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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 14, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines... labour says there are questions for devon and cornwall police about why it chose to return a shotgun licence to the man who killed five people in plymouth. how on earth did he get a gun licence in the first place? what gran checks were done? i am glad there is the investigation is under way about why it was returned. there are wider questions here. —— what background checks were done? —— what background checks were done? afghanistan's president says his top priority is boosting the armed forces, in his first national address since the taliban stepped up their offensive. translation: our dear country is in dancer of translation: our dear country is in danger of instability _ translation: our dear country is in danger of instability and _ translation: our dear country is in danger of instability and the - danger of instability and the security forces and the stability
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thereof is our top priority and we are taking steps to ensure this. as taliban insurgents continue their advance in afghanistan, us troops prepare for a massive airlift of civilians from kabul. flash flooding in turkey kills at least 31 people — as southern europe records one of the hottest summers ever. the nhs warns that tens of thousands of people are risking their lives in england because they're unable to spot the first warning signs of cancer. and please don't stress the seals. a plea for holiday makers on the northeast coast of england to be more kind and respectful to the bathing mammals. and the dance music fightback after covid. that's in half an hour, here on bbc news.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the independent police watchdog is investigating why the man who shot dead five people in plymouth, before turning the gun on himself, was given back his weapon and permit, after it had been confiscated. jake davison had both his shotgun and permit removed in december, after being accused of assault. last night hundreds of people attended a vigil close to where the shootings took place on thursday. luxmy gopal reports. the search for answers continuous for a community still in shock after a gunman claimed five lives in six minutes. hundreds gathered for a vigil last night to remember the victims. maxine davison, the killer's mother, stephen washington, kate sheperd, lee martyn, and his daughter sophie,
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who was just three years old. today, people kept arriving to pay tribute, with local shops running out of flowers. it is just frightening, it is just a terrible thing to have happened. it isjust devastating. it has devastated a community and shocked so many people. it is just a very dark day- for the community and it will be for weeks and months to come. basically, you know, . it isjust sad, very sad. forensic teams and officers have continued their investigations throughout the day. the force is itself being investigated by the iopc, the police watchdog, which is looking into how much was known about the killer's mental health and into the circumstances around his firearms licence. devon and cornwall police returned jake davison�*s shotgun and licence last month after they confiscated them in december last year following an alleged assault. meanwhile, support is being offered to those who need it. victim support are on hand
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to help with those that have been traumatised. the local churches and schools have opened up and that was yesterday and i visited those, with lots of community workers and third sector that are very much there to listen and help and assist with regards to what has been a devastating blow to plymouth and the local community in keyham. the five victims will be remembered with a service on wednesday led by the bishop of plymouth and a minutes�*s silence at 11 o'clock on a monday morning as people here try to come to terms with the violence that has shattered their normally peaceful neighbourhood. and luxmyjoins us now live from keyham. first — we understand the home secretary has paid her respects to the victims of this attack. what has she been saying? that is riuht. a what has she been saying? that is right- a little _ what has she been saying? that is right. a little while _ what has she been saying? that is right. a little while ago, _ what has she been saying? that is right. a little while ago, the - what has she been saying? that is right. a little while ago, the home secretary arrived here on a private visit and came to lay flowers at the
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scene of the mass shooting not far from here, at the park beyond those houses there. it was the scene of the vigil last night. she was joined by the chief constable of devon and cornwall police who also played a floral tribute stop she also spoke to members of the local neighbourhood watch team. what she did not do is answer questions from a bbc colleague about gun control and she was also joined by the local labour leader luke ballard, who said local people who want and need answers to questions about the possession of the shotgun. answers to questions about the possession of the shotgun. you've been speaking to people in this community left shaken by this attack — what have they been saying to you? that is right. this is the kind of community where everyone knows everyone. even for those who didn't know the victims or victims of�* families, the shock and grief is still so raw. people we spoke to
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this morning broke down in tears talking to us and people have continued coming along to place tributes down and even those who didn't, they came along and on some occasions stop to silently pay their respects and observe the tributes that have been placed. remembering the victims will also be happening in a more formal way with flags flying at half—mast in official buildings around plymouth and memorials continue to take place, including a minutes�*s silence on monday morning to remember them. including a minutes�*s silence on monday morning to remember them. well, the labour leader, sir keir starmer, has said it's important to urgently find out how the plymouth gunman was allowed a firearms licence. speaking in the past few hours, he also said more needs to be done to tackle and prevent incel culture on the internet. we're seeing further evidence of an extreme misogynist ideology,
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which is riddled with hatred and in some cases incitement to violence. wherever there is incitement to violence, that has got to be taken seriously. i do think that the terrorist laws in terms of prosecuting those that have been arrested need to be changed. we have got strong powers. we can bring successful terrorist prosecutions, i have been involved in many of them myself when i was director of public prosecutions. ——i do not think. where i would look in this case is the online element of this and the online harms bill has been promised for a very long time. now, in a tragic situation like plymouth, i don't want to get too party political about this but i do urge the government to bring forward the online harms bill because the prosecution side that i do think is adequately covered, the preventative side not so much.
