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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 17, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc world news. i'm yalda hakeem. our top stories... kabul airport reopens for military evacuation flights, after the taliban's takeover of afghanistan. the chaos at the airport on monday has been highlighted by newly—released satellite pictures showing people crowding onto the runway. president biden defends his decision to withdraw troops from afghanistan, saying the mission was counter—terrorism, not nation—building. i stand squarely behind my decision. after 20 years, i have learned the hard way that there was never a good time to withdraw us forces. a major afghan media outlet keeps women presenters on screen — one of them interviews
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a senior taliban official. and what's happened to afghanistan's president ghani? we speak to a former mp who gives fresh detail into the president's final moments in the country. hello and welcome to bbc news. in afghanistan, military flights have resumed at kabul airport a day after the scenes of chaos on monday, as people tried to cling on to a departing us air force plane. india was among those evacuating its personnel from afghanistan early on tuesday. a french military plane also departed. it's now two days since the taliban entered kabul without resistance, meaning they now effectively control the entire country. president biden has strongly defended his decision to withdraw us troops, saying the goals of the us mission in afghanistan had been counter—terrorism,
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not nation—building. 0ur diplomatic correspondent paul adams reports. at kabul airport, the exodus of foreigners continues, civilians boarding an indian military flight this morning. after yesterday's chaos, planes are once again leaving. earlier, france sent a plane to evacuate its citizens and their afghan colleagues. this vast international operation now gathering pace. the man running the british operation says he expects to bring out as many as 7000 people. how long have we got to do it? we don't really know and so every day, we are working as hard as we can to put as many forward into this pipeline as we possibly can. clearly, there is a dynamic political situation running across the city, we make no assumptions about that, other than that we really can't afford to pause and wait. and this is what it looks like for some. this extraordinary image from an american military flight on sunday.
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650 afghans crammed on board. in the city, an uneasy, watchful calm, taliban fighters highly visible as they assert their authority. and raise theirflag. for now, the city appears to be functioning. those who have chosen to stay or have no choice, wondering what taliban rule will be like. let's see what afghanistan brings, i want to stay here, i want to fight for my students, i want to fight for our vision of afghanistan and i know things are never going to be the same any more, it'sjust, i have to be here. in herat, which fell to the taliban last week, some things have not changed. schoolgirls were at their desks today, scenes unthinkable when the taliban last ruled the country. my hope is that we will continue to resist any possible regression and any possible deprivation,
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and the taliban must also realise that they cannot keep afghanistan to the knee, they have to live with the world. only in a moderate situation, moderate government, moderate islam, that we can live with ourselves and the world. these are strange, uncertain times. a world in which a female presenter in kabul can still interview a representative of the taliban. but for how long? it's been 20 years since the taliban last ruled kabul. not everyone here even remembers what it was like. the militants say they want an inclusive islamic government. what, people wonder, will that mean? paul adams, bbc news. let's bring you some live pictures from brussels where nato is holding a press conference. let's have a listen in to mr stoltenberg. that us
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troo -s listen in to mr stoltenberg. that us tr00ps would _ listen in to mr stoltenberg. that us troops would withdraw _ listen in to mr stoltenberg. that us troops would withdraw by _ listen in to mr stoltenberg. that us troops would withdraw by may. - listen in to mr stoltenberg. that us| troops would withdraw by may. after many rounds of consultations, all allies agreed to follow at the us decision. ending our military mission it was not easy. we were faced with a serious dilemma either leave and risk seeing the taliban regain control or stay and read risk renewed attacks and an open ended combat mission. we never intended to stay in afghanistan forever. 0ver stay in afghanistan forever. over the past few years, from over 100,000 troops who went down —— we went down to less than 10000 and now to zero. but what we have seen in the last few weeks was a military and political collapse at the speed which had not been anticipated.
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parts of the afghan security forces fought bravely. but they were unable to secure the country. because ultimately, the afghan political leadership failed to stand up to the taliban and to achieve a peaceful solution that afghans desperately wanted. there is a failure of afghan leadership led to the tragedy we are witnessing today. —— this failure of afghan leadership. at the same time, we need to have an honest clear eyed assessment of nato's own engagement in afghanistan. despite our considerable investment and a sacrifice over two decades, the collapse was swift and sudden. there are many lessons to be learned. but we should also recognise the gains we should also recognise the gains we have made. nato allies and
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partners went into afghanistan after 9/11 to protect the country from being a safe haven for international terrorist is wanting to attack us. the last two decades, there have been no terrorist attacks on allied soil organiser from afghanistan. there was now taking power have a responsibility to ensure that international terrorists do not gain sketch foothold. allies have the capabilities and vigilance to address a future terrorist threats from afghanistan. due to our military presence and the support of the international community, a new generation of men and women have grown up in a new afghanistan. able to get education, take part in the political process, run at their own businesses and enjoy a vibrant media scene. today's afghanistan is a very
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different to the afghanistan of 2001, so those gains cannot be easily reversed. the world will be watching and must continue to support a stable and peaceful afghanistan. with that, i am ready to take some questions. that afghanistan. with that, i am ready to take some questions.— afghanistan. with that, i am ready to take some questions. that was at the nato secretary-general- to take some questions. that was at the nato secretary-general there. l i'm joined now by our washington correspondent barbara plett usher. we were just listening they are to the nato secretary—general and it is very much similar to what we heard a joe biden said yesterday. yes. very much similar to what we heard a joe biden said yesterday.— joe biden said yesterday. yes, joe biden's argument _ joe biden said yesterday. yes, joe biden's argument being _ joe biden said yesterday. yes, joe biden's argument being that - joe biden said yesterday. yes, joe biden's argument being that the l biden's argument being that the mission had been achieved and it was time to pull out, that it was not the right thing to stay in the middle of what he called a civil conflict and also that there had been a major investment in the afghan military and that the
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military had been unable or unwilling to defend the country and mr stoltenberg also saying the decision had been made to pull out and i nato had supported it, although there has been criticism from nato countries, especially germany and, to some degree, britain that they had really been told what would happen and therefore had to, with that. find would happen and therefore had to, with that. �* , , ., g ., with that. and 'ust tell us how joe biden's with that. and just tell us how joe biden's speech — with that. and just tell us how joe biden's speech has _ with that. and just tell us how joe biden's speech has been - with that. and just tell us how joe biden's speech has been received | with that. and just tell us how joe l biden's speech has been received in washington. biden's speech has been received in washington-— washington. there was a lot of criticism. _ washington. there was a lot of criticism, so _ washington. there was a lot of criticism, so it _ washington. there was a lot of criticism, so it may _ washington. there was a lot of criticism, so it may be - washington. there was a lot of. criticism, so it may be stemmed a little bit of that. you had one senior democratic senator saying my praising him basically for laying out the cost of that endless war in afghanistan and for making the decision to get out, but by and large, it really did not stop the criticism and that is partly because he only really defended his decision to go. he didn't really talk very much about the manner in which he left. he didn't admit any mistakes in terms of the planning and
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execution and that is where much of the criticism has fallen, especially from the republicans because, of course, the supported withdrawal under president trump, an even fatter time to plunge ahead republicans coming out and saying, thatis republicans coming out and saying, that is a herring, that is not about the decision to withdraw, but the shambolic execution of it. they did not address that. senator mitt romney is saying that it does not look like biden is presenting it, a hasty ill—prepared exit, or staying forever, it is not the correct way to look at it. democrats were less vocal but are quite concerned, particularly about the meditating situation the —— humanitarian situation the —— humanitarian situation and for women and girls. and getting to those people who worked with the collagen, the refugee evacuation plan has been very slow in being brought together and now they are afraid people will left behind. ~ ., and now they are afraid people will left behind. ~ . ., ., , , , left behind. what about any public? how are the —
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left behind. what about any public? how are the public _ left behind. what about any public? how are the public responding - left behind. what about any public? how are the public responding to i how are the public responding to this? it how are the public responding to this? , ., ., , . ., how are the public responding to this? ,., ., ,~ ._ this? it is not really clear yet. the art this? it is not really clear yet. the part of— this? it is not really clear yet. the part of the _ this? it is not really clear yet. the part of the public- this? it is not really clear yet. the part of the public are - this? it is not really clear yet. - the part of the public are veterans are upset. some of them were angry with mr biden for putting so much blame on the afghan leadership, especially the military for the chaos that we have seen. 0ne especially the military for the chaos that we have seen. one of them said he is basically blaming people who sacrificed their lives for us. you can't make it on your own, too bad, we are heading out, he is saying. in terms of the broader public, we have to see how things play out. it is possible that some of them may feel that the collapse of them may feel that the collapse of them may feel that the collapse of the afghan military, given how much investment the us had put into it, does itjustify mr biden's argument. they might agree with him on that. if there are images of taliban brutality, in any coming weeks, especially against women, that might be a problem for the administration. if the islamist extremist, if there is a resurgence of them, especially the terror threat, that might also have an impact on sub it is not clear yet
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how the images of this humiliating exit will play out, well they have a lasting impact? mr biden is the face and that it is coming up on the 20th anniversary of 9/11 being marked and at that anniversary, the taliban have every ta ken at that anniversary, the taliban have every taken the country completely so it will be a very public event and a point that will be made very much in public. idem; be made very much in public. very much though- _ be made very much in public. very much though. thank _ be made very much in public. very much though. thank you, barbara for that update from washington. earlier i spoke to our correspondent. it earlier i spoke to our correspondent. earlier i spoke to our corresondent. , , ., correspondent. it will be seared in histo , correspondent. it will be seared in history. not _ correspondent. it will be seared in history. notjust — correspondent. it will be seared in history, notjust as _ correspondent. it will be seared in history, notjust as a _ correspondent. it will be seared in history, notjust as a lesson - correspondent. it will be seared in history, notjust as a lesson for i history, notjust as a lesson for afghanistan, but for all international engagement, certainly for the us looking forward. and that kind of panic we sign the airfield yesterday has not gone away, although it is much, we are told that the airport today with the military evacuation flights taking
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off today. the teledyne at the gates off today. the teledyne at the gates of kabul. and a neighbourhood by neighbourhood, the —— of the taliban. the taliban are now patrolling neighbourhood by neighbourhood. residents cautiously coming out of their homes are no coming out of their homes are no coming face—to—face with their new protectors, the new government in afghanistan. we are heeding the chief negotiator is coming from the gulf state of qatar where the taliban have their political office to begin the task of setting up a new, what are the taliban have always promised it would be a new islamic system, a pure islamic system as they say. there has been some surprising images. afghan television presenters, female interviewing taliban officials, female reporters, afghans on the streets. ice cream vendor is about, there have been days of electricity when there was no electricity before. and at some constants. the taliban have asked the health minister to stay on a mat the mayor
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of kabul. —— to stay on and eddie mair of kabul. it is that is a holding pattern or will this be administration that surprises some but is shattering for others a? —— to stay on as the mayer of kabul. i'm joined now from los angeles by khaled hosseini, the afghan—american author of the kite runner. you are a prominent afghan american, writing that book about a different time in afghan's history —— afghanistan's history. give me your reaction to the events that transpired yesterday. absolutely heartbroken. i do not think i will everforget those heartbroken. i do not think i will ever forget those images. heartbroken. i do not think i will everforget those images. like millions of afghans, filled with a sense of anxiety and uncertainty about what is going to unfold in the country. i was in touch with a
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colleague of mine in kabul who will explain he is hiding in his home with his family, he said we had hoped for the future, we had hoped for a better tomorrow, now all of thatis for a better tomorrow, now all of that is up in the air and are probably being crushed. so it is just a sense of a terrible sadness and anxiety right now. i just a sense of a terrible sadness and anxiety right now.— and anxiety right now. i suppose art of and anxiety right now. i suppose part of that _ and anxiety right now. i suppose part of that is — and anxiety right now. i suppose part of that is because _ and anxiety right now. i suppose part of that is because it - and anxiety right now. i suppose l part of that is because it happened so quickly, it was so swift, within a matter of days at the taliban or bradley gates of kabul. and then it was a one thing they were there, but then what happened at that airport —— were at the gates of kabul. but then what happened at the airport, people falling off the wing of an aircraft while it was taking off, those horrific images i do not think anyone will ever forget. i those horrific images i do not think anyone will ever forget.— anyone will ever forget. i can't. .. i will anyone will ever forget. i can't. .. i will never _ anyone will ever forget. i can't. .. i will never be _ anyone will ever forget. i can't. .. i will never be able _ anyone will ever forget. i can't. .. i will never be able to _ anyone will ever forget. i can't. .. i will never be able to raise - anyone will ever forget. i can't. .. i will never be able to raise them j i will never be able to raise them from my mind. yesterday i was watching television and at the taliban representative was on and he was expressing bewilderment as to why the afghan people should be
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afraid of them. and he was saying at this ironically, just as at the photos and images of the scene of the airport you just described were playing out. so clearly, people are frightened, people are terribly worried about what the taliban are going to do in afghanistan and i just hope that the small signs of moderation, might signs of moderation, might signs of moderation are a sign of how the taliban are wanting to do business moving forward. i think it will behove them to a change with the times and use a lighter touch and to see... allow all members of afghan society to have a voice and particularly women is not only good for those people, also good for the country and ultimately to the good of the taliban themselves for their own viability and durability.- own viability and durability. yeah, i think as own viability and durability. yeah, i think as a _ own viability and durability. yeah, i think as a writer— own viability and durability. yeah, i think as a writer and _ own viability and durability. yeah, i think as a writer and storyteller, | i think as a writer and storyteller, there was so much symbolism in at
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those images and that we saw. the desperate afghans are willing to fall off a plane because they were so afraid of what they would stay for, and the american slang out. yes. i mean, the whole thing —— of the americans are flying out. the whole thing was a surreal scene. i just hope... i go back to my one sliver of hope in all of this is that in the 20 years that have passed, afghanistan has gone through a lot of transformations, this is not the country the taliban left in 2001, this is a predominantly young country, a lot of urban educated professionals, many of them women who work for the government, work for non—governmental organisations, who have been educated, so this is a different country the taliban are going back to and i hope they realise that and have adapted to the times. i realise that and have adapted to the times. , , ,.,, , realise that and have adapted to the times. , , , , ., realise that and have adapted to the times. , , , ., , times. i suppose the big question is is their courage _ times. i suppose the big question is
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is their courage enough? _ times. i suppose the big question is is their courage enough? is - times. i suppose the big question is is their courage enough? is at - times. i suppose the big question is is their courage enough? is at the l is their courage enough? is at the couege is their courage enough? is at the college of all of these people who still remain in the country, who have built this country, all of these young people, is it enough to sort of deal with whatever changes at the taliban bring?— at the taliban bring? well, for millions of— at the taliban bring? well, for millions of people, _ at the taliban bring? well, for millions of people, they - at the taliban bring? well, for millions of people, they reallyj millions of people, they really don't have a choice. for me, i think the one question that i would have asked president biden yesterday and also the nato secretary—general is pointing out to the games that they have made in the last 20 years, but virtually every afghan i speak to think those gains will be lost any matter of time, particularly women's and personalfreedoms matter of time, particularly women's and personal freedoms that ordinary afghans have enjoyed, freedom of press and so forth. all of that was gained painstakingly through blood sweat and tears are no stands to be lost fairly quickly if the taliban
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in fact intend on behaving in the way they did in the 1990s. {line in fact intend on behaving in the way they did in the 1990s. one of the thin . s way they did in the 1990s. one of the things that _ way they did in the 1990s. one of the things that president - way they did in the 1990s. one of the things that president biden i way they did in the 1990s. one of i the things that president biden said and we alsojust the things that president biden said and we also just heard on the nato secretary general reiterate is that we gave the afghans all the tools in any tool box and this is now on the afghan leadership who have failed their people. afghan leadership who have failed their maple-— their people. well, i think there is a real legitimacy _ their people. well, i think there is a real legitimacy to _ their people. well, i think there is a real legitimacy to that _ their people. well, i think there is l a real legitimacy to that statement. i would say that the major failure of the last 20 years has been the establishment of a government that had real legitimacy in the eyes of ordinary afghans. unfortunately, as we have known for the last 20 years, afghan governments have been, unfortunately, a lot of corruption, they have failed to deliver necessary services to the population and, most importantly, they have failed to protect the population against the likes of the taliban.
