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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 14, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm BST

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to return a shotgun licence to the man who killed five people in the country's worst mass shooting since 2010. the last major city in northern afghanistan, mazar—i—sharif, falls to the taliban. us presidentjoe biden authorizes deployment of about 5,000 us troops to help with evacuations. at least 227 people have died in haiti after a powerful earthquake measuring 7.2 magnitude. a state of emergency has been declared. some clinically vulnerable children in england are struggling to get a covid vaccine, nearly four weeks after they were added to the roll—out.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are broadcaster penny smith and political commentatorjo phillips. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the observer leads with the crisis in afghanistan. it says that residents in kabul are gripped by fear and desperately searching for escape routes as taliban forces close in on the capital. in the telegraph, a former met police chief calls for tighter gun control rules in light of the plymouth shooting on thursday, including social media account checks, to prevent those with extremist views from having access to firearms. and according to the independent, red wall areas of england are set to lose up to £1 billion in funding this year due to brexit. that's despite the prime minister's
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pledge to level up the country. so, let's begin. let's start with the observer. the shocking thing about their says that throughout the past week, we have been reporting that afghans have been reporting that afghans have been fleeing to kabul from other areas in search of refuge, the relative safety of the capital, and here the observer reporting they are now having to flee from the city has that i have an advance. jo, started off with a detail you have picked out from this.— off with a detail you have picked out from this. yes, as you say, it is terrifying- _ out from this. yes, as you say, it is terrifying- i — out from this. yes, as you say, it is terrifying. i think _ out from this. yes, as you say, it is terrifying. i think it _ out from this. yes, as you say, it is terrifying. i think it shouldn't l is terrifying. i think it shouldn't come as any surprise to anybody because we know perfectly well that the taliban have been waiting for this moment to make a move, but i think the speed with which they are capturing cities, i mean you've been
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reporting earlier this evening that they have captured the fourth largest city in the country. and as you say, people going to kabul are now fleeing it. america and the uk are sending in troops and aircraft to get people out, including the british ambassador, who is apparently going to be airlifted out tomorrow or monday. in the country is descending into crisis. apparently, the afghan army did an input up a fight in mazar—e—sharif, and it isjust input up a fight in mazar—e—sharif, and it is just turning input up a fight in mazar—e—sharif, and it isjust turning into input up a fight in mazar—e—sharif, and it is just turning into the input up a fight in mazar—e—sharif, and it isjust turning into the most appalling turmoil, and i think, you know, many people will be asking the question, what has been achieved over the last 20 years? the trillions of dollars, the hundreds of lives lost, and itjust appears as though we are walking away and leaving it in absolute crisis.
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penny, it is interesting, i was hearing earlier this week that on the us military strategists worst case prediction, they thought maybe the taliban would make these kind of advancesin the taliban would make these kind of advances in six to 12 months after us forces left, it has barely been six to 12 weeks. the us forces left, it has barely been six to 12 weeks.— us forces left, it has barely been six to 12 weeks. the problem is they don't appear— six to 12 weeks. the problem is they don't appear to _ six to 12 weeks. the problem is they don't appear to be _ six to 12 weeks. the problem is they don't appear to be meeting - six to 12 weeks. the problem is they don't appear to be meeting any - don't appear to be meeting any resistance and the appalling bloodshed. we all know, we have seen pictures— bloodshed. we all know, we have seen pictures before of what goes after the taliban coming to town, and so of course, — the taliban coming to town, and so of course, who is going to put up enough _ of course, who is going to put up enough of— of course, who is going to put up enough of a _ of course, who is going to put up enough of a fight to repel them? the problem _ enough of a fight to repel them? the problem is _ enough of a fight to repel them? the problem is that as you said, ben, they— problem is that as you said, ben, they all_ problem is that as you said, ben, they all went to kabul, people were running _ they all went to kabul, people were running away from them, heading to kabul. _ running away from them, heading to kabul. a _ running away from them, heading to kabul. a city— running away from them, heading to kabul, a city of 4 million, and now of course — kabul, a city of 4 million, and now of course they are trying to find escape — of course they are trying to find escape routes, an escape route out. and let's — escape routes, an escape route out. and let's put _ escape routes, an escape route out. and let's put it on a human level as well, _ and let's put it on a human level as well, these — and let's put it on a human level as well, these are people who have now, you know. _ well, these are people who have now,