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let us sir keir starmer speaking a short time ago. let us sir keir starmer speaking a short time ago. —— that was sir keir starmer. as part of their investigation — police are looking at jake davison�*s social media accounts — where he posted a series of hate—filled rants about women, and made references to �*incels' in social media videos. incel stands for involuntary celibate — which is known for its misogyny and hostility to women. let's discuss this in more detail with matt dryden — an independent analyst on radicalisation and terrorism — he previously worked as an officer for the government's prevent programme. thank you forjoining us here. i don't know if you heard what sir keir starmer had to say there. do you agree with him? it is about monitoring and policing the internet. ., ,. ., , monitoring and policing the internet. . , . ., , ., , internet. that is certainly a big art of internet. that is certainly a big part of this _ internet. that is certainly a big part of this issue. _ internet. that is certainly a big part of this issue. the - internet. that is certainly a big part of this issue. the incel- part of this issue. the incel communities dominantly active online and that is its main domain. there have been calls for ways we can
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prevent such propaganda and the access to the type of information that incel gather and are inspired by, and the better that will prevent any acts of violence in reality. that is possible. that is. that is certainly something but the issue is much wider than that. so certainly something but the issue is much wider than that.— much wider than that. so this is our much wider than that. so this is your area _ much wider than that. so this is your area of _ much wider than that. so this is your area of speciality, - much wider than that. so this is i your area of speciality, specialism, what does and incel say to you? should we be concerned? irate what does and incel say to you? should we be concerned? we should be concerned. should we be concerned? we should be concerned- just — should we be concerned? we should be concerned. just like _ should we be concerned? we should be concerned. just like any _ should we be concerned? we should be concerned. just like any other _ concerned. just like any other extremist ideology, whether it is islamist extremism or far right extremism, the ideology poses a significant threat, both to people, vulnerable young people, in the way that they become obsessed by such
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ideologies and that limits their own life chances potentially if they go down the road... life chances potentially if they go down the road. . ._ life chances potentially if they go down the road... could i stop you there? what _ down the road... could i stop you there? what is _ down the road... could i stop you there? what is the _ down the road... could i stop you there? what is the ideology - down the road... could i stop you there? what is the ideology of. down the road... could i stop you there? what is the ideology of a l there? what is the ideology of a incel? it there? what is the ideology of a incel? , ,, ., , ., incel? it is essentially an antifeminist _ incel? it is essentially an antifeminist and - incel? it is essentially an i antifeminist and misogynist subculture and the idea is that they have a right to women and sex and by rejecting them, they are essentially __ by rejecting them, they are essentially —— by women denying men, it is essentially then denying men there right. essentially then denying men there riuht. , essentially then denying men there riiht. , ., essentially then denying men there riuht. , ., ., , right. does that mean eight is tarueted right. does that mean eight is targeted towards _ right. does that mean eight is targeted towards women? - right. does that mean eight is targeted towards women? it i right. does that mean eight is - targeted towards women? it does, rimaril targeted towards women? it does, primarily women — targeted towards women? it does, primarily women are _ targeted towards women? it does, primarily women are the _ targeted towards women? it does, primarily women are the targets i targeted towards women? it does, primarily women are the targets of that aggression and violence, but it can also be men that incels to be alpha males, men who they perceive
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to be successful when it comes to romance and sexual relationships because that is what incels envy. to me and most people, that would be a man, take it as that, terrorising a woman. that is a terrorist act, isn't it? ., , woman. that is a terrorist act, isn't it? . , . ., isn't it? that is the dictionary definition. _ isn't it? that is the dictionary definition. if— isn't it? that is the dictionary definition. if you _ isn't it? that is the dictionary definition. if you look - isn't it? that is the dictionary definition. if you look at - isn't it? that is the dictionary definition. if you look at the l definition. if you look at the definition, if you're talking about violence or the threat of violence for political or ideological or religious purposes, certainly the vast majority of us working within this field fully acknowledge incel as an ideology. so in theory, it would fit the definition of terrorism. there is a whole debate around the definition of terrorism. said, misogyny, do you think that is taken seriously enough these days? —— so, misogyny. i taken seriously enough these days? -- so. misogyny-— -- so, misogyny. i think the authorities _ -- so, misogyny. i think the authorities these _ -- so, misogyny. i think the authorities these days - -- so, misogyny. i think the authorities these days do i -- so, misogyny. i think the l authorities these days do take -- so, misogyny. i think the i authorities these days do take it seriously. i think incel and the
