Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 14, 2021 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

5:00 pm
this is bbc news — with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a major earthquake hits haiti measured at 7.2 magnitude — the us geological survey warns of widespread disaster. the haitian prime minister says the earthquake has caused several deaths. with fighting reported within a0 kilometres of kabul, the afghan president addresses the nation. translation: our dear country, afghanistan, is in serious - danger of instability. the reintegration of the security and defence forces is our priority and we are taking serious measures to deal with this. in the uk — there are questions for police, about why it chose to return a shotgun licence
5:01 pm
to the man who killed five people in the uk's worst mass shooting since 2010. the nhs warns that tens of thousands of people are risking their lives in england because they're unable to spot the first warning signs of cancer. and a major us study says july was the world's hottest month ever recorded. and — please don't stress the seals. a plea for holiday makers on the north—east coast of england. to be more kind and respectful to the bathing mammals. welcome to bbc news.
5:02 pm
a large earthquake has hit haiti, prompting fears that many people have been killed. local authorities have acknowledged a number of deaths, but don't yet have an exact figure. the haitian prime minister says the quake caused �*several�* deaths in various parts of haiti. this map has been released by the us geological survey — with the location of the 7.2 magnitude quake — 150 km west of the capital port—au—prince, close to saint louis de sud. the survey has issued a red alert for fatalities, saying that high casualties are probable and disaster is likely widespread. pictures on social media show collapsed buildings and damaged roads.
5:03 pm
in 2010, a magnitude seven quake killed an estimated 200,000 people. 0ur correspondent david willis has been following events. hello david. so what are you hearing from where you are? you ru much closer to this?— closer to this? yes, well, the epicentre _ closer to this? yes, well, the epicentre of _ closer to this? yes, well, the epicentre of this _ closer to this? yes, well, the epicentre of this earthquake l closer to this? yes, well, the l epicentre of this earthquake is closer to this? yes, well, the - epicentre of this earthquake is said to be 18 miles west of the capital, haitian capital port—au—prince and thatis haitian capital port—au—prince and that is in a fairly remote area. that i suppose is good news, in the sense that it lessons the number of fatalities because it is not in an urban area but the bad news is was a larger and deeper earthquake than the one that you mentioned back in 2010 which destroyed much of the capital, and it is thought to have claimed the lives of more than 200,000 people. now there are
5:04 pm
pictures on social media of rubble in the streets, of cars destroyed, and there are reports that people have heard cries for help, from the rubble in various places round the epicentre of the earthquake, there is no official numbers as far as casualties or deaths are concerned but the us geological survey who you mentioned in your introduction has said that possibly thousands of people have died and tens of thousands may have been injured in this latest quake. i thousands may have been in'ured in this latest quake.�* this latest quake. i mean as you were saying _ this latest quake. i mean as you were saying there, _ this latest quake. i mean as you were saying there, davis, - this latest quake. i mean as you were saying there, davis, it - this latest quake. i mean as you were saying there, davis, it is i this latest quake. i mean as you i were saying there, davis, it is the memorieses of 2010, i mean you have to look on social media and people are already, you know, the trauma is still there, the country is still trying to recover, mine it has been a really terrible ten, 11 years for the, for haiti. it a really terrible ten, 11 years for the, for haiti.— the, for haiti. it really is, this is a very _
5:05 pm
the, for haiti. it really is, this is a very luckless _ the, for haiti. it really is, this is a very luckless part - the, for haiti. it really is, this is a very luckless part of - the, for haiti. it really is, this is a very luckless part of the l is a very luckless part of the world, it has been buffeted by humanitarian crises, but natural disaster, by political turbulence, you mentioned the assassination last month of the former president. well, there is also the forecast of a tropical storm, would you believe, thatis tropical storm, would you believe, that is due the hilt haiti early next week. this is a part of the world that really you think can't get a break, and they were, of course,st ill in the process of rebuilding following that 2010 quake when this one, this latest one struck earlier today. 0k, we are leave it there for now, i know you are monitor this for us from the us, thank you. haiti has been hit by what has been described as a strong, a major eric. it was a 7.2 magnitude quake, there
5:06 pm
had been earlier measurements of up to 7.6 by the european mediterranean size logical centre but it has been reported at 7.2 at a depth of ten kilometre, there are early reports of some death, some damage to buildings and some damage also to the roads, and the devastation of that 2010 earthquake really fresh in the minds of haitian, just a quick reminder, that was only, if you can say only, but that was a seven magnitude earthquake. more than 200,000 people died in that. the country still recovering from that. the government of qatar, which is mediating talks involving the afghan government and the taliban, has called on the militants to stop their offensive. but taliban have continued to seize more territory across afghanistan, moving closer to kabul. heavy fighting has broken out in the afghan city of mazar—i—sharif, the afghan
5:07 pm
government's last major city in the north. we are also hearing that the taliban have seized control of the capital cities of two other provinces today. meanwhile, the afghan president, ashraf ghani, has spoken publicly for the first time since the taliban intensified their latest offensive. in a televised address to the nation, he described the "remobilization of armed forces" as his top priority. translation: our dear country, afghanistan, is in severe - danger of instability. 2010 earthquake really fresh in the minds of haitian, just a quick reminder, that was only, if you can say only, but that was a seven magnitude earthquake. more than 200,000 people died in that. the country still recovering from that. i offer my condolences to the martyrs of the security forces and