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the afghan national army that was supposed to protect the country was poorly paid and in many cases the soldiers were not being paid. they were not sure how they were fighting for is the legitimacy of a state —— the state was a question in mind, they were pearly arms, and many powerful, united and determined army likely taliban shows up at the gates, i do not condone their leaving, but i understand why they did. ., ~ , ., leaving, but i understand why they did. ., ~ ., leaving, but i understand why they did. ., ., ,, leaving, but i understand why they did. thank you for speaking to us from los angeles. _ the former president has been widely condemned by other politicians. elay ershad — a former afghan member of parliament — explained how she is cautiously hopeful for the future
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of afghanistan. iam i am optimistic because i was in europe and just came a few days ago and iface any europe and just came a few days ago and i face any sudden change. of course, i was panicked as well but when i saw that people are fighting face—to—face against taliban and then he captured and released him and gave him permission to go to iran, to travel actually, and then i calmed down because for nine years i was a member of the parliament and people trusted for me and voted for me so i thought this is the best time to be here for my people, a good leader and representative is one who will not leave their country or their citizens behind. itruiear one who will not leave their country or their citizens behind.— or their citizens behind. wear your shock though. _ or their citizens behind. wear your shock though, to _ or their citizens behind. wear your shock though, to see _ or their citizens behind. wear your shock though, to see your - or their citizens behind. wear your i shock though, to see your president flee the country? filth. shock though, to see your president flee the country?— flee the country? oh, my god, i am so mad at—
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flee the country? oh, my god, i am so mad at him- _ flee the country? oh, my god, i am so mad at him. and _ flee the country? oh, my god, i am so mad at him. and i— flee the country? oh, my god, i am so mad at him. and i would... - flee the country? oh, my god, i am so mad at him. and i would... it - flee the country? oh, my god, i am| so mad at him. and i would... it was not a good decision made by him. he could have left three months or six months ago, he could have prevented by his leaving the killing of all our soldiers in this few months more and also he left his people behind. and he left his country behind. he could have stayed. i am so angry, i don't have words to explain it. i don't have words to explain it. i don't know why i trusted this guy and voted for him. i am so sorry for my decision and i was a spokesperson in 2013. i was really shocked. i was shocked by captioning the taliban, but i was really shocked by him at leaving that way because he had a meeting on the people in the meeting with him told him hejust said, oh, i'm going to a meeting and said he would be back, but itjust
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disappeared from the palace. so he actually didn't _ disappeared from the palace. so he actually didn't tell _ disappeared from the palace. so he actually didn't tell anyone, - disappeared from the palace. so he actually didn't tell anyone, he - disappeared from the palace. so he actually didn't tell anyone, he said he was going to a meeting at the ministry of defence? and then disappeared from the country? exactly. even he sent some of his people to the ministry of defence and they've checked the ministry so have of the group went to the ministry of defence waiting for him, but he went somewhere else. i don't know where. did but he went somewhere else. i don't know where-— know where. did he leave any helicopter. — know where. did he leave any helicopter, do _ know where. did he leave any helicopter, do you _ know where. did he leave any helicopter, do you know? - know where. did he leave any helicopter, do you know? orl know where. did he leave any i helicopter, do you know? or do know where. did he leave any - helicopter, do you know? or do you know how he made the escape? i know it was any helicopter, _ know how he made the escape? i know it was any helicopter, but _ know how he made the escape? i know it was any helicopter, but i _ know how he made the escape? i know it was any helicopter, but i don't - it was any helicopter, but i don't know if it was from the airport or from the palace. some people say it was from the palace and some people said it was from the airport, but i
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am sure it must be from palace because... am sure it must be from palace because- - -_ am sure it must be from palace because... , ., ., ., , because... does anyone have any contact with _ because... does anyone have any contact with him _ because... does anyone have any contact with him now? _ because. .. does anyone have any contact with him now? is- because... does anyone have any contact with him now? is he - because... does anyone have any| contact with him now? is he likely to re—emerge at some point? because we had someone on the programme yesterday her remains one of his supporters and says he was forced to flee. he was totally by other afghan leaders are to avoid bloodshed, but he is actually still be president of afghanistan and will return? —— told to leave by other afghan leaders. no, never i wish he would return back. i would look in his eyes and tell him i was a woman and i stayed here and you ran away. anyway, it is a huge nasty lie and i do not want to talk about it. he had a meeting and any guy who was waiting for him, i do not want to say his name, in case he does not want it mentioned, so he was waiting for him and he said he was reading a book and then
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what happened to him, he was told i'm going to the ministry of defence and said i will be back, soon i will meetjoe and then theyjust about somewhere and disappear —— i will meet you. no i know is how it happened and he could manage it. if someone said he wanted to prevent bloodshed, he could have done it six months ago. six months ago, if he had run away, it would have been the best idea. the former afghan mp talking to my colleague. an update for you, we have had confirmation from campbell that the taliban plan to hold their first news conference since taking power in about half an hour's time, 3pm british summer time. we will bring you that here as we have access to the pictures. let's take some years at sketch make in the uk. —— news
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here in the uk. the uk economy is continuing to bounce back from lockdown with job vacancies hitting a record high of almost one million and wages ticking up. unemployment also fell in the three months tojune. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity reports. at this construction site in huddersfield, 18 houses are being built but so far only four have been completed. the amount of work getting done in the construction industry has been slowing down across the country, not because of covid but two shortages, raw materials and workers. in this sector alone there are now 38,000 vacancies being advertised. there is a shortage of young people coming into the industry, without a shadow of a doubt. we need more young people of all trades, bricklayers, carpenters, plumbers, electricians, and there is an acute shortage. this site has kept on workers into their 60s and across the industry they are being forced to pay more, with the average wage up by i2% in the last year. and it's notjust this industry.
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across the economy, vacancies are a fifth higher than before coronavirus and employers can't find the staff they need. i think it is a perfect storm of lots of things, we have had a pandemic, people have not been moving jobs, people have been sticking where they are, so you've got a lack of candidate movement, we have had a lot of eu workers that have gone home during the pandemic and it is difficult to get back if you want to. and the skill shortages, you're going back to a lack of apprenticeships from a long time ago that have not been coming through. there are still about 1.9 million more people workless than there were before the pandemic, with more than 607,000 fully furloughed, nearly 850,000 partially furloughed, 201,000 fewer on employers' payrolls and nearly 300,000 fewer in self—employed work. slowest to recover from the pandemic�*s economic symptoms is london where there are still far fewerjobs to be done serving coffee and lunch to workers in the city, for example, many of whom are still working from home. but in the wider economy, the big issue in thejobs market is now not so much
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people who cannot find work as employers who cannot get the staff. in health and social care, for example, a record 161,000 roles are going unfilled. likely to put increased pressure on inflation notjust in rising prices but lengthening queues and waiting times. andy verity, bbc news. i will have more on afghanistan after the half headlines. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. a cool north—westerly breeze labelling. aware we have more shelter from that base, south—east wales, the west country, you should be seeing some sunshine and the crowds then across many parts of scotland, but under the blanket of cloud, temperatures only 17, 18 degrees and there could be drizzle left over around at those western hills. that cloud will probably still be around overnight tonight and a law unto the hills and there
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could be a few pockets of light rain and drizzle. with that coming of cloud, temperatures like last night will be typically 12—111. some wetter weather showing its hand here. it could have run into the northern ireland and parts of men in scotland. sunshine across other parts of scotland and after a dull start elsewhere, —— into the northern isles. generally dry weather on wednesday, temperatures will be more widely up to a reasonable 20 or 21 celsius.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the senior british officer responsible for getting people to safety from afghanistan says up to 7000 could be evacuated — 300 have left so far but the taliban are controlling the gates of the airport. us presidentjoe biden defends his decision to withdraw troops from the country, saying the mission
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was counter—terrorism, not nation—building. morejobs are available than ever before — and average pay is up too. and the moderna vaccine is approved for use in the uk for 12 to 17 year olds. sport now, and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. we start with football. the chelsea striker tammy abraham has completed his move to the italian side roma for a fee of 3a million pounds. he's signed a five year deal and links up withjose mourinho who was appointed as the club's new manager at the end of last season. an academy player with chelsea, he wasn't picked by manager thomas tuchel for the final as chelsea won the champions league. he's found his opportunities limited, even more so with the big money arrival of romelu lukaku from inter milan. an emotional naomi 0saka has given herfirst press conference in three months.
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having received a bye into the second round at the cincinnati masters she reiterated the difficulty in facing tough questions so soon after competing. she refused to speak to the media at french open, and when faced with expulsion withdrew before taking some time away from the game. when you say i'm not crazy about dealing with you guys, what does that refer to? well, you said you don't especially like the press conference format. yet that seems to be the, obviously, the most widely used means of communicating to the media and through the media to the public.
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hm, that's interesting. conferences, is what i feel is the most difficult. andy murray is into the second round in cincinnati, he withdrew from the singles at the tokyo 0lympics. murray, who has won the tournament twice, completed a straight sets victory over richard gasquet. it's the first singles match he's played since his third round defeat at wimbledon six weeks ago and a good gauge of his form. when he retuned after his resurfacing operation at this event two years ago, he lost to the same opponent in the opening round. i thought i did well. i think i moved pretty well for my first singles match in a while, on the hard courts. certainly, a little bit more confidence in my movement than i did when i played him here a couple of years ago. it's the first match i've played since i had, singles match, since i've had the metal hip put in, so i was a bit apprehensive and he, you know, he uses all of the angles on the court really well and makes you move a lot. so you need to move well against him and i did that tonight. heather watson is also through to the second round of the women's event. she won in three sets against belarusian aliaksandra sasnovich and plays world number one ash barty next.
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england's top order batsmen find their places in the test team at risk after their collapse against india. the second test was lost when they were bowled out forjust 120. both openers failed to score, and coach chris silverwood accepts changes may have to be made. i'd rather get somebody have so many chances and not enough and we have invested in people. but at the same time clearly i don't want to start wrapping things up. at some point you have to think manoeuvring things a little bit and find something that works. from my point of view i have to be open—minded, but i might have to keep my eyes open to it. england's women will face world cup holders new zealand in back—to—back matches as the red roses contest four home tests this autumn. england, ranked one in the world, will play the black ferns twice before matches against canada and the us. the first meeting of the series
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is due to take place on the weekend of 29—31 october, with venues to be confirmed. that's all the sport for now. the taliban have announced that discussions are under way about the setup of the future afghan government. we don't yet know what the power structure will be. but the taliban are now in charge, and here are their most prominent leaders. the group's leader is mawlawi hibatullah akhundzada. known as the "leader of the faithful", he has ultimate authority over the taliban's political, religious and military affairs.
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he has 3 deputies. the first is one of the taliban's co—founders, and its political leader, mullah abdul ghani baradar. he was freed from prison in pakistan — at the request of the us — to lead peace talks. he is the taliban's most public face and has addressed the afghan people via social media. mullah mohammad yaqoob is the son of the taliban's co—founder mullah 0mar. he swiftly rose to prominence after his father's death in 2013, and oversees the group's military operations. and sirajuddin haqqani is both a deputy leader of the taliban, and leader of the offshoot haqqani network. it's known for its deadly bomb attacks on afghan and nato forces. joining me now is dr antonio giustozzi, who is a senior research fellow at the royal united services institute and afghanistan expert.
