of climate change. the antarctic balances the amount of snow falling on the interior of the continent by routinely discharging blocks of ice at its margins. it is quite hard to know whether we are seeing more at the moment or whether we are just getting better and better satellite data.
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the survey will continue to track a74 and the behaviour of the brunt ice shelf. it is entirely possible the big berg's gentle embrace delivered some unseen damage. if that's the case, the expected breakaway of unstable ice could yet happen in the days ahead. jonathan amos, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. the weekend is almost upon us and the weather is looking a little hit and miss, it will depend where you are going to be over the weekend. some of us will get some rain, not particularly prolonged but wet weather around, but also sunshine in the forecast. right now there is a fair bit of cloud across the country,
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shower clouds across scotland, in places quite overcast in the south, so the best of the weather through friday from lincolnshire, the midlands, northern wales, feeling warmest in one or two spots around 23, so a decent day. notice the showers and an atlantic breeze continuing especially in western and northern scotland. through the night, out towards the south—west we have got this next weather front coming in bringing milderair but it is damp, with grey cloud and mist around coasts. if you live in cornwall and devon, you will be familiar with that weather pattern, that moist south—westerly flow. saturday afternoon, fine weather for much of scotland, glasgow and edinburgh seeing some sunshine. not so bad in the lake district — cloudy. and this weather front stretching across central parts with outbreaks of rain. in the south in the afternoon on saturday it looks as though there will be sunshine. southampton, portsmouth,
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it should not be too bad. saturday, on balance, not a bad day. here is sunday. the low pressure is with us. the weather fronts are over us and again you can see some cloud and rain across northern parts of england, northern ireland, a bit of a breeze as well. it might brighten up across the south. but in scotland on the other hand in the north we have showers coming in on quite a cool northerly wind off the north atlantic. off the norwegian sea. this is what it looks like on monday. that northerly continues, quite a chilly wind. there will be a hint of autumn in the air across parts of northern scotland, it will be quite chilly. whereas in the south, variable amounts of cloud, some spits and spots of rain, but still around 20. lerwick, only 13, aberdeen, 15 on monday. goodbye.
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police have confirmed that a "very young girl" was among the five victims of yesterday's shooting in plymouth. the gunman has been named by police as 22—year—old jake davison, who had a licence for a firearm. we can confirm that mr davison is a licensed firearms holder and we are unable to confirm whether that is the firearm that was used to stop sign when it comes to firearms licensing that is absolutely what the police oversee and clearly i will be asking questions. also this lunchtime... taliban militants have captured afghanistan's second biggest city, kandahar. here, the widow of a british soldier killed serving in afghanistan calls on the british government to help afghan civilians. my husband died to give them a better life.

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