5:08 pm
civilian, and wish the injured people a speedy recovery. 0ur effort is to take care of our compatriots who have been displaced due the situation. i appreciate the courage of the afghan security and defence forces, who have a strong spirit to defend their people, and their country. right now the reintegration of the security and defence forces is our priority, and we are taking serious measures to deal with this. sir nicholas kay was the nato's senior civilian representative to afghanistan for a year to may 2020, and also the uk's ambassador in kabul between 2017 and 2018. sir nicholas thank you forjoining us on bbc news. first in response it's thes first time we have heard from president ashraf ghani. what do you think of his priorities being the afghan forces and how do wow think he will do that?— the afghan forces and how do wow think he will do that? thank you for havin: think he will do that? thank you for
5:09 pm
having me- — think he will do that? thank you for having me- i— think he will do that? thank you for having me. i heard _ think he will do that? thank you for having me. i heard another - think he will do that? thank you for having me. i heard another priority| having me. i heard another priority from president ashraf ghani as well, which was very much about avoiding further bloodshed and destruction, particularly in kabul and i think thatis particularly in kabul and i think that is absolutely the priority now, time needs to be won, and time can be won by continuing to support the afghan force, including us support for them, afghan force, including us support forthem, but afghan force, including us support for them, but time for a political settlement, the urgency for that is clear qatar as you say is hosting talk, those showed proceed quickly and seriously, all the regional powers should be involved. there needs to be time for a political settlement and time for a proper management of this, to avoid a humanitarian disaster in kabul. the taliban don't want to give up any time do they?— taliban don't want to give up any time do the ? ., ., , time do they? taliban have the, they have the wind — time do they? taliban have the, they have the wind in _ time do they? taliban have the, they have the wind in their _ time do they? taliban have the, they have the wind in their sail, _ time do they? taliban have the, they have the wind in their sail, they - have the wind in their sail, they are rushing helter—skelter down hill
5:10 pm
but they need to apply the brakes because they are rushing down into something that is not in is their interest, there will be a crash at the end of it. they will crash into the end of it. they will crash into the reality of a divided afghanistan, where they are are not welcome by significant constituencies across the country. going into a crash of international isolation, that has been clearly signalled and they are going into taking responsibility for a huge humanitarian case load and disaster for which they are not equipped to deal. d0 for which they are not equipped to deal. ,., , for which they are not equipped to deal. , ., , ., deal. do they really care about international— deal. do they really care about international isolation? - deal. do they really care about international isolation? do - deal. do they really care about| international isolation? do they really care about that? and also do they really care about afghans? we know how and we have seen how they are treated, we spoke recently to an afghan member in doha, and you know, he described how those who broke their rules were treated, and we know how they treat women, so, if they don't agree to a peace deal,
5:11 pm
why should they? there is no threat to their existence?— to their existence? there are those within the taliban _ to their existence? there are those within the taliban who _ to their existence? there are those within the taliban who have - within the taliban who have experienced the effects of international isolation after 1996 and they are wise enough to know that that is not something that they should be repeating or need to repeat or want to repeat, so there is possibility, but i absolutely agree, time is desperately short, the momentum is clearly with the taliban, but they need to pause, they need to apply the brakes and all of those with influence on them need to be saying the same thing, the situation needs to be managed. and who would be the alternative? ? if the taliban isn't there, because already people are questioning the legitimacy of president ashraf ghani. i legitimacy of president ashraf ghanl ~ . legitimacy of president ashraf ghani. ~' ., ., , ghani. i think we have to be absolutely _ ghani. i think we have to be absolutely clear _ ghani. i think we have to be absolutely clear that - ghani. i think we have to be absolutely clear that the - ghani. i think we have to be - absolutely clear that the taliban will be a major political factor in the future immediately of afghanistan. there is no doubt. but
5:12 pm
they are not the only constituency, they are not the only constituency, they are not the only religious or ethnic group in the country too and the only success for afghanistan can be an inclusive political settlement that brings together all the stakeholders, and the taliban know they cannot impose their will. they didn't up until 2001 run the whole country, but these are desperate time, the humanitarian situation concerns me enormously, 5.5 million people were food insecure before this offensive started and so it is only worse now, particularly with internally displaced people. there need to be a concerted international un led effort for a humanitarian response and that also requires a pause now, in the fighting. fine response and that also requires a pause now, in the fighting. one of the thin . s pause now, in the fighting. one of the things the _ pause now, in the fighting. one of the things the we _ pause now, in the fighting. one of the things the we are _ pause now, in the fighting. one of the things the we are hearing, - pause now, in the fighting. one of the things the we are hearing, sir| the things the we are hearing, sir nicholas, is the concerns regarding women, and the treatment of women. so as well as the humanitarian concern, that you have laid out there, obviously it is human rights as well. we are talking about about.