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thank you very much for being with us on bbc news. i suppose the obvious place to start, i reeled off a load of names which will mean probably not very much to a lot of people watching, and i have to hold up people watching, and i have to hold up the hem, in some cases with those names, that applies to me too. what can you most usefully tell us about the way the taliban leadership operates? the way the taliban leadership 0 erates? ~ ., , the way the taliban leadership oerates? ~ ., , ., , operates? well, the only appointed the deu operates? well, the only appointed the deputy recently, _ operates? well, the only appointed the deputy recently, abdul- operates? well, the only appointed the deputy recently, abdul ghani i the deputy recently, abdul ghani baradar is the deputy, they were the first two deputies, he left a pakistani prison not long before that, he was appointed as head of the political division, had significant because baradar was
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significant because ba radar was there, significant because baradar was there, mohammad yaqoob, his position is more mixed, he's predominantly as a moderate figure. akhundzada, being a moderate figure. akhundzada, being a leader, tries to keep different people, there have pragmatic attitudes to dominant issues. the leadership has a strong predominance of pragmatists and moderates. the ruestion i of pragmatists and moderates. the question i suppose as to what extent the leadership exercises full authority over the rank—and—file members of the organisation, who are the people who would effectively be running things in other parts of afghanistan where leadership is currently present.— afghanistan where leadership is currently present. when you look at an organisation _ currently present. when you look at an organisation that _ currently present. when you look at an organisation that has _ currently present. when you look at an organisation that hasjust - an organisation that has just emerged from war, taking such heavy
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casualties throughout the years and you talk to people, you find a lot of moderate leaders that are, essentially you could summarise the situation is predominantly pragmatic, moderates, political leadership, not a lot of military leadership, not a lot of military leaders to start much more, and this is a victory they didn't expect themselves. the military leaders, themselves. the military leaders, the taliban are not bound by any discussion that was previously, they believe the americans essentially have not kept the terms of the agreement, the americans believe the taliban have not kept it, these are different views, but also basically, essentially, the other side is not more willing to come to terms, another should not really share power. these are the two extremes,
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and i think what will emerge as the dominant position with the taliban will also be the interaction between the taliban and the outside, so within afghanistan, other groups and people will deal with the telephone, and of course international actors. the question, i suppose, the time that they have left outside of afghanistan, the previous government had not, they had lived almost exclusively inside the country, to what extent that might have moderated some of their positions. it's difficult to know exactly how moderate they are in terms of their ideological leaning. they don't talk much about it, but even internally, other people, sometimes they're not
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really sure what the leaders think, but for sure there are taliban agreement, it was essentially an ambush down which the americans were led, but before that there was the closing relationship a few years ago, they used to be quite determined enemy of orion, russia, which of course has not been seen positively, and seen by the taliban as an enemy because they supported the position in the 90s and had a negative attitude to the taliban government, they had positive relations between these two countries, it's a sign of
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pragmatism, it was not easily, in to do that, there were debates, quite acrimonious debates. we know they are pragmatic, for sure, and there is a chance of seeing how far they are willing to go in terms of establishing their own, what kind of concessionaire willing to do to other afghan parties in the society and so on. ., ~ other afghan parties in the society and so on. ., ,, , other afghan parties in the society and so on. ., ,, i. , . a tropical storm that hit haiti overnight is hampering rescue work in the aftermath of the earthquake on the weekend. more than 11100 people have been killed. 0ur correspondent james clayton reports from the town of le cai — which is in the path off the storm. the church behind me is called l�*eglise du sacre—coeur and as you can see it's been hugely impacted by this earthquake. you can see right the way through it. there is a statue of the virgin mary
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completely smashed, there are these huge lines that cut across church that is structurally unsound and actually the locals have told me they are worried about that spire up there could fall at any moment because there are these huge cracks down the side of it. up across the road you have the local coffin maker. a small business trying to make ends meet. and once again it has been totally decimated by this earthquake. and really this is a very similar story across this town. there are some buildings that are fine, or at least cracked but have not fallen, and others that have completely fallen in on themselves. the death count at the moment is still increasing and people are worried now about a storm. there are dark pounds over that way. we have heard it is raining in some parts of this region already, and people do worry that now they are forced out of their homes
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they are going to have to sleep in the wet and cold. the uk's medicines regulator has concluded the moderna covid vaccine is safe to use for children and young people aged between 12 and 17. it was authorised for use in northern ireland last month — but is now approved in england, scotland and wales. joing me here in the studio is our health correspondent naomi grimley. it still seen as a process that takes quite a long time, notwithstanding how rapidly these vaccines were developed in the first place. vaccines were developed in the first lace. , ., vaccines were developed in the first lace, , ., , , vaccines were developed in the first lace. , .,, , ., vaccines were developed in the first lace. , ., , , ., ., ., place. yes, in a sense of a downer is nowjoining _ place. yes, in a sense of a downer is nowjoining the _ place. yes, in a sense of a downer is nowjoining the pfizer— place. yes, in a sense of a downer is now joining the pfizer vaccine i is nowjoining the pfizer vaccine approved for 12 to 17—year—olds. earlier this month the pfizer vaccine it was announced was going to be used to jab 16 and 17—year—olds, and that process is now under way. they will all be offered by the beginning of next week. so, this announcement is interesting because it may be the
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prelude to younger teenagers being vaccinated. we don't know that for sure, though, this is simply about saying it is safe and effective and the regulator giving at the green light. it will be for the joint light. it will be for thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation to actually decide a rather advise ministers as to whether the younger teenagers get thejob. whether the younger teenagers get the 'ob. , ., , , , whether the younger teenagers get the'ob. , ._ , ., , whether the younger teenagers get the 'ob. , ._ , ., , ., ., the 'ob. presumably this does mean a net the job. presumably this does mean a net increase — the job. presumably this does mean a net increase supply _ the job. presumably this does mean a net increase supply of _ the job. presumably this does mean a net increase supply of vaccine - net increase supply of vaccine doses. , ., , ., , doses. yes, that is what is interesting, _ doses. yes, that is what is interesting, we _ doses. yes, that is what is interesting, we know- doses. yes, that is what is interesting, we know that l doses. yes, that is what is - interesting, we know that was 15, 16 and 17—year—olds there was no issue with supply for them, there were about 1.4 million of them, but again, the fact that they have now approved a second mrna vaccine for teenagers does suggest that they are looking at supply issues, and if they were to extend it to younger age groups, that would make things much easier. remember, the uk is not the only westernised country to be doing this. we are already saying teenagers being jabbed in canada,
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france, israeland, of course, teenagers being jabbed in canada, france, israel and, of course, the us. ., ~ , ., , . the headlines on bbc news. the senior british officer responsible for getting people to safety from afghanistan says up to 7000 could be evacuated — 300 have left so far but the taliban are controlling the gates of the airport. us presidentjoe biden defends his decision to withdraw troops from the country, saying the mission was counterterrorism, not nation—building. and bob dylan is being sued by a woman who says he sexually abused her in 1965 when she was 12 years old. he denies the allegations. the data watchdog is warning pub customers to think carefully before handing over personal information when signing up to apps before ordering drinks. app and web—based ordering has become pretty commonplace during the pandemic — and despite the easing of restrictions — the big pub chains are continuing to offer them
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as an option — but there are concerns about the amount of personal data being collected. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has the story. the lads are out for pints, but which will be quicker, the app or the bar? the race is on. table service sweeps in with the phone orders before the slow coaches make it back. if this place was packed, i would be dreaming for the app, i wouldn't go anywhere near the bar. you end up with ten different passwords, greene king, wetherspoons, i've got so many different apps. postcode, e—mail, there seems like a lot of irrelevant information that you don't technically need. the information is irrelevant, i we all know it's kind of the cost you have to pay almost, i think. the data watchdog wants customers to be careful not to give away too many personal details. if you think about an ordering app,
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what information is necessary it needs to be relevant to the order and it also needs to be not excessive. if you are a member of the public and you're filling in your details and you think, hang on a second, you want my name and address, you want all my personal details, question it. if it feels excessive, just pause for a second. we've been in touch with the biggest pub chains, who all say their apps are we've been in touch with the biggest pub chains, who all say their apps are here to stay. they said take—up of the apps is on the rise. are here to stay. they said take-up of the apps is on the rise.— of the apps is on the rise. small independent _ of the apps is on the rise. small independent businesses, - of the apps is on the rise. small independent businesses, the i of the apps is on the rise. sn—ii independent businesses, the take—up has been slower, but it's still around 50%. the data we collect from individuals has gradually been worn away now to a point where we want to make it as simple and easy as possible for customers to sign up. bar manager steve makes a little less money on every order, but it is time because plenty of customers are still using it. it’s time because plenty of customers are still using it— still using it. it's roughly 70% at the moment. — still using it. it's roughly 7096 at the moment, at— still using it. it's roughly 7096 at the moment, at the _ still using it. it's roughly 7096 at the moment, at the bar, - still using it. it's roughly 7096 at i the moment, at the bar, compared to the moment, at the bar, compared to the app. _ the moment, at the bar, compared to the app, which is 30. the busiest periods, — the app, which is 30. the busiest periods, friday and saturday nights,
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the app _ periods, friday and saturday nights, the app comes into play more, because — the app comes into play more, because people typically want to queue _ because people typically want to queue at— because people typically want to queue at the bar, so use table service — queue at the bar, so use table service more.— queue at the bar, so use table service more. ~ , ., ., ., ., , , service more. whether you are an app addict who has — service more. whether you are an app addict who has an _ service more. whether you are an app addict who has an app _ service more. whether you are an app addict who has an app version, - service more. whether you are an app addict who has an app version, the i addict who has an app version, the reality is these things are here to stay, with more and more venues offering apps as an option for customers to order, but for most of us the reality is we will never read the terms and conditions behind the 3pp, the terms and conditions behind the app, especially after you have had a few. howeverthe app, especially after you have had a few. however the next round is ordered, the chief question is who's paying. bob dylan is being sued by a woman who says the us singer—songwriter sexually abused her in 1965 when she was 12. her legal case alleges the star "exploited his status as a musician to provide her with alcohol and drugs and sexually abuse her multiple times", and used threats of physical violence. it says the abuse took place at dylan's apartment in new york's chelsea hotel. mr dylan denies the allegations. hundreds of firefighters in southern france are battling a wildfire that's forced thousands of residents
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and tourists to evacuate as a precaution. officials say the blaze broke out on monday and has so far burned more than three square kilometres of forest and scrubland to the west of the resort of saint—tropez. firefighting aircraft are dumping water to help douse the flames. investment in hydrogen energy to power vehicles and heat homes will create thousands of newjobs and reduce carbon emissions — that's according to a new government strategy. ministers hope the industry will attract billions of pounds in investment. it's thought the fuel could account for a third of the uk's energy use by 2050 but environmental campaigners say there should be more focus on renewably sourced hydrogen. i'm joined now by tim harper, ceo of the hydrogen company, element 2. he has been supporting the work that's been done on developing this hydrogen strategy. thank you very much for being with us. could you
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just take us back to basics? what is it that makes hydrogen a sustainable fuel? ~ , ., ., fuel? well, the energy that we are usin: has fuel? well, the energy that we are using has to _ fuel? well, the energy that we are using has to come _ fuel? well, the energy that we are using has to come from _ fuel? well, the energy that we are l using has to come from somewhere, and for the last hundred years or 200 years we have been digging it out of the ground, oil wells or gas reservoirs, and we know all about the problems that's causing, so the idea behind hydrogen is something you can create out of renewable energy, things like renewable wind, offshore wind, geothermal, whatever you want to do, and hydrogenjust allows you to store that energy in a form that you can use it where batteries can reach, for example in long—distance transport. in batteries can reach, for example in long-distance transport.— batteries can reach, for example in long-distance transport. in terms of the practicalities _ long-distance transport. in terms of the practicalities of _ long-distance transport. in terms of the practicalities of this, _ long-distance transport. in terms of the practicalities of this, i _ long-distance transport. in terms of the practicalities of this, i notice i the practicalities of this, i notice you are talking about element 2 decarbonising by 2030, the government says it's conceivable a
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third of all energy could be by 2050, what stands in the way of achieving that?— 2050, what stands in the way of achieving that? there's two things, one is the technology _ achieving that? there's two things, one is the technology for _ achieving that? there's two things, one is the technology for producing j one is the technology for producing hydrogen. we are lucky in that respect, hydrogen has been around for 20 odd years, and 20 years ago it is nice to have, and now with net zero, decarbonisation, it's a must have, so we are lucky that a lot of the technology that is available off the technology that is available off the shelf, and the reels colleges scaling up quickly enough. fortunately, with things like offshore wind, solar and other renewables, we have got a source of that electricity that you can then use to create the hydrogen that we are going to need, we are going to need quite a huge amount of hydrogen —based energy. i need quite a huge amount of hydrogen -based energy-— -based energy. i wonder if there is a bit of a contradiction _ -based energy. i wonder if there is a bit of a contradiction in _ -based energy. i wonder if there is a bit of a contradiction in the i a bit of a contradiction in the government strategy, because it's talking about sourcing hydrogen from fossil fuels. , talking about sourcing hydrogen from fossilfuels. , ~ �* , ., fossilfuels. yes. well, there's a
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whole spectrum _ fossilfuels. yes. well, there's a whole spectrum of _ fossilfuels. yes. well, there's a whole spectrum of colours i fossilfuels. yes. well, there's a whole spectrum of colours of i whole spectrum of colours of hydrogen. the main two that people are discussing at the moment is blue hydrogen and green hydrogen, so, green hydrogen is what we are basing our business on, it's100% renewable, so it comes from offshore, recycled waste all these kind of areas, where is blue hydrogen is effectively methane, and that's combined with carbon catching utilisation and storage to make it blue, otherwise it would be what's called grey hydrogen, which is what you just get if you use natural gas and turned into hydrogen. to clarify that, the blue _ and turned into hydrogen. to clarify that, the blue hydrogen _ and turned into hydrogen. to clarify that, the blue hydrogen the - that, the blue hydrogen the government is talking about, actually, we're not even ready for that, are we? carbon capture storage is we talk a lot about, ministers are able to get in their speeches, so we got this marvellous thing, back to the technology is not yet got to the stage where it's great to be back commercially viable. i think
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a lot of the — be back commercially viable. i think a lot of the government _ be back commercially viable. i think a lot of the government strategy i a lot of the government strategy tends to hedge their bets, because there's an assumption that some people come up with the technology between now and whether targets are set, and hence targets are 2040, 2050, to give people time to do that. it is an area that is moving fast, but as with everything else in hydrogen, it was just bubbling along because there wasn't much demand for the last 20 years, and the challenge really is to scale up those technologies to industrial scale. now you have government seriously interested, and therefore engaged in doing this, which presumably helps in that in terms of helping to create the interest that helps to create the interest that helps to create the interest that helps to create the market that would then help to make this more affordable. you are talking in the case of element 2 doing this without public subsidy. that sounds like quite a numeric thing to aim for. idat numeric thing to aim for. not reall . numeric thing to aim for. not really- it _ numeric thing to aim for. not really. it comes _ numeric thing to aim for. iirrt really. it comes down to the
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economics, sourcing green hydrogen in the next two or three years to supply the transport industry, by which i mean buses, heavy trucks, freight, i get that down to a cost thatis freight, i get that down to a cost that is comparable with diesel in terms of the cost of ownership. the economics work quite well. the government support is always useful, but if you sit on your hands waiting for the government to come up with a strategy, then you find yourself at the back of breaks, and somebody needed to crack this chicken and egg situation, basically, where can i feel something up with hydrogen? so we have gone out and raised private capital to enable us to build up the infrastructure, and it's a bit like the early days of ev, buying an electric car, you couldn't go anywhere if you couldn't charge it, hydrogen is exactly the same. you have to have a certain coverage of
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infrastructure for people to be able to make that switch away from diesel into hydrogen. tim to make that switch away from diesel into hydrogen-— into hydrogen. tim harper, fascinating _ into hydrogen. tim harper, fascinating stuff, _ into hydrogen. tim harper, fascinating stuff, thank- into hydrogen. tim harper, fascinating stuff, thank you into hydrogen. tim harper, i fascinating stuff, thank you for talking to us. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello, doesn't look like went to, most of the wetter weather has moved away, the crowd as they occur in scotland where we have seen some sunshine coming through, particularly have shelter from the wind, could get some sunshine across south—east wales, the west country, most of us are under a cloud, generally dry, the temperatures and cloudy skies typically only 17 or 18 degrees, a little bit one where you are lucky enough to see the sunshine. it may well lower back unto the hills, as well,
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as the winds drop and we have got a few pockets of light rain or drizzle here and there, and with the blanket of cloud, temperatures will be held at 12—14 degrees, as they were last night. could see some more persistent rain coming in to the northern isles, perhaps edging into northern parts of mainland scotland, but some sunshine, hopefully, elsewhere across other parts of scotland, and after a doll started many other parts of the uk, we should see the cloud tending to thin and lift a little bit. it won't look quite so gloomy, and many places will have a dry day on wednesday, and with those brighter skies, temperatures more widely getting up to 20 or 21 celsius. still on the cooler side, though, for this time of the year. heading into thursday and we are looking to the atlantic, a couple of weather systems to move very slowly in from the west. the first one is mainly going to bring some rain across northern ireland into wales and the south—west of england. there probably won't be much rain, either. ahead of that, we've still got those fairly cloudy skies with a hint of sunshine coming through now and again. the winds will be light on thursday. if you do get the sunshine, it will feel a little bit warmer, and temperatures still, again, up to 20 or 21 celsius at best. towards the end of the week,
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the next where the system begins to arrive, but it's making very slow progress. that band of rain is mainly going to be affecting ireland into northern ireland, but much of the uk may well be dry. a little bit of sunshine coming through. more, especially, across parts of england and wales, and we could see those temperatures getting up to 22 or even 23 degrees, and by the time we get to saturday we are likely to find a getting a bit warmer and sunnier across parts of england and wales ahead of that rain that arrives during the weekend.