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you know, they'd seen that women can -et you know, they'd seen that women can get educated, they can fulfil their potential, and what they are looking at now _ potential, and what they are looking at now is _ potential, and what they are looking at now is the sheer terror. i mean, i at now is the sheer terror. i mean, iwas _ at now is the sheer terror. i mean, iwasjust_ at now is the sheer terror. i mean, i wasjust putting myself in their place _ i wasjust putting myself in their place and — i wasjust putting myself in their place and i was thinking, how would ifeel_ place and i was thinking, how would ifeei if— place and i was thinking, how would ifeei if i_ place and i was thinking, how would i feel if i were sitting here in this— i feel if i were sitting here in this dress, waiting for them to arrive, — this dress, waiting for them to arrive, and _ this dress, waiting for them to arrive, and thinking, from now on, this is— arrive, and thinking, from now on, this is the — arrive, and thinking, from now on, this is the last time that they say is as— this is the last time that they say is as it _ this is the last time that they say is as it is, — this is the last time that they say is as it is, the last time i will actually— is as it is, the last time i will actually be able to speak out, say anything. — actually be able to speak out, say anything, be allowed to leave the house _ anything, be allowed to leave the house without being completely covered, — house without being completely covered, not allowed to actually leave _ covered, not allowed to actually leave without having a male escort at all _ leave without having a male escort at all times. your entire life absolutely, you know, really absolutely, you know, really absolutely destroyed. let alone the fact that _ absolutely destroyed. let alone the fact that they take six slaves, girls— fact that they take six slaves, girls as — fact that they take six slaves, girls as young as 12 to be married to these — girls as young as 12 to be married to these appalling people. and of course, _ to these appalling people. and of course, all the men who supported these _ course, all the men who supported these women as well. decent man.
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yeah, _ these women as well. decent man. yeah, very— these women as well. decent man. yeah, very much so. i want to move on, will stay with the observer but the terribly tragic shooting, the uk's worse mass shooting since 2010 took place in plymouth the last couple of days, and these messages, these anti—women messages that were revealed that the killer had exchanged on line. and, jo, as we start to think about how we can prevent something like this happening again, this idea coming to the fore that may be social media accounts should be checked when it comes to giving firearms licences. certainly, there are big questions to be answered about why he had a firearms licence in the first place. my firearms licence in the first place. my understanding of the gun licensing laws is that the type of gun he had you would only have reason to have it if you were a member of the sporting shooting club, which presumably, the police
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would check, that this person was a member of a club. we know he had the gun licence revoked last year, in december, and then it was returned to him only a month ago. this is despite, you know, his mother's pleas for help to support her dealing with clearly a very disturbed young man. but to go back to this point about this online hatred. i mean nobody wants the authorities poring over everybody�*s social media account, and certainly the police have got plenty of other things to do rather than going through people's twitter feeds and social media but this group of people, these so—called incels, they are misogynist of the worst kind. they hate women, they blame women for everything. they are extremely violent, they have been connected
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with two mass killings in canada and in america, in the last few years, and it is fairly clear that somewhere along the line, they should be a flag. now, we are going to have the same old arguments about the social media companies, were going to have the same l arguments about privacy and that sort of thing, but these groups are dangerous, and because they will see this action as something that validates their existence, you know, they should be in the same level as a terror threat.— a terror threat. penny, what do you make of it? — a terror threat. penny, what do you make of it? the _ a terror threat. penny, what do you make of it? the sunday _ a terror threat. penny, what do you make of it? the sunday telegraph | make of it? the sunday telegraph leading with the same calls for doing an online hate troll before gun owners get given a licence, what jumped out at you from this please? i know thatjo says we don't want to i know that jo says we don't want to live in— i know that jo says we don't want to live in a _ i know that jo says we don't want to live in a society where the government trawls through social media _ government trawls through social media accounts but on the other hand, _ media accounts but on the other hand. is— media accounts but on the other hand. is it — media accounts but on the other hand, is it not right that if you are on— hand, is it not right that if you are on certain media sites, they are