5:13 pm
you have worked in afghanistan. i wonder if you could explain to us why do the taliban have a problem with women? i why do the taliban have a problem with women?— why do the taliban have a problem with women? i had the privilege of bein: a uk with women? i had the privilege of being a uk ambassador _ with women? i had the privilege of being a uk ambassador before - with women? i had the privilege of being a uk ambassador before i i being a uk ambassador before i retired. i am being a uk ambassador before i retired. iam not being a uk ambassador before i retired. i am not a spokesperson for the taliban you would have to ask them. but it is well documented their period up until 2001 their treatment of women infringed all international standards and norms, and the world has changed, the taliban may not have changed, but they have to realise that the world has changed everyone since the mid 90s, there is now robust accountability for war crimes for crimes against humanity and also for international criminal actions too, and that needs to be factored in too. ~ , . , and that needs to be factored in too. g ., , , ., , and that needs to be factored in too. g ,., , too. my last question, very quickly is how long — too. my last question, very quickly is how long do _ too. my last question, very quickly is how long do you _ too. my last question, very quickly is how long do you think _ too. my last question, very quickly is how long do you think is - too. my last question, very quickly is how long do you think is going i too. my last question, very quickly| is how long do you think is going to take to solve. the other question a lot of people are asking is who on
5:14 pm
earth funds the taliban? the taliban receive their — earth funds the taliban? the taliban receive their money _ earth funds the taliban? the taliban receive their money from _ earth funds the taliban? the taliban receive their money from a - earth funds the taliban? the taliban receive their money from a lot - earth funds the taliban? the taliban receive their money from a lot of. receive their money from a lot of sources, a lot of it criminal, whether it is extortion or linked to the drugs trade or other sources, but, how long is this going to go on? as i say, i hope that there will be a pause, and wise heads will prepail and those with influence upon the taliban will help to achieve that, so there can be a managed political transition that takes place. and that is within the next hours and days, i think, really, we are talking about. thank ou ve really, we are talking about. thank you very much _ really, we are talking about. thank you very much for _ really, we are talking about. thank you very much for your— really, we are talking about. thank you very much for your reflections | you very much for your reflections and analysis. in the uk — the independent police watchdog is investigating why the man who shot dead 5 people in plymouth, before turning the gun on himself, was given back his weapon and permit, after it had been confiscated. jake davison had both his shotgun and permit removed in december, after being accused of assault. last night hundreds of people attended a vigil close
5:15 pm
to where the shootings took place on thursday. luxmy gopal reports. the search for answers continues for a community still in shock after a gunman claimed five lives in six minutes. hundreds gathered for a vigil last night to remember the victims. maxine davison, the killer's mother, stephen washington, kate shepherd, lee martyn, and his daughter sophie, who was just three years old. today, people kept arriving to pay tribute, with local shops running out of flowers. it is just frightening, it is just a terrible it isjust devastating. it has devastated a community and shocked so many people. it is just a very dark day- for the community and it will be basically, you know, . it isjust sad, very sad.
5:16 pm
forensic teams and officers have continued their investigations throughout the day. the force is itself being investigated by the iopc, the police watchdog, which is looking into how much was known about the killer's mental health and into the circumstances around his firearms licence. devon and cornwall police returned jake davison's shotgun and licence last month after they confiscated them in december last year following an alleged assault. meanwhile, support is being offered to those who need it. victim support are on hand to help with those that have been traumatised. the local churches and schools have opened up and that was yesterday and i visited those, with lots of community workers and third sector that are very much there to listen and help and assist with regards to what has been a devastating blow to plymouth and the local community in keyham. the five victims will be remembered with a service on wednesday led by the bishop of plymouth and a minutes�*s silence at 11
5:17 pm
o'clock on monday morning as people in keyham try to come to terms with the violence that has shattered their normally peaceful neighbourhood. the headlines on bbc news... a major earthquake hits haiti measured at 7.2 magnitude — the us geological survey warns of widespread disaster. with fighting reported within a0 kilometres of kabul, the afghan president addresses the nation. in the uk — there are questions for police, about why it chose to return a shotgun licence to the man who killed five people in the uk's worst mass shooting since 2010. in the uk — the new head of the nhs in england says she fears tens of thousands of people are are risking their lives because they're unable to spot the first warning signs of cancer. research also suggests three in five
5:18 pm
people would delay seeking medical advice because they don't want to be a burden during the pandemic. 0ur health correspondent anna collinson reports. cancer services are back to pre—pandemic levels and are busy, but nhs england says over the past year there has been a 10% drop in cancer patients receiving treatment. we know that people are out there and we are worried they may have symptoms and not be coming forward, so the purpose of this campaign is to highlight those symptoms, to make sure people are aware of what is normal and what's not normal for them, and to come forward if they need help. just, you've said it too. health officials are particularly concerned about abdominal, neurological and lung cancers, as this new advert shows, symptoms can include discomfort in the stomach, blood and urine, persistent diarrhoea or a cough that lasts longer than three weeks. it was a gp who first detected declan's kidney cancer eight years ago.