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this is bbc world news, i'm yalda hakim. our top stories: kabul airport reopens for military evacuation flights after the taliban's takeover of afghanistan. the chaos at the airport on monday has been highlighted by newly—released satellite pictures showing people crowding onto the runway. president biden defends his decision to withdraw troops from afghanistan, saying the mission was counter—terrorism, not nation—building. i stand squarely behind my decisions. after 20 years, i've learned the hard way that there was never a good time to withdraw us forces. a time to withdraw us forces. major afghan media oi women a major afghan media outlet keeps women presenters on a screen. 0ne
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interview as a senior taliban official. hello and welcome to bbc news. let's go straight to afghanistan now. military flights have resumed at kabul airport a day after the scenes of chaos on monday, as people tried to cling on to a departing us air force plane. india was among those evacuating its personnel from afghanistan early on tuesday. a french military plane also departed. it's now two days since the taliban entered kabul without resistance, meaning they now effectively control the entire country. president biden has strongly defended his decision to withdraw us troops, saying the goals of the us mission in afghanistan had been counter—terrorism, not nation—building. 0ur diplomatic correspondent paul adams reports. at kabul airport, the exodus of foreigners continues, civilians boarding an indian
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military flight this morning. after yesterday's chaos, planes are once again leaving. earlier, france sent a plane to evacuate its citizens and their afghan colleagues. this vast international operation now gathering pace. the man running the british operation says he expects to bring out as many as 7000 people. how long have we got to do it? we don't really know and so every day, we are working as hard as we can to put as many forward into this pipeline as we possibly can. clearly, there is a dynamic political situation running across the city, we make no assumptions about that, other than that we really can't afford to pause and wait. and this is what it looks like for some. this extraordinary image from an american military flight on sunday. 650 afghans crammed on board. in the city, an uneasy, watchful calm, taliban fighters highly visible as they assert their authority and raise their flag.
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for now, the city appears to be functioning. those who have chosen to stay or have no choice, wondering what taliban rule will be like. let's see what afghanistan brings, i want to stay here, i want to fight for my students, i want to fight for our vision of afghanistan and i know things are never going to be the same any more, it'sjust, i have to be here. in herat, which fell to the taliban last week, some things have not changed. schoolgirls were at their desks today, scenes unthinkable when the taliban last ruled the country. my hope is that we will continue to resist any possible regression and any possible deprivation, and the taliban must also realise that they can't keep afghanistan to the knee, they have to live with the world. only in a moderate situation, moderate government, moderate islam, that we can live with ourselves and the world.
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these are strange, uncertain times. a world in which a female presenter in kabul can still interview a representative of the taliban. but for how long? it's been 20 years since the taliban last ruled kabul. not everyone here even remembers what it was like. the militants say they want an inclusive islamic government. what, people wonder, will that mean? paul adams, bbc news. the taliban have announced that discussions are under way about the setup of the future afghan government. we don't yet know what the power structure will be. but the taliban are now in charge, and here are their most prominent leaders. the group's leader is hibatullah akhundzada. known as the "leader of the faithful", he has ultimate authority over the taliban's political, religious and military affairs. he has three deputies — the first is one of the taliban's co—founders, and its political
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leader, mullah abdul ghani baradar. he was freed from prison in pakistan — at the request of the us — to lead peace talks. he is the taliban's most public face and has addressed the afghan people via social media. mullah muhammad yaqoob is the son the taliban's founder mullah 0mar. he swiftly rose to prominence after his father's death in 2013, and oversees the group's military operations. and sirajuddin haqqani is both a deputy leader of the taliban, and leader of the offshoot haqqani network. it's known for its deadly bomb attacks on afghan and nato forces. let's go straight to washington, dc and here straight from the pentagon spokesperson, john kirby.— spokesperson, john kirby. before i ask the general _ spokesperson, john kirby. before i ask the general to _ spokesperson, john kirby. before i ask the general to give _ spokesperson, john kirby. before i ask the general to give you - spokesperson, john kirby. before i ask the general to give you an i ask the general to give you an update, there is a couple of other things i want to get out there.
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first on haiti, in support of the us agency for international development, their bureaus are monetary in assistance, —— humanitarian assistance, they are working to provide a life—saving support for the people of haiti. they set up a joint task force, joint task force haiti, which will be led by rear admiral keith davids. he will be cutting the operating from home is dead air reserve base. thejtf from home is dead air reserve base. the jtf is now the forward elements of it, the —— from homestead air base. when i'm flying to helicopters at tahiti providing a picture of a head at this morning. —— to haiti.
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we have a ship going which will have a surgical team, we have a ship going which will have a surgicalteam, landing we have a ship going which will have a surgical team, landing craft to move things ashore. the us naval ship burlington is going to be used to provide aerial footage and assist with our overall assessment. two p8 poseidon maritime reconnaissance aircraft, which are currently operating out of el salvador, will also be sent to the region to provide aerial coverage and assist again in our assessment. that is where we are right now is getting a click picture of what the situation looks like on the ground dash and a clear picture. the assessment team on the ground will continue to look at the area and report back so that we can best coordinate and integrate us aidc and agency assistance. to the people of haiti. there are also two us coast guard cutters on station in southern haiti. there are seven additional cutters are now moving forward. there will also be
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one of the us coast guard fixed wing aircraft operating out of guantanamo bay to help us provide aerial visibility on how things look on the ground. we expect feel hospitals, four, from us southern command will be set up in southern haiti next week. the us military continues to provide a unique air, medical, logistical capabilities in support of us aidc and they are bureau of humanitarian assistance. they are leading this effort and we are supporting them to help save lives -- aid. we supporting them to help save lives —— aid. we will have more to say. that was a john kirby, the pentagon spokesperson. we are waiting for them to speak about afghanistan. as soon as that happens, we will go back to that press conference. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet
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is currently in dubai. she's trying to get into afghanistan. those heartbreaking, heart—stopping images yesterday, the chaos, the panic at kabul international airport will live long in memory and will be seared in history, notjust as a lesson forafghanistan, but forall international engagement, and certainly for the us looking forward. and that kind of panic we saw on the airfield yesterday hasn't gone away, even though it's much calmer, we're told, at the airport today with the military evacuation flights taking off today, the taliban at the gates of kabul of kabul and, at the gates of kabul and, yes, neighborhood by neighborhood, the taliban are now patrolling and literally afghan residents who are cautiously coming out of their homes are coming face to face with their new taliban protectors, the new government in afghanistan. and we are getting reports that the deputy leader of the taliban, the chief negotiator, mullah baradar, is on his way from the gulf state of qatar, where the taliban have their political office, to kabul to begin the task of setting up a new —
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well, what the taliban have always promised would be a new islamic system, a pure islamic system, as they say. but there's been some surprising images. afghan television presenters, female, interviewing taliban officials, female reporters, afghans on the streets. the ice cream vendors are back. there's been days of electricity when there was no electricity before. and some constants, the afghans, the taliban have asked the health minister, wahid majroh, to stay on, the mayor of kabul, daud sultanzoy, is still in charge. are these just sort of the holding pattern or will this be an administration that surprises some but, of course, is shattering for others? let's go back to washington, dc and that press conference. br; let's go back to washington, dc and that press conference.— let's go back to washington, dc and that press conference. by the end of toda , that press conference. by the end of today. there — that press conference. by the end of today, there will _ that press conference. by the end of today, there will be _ that press conference. by the end of today, there will be more _ that press conference. by the end of today, there will be more than i that press conference. by the end of| today, there will be more than 4000 trips on the ground in kabul. forces
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will continue to flow in and reinforce the state department and a dod effort there —— 4000 troops. the operation is ongoing and i would like to give you a few more details on that investigation. each kaya remain secure and is currently open for a military flight operations as well as commercial flight operations. throughout the night, nine se 17 is arrived at delivering equipment and approximately 1000 troops. additionally seven flight departed, lifting approximately 700-800 departed, lifting approximately 700—800 passengers and we can confirm 165 of these passengers are american citizens. they rest on a mix of sib applicants, third country nationals. responding to the situation, our initialfocus nationals. responding to the situation, our initial focus was to assert forces and equipment. as part
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of this force looking clouds, the speed of evacuation will pick up. right now we are looking at one aircraft per hour i. we predict that our best effort could be 5000—9000 passengers departing per day but we are mindful that he number of factors influenced this effort and circumstances could change. we will keep you updated. there are number of challenges for personnel any complex dynamic. we are content we have taken the right steps to resume or delay operations at the airport. we continue to prioritise the safety of military personnel and those who await evacuation from afghanistan. with great effort and care, we proceed through each day of this work. you have likely seen the image floating around of afghan families
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any cargo plane. this speaks to the humanity of our troops in this mission. the skill and professionalism of a us military. at the last point i would like to make is about the assess the threat right now. we have had no hostile or communications from the taliban and have not experienced any additional security incidents and we retain a security incidents and we retain a security that enables the safe and orderly evacuation of americans and afghans. i want to be in force we are focused on any present mission. to facilitate the safe evacuation of us citizens, sivs and afghans at risk, to get these personal out of afghanistan as quickly and safely as possible. that mission has not changed. the mission is of
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historical significance and is... i have another question for the general— have another question for the general and _ have another question for the general and a _ have another question for the general and a broader- have another question for the i general and a broader question for you. general and a broader question for you if_ general and a broader question for you if i_ general and a broader question for you. if i could _ general and a broader question for you. if i could start— general and a broader question for you. if i could start with _ general and a broader question for you. if i could start with him - you. if i could start with him first — you. ifi could start with him first. �* , , first. absolutely. i will 'ust leave. general, ii first. absolutely. i will 'ust leave. general, ithinki first. absolutely. iwilljust leave. general, ithink you first. absolutely. i willjust i leave. general, i think you said that leave. general, ithink you said that ou leave. general, i think you said that you would _ leave. general, i think you said that you would wrap _ leave. general, i think you said that you would wrap up - leave. general, i think you said that you would wrap up to i leave. general, i think you said that you would wrap up to one | that you would wrap up to one aircraft — that you would wrap up to one aircraft departure _ that you would wrap up to one aircraft departure per- that you would wrap up to one aircraft departure per hour. i that you would wrap up to one i aircraft departure per hour. that that you would wrap up to one aircraft departure per hour. that is the planning _ aircraft departure per hour. that is the planning figure. _ aircraft departure per hour. that is the planning figure. my _ aircraft departure per hour. that is the planning figure. my question i aircraft departure per hour. that isj the planning figure. my question is when will you _ the planning figure. my question is when will you get _ the planning figure. my question is when will you get there? _ the planning figure. my question is when will you get there? we i the planning figure. my question is when will you get there? we are i when will you get there? we are hoinu when will you get there? we are hoping within — when will you get there? we are hoping within the _ when will you get there? we are hoping within the next _ when will you get there? we are hoping within the next 24 - when will you get there? we arej hoping within the next 24 hours. when will you get there? we are i hoping within the next 24 hours. as the commander on the ground continues to build the there... the mention that _ continues to build the there... the mention that there has been no hostile — mention that there has been no hostile threats _ mention that there has been no hostile threats from _ mention that there has been no hostile threats from the - mention that there has been nol hostile threats from the taliban, does _ hostile threats from the taliban, does the — hostile threats from the taliban, does the us— hostile threats from the taliban, does the us have _ hostile threats from the taliban, does the us have an— hostile threats from the taliban, i does the us have an arrangement to