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available _ are on certain media sites, they are available to — are on certain media sites, they are available to be looked at from others, — available to be looked at from others, so you're putting it out there _ others, so you're putting it out there in— others, so you're putting it out there in the first place, so what is there in the first place, so what is the problem with trawling through them? _ the problem with trawling through them? certainly, it does seem that so nrany— them? certainly, it does seem that so many people have been saying the same _ so many people have been saying the same thing _ so many people have been saying the same thing which is of course they should _ same thing which is of course they should he — same thing which is of course they should be able to have a look through— should be able to have a look through people's social media accounts _ through people's social media accounts and check these things. they— accounts and check these things. they would merely have spotted that this was— they would merely have spotted that this was somebody who was incredibly angry, _ this was somebody who was incredibly angry, very— this was somebody who was incredibly angry, very angry. some of the things— angry, very angry. some of the things that he said, some of the misogynistic, appalling things that he had _ misogynistic, appalling things that he had said about women. i tell you what the _ he had said about women. i tell you what the only thing i am slightly confused — what the only thing i am slightly confused about is if you actually suddenly— confused about is if you actually suddenly then say, this is terrorism, what does that do? why is that a _ terrorism, what does that do? why is that a good _ terrorism, what does that do? why is that a good thing, to have it down is terrorism? because i don't know about— is terrorism? because i don't know about you. — is terrorism? because i don't know about you, jo, as soon as people talk about you, jo, as soon as people tatk about— about you, jo, as soon as people talk about the word terrorism and this is— talk about the word terrorism and this is terrorism, it makes... i think— this is terrorism, it makes... i think it — this is terrorism, it makes... i think it makes quite a lot of people very anxious and we certainly
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perhaps— very anxious and we certainly perhaps see it as even more of a threat _ perhaps see it as even more of a threat than — perhaps see it as even more of a threat than it is.— threat than it is. yeah. i'm going to move on _ threat than it is. yeah. i'm going to move on only _ threat than it is. yeah. i'm going to move on only because - threat than it is. yeah. i'm going to move on only because time i threat than it is. yeah. i'm going to move on only because time is| to move on only because time is against us. i am moving to the next door sunday telegraph, and jo, i am keen to get your thoughts on this one, as the political commentator. this seems fair enough? and one, as the political commentator. this seems fair enough?— one, as the political commentator. this seems fair enough? and we will all be eating — this seems fair enough? and we will all be eating bacon _ this seems fair enough? and we will all be eating bacon sandwiches - this seems fair enough? and we will| all be eating bacon sandwiches made from flying pigs tomorrow morning. there are rules at the moment, it is public interest, and i have them in front of me, on leaving office, ministers will be prohibited from lobbying government for two years, . .. lobbying government for two years,... now, this has come to the fall because of david cameron, former prime minister, and his role in the green sale affair. and now,
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more recently, philip hammond, now lord hammond, who is the former chancellor who left parliament in 2019, who has been accused of lobbying on behalf of the bank that he was working for. now, it does seem to me that yes, of course, everybody is going to use their contacts, everybody is going to use their networks, but lobbying on behalf of someone who is paying you as a whole different ball game. and i think, you as a whole different ball game. and ithink, you know, two as a whole different ball game. and i think, you know, two years isn't very long, there has been a conversation about whether that should be extended to five years, but, you know, the idea that you would then get these people to give money back, i mean, you know, it just isn't going to happen, it is just isn't going to happen, it is just empty words, in my view, and i think anything will come of it. penny, i want to get your thoughts on the final story, the one on the front of the independent. for parts