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ideology in general is absolutely taken seriously and is on the radar of the authorities. whether you look at individuals referred to prevent, for example, who might have an element of their ideology related to misogyny or incel culture, whether it is people who discuss perpetrating act of violence and have an element of misogynistic antifeminist hate within it. the issueis antifeminist hate within it. the issue is that other forms of extremism such as islamist extremism and far right extremism, we have a wealth of experience of dealing with those, and identifying them and responding to them, whereas incel ideology, the violent misogyny that underpins most of it, is much newer to us, certainly in... but
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underpins most of it, is much newer to us, certainly in...— to us, certainly in... but you said it is on the _ to us, certainly in... but you said it is on the government's - to us, certainly in... but you said it is on the government's radar. i to us, certainly in... but you said i it is on the government's radar. you work in prevent, and what sort of examples of incels did you come across and what is the government, if it is on their radar, doing about it? monitoring it for a start? like i said, it? monitoring it for a start? like i said. prevent — it? monitoring it for a start? l age: i said, prevent receives referrals from people who are on the periphery of involvement within incel culture or ideology and like any other extremist ideology, people referred to prevent will be asked to step away from that ideology and help preventing those ways of thinking. the government is aware of it and it is on their radar, and the government needs, as well as society as a whole, to better understand what this ideology is and what it looks like, because the more people we can have referred to prevent for
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signs of incel ideology, we can support and prevent acts of violence further down the line, which is really important. for further down the line, which is really important.— further down the line, which is really important. for many people, like ou really important. for many people, like you said. _ really important. for many people, like you said, this _ really important. for many people, like you said, this will— really important. for many people, like you said, this will be _ really important. for many people, like you said, this will be new i really important. for many people, like you said, this will be new to i like you said, this will be new to them, this idea of a incel. is it a particular... you said it was the alpha male and men who are struggling to have relationships with women, how do you begin to sort that out? because a woman would say, well, that is not my problem. this must be sorted out with the men. yes, absolutely, and much of this comes back to where this ideology originates. so does this originate from intergenerational perceptions of women? is it normalised online? and we must really be clear that the
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kind of violent misogynistic antifeminist hate in society is incredibly dangerous and we need to fight this ideology in a similar way we do with muslim extremism or far right extremism.— we do with muslim extremism or far right extremism. thank you very much for that. the headlines on bbc news... labour says there are questions for devon and cornwall police about why it chose to return a shotgun licence to the man who killed five people in plymouth. afghanistan's president says his top priority is boosting the armed forces, in his first national address since the taliban stepped up their offensive. flash flooding in turkey kills at least 31 people — as southern europe records one of the hottest summers ever. the taliban are now in control of most of the northern region
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of afghanistan and almost half of the country's regional capitals, as their swift takeover of territory continues. the capital of logar province, puli alam, fell to militants this morning. it is just a0 miles south of the capital kabul. heavy fighting also continues in the city of mazar—i—sharif. it comes as british troops have been flown out in order to safely airlift british citizens from the country. our diplomatic correspondent caroline hawley reports. the taliban hoist their flag on the gates of kandahar, afghanistan's second largest city. the speed of their advance has left the afghan government reeling and millions of afghan people in terror and dread. as the militants now close in on the capital, kabul, the beleaguered president ashraf ghani gave a televised address. translation: in the current| situation, the re-mobilisation of our security and defence forces is our top priority
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and serious steps are being taken in this regard. but in many areas, it is too late. the man on the right, one of the most prominent local commanders fighting for the government, nicknamed because of his fearsome reputation the lion of herat. but he and his city, afghanistan's third largest, are now firmly in taliban hands. the humanitarian crisis is growing by the day. tens of thousands of people have bought into kabul to escape the fighting. now people who can afford to leave are scrambling to get out. i'm afraid of being killed. like, i am totally sure that i am not going to survive here. the uk lost a54 lives in afghanistan before pulling out a few weeks ago at the end of an almost 20 year mission. but this weekend, 600 troops will fly back into the country to take british nationals out. the americans are doing the same, leaving many afghans are feeling abandoned by the world. caroline hawley, bbc news.