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allow— does the us have an arrangement to allow the _ does the us have an arrangement to allow the evacuation _ does the us have an arrangement to allow the evacuation to _ does the us have an arrangement to allow the evacuation to proceed i allow the evacuation to proceed until— allow the evacuation to proceed until august _ allow the evacuation to proceed until august 31 _ allow the evacuation to proceed until august 31 with _ allow the evacuation to proceed until august 31 with the - allow the evacuation to proceed until august 31 with the talibanl allow the evacuation to proceed i until august 31 with the taliban and the second — until august 31 with the taliban and the second question _ until august 31 with the taliban and the second question is, _ until august 31 with the taliban and the second question is, under- until august 31 with the taliban and the second question is, under whatj the second question is, under what circumstances _ the second question is, under what circumstances would _ the second question is, under what circumstances would the _ the second question is, under what circumstances would the us - the second question is, under what circumstances would the us troops| circumstances would the us troops leave _ circumstances would the us troops leave before — circumstances would the us troops leave before august _ circumstances would the us troops leave before august 31? _ circumstances would the us troops leave before august 31? on - circumstances would the us troops leave before august 31?— leave before august 31? on your first question. — leave before august 31? on your first question, what _ leave before august 31? on your first question, what i _ leave before august 31? on your first question, what i would i leave before august 31? on your first question, what i would tell| first question, what i would tell you is— first question, what i would tell you is coming out of general mackenzie's discussions with senior taliban— mackenzie's discussions with senior taliban leaders in doha, are commanders at the airport are in communication with taliban commanders on the ground outside the airport _ commanders on the ground outside the airport. there have been discussions and that— airport. there have been discussions and that is— airport. there have been discussions and that is communication between them _ and that is communication between them and _ and that is communication between them and us. i would just select the results _ them and us. i would just select the results speak for themselves. i'm not going — results speak for themselves. i'm not going to get into the details of how those — not going to get into the details of how those discussions are progressing because there are interactions multiple times a day and as— interactions multiple times a day and as a — interactions multiple times a day and as a general said, think very well— and as a general said, think very well there — and as a general said, think very well there has been no hostel interactions from the taliban to our operations— interactions from the taliban to our operations at the airport. the interactions from the taliban to our operations at the airport.— operations at the airport. the point ofthat operations at the airport. the point of that would _ operations at the airport. the point
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of that would be _ operations at the airport. the point of that would be to _ operations at the airport. the point of that would be to allow, - operations at the airport. the point of that would be to allow, that i operations at the airport. the point of that would be to allow, that the | of that would be to allow, that the taliban— of that would be to allow, that the taliban is— of that would be to allow, that the taliban is willing _ of that would be to allow, that the taliban is willing to _ of that would be to allow, that the taliban is willing to allow- of that would be to allow, that the taliban is willing to allow it - of that would be to allow, that the taliban is willing to allow it to i taliban is willing to allow it to proceed — taliban is willing to allow it to proceed and _ taliban is willing to allow it to proceed and they _ taliban is willing to allow it to proceed and they are - taliban is willing to allow it to i proceed and they are cooperating? taliban is willing to allow it to - proceed and they are cooperating? i would proceed and they are cooperating? would just let the results speak for themselves so far. we are not taking anything _ themselves so far. we are not taking anything for — themselves so far. we are not taking anything for granted. prior to august— anything for granted. prior to august 31? i'm sorry. right now, as a general— august 31? i'm sorry. right now, as a general made clear, the mission runs through august 31. the commander—in—chief made it very clear— commander—in—chief made it very clear we _ commander—in—chief made it very clear we are — commander—in—chief made it very clear we are to complete this drawdown by august to 31st. which now includes the drawdown of american _ now includes the drawdown of american citizens, the pulling out of american citizens and a drawdown of american citizens and a drawdown of emhassy— of american citizens and a drawdown of embassy personnel, so that is what _ of embassy personnel, so that is what we — of embassy personnel, so that is what we are focused on. that is the time _ what we are focused on. that is the time i_ what we are focused on. that is the time i wear— what we are focused on. that is the time i wear on and as the secretary made _ time i wear on and as the secretary made clear— time i wear on and as the secretary made clear to leaders, even as recently— made clear to leaders, even as recently as— made clear to leaders, even as recently as this morning, time is of the essence — recently as this morning, time is of the essence and we all share a sense of urgency _ the essence and we all share a sense of urgency. but right now, the mission — of urgency. but right now, the mission runs at two 31st of august and i_ mission runs at two 31st of august and i will— mission runs at two 31st of august and i will not begin to speculate on what happens after that. do and i will not begin to speculate on what happens after that.— what happens after that. do those discussions _ what happens after that. do those discussions with _ what happens after that. do those discussions with the _ what happens after that. do those discussions with the taliban i what happens after that. do those | discussions with the taliban include allowing _ discussions with the taliban include allowing afghans— discussions with the taliban include allowing afghans are _ discussions with the taliban include
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allowing afghans are americans i allowing afghans are americans around — allowing afghans are americans around these _ allowing afghans are americans around these checkpoints - allowing afghans are americans around these checkpoints or i around these checkpoints or expanding _ around these checkpoints or expanding a _ around these checkpoints or expanding a perimeter- around these checkpoints or i expanding a perimeter around around these checkpoints or - expanding a perimeter around the airport— expanding a perimeter around the airport so— expanding a perimeter around the airport so that _ expanding a perimeter around the airport so that people _ expanding a perimeter around the airport so that people can - expanding a perimeter around the airport so that people can get i expanding a perimeter around the. airport so that people can get there safely— airport so that people can get there safely question _ airport so that people can get there safely question mark— airport so that people can get there safely question mark we _ airport so that people can get there safely question mark we had - airport so that people can get there safely question mark we had that i safely question mark we had that people _ safely question mark we had that people cannot _ safely question mark we had that people cannot get _ safely question mark we had that people cannot get through - safely question mark we had that people cannot get through thesel people cannot get through these checkpoints _ people cannot get through these checkpoints and _ people cannot get through these checkpoints and cannot - people cannot get through these checkpoints and cannot get i people cannot get through these| checkpoints and cannot get there people cannot get through these i checkpoints and cannot get there to leave _ checkpoints and cannot get there to leave both — checkpoints and cannot get there to leave both. ~ l, checkpoints and cannot get there to leave both. ~ a, a, a, leave both. without going into detail of communications - leave both. without going into | detail of communications which leave both. without going into - detail of communications which i'm not a _ detail of communications which i'm not a part. — detail of communications which i'm not a part, there are interactions down _ not a part, there are interactions down at — not a part, there are interactions down at the _ not a part, there are interactions down at the local level and as a general— down at the local level and as a general said, we are processing american — general said, we are processing american citizens to get out. without _ american citizens to get out. without speaking to the sausage making — without speaking to the sausage making of communications here, thus far, making of communications here, thus far. and _ making of communications here, thus far. and it _ making of communications here, thus far. and it is— making of communications here, thus far, and it is early on, the results are speaking for themselves and i think— are speaking for themselves and i think it _ are speaking for themselves and i think it is — are speaking for themselves and i think it is probably when i would like to— think it is probably when i would like to leave it.— think it is probably when i would like to leave it. generaltaylor, on the numbers. _ like to leave it. generaltaylor, on the numbers, this _ like to leave it. generaltaylor, on the numbers, this is _ like to leave it. generaltaylor, on the numbers, this is now- like to leave it. generaltaylor, on| the numbers, this is now 700-800 the numbers, this is now 700—800 have _ the numbers, this is now 700—800 have gotten— the numbers, this is now 700—800 have gotten it. _ the numbers, this is now 700—800 have gotten it, so _ the numbers, this is now 700—800 have gotten it, so is _ the numbers, this is now 700—800 have gotten it, so is that— the numbers, this is now 700—800 have gotten it, so is that now- the numbers, this is now 700—800 have gotten it, so is that now a - have gotten it, so is that now a total— have gotten it, so is that now a total of— have gotten it, so is that now a total of around _ have gotten it, so is that now a total of around 1400 _ have gotten it, so is that now a total of around 1400 1500 - have gotten it, so is that now a l total of around 1400 1500 people since _ total of around 1400 1500 people since august _ total of around 1400 1500 people since august 14 _ total of around 1400 1500 people since august 14 being _ total of around 1400 1500 people since august 14 being taken- total of around 1400 1500 people since august 14 being taken out. since august 14 being taken out since _ since august 14 being taken out since it— since august 14 being taken out since it ilegen— since august 14 being taken out since it began question - since august 14 being taken out since it began question mark. since august 14 being taken out. since it began question mark yes, rc>ugh _ since it began question mark yes, rc>ugh numbers— since it began question mark yes, rough numbers to _ since it began question mark yes, rough numbers to include - since it began question mark yes, rough numbers to include the - since it began question mark yes, i rough numbers to include the sivs. from _ rough numbers to include the sivs. from an _ rough numbers to include the sivs. from an operational— rough numbers to include the sivs. from an operational perspective, . rough numbers to include the sivs.i from an operational perspective, is at their— from an operational perspective, is at their talk— from an operational perspective, is
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at their talk of— from an operational perspective, is at their talk of expanding _ from an operational perspective, is at their talk of expanding the - at their talk of expanding the perimeter— at their talk of expanding the perimeter around _ at their talk of expanding the perimeter around the - at their talk of expanding the l perimeter around the airport? at their talk of expanding the - perimeter around the airport? right now, the perimeter around the airport? right now. they feel— perimeter around the airport? right now, they feel like _ perimeter around the airport? right now, they feel like i _ perimeter around the airport? now, they feel like i said earlier is secure. —— the airfield is secure. we can continue to flow flight in and out sol secure. we can continue to flow flight in and out so i would say the airfield a secure right now to allow us to do that mission. just airfield a secure right now to allow us to do that mission.— us to do that mission. just to clari a us to do that mission. just to clarify a couple _ us to do that mission. just to clarify a couple of— us to do that mission. just to clarify a couple of things - us to do that mission. just to clarify a couple of things and | us to do that mission. just to - clarify a couple of things and what you said _ clarify a couple of things and what you said about— clarify a couple of things and what you said about these _ clarify a couple of things and what you said about these talks - clarify a couple of things and what you said about these talks with i clarify a couple of things and what i you said about these talks with the tatiban— you said about these talks with the taliban to — you said about these talks with the taliban to make _ you said about these talks with the taliban to make sure _ you said about these talks with the taliban to make sure i— you said about these talks with the taliban to make sure i get - you said about these talks with the taliban to make sure i get it,... i taliban to make sure i get it,... that— taliban to make sure i get it,... that was— a press c0 nfe re nce a press conference at the pentagon. much of the last 20 years were spent training afghan security forces to protect afghanistan from extremists, yet in a matter of days, the taliban has taken over that role and any country. we can now speak with the retired general david petraeus, a former commander of us troops in afghanistan, joining me now from washington. general, thank you very much forjoining us. president biden said he wants to get americans and afghans out. ijust want
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said he wants to get americans and afghans out. i just want to said he wants to get americans and afghans out. ijust want to get said he wants to get americans and afghans out. i just want to get a sense from you whether you think it has been probably managed and resourced. ~ ., ., ~' has been probably managed and resourced. ~ ., ., ,, , has been probably managed and resourced. ~ , . ., resourced. well, look, it is hard to see what we _ resourced. well, look, it is hard to see what we are _ resourced. well, look, it is hard to see what we are seeing _ resourced. well, look, it is hard to see what we are seeing on - resourced. well, look, it is hard to l see what we are seeing on television and describe that as smooth. but let's get past that very moment and really focus on what is going on and i think that is very commendable. we should work very hard to put that into terms the bbc audience will understand, in some respects this is a dunkirk moment. we need to do everything humanly possible with our most capable military forces together with state department diplomats and department of homeland security, these experts and all of the rest of it, get notjust all of the rest of it, get notjust all of the american citizens out of the kabul and ideally all of afghanistan, but to get those to whom we have a moral obligation, particularly the special immigrant visa qualifiers too, some 16 or
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17,000 of which are still left in afghanistan, time is her three family members in many cases who served two years on the ground as battlefield interpreters with our young men and women in uniform and have more than earned the opportunity to come to the united states. as we see is what clearly is a heartbreaking tragic disastrous outcome. i do not know how you can explain the taliban controlling afghanistan once again as anything other than disastrous. find afghanistan once again as anything other than disastrous.— other than disastrous. and it is difficult to _ other than disastrous. and it is difficult to get _ other than disastrous. and it is difficult to get past _ other than disastrous. and it is difficult to get past those - other than disastrous. and it is i difficult to get past those scenes yesterday, general. let's talk about that. because do you think the biden administration really understands the gravity of this crisis question mark or do you think they are just going to botch this up? filth. mark or do you think they are 'ust going to botch this up?* going to botch this up? oh, no, i think they _ going to botch this up? oh, no, i think they understand _ going to botch this up? oh, no, i think they understand very - going to botch this up? oh, no, i think they understand very much | going to botch this up? oh, no, i - think they understand very much the gravity of this, particular moment right now. i think there have been obviously some miscalculations previous to this in previous months when a number of us warned that