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of the uk suffer after losing, or will lose up to £1 billion due to brexit. the bit of the article on the front page doesn't exactly say how they will use that 1 billion. i know, but i think reading through the gaps. — know, but i think reading through the gaps, it is because of what the eu woutd — the gaps, it is because of what the eu would have given in grants, i am assuming— eu would have given in grants, i am assuming that is what it was, it is because _ assuming that is what it was, it is because we — assuming that is what it was, it is because we have now consciously uncoupled — because we have now consciously uncoupled from europe, europe has said, _ uncoupled from europe, europe has said. well. — uncoupled from europe, europe has said, well, obviously, they are not going _ said, well, obviously, they are not going to _ said, well, obviously, they are not going to he — said, well, obviously, they are not going to be giving grants, are they? and any— going to be giving grants, are they? and any meh that is coming through is still— and any meh that is coming through is still going to very much to the south _ is still going to very much to the south and — is still going to very much to the south and not to what they call or used _ south and not to what they call or used to— south and not to what they call or used to call— south and not to what they call or used to call the red wall, which is no longer— used to call the red wall, which is no longer read, of course. i no longer read, of course. suppose, no longer read, of course. i suppose, this should come as no shock because we knew that eu grants were going to go as soon as the uk left. i were going to go as soon as the uk left. , , , ., , . were going to go as soon as the uk left. , ., , ., , left. i suppose that is the only surprise. _ left. i suppose that is the only surprise. the _ left. i suppose that is the only surprise, the fact _ left. i suppose that is the only surprise, the fact that - left. i suppose that is the only| surprise, the fact that anybody left. i suppose that is the only i surprise, the fact that anybody is surprised —
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surprise, the fact that anybody is surprised. you know, but the thing is, surprised. you know, but the thing is. these _ surprised. you know, but the thing is, these things do take time, don't they? _ is, these things do take time, don't they? they— is, these things do take time, don't they? they do take time, it is like a thing _ they? they do take time, it is like a thing else, whenever you change a system. _ a thing else, whenever you change a system. it— a thing else, whenever you change a system. it is— a thing else, whenever you change a system, it is never smooth, nothing runs smoothly. system, it is never smooth, nothing runs smoothly-— system, it is never smooth, nothing runs smoothly. indeed. very much so. i tell ou runs smoothly. indeed. very much so. i tell you what. _ runs smoothly. indeed. very much so. i tell you what, let's _ runs smoothly. indeed. very much so. i tell you what, let's leave _ runs smoothly. indeed. very much so. i tell you what, let's leave our - i tell you what, let's leave our review of the that for now but do come back at 11:30pm and we will look at those stories and some as well. thank you, jo and penny, and thank you forjoining us and do come back at 11:30pm, it will be worth it. next, time for click.
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hello and welcome to click. this week, we have a summer themed specialfor you — although the weather isn't great, i'm hoping the rain is going to hold off. but what a summer of sport it has been. england may not have been able to bring it back home this year, but this weekend is the start of the premier league season, and clubs are gearing up to welcome the fans back to stadiums. but how these clubs discover talent could be about to change. instead of sending scouts to identify young football stars, and then after a trial, picking the best ones, artificial intelligence is helping take on the job, as 0mar mehtab has been finding out. some of the world's biggest footballing talents are cherry—picked from a young age, as scouts scour the pitches to find the best of the best. well, they missed me.
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i have been in love with the beautiful game all my life. granted, i wasn't playing many sunday league matches — however in order to get spotted, what if you don't need to anymore? there is a new app that has popped up, called aiscout, and it is all in the name. artificial intelligence is being used to identify and analyse videos sent in by whoever, wherever. it can be at your local five—a—side, or evenjust in your back garden. and you don't have to be a pro. the way it works is you follow the instructions given on the app, using objects such as balls or cones as markers for the al to pick up. once you complete an exercise, you upload it to the app for processing. anything they do with the ball, with their body, gets tracked. all the movements then go into a system that has been built to identify what good football movement looks like, and that is referenced against benchmark data, academy data from clubs around the world. for players to be able
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to generate the same data without having to be on the right team or go to the right school or be in the right country. we can actually generate that data and get enough of an indication that someone can play football and they are worth a further look at. we don't replace the scouts, but we revolutionise their workflow. now this app is in partnership with a few premier league football clubs, one of them being burnley, with over 12,000 aspiring footballers across 125 different countries completing their virtual trials. so i also did their trial through the app. and it went...uh... all the way down, get your nose on the ground. shut up. argh! and soon after, the al was done processing my data. so how did i do?