5:19 pm
he is now a patient at this urology clinic at guy's hospital in london, and is mostly able to live a normal life. if there is something bothering you it may not be something serious but it is absolutely worth getting it checked out, you know? and i know that you can go to your gp. i think some people think that these things aren't happening now, but they are. the earlier cancers are detected, the more likely it is that we can treat them effectively. if a patient spots a possible symptom, the nhs as it is ready to help. anna collinson, bbc news. the us federal weather agency says july was the hottest month the national oceanic and atmospheric administration calculates the combined land and ocean surface temperature was 0.93 celsius
5:20 pm
above the 20th century average of 15.8 celsius. in italy — which has reached its peak holiday weekend — seventeen cities are now on red alert because of the heatwave being suffered across southern europe. just a couple of days ago the island of sicily registered the staggering 48.8 celsius. if confirmed by the world meteorological organization, it will be the hottest temperature ever recorded in europe. 0ur europe correspondent mark lowen reports from sicily. vailand vail and those with influence upon the taliban will help to achieve that, so there can be a managed political transition that takes place. and that is within the next hours and days, i think, really, we are talking about.— are talking about. thank you very much for your— are talking about. thank you very much for your reflections - are talking about. thank you very much for your reflections and - much for your reflections and analysis. the temperatures have dropped for, they are closer to 30, but the temperatures have dropped for, they are closer to 30,— they are closer to 30, but the worst ofthe they are closer to 30, but the worst of the heat — they are closer to 30, but the worst of the heat today _ they are closer to 30, but the worst of the heat today in _ they are closer to 30, but the worst of the heat today in the _ of the heat today in the mediterranean will be in spain, where in madrid temperatures likely to be 43, and in the south of spain, going up to a5, to be a3, and in the south of spain, going up to a5, and the spokesman for spain's weather agency says it could today by the hottest day on record. and people we were speaking to on the beach said the interesting thing, despite the air being scorching the water is very very cold for this time of year, so you
5:21 pm
have the extremes as well, and we had an announcement from the administration which is the us federal agency which monitored the climate which has found thatjuly was the hottest month in the world, since records began 1a2 years ago. i can tell you from being here today, think probably a scorching august is going to follow that sweltering july. a water—dropping plane with eight people on board has crashed in southern turkey, killing all on board. russia's defence ministry said five russian servicemen and three turkish citizens were on board the plane. the country has been trying to contain some of the worst wildfires in years along the south coast. at least a0 people are known to have died from the devastating floods along turkey's black sea coast. in the worst—hit town, bozkurt, several apartment blocks were brought down by floodwaters from a swollen river. president erdogan promised swift government help to rebuild but some residents have criticised the authorities for failing to provide an early warning.
5:22 pm
seals are a big attraction for tourists visiting the eastern coast of england, especially the northern county of yorkshire. but as visitor numbers increase, conservationists are worried that the seals are getting stressed. they're particularly concerned that people and dogs are getting far too close for comfort. here's our environment correspondent, paul murphy. yorkshire's seal population is one of the wonders of the east coast but it is under threat. the biggest impact is coming from human disturbance. selfies on the shoreline or perhaps just dogs that are brought to close. predominantly what is happening to the seals is they will have a fight or flight response, they will perceive the human is a threat and try to escape that threat. we have seen a massive prevalence
5:23 pm
of humans try to seek out those encounters so rather than be anecdotal, there actively out anecdotal, they're actively out walking to pursue them. this is what can happen, it is known as a seal stampede, they injure themselves as safely across the rocky shore line. even from a distance they can find humans intimidating. you don't realise you're quite far from them for them to be like that, yeah. i didn't think they would be that sensitive to us being 200 metres from them. the surge of visitors to this coast has meant extra policing has been put in place to safeguard birds, whales and dolphins from irresponsible water users, but conservationists have now launched an online petition to get specific legal protection for the seal colonies. so where you have whales, dolphins and porpoises, seals are separate from that. so whilst the former
5:24 pm
are protected from harassment and reckless disturbance, seals are not, so we are trying to change the law here in the uk or particularly england and wales. government funded campaigns are trying to get the message across, but the stark reality is that if the disturbances continue, experts believe the seal population could actually start to decline. paul murphy, bbc news on the east yorkshire coast. let's remind you of our breaking news this hour. a big earthquake has hit haiti, prompting fears that many people have been killed. the haitian prime minister says the quake caused �*several�* deaths in various parts of haiti. this is coming from the prime minister, enormous damage to
5:25 pm
southern areas of the island, the us gs has issued a red alert which warns of deaths and damage to the local infrastructure as well. so it struck at 7.2 magnitude on saturday morning at a depth of ten kilometres, it was round 150 kilometres, it was round 150 kilometres west of the capital port—au—prince. you remember port—au—prince. you remember port—au—prince was hit badly back in 2010, devastating earthquake, it was a seven magnitude earthquake, and it resulted in over 200,000 deaths, so far, and i must stress this, we are simply getting reports of several deaths and this is how the haitian prime minister is describing it, but also enormous damage, social media has been showing video, we have yet to verify them, of buildings and rubble and people also being pulled
5:26 pm