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there would be a psychological blow that accompanied our announcement to withdraw, then the actual withdrawal because i think there are many who just are still believed we would look into the precipice and a drawback. most of our coalition partners, many if not all, wanted to stay. a nato, i believe, wanted to stay. a nato, i believe, wanted to stay. and actually, the impact of something much overlooked was at the withdrawal of 18,000 or so civilian maintenance contractors who kept the us provided with helicopters —— us provided helicopters and planes operating. the afghan force with a critical element. they did fight for tour three days and then when the afghan commandos on those helicopters, the afghan close air support did not show up, they realised that nobody had any back, no one was coming to the rescue, no emergency resupply, and then they do her realise that no one has their back and that is either fully or cut a deal. this and afghans are
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survivors, at the end of the day. they have seen in many different countries' forces across the land, needless to say. let's focus on where we are right now, not on how to apportion blame or miss also but we do need to look at what went wrong, general, because we are now in the situation. ear; wrong, general, because we are now in the situation.— in the situation. say the president is the decider, _ in the situation. say the president is the decider, what _ in the situation. say the president is the decider, what is _ in the situation. say the president is the decider, what is the - in the situation. say the president is the decider, what is the role - in the situation. say the president is the decider, what is the role of| is the decider, what is the role of a national security team? welcome obviously it — a national security team? welcome obviously it is _ a national security team? welcome obviously it is to _ a national security team? welcome obviously it is to present _ a national security team? welcome obviously it is to present to - obviously it is to present to president in their best estimate of what it is that might happen under various circumstances in various contexts, various options and to provide courses of action to him and a recommendation. that is theirjob. now, i can't comment on what took place in the situation room in the west wing of the white house, obviously. i do understand that there were alternatives that were laid out. i believe that these were
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sustainable and measured in the expenditure of blood and treasure, but we have to recognise that we have not had an american battle loss since february of 2020, so the idea this was completely unsustainable, i do not think meets that particular merit. again, i do not think meets that particular merit. again, lam do not think meets that particular merit. again, i am uncomfortable with this... the blame everything on the afghans in this particular situation where clearly does not appear that there was a full appreciation of what might transpire. and by the way, i am sure the british soldiers and they will confirm, the afghans fought and died in enormous numbers over the years when they knew someone had their back and would be coming to the esco. that was usually us and coalition air power. —— to the rescue. again, the idea that they will not fight, afghans are born with an ak—47 in their hands and in many cases we had to hold them back somewhat. their losses were so high
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that we were worried that they would not be able to maintain the authorised... what we need to focus on right now is what is going on in thejob at hand, on right now is what is going on in the job at hand, which on right now is what is going on in thejob at hand, which i do believe thejob at hand, which i do believe the american administration very much understands and appreciates the gravity of the situation is to figure out how to get people from basements where they are e—mailing many of us, saying the taliban are going door to door to get... find going door to door to get... and that should _ going door to door to get... and that should not _ going door to door to get... and that should not happen. to - going door to door to get... and that should not happen. to get. going door to door to get... and - that should not happen. to get them to the perimeter _ that should not happen. to get them to the perimeter of _ that should not happen. to get them to the perimeter of the _ that should not happen. to get them to the perimeter of the approach - to the perimeter of the approach they can get inside the entry control point.— they can get inside the entry control point. i've seen those imaues, control point. i've seen those images, general, _ control point. i've seen those images, general, it— control point. i've seen those images, general, it is- control point. i've seen those i images, general, it is incredibly difficult to get into this actually apart now. of course it is. is that not the responsibility of the administration of the national security team to ensure that a plan and strategy was put in place to safely evacuate americans? because clearly what we can see right now is there is a failure of that. do you think they are put americans in harms way?—
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harms way? there is no way to describe the _ harms way? there is no way to describe the chaotic _ harms way? there is no way to describe the chaotic situation l harms way? there is no way to i describe the chaotic situation we are seeing as a smoothly unfolding. clearly what they are trying to do now is to have adequate security on the ground and we should be putting our most capable forces in there with all kinds of assets of a head. notjust drones, but close air support that is precise if need be. and any taliban should understand a very, very clearly that if the mp did the ethics of american citizens or those who qualify for the special immigrant visa and other categories probably, they will feel the military might of the united states. they are very familiar with that and know what we can do. we have got to figure out some modality to work with a group that we frankly despise as medieval ultraconservative if not extremist theocratic islamist who
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want to establish an emirate. and that prospect, by no means, obviously, can be seen as anything other than disastrous. i don't think. but let's see how they operate, let's see what they actually do now that they control afghanistan and, needless to say, we have to act accordingly. the president — have to act accordingly. the president biden _ have to act accordingly. the president biden has also said that we will be ready if al-qaeda re—emerges in afghanistan. is there a counterterrorism strategy that you think is in place? filth. a counterterrorism strategy that you think is in place?— think is in place? oh, i'm very confident— think is in place? oh, i'm very confident that _ think is in place? oh, i'm very confident that there _ think is in place? oh, i'm very confident that there is. - think is in place? oh, i'm veryj confident that there is. again, given what has transpired, very clearly there will be an enormous focus on identifying any successful effort by the al-qaeda remnants that are in afghanistan and pakistan, by the islamic state affiliates it, the group that has been established they are, that but that will be vastly more difficult because of the loss of the military footprint from
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within which intelligence assets obviously opposite. it is going to be vastly more difficult because we have no basis in pakistan or other neighbouring states and i don't think that we can expect that they are going to allow us to re—establish those. so everything is going to have to be conducted from bases that are in the gulf states or an aircraft carrier pact of pakistan, which will be very intermittent at best. and recognising the most important unblinking eye we can but over afghanistan, drones, will spend 60% of theirflight time afghanistan, drones, will spend 60% of their flight time getting to and from afghanistan because of the enormous distance we must travel. again, you can't go the straighter route between afghanistan and the gulf states, you can't go over iran, so you have to go out over the gulf south of pakistan and then north and into the country. so it is going to be enormously challenging and the director of the cia has been a very
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forthright in recognising that the challenges will exist, but i can assure you that they know the importance of this particular mission. again, especially what has transpired as a result of the policy that was taken —— decision that was taken by the white house because i know you do not want to start the blame game, but we were speaking to head of tullow news here, and he says this will be the new saigon moment. he says this will be the new saigon moment. , , moment. he says it will be the cambell moment. he says it will be the campbell moment, _ moment. he says it will be the campbell moment, the - moment. he says it will be the campbell moment, the image| moment. he says it will be the i campbell moment, the image of moment. he says it will be the - campbell moment, the image of people hanging off an aircraft, falling to their deaths —— kabul moment. the chaos that we saw. do they think there should be resignations of this? —— do you think? i there should be resignations of this? -- do you think?- this? -- do you think? i leave domestic— this? -- do you think? i leave domestic politics _ this? -- do you think? i leave domestic politics to _ this? -- do you think? i leave domestic politics to others - this? -- do you think? i leave | domestic politics to others and this? -- do you think? i leave - domestic politics to others and they can argue over that, the pundits on different news channels in the united states. i have enormous respect and actual affection for what the news dead, one of the many freedoms that just exist, what the news dead, one of the many freedoms thatjust exist, freedom of
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the press, —— what the news dead, and however slow the afghan government may have been, and it had distinct shortcomings, needless to say, it was oddly democratically elected and representative of the country of afghanistan and i am deeply saddened that organisations like that news that sustained casualties on many occasions but kept broadcasting, kept reporting, that they obviously will not be a feature of the future in afghanistan.— feature of the future in afghanistan. feature of the future in afr hanistan. �* ., feature of the future in afuhanistan. �* ., ,, ., feature of the future in afuhanistan. ., ,, ., afghanistan. and general, i know you have touched — afghanistan. and general, i know you have touched on _ afghanistan. and general, i know you have touched on this _ afghanistan. and general, i know you have touched on this briefly, - afghanistan. and general, i know you have touched on this briefly, but - afghanistan. and general, i know you have touched on this briefly, but of i have touched on this briefly, but of course at the afghan government bears responsibility and president ghani has led the country and the afghan people feel totally, totally abandoned, but was it fair for president biden to put the finger of blame squarely on the afghans? this president biden to put the finger of blame squarely on the afghans? first blame squarely on the afghans? as i mentioned blame squarely on the afghans? " i mentioned earlier, i thought it was a bit uncharitable, frankly,. ashraf
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ghani i have known for nearly 20 years. he gave up a lucrative job ghani i have known for nearly 20 years. he gave up a lucrativejob in the united states, he sold his house, he gave up his us citizenship, he made a number of sacrifices over the years and selflessly served his country. we can debate now again, later on perhaps, whether he should have left or negotiated, handed the keys to the taliban are what might have been the taliban are what might have been the best approach at that point in time, but again, at he moment like this, ifind it again time, but again, at he moment like this, i find it again a time, but again, at he moment like this, ifind it again a bit uncharitable to toss individuals under the bus are given the psychological blow that was struck. with our decision to withdraw. general petraeus, always a great to talk with you. thank you so much for joining us. that was general david
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petraeus. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the senior british officer responsible for getting people to safety from afghanistan says up to 7000 could be evacuated — 300 have left so far, but the taliban are controlling the gates of the airport. us presidentjoe biden defends his decision to withdraw troops from the country, saying the mission was counterterrorism, not nation—building. morejobs are available than ever before — and average pay is up too. and the moderna vaccine is approved for use in the uk for 12 to 17 year olds. and coming up — apprenticeships with a difference on one seaside town in devon.
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jon watson. good afternoon. the chelsea striker tammy anbraham has completed his move to the italian side roma for a fee of 34 million pounds. he's signed a five year deal and links up withjose mourinho who was appointed as the club's new manager at the end of last season. an academy player with chelsea, he wasn't picked by thomas tuchel for the champions league final and has found opportunities limited, even more so with the big money arrival of romelu lukaku from inter milan. an emotional naomi osaka has given herfirst press conference in three months. having received a bye into the second round at the cincinnati masters she reiterated the difficulty in facing tough questions so soon after competing. she refused to speak to the media at french open, and when faced with expulsion withdrew before taking some time away from the game.
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when you say i'm not crazy about dealing with you guys, what does that refer to? well, you said you don't especially like the press conference format. yet that seems to be the, obviously, the most widely used means of communicating to the media and through the media to the public. hm, that's interesting. conferences, is what i feel is the most difficult. andy murray says his hip and body feels good having moved into the second round of the cincinnati open he completed a straight sets victory over richard gasquet in what was his first singles match since his third round defeat at wimbledon six weeks ago. when he returned to competition following his resurfacing operation at this event two years ago, he lost to gasquet in the opening round. i thought i did well.
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i think i moved pretty well for my first singles match in a while, on the hard courts. certainly, a little bit more confidence in my movement than i did when i played him here a couple of years ago. it's the first match i've played since i had, singles match, since i've had the metal hip put in, so i was a bit apprehensive and he, you know, he uses all of the angles on the court really well and makes you move a lot. so you need to move well against him and i did that tonight. heather watson is also through to the second round of the women's event. she won in three sets against belarusian aliaksandra sasnovich and plays world number one ash barty next. england cricket head coach chris silverwood has warned players may lose their test spots after yesterday's disappointing defeat to india. joe root�*s side started the day with hopes of winning the second test, only to slip to a 151 run defeat. with pressure on england's top order silverwood said ben stokes will still be given the time
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he needs away from the sport. the important thing is that ben is ok, his family is ok, he feels 0k, his family is ok, he feels strong, when he re—enters the frame he is ready his mind to come back, i'm certainly not pushing him for an answer, i don't think that would be the right thing to do. there's people around him supporting him, when he is ready to come back in, we will welcome him back with open arms, but until then he will get all the support he needs. england's women will face world cup holders new zealand in back—to—back matches as the red roses contest four home tests this autumn. england, ranked one in the world, will play the black ferns twice before matches against canada and the us. the first meeting of the series is due to take place on the weekend of 29—31 october, with venues to be confirmed. that's all the sport for now.