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secunder kermani is in afghanistan and was listening to the president's address. well, everyone was waiting to hear what the president would say. it is the first time he has addressed the nation after this really unprecedented advance by the taliban. everyone has been left pretty much astonished by the pace and the scale of the militant�*s push across the country, taking out around half of all the provincial capitals here. president ghani, in a short pre—recorded message today, said it was his priority to re—mobilise the security forces and prevent further instability. there had been speculation yesterday, even this morning, that perhaps he would announce his resignation.
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that certainly doesn't seem to be the case. but what is also missing for the moment at least from the public debate is any kind of real indication of what president ashraf ghani and his team can do to reverse the situation. the more and more people look at the way things are developing here in afghanistan, the government's position is seeming to be increasingly untenable. the taliban taking control of another city just a short distance away from kabul earlier today. many fear it is only a matter of time before they eventually push in on kabul, though for the moment my sources tell me that the taliban want to wait, they want to see if kabul can be handed over peacefully to them, a surrender of sorts. we have seen that actually happen in number of other provincial capitals where security forces have been approached by influential tribal elders, community leaders who have said, "look, the game is basically over. "spare the civilian population from becoming caught in the middle "of protracted fighting and retreat." the taliban seems to
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want that to happen, but president ghani and his team are digging in and so there is real uncertainty here in the capital about what the future is going to bring. to turkey now, and just as crews battled to bring wildfires under control, devastating floods have swept through northern parts of the country. reports say a0 people have died, and president erdogan has declared a disaster zone in flood—hit regions. tanya dendrinos reports. vehicles tossed in the torrent. this terrifying eyewitness footage captured the scene in northern turkey just days ago. roads turned to rivers and buildings simply crumbled. and this is the aftermath, a mangled heap of mud, debris and belongings. translation: i went out and all of a sudden i floodwaters gushed behind me. i couldn't look back, it swallowed homes, people, everything. president erdogan visited here on friday declaring flood—hit regions along the black sea
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coast disaster areas. translation: we cannot bring back people who lost their lives _ but our state has the power, opportunity and determination to compensate for any loss other than that. a mammoth search and rescue operation is now under way, more than 1700 people have been evacuated and hundreds of villagers have been left without power. turkey's interior ministry labelling the situation as the worst flood disaster he has ever seen. this on the back of wildfires in the south of country and across the mediterranean in a week a un climate report sounded a code red for humanity. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. july has been confirmed as the world's hottest month ever recorded
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by us government scientists. data shows that the combined land and ocean surface temperature last month was nearly one degree celsius hotter than the 20th century average. the new head of the nhs in england says she fears tens of thousands of people are are risking their lives because they're unable to spot the first warning signs of cancer. research also suggests three in five people would delay seeking medical advice because they don't want to be a burden during the pandemic. 0ur health correspondent anna collinson reports. cancer services are back to pre—pandemic levels and are busy, but nhs england says over the past year there has been a 10% drop in cancer patients receiving treatment. we know that people are out there and we are worried they may have symptoms and not be coming forward, so the purpose of this campaign is to highlight those symptoms, to make sure people are aware of what is normal and what's not normal
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for them, and to come forward if they need help. just, you've said it too. health officials are particularly concerned about abdominal, neurological and lung cancers, as this new advert shows, symptoms can include discomfort in the stomach, blood and urine, persistent diarrhoea or a cough that lasts longer than three weeks. it was a gp who first detected declan�*s kidney cancer eight years ago. he is now a patient at this urology clinic at guy's hospital in london, and is mostly able to live a normal life. if there is something bothering you, it may not be something serious but it is absolutely worth getting it checked out, you know? and i know that you can go to your gp. i think some people think that these things aren't happening now, but they are. the earlier cancers are detected, the more likely it is that we can treat them effectively. if a patient spots a possible symptom, the nhs as it is