out of the rubble of what was once their homes. we are getting more on this, we are watching it very closely, do stay with us here on bbc news. we are going to have the latest news on bbc one with rita. first here is the weather. hello, it's a mixed picture this weekend. sunshine for some. cloud and rain for others. has been bringing rain into parts of wales, the midlands, northern england and northern ireland, but elsewhere, we have had some warm spells of sunshine, this is the earlier radar picture you with see we have had the breaks in the cloud, this rain pushing in to northern ireland, northern england, lingering across parts of the midlands and north wales but that will begin to ease this evening, it will fizzle
5:27 pm
out as we head through the overnight period. the showers becoming confined to northern scotland but we could see more cloud pushing back in to wales and south—west england later, bringing mistiness and patchy light rain and drizzle. it a mild night again for most. could dip into single figures in scotland and the far north of england. the frontal system is still with us tomorrow, bringing a lot of cloud and patchy rain tieded in with this, particularly in the morning and south—west england. still the zone of cloud and rain through northern england, looks like the showers will be mostly confined to the far north of scotland, so away from this zone of scotland, so away from this zone of cloud across northern england and the midlands, should see spells of sunshine, once again in east anglia and the south—east england which will help temperatures up to 23, but just 11 celsius for the northern isles and a rather cool day in northern ireland as well. through sunday night and into monday, looks like we will lose the rain across
5:28 pm
england and wales but keep the showers going across scotland and also a cooler north—westerly wind setting up as we head into monday. that is quite a moist airflow so we will see a lot of cloud round as we start monday morning, could see one or two showers feeding in on the north—westerly wind. most should have a dry day and the best of any brightness or sunshine will by a cross eastern counties of scotland and england but certainly a cooler feeling day to start the new week, with highs of round 16 to 20 celsius. now for the week ahead little change really, you can see temperatures round about average, could get warmer by the end of the week but on most days there will be cloud with the north—westerly wind, it will bring in one or two showers but the week ahead is looking fairly quiet and mostly dry.
5:29 pm
5:30 pm
5:31 pm
good afternoon. the decision to return a shotgun and a licence to the man who killed five people in plymouth on thursday is being examined by the independent police watchdog. jake davison's victims included his mother maxine, a three year old girl, sophie martyn, and herfather lee. davison also injured two other people before turning the gun on himself. 0ur correspondentjon kay has more. 200 miles from westminster,
5:32 pm
the home secretary came to plymouth to pay her respects to the victims. maxine davison, the mother of the gunman, three—year—old sophie martyn and her dad lee. stephen washington, who was 59, and 66—year—old kate sheppard. it is tragic beyond words. really, really tragic. priti patel promised to support the community with a specialist help for anyone left traumatised. she wouldn't comment on news that the gunman, jake davison, had his firearms licence returned last month, despite posting hate—filled rants online. home secretary, should davison have had a gun? you say you want to reassure people here, a lot of people have questions about gun control. my brain can't process it. it physically can't process that information that i was given. chris says his family is reeling.
5:33 pm
not only was his auntie maxine shot dead but it was her son that killed her. chris never met his cousin jake davison and doesn't understand what has gone so catastrophically wrong. it's impossible. you can't plan for this, you can't see the next day or the day after or the day after. you just literally take each day as it comes but ijust know, as a family, they will come together, be there for each other, and try to understand this horrendous thing that has happened. and also the other four innocent people that had no part in this. i'm sorry to everybody that has gone through this. it must be the worst thing in the world. i can't even imagine to understand. among those grieving, the family of three—year—old sophie martyn and her dad, lee. apparently shot at random as they walked home together. they were definitely a pair. little one running around and eating all the ice creams. 0nly last month the dad and daughter were watching the euros with friends here at the anchorage pub. amazing together. always mucking about and playing.
5:34 pm
he just absolutely doted on her. she was an amazing little girl. and he was a great dad. she hadn't even started her life, she was so little. yeah, it's terrible. this afternoon plymouth argyle's match fell silent. concerts have also been cancelled. a8 hours on, this city has so many questions, and things are still so raw. john key, bbc news, plymouth. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is here. 0ne one of the questions is why davison was allowed to be in possession of it gone? was allowed to be in possession of it one? ., ., , it gone? there are two elements,. what should _ it gone? there are two elements,. what should a _ it gone? there are two elements,. what should a young _ it gone? there are two elements,. what should a young man - it gone? there are two elements,. what should a young man living i it gone? there are two elements,. what should a young man living in | it gone? there are two elements,. | what should a young man living in a city with a history of mental illness be allowed to keep a gun at home at all? the second element is a certificate for the shot gun and shot gun itself were taken off him
5:35 pm
in december because of an allegation of assault in september but injuly police returned both to him and anybody who did any research onjake davison after the shooting could go through his social media history and see elements of depression, extreme violence towards his mother being discussed, discussion of extreme violence towards other women and an obsession with mass shootings and one of the questions will be was enough research done onjake davison before at certificate and that shotgun were returned to him? in afghanistan, the taliban have continued to seize yet more territory and are now in control of more regional capitals than the government. the afghan president, ashraf ghani, addressed the nation for the first time since the taliban advance, saying his focus was to prevent further instability. british troops have been sent to help british citizens leave. 0ur afghanistan correspondent secunder kermani reports from the capital, kabul.