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some good, some bad. this is you. this is aiscout's data of omar. nrs, what's nrs? nrs is the national rating score, so that's all the combined physical trials you did. the top you can get is two. so players that have been generally found by burnley are around 1.7, so pretty high. so how do i actually compare to others who have taken the trial? should we take a look? laughs. you can see the graph there at the bottom. there is a little bit of a difference. ok, i wasn't the best, which is to be expected — but even still, the apps trials seemed quite simplistic by premier league club standards. so what is an actual club's trial like? and so i went to burnley to find out. this is something. a boyhood dream being lived. doing a trialfor a big club. and, oh man — i wasn't ready.
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i will feed a ball in to you, and all i would like you to do is run across the first defender, finish first time if you can. it is a lot different to the trials on the app. i am doing the things i would normally do, but it's knowing i am being watched by people who have been doing this for absolutely years. good, i'm going to give you a shooting one now. that includes running? yeah, just going to extend you a little bit, 0mar. argh! it is not even a man, it is a mannequin, and i overthought beating the mannequin. the mental strength they need to have to be able to go through this and show what they can do, without overthinking it, without hesitating. .. something i can't imagine. i can shoot better than that! laughs. i can shoot so much better than that. obviously a lot more difficult in person. i couldn't do it on a cold, wet tuesday afternoon in burnley. you remember the numbers, can't you?
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one, two, three, four. are you sure? no. but then how confident are the club in actually identifying talent from the app? there'll always be people who are sceptical of new methods, and we are trying to be ahead of the game. we understand the level, we understand it, we're not going to get everybody at academy standard football. but if we can get one through, that one mightjust be the next one. and so as i said, it is really important for us that we keep our options open as far as we can when we are looking at recruitment of players. that's number four. no, that... that's number four. in the end, the best 28 players are selected from aiscout's trial run, and they play a game against each other with human scouts watching, to see if there is someone worth signing. there is some exceptional talent out here on display. 0ver there is reef, he has been recently called up by sri lanka after finding him on the app,
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soon to get his first international cap. and over there is bevan. he's been given a second trial by burnley after being recommended by the ai. i just went to my local park and they told me what to do with the video, and i uploaded it, my dad filmed me, and after about a couple of hours it showed me my score. and because of the app i am now on my second trial with burnley. i probably would never had a trial with burnley or anything to do with burnley, so i am here because of that basically. the sports science team put through an information document on me, talked to the sri lanka national team because i could play for them. i then went to the under—19 trial, the men's coach came up to me and said "can you come back next year and play for us?", so. the opportunities that have been opened for minority groups that maybe wouldn't get the opportunities to play football, wouldn't want to play
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football, have been ridiculous. after the year we have had, i think it is time for a bit of fun in the sun. ok, the weather may be a little bit changeable but you get the idea. so i have got my hands on a whole heap of gadgets that i am hoping are going to make me a little bit cooler. first up, this. the motus 0rbit+. and yes, it's like a smart hula hoop. the great thing about this is it doesn't drop like a regular hula hoop. you take out the pieces to make it the right size to fit you, and it will only land on your hips and you can keep going and going. you really do need to stop to see how many times it has gone round though, which does feel counter—productive. but the weighted hula hoop concept itself was better than i expected, although i'm sure the novelty would wear off after not long.
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0w, surely that is enough. it does feel like cardio after a while, but in the house i was quite nervous about it hitting anything around me or a small child. but out here with the space, it certainly feels like exercise. i'm a bit hot after that! but luckily at the moment there is a trend for neck fans. this is the yoshfan. it has a couple of different settings. you can choose how high you want the fan to go, or there are temperature sensors embedded in it so it can decide how much fanning you're likely to need. i thought it was going to get really caught up in my hair, actually. but amazingly, it doesn't seem to, although if i move my hair out of the way, obviously i could feel it blowing a bit more. would i really wear this? well, maybe if i was in a hot country it might feel quite nice. and i suppose it doesjust look like a pair of headphones around your neck. but still, the concept itself does feel a little over the top to me, although maybe i was just not born
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to be this cool. rather conveniently, the sun has just come out for my next item. i have shown you before on the programme audio sunglasses where you can listen to music or talk on the phone via the glasses. this pair has a bit of a difference, though. this prototype is called dusk and it is a pair of smart transition lens glasses so you can change the colour of the lenses according to what you are up to. maybe you're reading, maybe you're driving, and maybe the sunlight around you is changing. at the moment you can do it by a button on the side, but eventually they're going to connect to an app and you will be able to do it on there. they just won't stay in the right position. but i guess they are just a prototype. if you wondered what this is, this is my cooler box. as you can see, it has speakers so i can connect that to my phone to play a little bit of music or maybe an old episode of click — rights issues. turn it on. i can now connect it to my my phone's bluetooth and it is connected. click theme plays.