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——says it is ready to help. anna collinson, bbc news. andy thompson was diagnosed with stage two bowel cancel in december last year. hejoins me now from essex. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. first of all, how are you? i am fine, thank you. i would like to highlight the importance of not living in denial. if you notice anything strange or unusual, with your bowel movements or pain in your stomach, please go and see a doctor. what was your story? did you heed your own advice and go straight to your own advice and go straight to your doctor or did you leave it for a bit? :, :, , :, :, a bit? unfortunately i left it for a coule of a bit? unfortunately i left it for a couple of months. _ a bit? unfortunately i left it for a couple of months. i _ a bit? unfortunately i left it for a couple of months. i lived - a bit? unfortunately i left it for a couple of months. i lived in i a bit? unfortunately i left it for a l couple of months. i lived in denial and thought it could be the food i
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was eating. eventually, last november i had an appointment with my doctor and she booked me in for a colonoscopy straightaway. it is uncomfortable _ colonoscopy straightaway. it is uncomfortable as _ colonoscopy straightaway. it is uncomfortable as a _ colonoscopy straightaway. it is uncomfortable as a conversation —— it is an uncomfortable conversation to have your doctor. what did you say to her? i to have your doctor. what did you say to her?— say to her? i told her the truth. last say to her? i told her the truth. last three _ say to her? i told her the truth. last three or — say to her? i told her the truth. last three or four _ say to her? i told her the truth. last three or four months i say to her? i told her the truth. last three or four months there say to her? i told her the truth. i last three or four months there has been blood in my. that is the truth of it. : :, , :, been blood in my. that is the truth ofit. : :, :, of it. and that is a conversation man do of it. and that is a conversation many do not — of it. and that is a conversation many do not want _ of it. and that is a conversation many do not want to _ of it. and that is a conversation many do not want to have. i of it. and that is a conversation | many do not want to have. what happened then? i many do not want to have. what happened then?— happened then? i had the colonoscopy, _ happened then? i had the colonoscopy, there i happened then? i had the colonoscopy, there was i happened then? i had the colonoscopy, there was a | happened then? i had the i colonoscopy, there was a further scan and then from that scan, they saw that i had a tumour and within a week i was chatting to my surgeon about having it removed. i had stage to bowel cancer, so i was very fortunate that i went when i did and it was not stage 304. what fortunate that i went when i did and it was not stage 304.— it was not stage 304. what went throu . h it was not stage 304. what went through your _
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it was not stage 304. what went through your mind _ it was not stage 304. what went through your mind when - it was not stage 304. what went through your mind when you i it was not stage 304. what went l through your mind when you were it was not stage 304. what went i through your mind when you were told you had a tumour? i through your mind when you were told you had a tumour?— you had a tumour? i was in shock and m wife you had a tumour? i was in shock and my wife just — you had a tumour? i was in shock and my wife just cried _ you had a tumour? i was in shock and my wife just cried her _ you had a tumour? i was in shock and my wife just cried her eyes _ you had a tumour? i was in shock and my wife just cried her eyes out. i you had a tumour? i was in shock and my wife just cried her eyes out. but l my wife just cried her eyes out. but the surgeon, she gave me, she was positive and said i could get through this and within ten days, i was in the hospital and i had the tumour removed. liid was in the hospital and i had the tumour removed.— was in the hospital and i had the tumourremoved. , :, :, , tumour removed. did you at any point wor that tumour removed. did you at any point worry that you — tumour removed. did you at any point worry that you wouldn't _ tumour removed. did you at any point worry that you wouldn't get _ tumour removed. did you at any point worry that you wouldn't get the i worry that you wouldn't get the treatment because we are in a pandemic? did that go through your mind? , :, :, , , pandemic? did that go through your mind? , :, , :, :, :, mind? yes, and i was very aware of covid and especially _ mind? yes, and i was very aware of covid and especially in _ mind? yes, and i was very aware of covid and especially in southend i mind? yes, and i was very aware of| covid and especially in southend and the tight restrictions we had over? spent, where i my? in hospital, but i was very aware. —— i spent my christmas in hospital. fortunately, i was seen very quickly. for