5:36 pm
this is the very centre of kabul. thousands who have fled fighting across the north now live in these miserable conditions. this family escaped the violence but say they still don't feel safe. translation: we are thirsty, . we are hungry, we have no home. 0ther makeshift camps are even bigger, but this, in the heart of the city, shows how quickly the country is unravelling. we don't go back to the 19th century. we just want to be as far as we have developed until here, we want to go further and further. we don't want to go back to the era where sisters in our education sector, in our development sector, was so harsh, we don't want to go back to that. today fighting erupted around mazar—i—sharif,
5:37 pm
one of the few major cities still under government control. whilst in kandahar the insurgents cemented their position, with their own flag hoisting ceremony. finally addressing the nation, president ghani didn't comment on rumours he may resign. instead, simply promising to remobilise beleaguered forces. for now, for many people here in kabul, life is continuing more or less as normal but the taliban are getting closer and closer to the city and there is increasing concern a fierce and protracted battle for control of kabul the speed of the advance of the taliban has led to the us and uk sending in more than 3500 troops to afghanistan to repatriate many of their own citizens and many embassy staff. many afghan cities are now being handed over to the taliban
5:38 pm
following local deals with the security forces. that may be the only way to avoid even more suffering in kabul, too, but it would mean an end to the life here as residents residents know it. secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul. a major earthquake measuring 7.2 magnitude has hit haiti in the caribbean. that's bigger than the devastating earthquake which rocked the island in 2010, prompting fears that many people may have been killed. the country's prime minister ariel henry has said the quake has caused huge damage across the south of the country. he's described the situation as dramatic and appealed to all haitians to act in a spirit of solidarity. the latest government coronavirus figures 29,520 new infections recorded in the latest 2a—hour period, which means on average there were 28,715 new cases per day in the last week.
5:39 pm
5875 people are in hospital with coronavirus. 93 deaths were recorded in the last 2a hours, which means an average of 88 deaths a day in the last week. more than 89% of adults in the uk have now had their firstjab. and more than 76% have had both jabs. meanwhile, in other covid news today, some clinically vulnerable children in england are struggling to access a covid vaccine, nearly four weeks after they were made eligible for the jab. nhs england say at—risk 12 to 15 year olds, and those living with someone with a weak immune system, should be offered a jab from the 23rd of august at the latest. the cost of nhs coronavirus tests for international arrivals to the uk has been reduced. test kits have been cut from £88 to £68 for people arriving from green list countries, and those coming from amber list countries who are fully vaccinated.
5:40 pm
the price of two tests for amber arrivals who have not had both jabs has been cut from £170 to £136. tests can also be bought from other suppliers. july has been confirmed as the world's hottest month ever recorded by us government scientists. data shows that the combined land and ocean surface temperature worldwide last month was nearly one degree celsius hotter than the 20th century average. james reynolds is here with us. talk us through the figures. the us agency says that record you just describe as to the disturbing and disruption fixture which has been laid out for a climate change. we've got a map showing some of the findings and the pink bits are where temperatures were warmer than normal but there are dark red bits where records were set, particularly at the western united states and
5:41 pm
canada. the recently suffered the effects of a so—called heat dome. more globally asia had its hottest july on record and you also had its second hottestjuly. 0ne figure stands out. a8.8 celsius, that was a temperature record and this week in sicily, almost halfway to boiling point it is like walking through sicily with several options open in yourface. we think sicily with several options open in your face. we think that was caused ljy your face. we think that was caused by anticyclones rising up from africa and people have been having their air conditioning on day and night, leading to shortages. this comes after— night, leading to shortages. this comes after a — night, leading to shortages. this comes after a week _ night, leading to shortages. this comes after a week where we had a dire warning on the climate from the un. ., , ., un. code red is what the un secretary — un. code red is what the un secretary called _ un. code red is what the un secretary called it. - un. code red is what the un secretary called it. that - un. code red is what the un secretary called it. that was| un. code red is what the un - secretary called it. that was after a report which took eight years to compile, it gave several warnings talking about heatwaves, droughts and floods being likely in the future and talking about key
5:42 pm
temperature point perhaps have been reached within a decade or so. all of this will be discussed in glasgow in november, a very important climate change conference. the daily temperature in glasgow at that time of year is around 7—10 c, the political temperature in the chamber will be an awful lot hotter.— will be an awful lot hotter. james, thank you- — manchester united made a superb start to their premier league campaign today with an emphatic 5—1 victory over leeds. patrick gearey was watching. two uniteds sharply divided. if you wanted a game to demonstrate the difference having a capacity crowd makes, here it was. a chance to feel the expectation that followed paul pogba's pass to bruno fernandes. the goal and the reaction a long time coming. but under marcelo bielsa, leeds attack in faith and numbers. the man coming onto the ball is in their right back, luke ayling.