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recognise that? finally, if you want to catch all of that summer fun on camera, here i have the latest take on the polaroid. i remember how much my dad loved his polaroid camera when i was a little girl. now it is much, much smaller, rechargeable and, of course, it has a selfie mode. the brands latest release is the polaroid go. i can't do the pouting thing. let's go for a smile. it can also do double exposure shots and has a timer. now i just leave that there for a few minutes upside down. how did it go? well, it looks like a polaroid — oh, the nostalgia — but the thing is we are so used to doing pictures on our phones now that if you got your eyes shut or it's a bad picture you just take more. each one of these you print is pretty expensive so you sort of want to get every picture right. yep, over £1 per photo.
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and that is it for the short version of the programme. the full—length show can be found on iplayer. the click team are about to take a break for a couple of weeks, we will leave you with some repeats but full service will be resumed in september. until then, enjoy your summer. hello, it is turning into a very mixed but not particularly dramatic weekend of weather. saturday brought a bit of sunshine, a bit of rain for some. it is a similar mix as we head into sunday. a couple of frontal systems, this curl of a weather front here bringing rain for parts
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of northern ireland, england, and wales at times. this front pushing into northern scotland promises some pretty hefty showers. and in between, some zones of drier, brighter weather. some patchy rain likely to push across east anglia and the south—east through sunday morning, but then brighter skies follow, at least for a time. more cloud for wales in the south—west, spots of rain here. some rain for a time in northern england but northern ireland should brighten up with some sunshine, quite a lot of dry weather. and in central parts of scotland but northern scotland will see some showers and it will feel decidedly cool here, highest temperatures across parts of eastern england up to 23 degrees. so, we will see areas of cloud and some showery rain continuing through sunday evening but most places turned right into the early hours of monday. notice quite a lot of cloud out west by this stage, and overnight temperatures, generally between ten and 1a degrees. so, as we start monday, we have a low pressure to the north—east of us, high pressure attempting to build from the west. we are essentially trapped between the two, and that brings a north—westerly wind across the uk, not a particularly warm north—westerly wind, i have to say,
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and one that will also introduce quite a lot of cloud, especially across western areas, that cloud bringing some showery rain at times. the best of the sunshine across eastern scotland, down across the eastern side of england, but temperatures will struggle, 16 to 20, maybe 21 degrees in the south of england, that is the very best we can expect. and then as we get on into tuesday, again we can expect lots of cloud, some showery rain here and there. we still got that north—westerly wind so temperatures are going to be little disappointing for this point in mid august. 17 perhaps in aberdeen, 19 cardiff, 19, 20 in london. and as we head through the middle part of the week, we keep that north—westerly flow across the uk, and we keep that feed of cloud. now, it is not going to be cloudy all the time, that cloud will break to give some sunny spells, but generally speaking, if you expect lots of cloud, you word go too far wrong. temperatures will struggle, though, high teens or low 20s.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. at least 227 people have died in haiti after a powerful earthquake measuring 7.2 magnitude. a state of emergency has been declared. the government decided this morning to declare a state of emergency for one month following this disaster. the last major city in northern afghanistan — mazar—e—sharif — falls to the taliban, as president biden issues a stong —— strong defence of his decision to pull us troops out of the country. we'll be speaking to a former deputy un special envoy to afghanistan — about the deteriorating situation. also in the programme. tributes to the victims — as questions are asked of police
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about why a shotgun licence was returned to the man who killed

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