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christmas in hospital. fortunately, i was seen very quickly.— i was seen very quickly. for other cancer patients _ i was seen very quickly. for other cancer patients who _ i was seen very quickly. for other cancer patients who are _ i was seen very quickly. for other cancer patients who are waiting i i was seen very quickly. for other. cancer patients who are waiting for treatment or for those listening to this going, i mightjust have that conversation, once you were in hospital, what was the treatment like? rememberthat hospital, what was the treatment like? remember that the protocols were very strong and they were keeping their eye on protecting patients, what was it like? did you feel safe? i patients, what was it like? did you feel safe? , :, , feel safe? i felt very safe. i was in a green _ feel safe? i felt very safe. i was in a green ward _ feel safe? i felt very safe. i was in a green ward on _ feel safe? i felt very safe. i was in a green ward on top - feel safe? i felt very safe. i was in a green ward on top of i feel safe? i felt very safe. i was in a green ward on top of the i feel safe? i felt very safe. i was i in a green ward on top of the tower block and i was... the nurses and doctors, they looked after me so well in such an unusual situation. we had no visitors, they were always cleaning, everyone was wearing masks, it was an unusual time to be in hospital. masks, it was an unusual time to be in hospital-— in hospital. your final message, you started off with _ in hospital. your final message, you started off with a _ in hospital. your final message, you started off with a fairly _ in hospital. your final message, you started off with a fairly strong i started off with a fairly strong message to people to get checked out, but your final message to people who are holding back perhaps. you know how the british are, don't
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want to be a burden.— you know how the british are, don't want to be a burden. believe me, you won't be a burden _ want to be a burden. believe me, you won't be a burden if— want to be a burden. believe me, you won't be a burden if you _ want to be a burden. believe me, you won't be a burden if you get - want to be a burden. believe me, you won't be a burden if you get it - won't be a burden if you get it sorted out quickly, better than leaving it. i'm sure the nhs are happy to help. leaving it. i'm sure the nhs are happy to help-— leaving it. i'm sure the nhs are happy to help. leaving it. i'm sure the nhs are ham to hel, , :, :, 4' :, :, happy to help. great to know you are doinu so happy to help. great to know you are doing so well— happy to help. great to know you are doing so well and _ happy to help. great to know you are doing so well and thank— happy to help. great to know you are doing so well and thank you - happy to help. great to know you are doing so well and thank you very i doing so well and thank you very much. :, ~ i. doing so well and thank you very much-_ andy - doing so well and thank you very i much._ andy thompson, much. thank you. andy thompson, bowel cancer _ much. thank you. andy thompson, bowel cancer survivor. _ every year, thousands of tourists visit the coastline of yorkshire to see the colonies of seals that live there, but a surge in visitor numbers could be putting them under threat. conservationists say people are getting too close to the animals and causing distress. here's our environment correspondent, paul murphy. yorkshire's seal population is one of the wonders of the east coast but it is under threat. the biggest impact is coming from human disturbance.
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selfies on the shoreline or perhaps just dogs that are brought too close. predominantly what is happening to the seals is they will have a fight or flight response, they will perceive the human as a threat and try to escape that threat. we have seen a massive prevalence of humans try to seek out those encounters so rather than being anecdotal, there are people actively out walking to pursue them. this is what can happen, it is known as a seals stampede, they injure themselves as they try to safely cross the rocky shore line. even from a distance they can find humans intimidating. you don't realise you're quite far from them for them to be like that, yeah. i didn't think they would be that sensitive to us - being 200 metres from them. the surge of visitors to this coast has meant extra policing has been put in place to safeguard birds, whales and dolphins from irresponsible water users, but conservationists have now
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launched an online petition to get specific legal protection for the seal colonies. so where you have whales, dolphins and porpoises, seals are separate from that. so whilst the former are protected from harassment and reckless disturbance, seals are not so we are trying to change the law here in the uk, or particularly england and wales. government funded awareness campaigns are trying to get the message across but the stark reality is that if the disturbances continue, experts believe the seal population could actually start to decline. paul murphy, bbc news, on the east yorkshire coast. now it's time for a look at the weather with alina jenkins. hello. this band of cloud and rain pushing 0verton to northern ireland, wales, parts of northern england. breaks in the cloud wasn't and the best across
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south billy mcneill is angry and south—east england.

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