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thank you very much. let's get more now on our top story, the taliban takeover of afghanistan. the chief of the taliban's political office, very familiar with him with his work on behalf of the taliban during the peace talks, he has left qatar. we are told that he and his delegation have landed in kandahar province. he will obviously have quite a lot to say in the establishment of a government, and he has been involved in the public relations, one of the spokespeople for the organisation, released from prison at the request of the united states when it was trying to broker the piece, in agreement that donald trump eventually signed. intriguing, in a sense, it illustrates the fact
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that there are potentially different low ki of power in afghanistan at the moment. there was an elected government, an elected president, who has fled, but one of his vice presidents, who used to be the spy chief, has more recently been interviewed by stephen sackur, he says that he is in afghanistan, iea hasn't fled, and he describes himself as the legitimate caretaker president. that's from reuters, who quotes his twitter account. the vice president who served under the last president who served under the last president says he remains in afghanistan with describes himself as the legitimate caretaker president. it will be interesting to see when that press conference promised involving the taliban in takes place. we will bring it to you
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if it takes place. be interesting to see what his responses if they are taking any questions. a round—the clock operation is under way to get people to safety from afghanistan to the uk, with the taliban controlling the gates at the airport. 300 people have already been brought out. vice admiral, sir ben key, who is running the uk evacuation operation says the aim is to bring out as many as 7,000 people. we brought outjust under 300 entitled personnel, british nationals, that's aside from all the embassy staff we brought back, and in the last few weeks, just shy of 2000 under the arap programme. looking ahead, i think the demand placed upon us is in the order of 6000, both arap and entitled personnel. those numbers are changing all the time, as we understand the scale of the ask. people are coming forward, making themselves known through the fcdo consular services or into us under the arap programme, but i think the order of the ask
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is going to be between 6,000 and maybe up to 7000 personnel. how long have we got to do it? we don't really know, and so everyday we are working as hard as we can to put as many forward into this as we possibly can. clearly there is a dynamic political situation running across the city. we make no assumptions about that other than that we really can't afford to pause and wait. so behnke, who is running the evacuation operation. i'm joined now by rehman chishti, who is the conservative mp for gillingham and rainham. he previously worked as a special advisor to benazir bhutto, the former prime minister of pakistan from 1999 to 2007. he's also been an advisor to many prominent conservative politicians. thank you for being with us. there
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is a kind of reality here, where whatever the arguments about the decision to get out, whatever the arguments about the past that preceded it, we are in a situation where it looks like the taliban is de facto in charge of afghanistan. what do we do in terms of establishing some kind of relationship with that regime? i relationship with that regime? i think what we have to look at, relationship with that regime? i think what we have to look at, of course, is what is the ground reality in afghanistan now is not what we would have liked to seen, what we would have liked to seen, what is concerning to many around the world is that the united states has not learnt from the past at all, actually. in 1989, the united states and the international community left afghanistan after the russians were defeated through the use of the mujahedin, which the international community supported, and after that episode, afghanistan was abandoned. in came the taliban, al-qaeda, i know we had a situation where the
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united states has done it again, the international partners have left and the endgame is a completely messed up the endgame is a completely messed up scenario which has now led to the taliban coming in. your question is, what we now do? well, the first question we have to ask is this. the reason we went into afghanistan in 2001 was in regards to a national security imperative, and the question now is how effective are we the international community going to be with regards to a national security threat by not having a small military presence on the ground in afghanistan which has helped avoid a security threat, terrorist attacks throughout the world for the last 20 years? the ground reality now for us is, how many levers to be have, and the answer to that is, i think we are very limited in terms of leaders, because there are international players, russia, china, neighbouring
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countries like iran and pakistan, so on that basis, the question is what can we do, what levers do we have to bring about firstly the one key commitment from the taliban, accepting that they are now an effective control of afghanistan, is to work with international partners to work with international partners to ensure that the assurances given and afghanistan will never, ever, ever be used by terrorist organisations or harbour terrorist activity. is organisations or harbour terrorist activi . , ' . , organisations or harbour terrorist activi . , , . organisations or harbour terrorist activi ., m activity. is effectively a quid pro uuo, activity. is effectively a quid pro quo. offering — activity. is effectively a quid pro quo, offering some _ activity. is effectively a quid pro quo, offering some kind - activity. is effectively a quid pro quo, offering some kind of - activity. is effectively a quid pro - quo, offering some kind of financial support helping them to stabilise the country? presumably that's all we can do. we start talking about guaranteeing these things, women's rights education or the rest of it,
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because however much we want those things, our levers are so limited. 1 things, our levers are so limited. i think quite frankly to say we want to talk tough, you can do this, it you can do this, we are in a very difficult situation, we want to push hard to deliver with regards to the reality of the ground now, they now control, at this point of time, whether they are able to control that line for an amount of time is a different question, but at this point in time, what are the levers we have two to comply with certain conditions? i would say we do have leveraged, but it is limited, it is working with other countries, for example of the security point, china has a real concern with regards to their uighurs, they have a security issue, with pakistan, refugees from
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afghanistan, it's lost over 70 to 80,000 people, so security is it we can work with china, iran, and other countries who may not see eye to eye on other issues, but the current approach is to ensure that, look, we want to help rebuild afghanistan so that the ordinary citizen in afghanistan is not going to suffer, but not directly given giving money to the taliban, to see how genuine they are for reform, they say it, but the proof is in the pudding. just on the question of rebuilding afghanistan, people say we spent a lot of money there are ready not least to support an army that pretty much banished from the battlefield, asjoe much banished from the battlefield, as joe biden much banished from the battlefield, asjoe biden rather bitterly implied in his statement yesterday. we have already cut international aid by half a percent, so presumably the amount of money we have available to
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afghanistan is going to be limited. putting all that to one side, you mention an important point about regional players, china, iran, russia. pakistan hugely important, lot of controversy about the relationship with the taliban, and whether they were involved with al-qaeda when they were in afghanistan, imran khan has been quoted as saying that the people afghanistan have thrown off the shackles of slavery. pakistan is an ally of britain, as well. what can we hope from pakistan given that kind of rhetoric? presumably, frankly, building a good relationship with afghanistan is much more important to pakistan than what we think. i much more important to pakistan than what we think-— what we think. i think you are absolutely — what we think. i think you are absolutely spot _ what we think. i think you are absolutely spot on. _ what we think. i think you are absolutely spot on. if- what we think. i think you are absolutely spot on. if i - what we think. i think you are absolutely spot on. if i can i what we think. i think you are l absolutely spot on. if i can just come to pakistan, if i say this, intensive developmental support for afghanistan, the people who need our help, we need friends of syria,
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other partnerships, people had to come together through a contact group, the united kingdom can facilitate bring them all together. your point on pakistan, i think you're absolutely right. which country has suffered the most from the withdrawal of the international community from afghanistan? when benazir bhutto was my government came in, as a result, they lost 80,000 civilians, and also the school incident, innocent children killed by the taliban in pakistan. the country itself has suffered immensely as a result of what's been going on in afghanistan into pakistan, they need our support, so with regards to your point, we have cut international development aid 4.7% to .5%, i voted against that. i think we need support, i've what
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support are we going to give to neighbouring countries, what is what we going to get to them? the issue of what happens in afghanistan, the country with pakistan, knows these elements in afghanistan, because over the years they had to deal with them on their own national security, so ensuring there is no terrorist threats coming from afghanistan is as much importance pakistan as the united states, as to the uk, as it is the people into general around the world, so i think that is crucial, but in terms far leveraged with the taliban, there are three main trading partners are pakistan, iran and china, so terms or leveraged at the moment, we do not have that much leverage. it's working with the regional players, whether it's china, we may not agree with them on many things on their
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values, but i think from a national security perspective we have to work with them and other international partners to ensure everything they can be done to ensure that the issue of our security is maintained. just while we continue our conversation, i want to point out that the news conference i mentioned in kabul is beginning. we can look at some pictures of that. we don't yet have an english translation of what he is saying, but this conference will give us some enlightenment, hopefully, but what exactly the taliban is planning for the coming weeks and months. let me ask you one last point, i was talking to a tajik afghan who lives in london and exile, and he was saying that a lot of minorities there are worried about how they will use their new power and influence under the taliban. is it something that concerns you? it
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taliban. is it something that concerns you?— taliban. is it something that concerns you? it most certainly does. i concerns you? it most certainly does- l was _ concerns you? it most certainly does. i was the _ concerns you? it most certainly does. i was the former - concerns you? it most certainly does. i was the former british i does. i was the former british envoy, i worked with international partners to address the issue of individuals being persecuted for the faith, and afghanistan you have got various communities which have been persecuted, you also have cican hindu communities, and what comes now is working with international partners to see how the new caliban administration, said as a new way of doing things. if they really want to change and reform, say, the proof is in the pudding, how they treat minorities, signing up to respecting minority rights, but as the former british envoy for religious freedom i have concern as regards to minority rights and individuals minority rights and individuals minority faith, and in our
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evacuation programme, we have to ensure that women, children, different of t people of faith backgrounds, and make sure the resettlement programme is as generous as it possibly can be, in these challenging times, many of people who have supported us against the extreme elements of the taliban. thank you very much. these are live pictures from kabul, where taliban spokesman, zabihullah mujahid, is speaking. it is taking place in facility by the afghan government used to hold conferences. we have a number of leaders conducting this, one of them as a spokesperson who has been very familiar face as a spokesperson who has been very familiarface for as a spokesperson who has been very familiar face for afghans over many years and has been also someone who generously spoken to over a number of years, often there is the use of
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pseudonyms so people cannot be tracked down, and it has been the case, so a lot of the names, we can actually guarantee they are the real names, the given names of the people who use them, and have obviously use them over the last 20 years, because they have been an organisation on they have been an organisation on the run, and persona non grata in afghanistan. this news conference is taking place at the moment, i guess we will be interested in finding out from the taliban what exactly is planned next for afghanistan. i don't even know at this stage whether or not they are taking questions from the journalist whether it is more like a press statement on a conference, but it will be interesting to see if they do so. in the last couple of years that halliburton has developed quite a sophisticated pr department, and
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it was not the case when they were ruling afghanistan, and it's what people are hoping is that people who have spent so much time out of afghanistan, an organisation that began as an insular organisation for the country alone will be one that is much more engaged with the outside world, and maybe some of the preoccupations might have moderated some of the hardline interpretation of sharia law that the organisation was known for what it is in office. it's probably unrealistic to expect significant changes, but the hope is that the status of women in afghan society which has transformed over the last few years, and young girls and women have been deeply afraid about what will happen once the taliban are back in power. that is a
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news conference taking place in kabul, we will have a translation in due course, and once we have that we will bring some of the main points, or we will return to it like if we get the translation of live at the same time. the uk economy is continuing to bounce back from lockdown— with job vacancies hitting a record high of almost one million — and wages ticking up. unemployment also fell in the three months tojune. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. at this construction site in huddersfield, 18 houses are being built but so far only four have been completed. the amount of work getting done in the construction industry has been slowing down across the country, not because of covid but two shortages, raw materials and workers. in this sector alone there are now 38,000 vacancies being advertised. there is a shortage of young people coming into the industry, without a shadow of a doubt. we need more young people of all trades, bricklayers, carpenters, plumbers, electricians, and there is an acute shortage.
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this site has kept on workers into their 605 and across the industry they are being forced to pay more, with the average wage up by 12% in the last year. and it's notjust this industry. across the economy, vacancies are a fifth higher than before coronavirus and employers can't find the staff they need. i think it is a perfect storm of lots of things, we have had a pandemic, people have not been moving jobs, people have been sticking where they are, so you've got a lack of candidate movement, we have had a lot of eu workers that have gone home during the pandemic and it is difficult to get back if you want to. and the skill shortages, you're going back to a lack of apprenticeships from a long time ago that have not been coming through. there are still about 1.9 million more people workless than there were before the pandemic, with more than 607,000 fully furloughed, nearly 850,000 partially furloughed, 201,000 fewer on employers' payrolls and nearly 300,000 fewer in self—employed work.
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slowest to recover from the pandemic�*s economic symptoms is london where there are still far fewerjobs to be done serving coffee and lunch to workers in the city, for example, many of whom are still working from home. but in the wider economy, the big issue in thejobs market is now not so much people who cannot find work as employers who cannot get the staff. in health and social care, for example, a record 161,000 roles are going unfilled. that's likely to put increased pressure on inflation notjust in rising prices but lengthening queues and waiting times. andy verity, bbc news. let mejust let me just update you on the news conference being hosted by the taliban spokesperson. to quote him, i would like to congratulate the whole nation, this is a proud moment for the whole nation of afghanistan.
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more from that news conference in the course of the next hour. to stay with us. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello, there. it really doesn't look or feel like the middle of august at the moment. the next few days will stay cool, often cloudy, could be a little rain or drizzle down again, and it was quite a damp start this morning across england and wales. most of that wet weather has moved away now, and the clouds a bit thinner, actually, in scotland, where we are seeing some sunshine coming through, particularly where we have got shelter from that north—westerly wind. cool wind once again today, could get some sunshine across south—east wales, the west country. most of us, though, are under a cloud. it's generally dry. those temperatures in the cloudy skies typically only 17 or 18 degrees. a little bit warmer where you are lucky enough to see the sunshine. this evening and overnight, we generally keep that covering of cloud. it may well lower back unto the hills, as well, as the winds drop and we have got a few pockets of light rain or drizzle here and there, and with the blanket of cloud, temperatures will be held at 12—14 degrees, as they were last night. could see some more persistent rain
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coming in to the northern isles, perhaps edging into northern parts of mainland scotland, but some sunshine, hopefully, elsewhere across other parts of scotland, and after a dull started many other parts of the uk, we should see the cloud tending to thin and lift a little bit. it won't look quite so gloomy, and many places will have a dry day on wednesday, and with those brighter skies, temperatures more widely getting up to 20 or 21 celsius. still on the cooler side, though, for this time of the year. heading into thursday and we are looking to the atlantic, a couple of weather systems to move very slowly in from the west. the first one is mainly going to bring some rain across northern ireland into wales and the south—west of england. there probably won't be much rain, either. ahead of that, we've still got those fairly cloudy skies with a hint of sunshine coming through now and again. the winds will be light on thursday. if you do get the sunshine, it will feel a little bit warmer, and temperatures still, again, up to 20 or 21 celsius at best. towards the end of the week, the next weather system begins to arrive, but it's making very slow progress. that band of rain is mainly going to be affecting ireland
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into northern ireland, but much of the uk may well be dry. a little bit of sunshine coming through. more, especially, across parts of england and wales, and we could see those temperatures getting up to 22 or even 23 degrees, and by the time we get to saturday we are likely to find it getting a bit warmer and sunnier across parts of england and wales ahead of that rain that arrives during the weekend.