5:43 pm
absolute mayhem. commentator: there's an early contender for goal of the month. | what a moment, butjust a moment. mason greenwood was born in bradford but came to manchester, here completely bypassing leeds. 2-1. now manchester united pounced. fernandes again, his shot cleared not off the line but, as it turned out, just over it. goal. while leeds want to be full—fat going forward, they were thin at the back. 0ne pass, one shot. fernandes, three, manchester united, four. and still they advanced. now with pogba. "play it right", said fred, and he made it five. some start. the two uniteds comprehensively divided. patrick gearey, bbc news. we're back with the late news at ten. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are.
5:44 pm
5:45 pm
hello and welcome to the film review with me, anna smith. i'm filling in for mark kermode to review this week's releases. there are a lot of films in cinemas this week and i'm going to start with my personal favourite. i'm your man, a genderflip on the pygmalion myth starring downton abbey's dan stevens as a romantic robot.
5:46 pm
set in berlin, i'm your man is a german comedy drama with a sci—fi twist. it stars the excellent maren eggert as alma, a scientist who is taking part in a trial of humanoid robots to see if they could make realistic life partners. alma's ideal match has been created using algorithms based on her brain scans, her responses and research involving 17 million people. as it happens, alma has a soft spot forforeign men. enter dan stevens as tom, a charmer who speaks fluent german with an english accent. he speaks german. alma is initially sceptical, but when she starts to warm to tom, she plunges into a period of self analysis and self—doubt. i'm your man has a very sharp sense of humour, and a pitch perfect dan stevens
5:47 pm
makes the most of comical misunderstandings between humans and ai. but this also takes a serious look at identity, humanity, attraction and happiness. the set up recalls everything from blade runner to the 2013 sci—fi her. but this is inspired by a short story by emma braslavsky, and directed by maria schrader and the female perspective makes it a distinctly different work. i'm your man is a playful intelligent conversation starter that is as fun to watch alone as it is with a real life partner. he speaks german. it is in cinemas and on curzon home cinema now. my name is guy. sunday should be warm and sunny. just a scattering of drive bys. and i live in paradise. i've got a best friend.
5:48 pm
this is the greatest cup of coffee of all time. mondays, am i right, joe? now to another charming funny ai character, this time played by ryan reynolds in the disney action comedy free guy. guy is a cheerful bank teller who loves his routine life, from his morning coffee to small talk with his co—worker buddy who is played by lil rel howery. he even shrugs off the daily raids from bank robbers. what he doesn't realise is he is a background player in an open world video game called free city. those violent robbers wearing sun glasses, they are avatars of geeky real world players. when he sees molotov girl, played by killing eve'sjodie comer, he falls for her, not realising she is the real world coder who is trying to prove that her idea is stolen and so a computer game comedy turns into a romantic action thriller with existential angst to spare. free guy owes a debt to more classic sci—fis than i have time to list,
5:49 pm
but there are clear parallels with galaxy quest, tron, groundhog day and the matrix. but its biggest influence is perhaps the truman show. likejim carey before him, our innocent hero grapples with the knowledge he has been living a lie and is merely a pawn in a world created for the entertainment of others. this is a much busierfilm than the truman show. this central idea gives the film heart and it's helped considerably by reynolds ability to balance deadpan comedy with sensitive boyish charm, and a dash of deadpool�*s mischief. jodie comer proves her versatility as both her english avatar and the american who created her, although i was a bit disappointed that this genius coder is characterised chiefly by her love of bubble gum ice—cream and mariah carey. still, she shares good chemistry with reynolds, as well asjoe keery, who plays her former creative partner.
5:50 pm
meanwhile, taika waititi and channing tatum enjoy smaller roles that are amusing, if not hilarious. free guy isn't as powerful as the films it recalls, but it is an enjoyable actioner that brings a pacifist message to the genre, and for a disney film it even takes a swipe at our sequel obsessed culture. bring on free guy two. meantime, free guy is in cinemas now. forgive me, i'm just a bit... sorry, james, i know you said you had an office in board of trade, but... is it possible you actually work at a different branch of her majesty's government? oh my. this is unexpected. a salesman is recruited as a spy in the courier, a true story starring benedict cumberbatch.
5:51 pm
greville wynne is an ordinary british businessman who is surprised to be approached by m16 and the cia during the cold war. after some debate he agrees to peddle his wares in the soviet union, while forming a partnership with a soviet officer, 0leg penkovsky. it is a tall order keeping his work a secret from his wife, played byjessie buckley, but then there is the more pressing concern of the soviets finding him out. dominic cook's period thriller is a quiet but classy watch. and while it's a little exposition heavy, it tells a fascinating story with strong performances all round. i am volunteering to bring back the best source of soviet intelligence you've got at a time where russia and america are on the brink of nuclear war. you talk about using people. for god's sake, use me. the courier is in cinemas now. get out of here.
5:52 pm
johnny depp also plays a reluctant real life hero this week, in the drama minamata. in depp's first release since his lost his libel case against the publishers of the sun newspaper, he plays life magazine photo journalist w eugene smith. smith was instrumental in documenting the devastating effects of mercury poisoning in the japanese coastal city of minamata. this follows his recruitment by aileen, who is played by the japanese actress minami, and his shocking discoveries in minamata, where afflicted families are battling for compensation. andrew levitas�* film feels torn between detailing the fight forjustice, and exploring its alcoholic central character, and the balance doesn't feel particularly even. but once again it is a powerful
5:53 pm
and important story, and it's depp's best for some time. no—one has really covered it. i mean, it's in the god damn fish. and that's all those poor people have to eat. the times has a tokyo desk. and we have deadlines literally one hour. - so that sounds to me like, bob, time is of the essence. and you know that the cover up is going to be as much of a story as the story itself. minimata is in cinemas now. i love a tense real time thriller, and the mexican film new order did not disappoint. the winner of the grand jury prize at last year's venice film festival, new order is not an escapist
5:54 pm
thriller. it's a disturbing dystopian nail biter about escalating class warfare in mexico city. as a lavish wedding is taking place, riots are erupting in the streets and the peril spills into the festivities. meanwhile, the bride sets off on a dangerous mission to help a former member of staff. a gripping and disturbing thriller, new order is another powerful film from after lucia director michael franco, and it will stay with you long after the credits roll. it is in cinemas now.
5:55 pm
finally, a musical crowd pleaser called coda, which stands for child of deaf adults. an american remake of the french film la famille belier, it stars emilia jones as ruby, a 17—year—old who is the only hearing member of her family. outside of school, her spare time is spent acting as an interpreter for her parents and brother and working on theirfishing boat. but ruby has a secret. she loves to sing. spurred on by her teacher, she considers a career in music but she fears her parents won't support her ambitions. funny and unconventional, ruby's parents bring wit and warmth to the story, and crucially they are played by deaf actors,
5:56 pm
troy kotsur and marlee matlin, who won an oscar for children of a lesser god in 1986. as for the hearing cast, emilia jones, who is the daughter of singer aled jones, is terrific, though eugenio derbez feels miscast as her flamboyant music teacher. still, i was prepared to forgive and forget when it came to the emotionalfinale. coda is an uplifting, inclusive tear—jerker with a flavour of the tv series glee, and it is a real step forward when it comes to the representation of deaf characters on screen. it is in cinemas, and on apple tv plus now. thanks for watching the film review with me anna smith. i will be back next week. meantime, stay safe.
5:57 pm
hello, it's a mixed picture this weekend. sunshine for some. cloud and rain for others. the low pressure has been burning outbreaks of rain into parts of wales, the midlands, northern england and northern ireland. elsewhere some warm spells of sunshine. we've had some breaks in the cloud across east anglia and the central southern england and this is pushing into northern ireland and northern england. that begins to ease through this evening and fizzling out through the overnight period. showers generally confined then to northern scotland but we could see more cloud pushing into wales later in the night. a mild night once again for most and could
5:58 pm
just dip into single figures in parts of scotland and far north of england. the frontal system still with us tomorrow bringing cloud and patchy rain. particularly through parts of wales and south—west england. the showers tomorrow once again mostly confined to the far north of scotland. away from this area of cloud some spells of sunshine through the afternoon especially across parts of east anglia and south east england. temperatures around 23 celsius but just 11 for the northern isles and a cool day across parts of northern ireland as well. through sunday night into monday will lose the rain across parts of england and wales but will keep the showers going across scotland and a cooler north—westerly wind as we head into monday. quite a moist air flow as well sell quite a lot of clout around on monday morning. some
5:59 pm
showers feeling in but most should have a dry day and the best of any sunshine across eastern counties of scotland and england. the feeling cooler to start the new week with highs of around 16, 20 celsius. little change for the week ahead, temperatures around average. 0n little change for the week ahead, temperatures around average. on most days a lot of cloud with a north—westerly wind bringing some showers but the week head looking quiet and mostly dry.
6:00 pm
this is bbc news, the headlines at six. at least 29 people have been killed in haiti after an earthquake measuring 7.2 magnitude. with fighting reported within a0 kilometres of kabul, the afghan president addresses the nation. translation: our dear country, afghanistan, is in serious - danger of instability. the reintegration of the security and defence forces is our priority and we are taking serious measures to deal with this. in the uk, there are questions for police about why it chose to return a shotgun licence to the man who killed five people in the uk's worst mass shooting since 2010. some clinically vulnerable children in england are struggling

40 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on