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talk with you. thank you so much for joining us. you're watching bbc news, it is just before 4pm,. these are live pictures from kabul, where taliban spokesman, zabihullah mujahid, is speaking. translation: unfortunately, the last government was weak and did not keep their promises. government was weak and did not keep their promises-— their promises. there were security forces, their promises. there were security forces. army. _ their promises. there were security forces, army, police, _ their promises. there were security forces, army, police, but _ their promises. there were security forces, army, police, but they- their promises. there were security forces, army, police, but they all. forces, army, police, but they all left theirjobs. it forces, army, police, but they all left their jobs. it was forces, army, police, but they all left theirjobs. it was because of the last government. so there was no police or law and order on the streets. but they were using the
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name of islamic emirate. the gangs started looting, so we had to, we had no choice but to deploy our own forces in the city. this we had told everybody that we are not coming with force to kabul, but when we saw the gangsters taking advantage of our name and at the situation and the vacuum that was created because of security forces are leaving their jobs, that is why we have deployed our forces now, jobs, that is why we have deployed ourforces now, but we jobs, that is why we have deployed our forces now, but we are reassuring all kabul residents their security is ensured. it is very understandable the international community is expressing worries about any security and about afghanistan. but i reassure all
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internationals, the un, all embassies, to our neighbours that we will not be allowing the soil of afghanistan to be used against anybody. we assure them we keep our promises and we keep the islamic emirate' promises. but we expect the international community, the internationals to speak to isaac, to sit with isaac, to talk to us and express their concerns direct to —— to speak to us. we do not want political turmoil and they have to respect our religious rules because the emirate has sacrificed a lot for their
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religion. anybody want to talk to us, they are free. this is our right, this is afghanistan's right to be able to speak according to our own rules. this is how the world works. everybody wants their own rules. arabic countries have their own law, so we are following a own law. afghans are following at their own laws. we have this right. they are in favour of our people, but no international community, no internationals should worry about that. as long as they respect our law, our rules. the issue of women —— those issues of women are very important issues. the islamic emirate believes we have rights for women in islam, all our sisters,
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although women are secure. —— all are women. our god, our koran says that women are a very important part of our society. they can work, they can get education, they are needed in our society. and that they will be actively involved. this if any international community is worried about these issues, we will tell them there will be no, nothing against women in our ruling. our people except our women are muslims, they accept islamic rules. if they continue to live according to sherry aya, we will be happy, they will be happy. aya, we will be happy, they will be happy--- aya, we will be happy, they will be happy. —— live according to sharia.
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we hope that when afghanistan comes out of work, out of fighting, the economy will improve and we will take very serious steps to improve our economy. we have spoken to many countries. we want them to work on our economy, we want them to help us. we are giving reassurance to all afghan people that we will change the afghanistan, our country very soon. it will be a positive change. i know that every afghan wants to have a better life and if we all move with that motive, that everyone wants to have a better life, we will
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ensure that security for them and we will make a better life at everybody. this it will be a government that serves government. they will not force people, but they will work for any benefits of people. inshallah. iwant will work for any benefits of people. inshallah. i want to reassure all media groups if any work according to our islamic rules, to sharia, they will be free, they can work, they can broadcast freely, but i have three requests for the media. first, they need to know that islam in afghanistan is very important. if there is anything against islamic law or sharia on their broadcast, they will not be allowed. but according to islam,
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they have at the whole of freedom to broadcast freely. this we know that free broadcasting, fair broadcasting, if they are fair, they can criticise us so we know our mistakes, but it all needs to be fair. and balanced. so they are serving the people, they are serving the government, we want them to be biased, we want them to be balanced and fair, and they need to serve our national values. there are very important for us. this but if broadcasting is against our national
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values, if they are broadcasting ethnic issues, if they are doing it with purpose of ethnic violence, then we will not allow that. we want every afghan to live together, we want them to live as brothers and sisters together in one country and we want our media to help us and work with us. and i thank you so much for attending this press conference and being with us. we will have a lot of press conferences. i know you all want to ask questions. and i was a bit late. i had a very long trip and journey, but ijust came i had a very long trip and journey, but i just came for you i had a very long trip and journey, but ijust came for you because at this is my initial meeting, initial
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press conference. yes, i will let you ask questions as well. yes, i will let you. one question at a time. aljazeera reporter, honeyed. we will give you a chance. —— honeyed. you can speak in english. i want to talk to about _ you can speak in english. i want to talk to about women's _ you can speak in english. i want to talk to about women's rights - you can speak in english. i want to talk to about women's rights and i talk to about women's rights and girls' _ talk to about women's rights and girls' rights — talk to about women's rights and girls' rights and _ talk to about women's rights and girls' rights and our— talk to about women's rights and girls' rights and our concern, - talk to about women's rights and girls' rights and our concern, will women _ girls' rights and our concern, will women be — girls' rights and our concern, will women be allowed _ girls' rights and our concern, will women be allowed to _ girls' rights and our concern, will women be allowed to work- girls' rights and our concern, will women be allowed to work and l girls' rights and our concern, will. women be allowed to work and girls will be _ women be allowed to work and girls will be able — women be allowed to work and girls will be able to — women be allowed to work and girls will be able to go _ women be allowed to work and girls will be able to go to _ women be allowed to work and girls will be able to go to school? - women be allowed to work and girls will be able to go to school? what i will be able to go to school? what assurances — will be able to go to school? what assurances can _ will be able to go to school? what assurances can you _ will be able to go to school? what assurances can you give _ will be able to go to school? what assurances can you give to - will be able to go to school? whatj assurances can you give to women will be able to go to school? what - assurances can you give to women and .irls assurances can you give to women and girls that _ assurances can you give to women and girls that their— assurances can you give to women and girls that their rights _ assurances can you give to women and girls that their rights be _ girls that their rights be protected? _
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translation: i have my own translator, that is fine. they're asking about women's rights, will you be allowing them to study. i did explain our plans for women, they are not allowed to work, they are allowed to educate according to sharia, they are a very important part of society, we need them, they need to be actively involved in our society, but according to sharia. women will be offered all their rights — women will be offered all their rights whether it is in work or
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activities _ rights whether it is in work or activities because women are a key part of— activities because women are a key part of our— activities because women are a key part of our society. and we are guaranteeing all of their rights within— guaranteeing all of their rights within the limits of a slam. —— islam~ — within the limits of a slam. -- islam. ., ~ .. within the limits of a slam. -- islam. ., ~ ., within the limits of a slam. -- islam. ., ~ islam. from america, can i ask you what... what guarantees will you give to the afghans _ what guarantees will you give to the afghans for — what guarantees will you give to the afghans for now _ what guarantees will you give to the afghans for now hiding _ what guarantees will you give to the afghans for now hiding at _ what guarantees will you give to the afghans for now hiding at home - what guarantees will you give to the afghans for now hiding at home and | afghans for now hiding at home and want to— afghans for now hiding at home and want to leave — afghans for now hiding at home and want to leave the _ afghans for now hiding at home and want to leave the country _ afghans for now hiding at home and want to leave the country who - afghans for now hiding at home and want to leave the country who are l want to leave the country who are the americans _ want to leave the country who are the americans will— want to leave the country who are the americans will transport? - want to leave the country who are the americans will transport? toi want to leave the country who are i the americans will transport? to the upper— the americans will transport? to the upper cut— the americans will transport? to the upper cut what — the americans will transport? to the upper cut what guarantees? - the americans will transport? to the upper cut what guarantees? this - the americans will transport? to the upper cut what guarantees? this is i upper cut what guarantees? this is very important. _ upper cut what guarantees? this is very important, this _ upper cut what guarantees? this is very important, this is _ upper cut what guarantees? this is very important, this is a _ upper cut what guarantees? this is very important, this is a man- upper cut what guarantees? this is very important, this is a man who. upper cut what guarantees? this isl very important, this is a man who is being _ very important, this is a man who is being held _ very important, this is a man who is being held hostage _ very important, this is a man who is being held hostage by— very important, this is a man who is being held hostage by the _ very important, this is a man who is being held hostage by the taliban. i being held hostage by the taliban. on behalf— being held hostage by the taliban. on behalf of— being held hostage by the taliban. on behalf of his _ being held hostage by the taliban. on behalf of his parents, - being held hostage by the taliban. on behalf of his parents, they- being held hostage by the taliban. on behalf of his parents, they had| on behalf of his parents, they had asked _ on behalf of his parents, they had asked me — on behalf of his parents, they had asked me to— on behalf of his parents, they had asked me to ask _ on behalf of his parents, they had asked me to ask you _ on behalf of his parents, they had asked me to ask you whether - on behalf of his parents, they had asked me to ask you whether you| on behalf of his parents, they had i asked me to ask you whether you will now commit— asked me to ask you whether you will now commit to — asked me to ask you whether you will now commit to release _ asked me to ask you whether you will now commit to release him. -
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translation: let me answer that first. just translating the question, what a reassurance that you can give to the americans who have been translator are hiding in home who want _ translator are hiding in home who want to— translator are hiding in home who want to go— translator are hiding in home who want to go —— translators under heading — want to go —— translators under heading at _ want to go —— translators under heading at home. translation: i want to reassure all our countrymen. _ translation: i want to reassure all our countrymen, whoever _ translation: i want to reassure all our countrymen, whoever has - translation: i want to reassure all| our countrymen, whoever has worked in the military, in translation, we have given amnesty to everybody. there is no revenge. all those young people who have a talent, who have got education, we do not want them to leave, we want them to be here in
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afghanistan, work for their own country. i reassure all of them know when it will go after them, no one will ask them why you worked with, or why you translated for the americans? orsupported or why you translated for the americans? or supported them. there is a no dangerfor them. and you asked me about a prisoner? i don't know about that. it might be related to other years of the work, i don't have any information about that. dashing of the war. we are assuring the safety— dashing of the war. we are assuring the safety of all those who have worked — the safety of all those who have worked with the united states and forces, _ worked with the united states and forces, whether as interpreters or other— forces, whether as interpreters or other field — forces, whether as interpreters or other field that they have worked with them. as for their talents and skills. _ with them. as for their talents and skills. we — with them. as for their talents and skills, we do not want them to leave the country. — skills, we do not want them to leave the country, we want them to server their own _ the country, we want them to server their own homeland. as for the contractor— their own homeland. as for the contractor who was perhaps gone
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missing, — contractor who was perhaps gone missing, as reported by the media, we do _ missing, as reported by the media, we do not _ missing, as reported by the media, we do not have any information about him at _ we do not have any information about him at the _ we do not have any information about him at the moment. question being asked. the question is about— question being asked. the question is about thousands _ question being asked. the question is about thousands of _ question being asked. the question is about thousands of people _ question being asked. the question is about thousands of people leaving . is about thousands of people leaving the airport. — is about thousands of people leaving the airport, wanted _ is about thousands of people leaving the airport, wanted to _ is about thousands of people leaving the airport, wanted to leave - is about thousands of people leaving the airport, wanted to leave the - the airport, wanted to leave the country — the airport, wanted to leave the count . ~ ,, �* the airport, wanted to leave the count . ~ ,, ~ ., country. translation: i am assuring them, country. translation: i am assuring them. please _ country. translation: i am assuring them, please come _ country. translation: i am assuring them, please come home. _ country. translation: i am assuring them, please come home. the - them, please come home. the leadership of the islamic emirate have ordered nobody is allowed to be
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hunted. , .,, ., ., ., hunted. some people have gone, no. the are hunted. some people have gone, no. they are not — hunted. some people have gone, no. they are not taliban, _ hunted. some people have gone, no. they are not taliban, they _ hunted. some people have gone, no. they are not taliban, they are - hunted. some people have gone, no. they are not taliban, they are not. they are not taliban, they are not our forces. they are not taliban, they are not ourforces. they they are not taliban, they are not our forces. they are just gangsters. however has gone to people's houses, they are not through taliban. —— however has gone to people's houses. but when we thought, i know they fought against us with the americans, but now the country has changed, no one is following them, i reassure them. no one will be asking them questions why they worked with them questions why they worked with the americans are with foreigners. they are allowed to come back, they don't need to leave. there is amnesty for everybody. question being asked. translation:
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your giving amnesty to everybody, do you think— your giving amnesty to everybody, do you think people _ your giving amnesty to everybody, do you think people will— your giving amnesty to everybody, do you think people will give _ your giving amnesty to everybody, do you think people will give you - you think people will give you amnesty? _ you think people will give you amnesty? do— you think people will give you amnesty? do you _ you think people will give you amnesty? do you think - you think people will give you amnesty? do you think they. you think people will give you . amnesty? do you think they will forgive — amnesty? do you think they will forgive you? _ amnesty? do you think they will forgive you? there _ amnesty? do you think they will forgive you? there has - amnesty? do you think they will forgive you? there has been - amnesty? do you think they will forgive you? there has been a i amnesty? do you think they will. forgive you? there has been a lot amnesty? do you think they will- forgive you? there has been a lot of bloodshed _ forgive you? there has been a lot of bloodshed in — forgive you? there has been a lot of bloodshed in cobble, _ forgive you? there has been a lot of bloodshed in cobble, a _ forgive you? there has been a lot of bloodshed in cobble, a lot— forgive you? there has been a lot of bloodshed in cobble, a lot of- forgive you? there has been a lot ofj bloodshed in cobble, a lot of people have lost _ bloodshed in cobble, a lot of people have lost lives. _ bloodshed in cobble, a lot of people have lost lives. what _ bloodshed in cobble, a lot of people have lost lives. what do _ bloodshed in cobble, a lot of people have lost lives. what do you - bloodshed in cobble, a lot of people have lost lives. what do you tell - have lost lives. what do you tell those _ have lost lives. what do you tell those families _ have lost lives. what do you tell those families who _ have lost lives. what do you tell those families who have - have lost lives. what do you tell those families who have lost - have lost lives. what do you tell . those families who have lost loved ones? _ translation: i have to say, we have given amnesty to everybody, we have forgiven everybody. this given amnesty to everybody, we have forgiven everybody.— forgiven everybody. this is the wheels of _ forgiven everybody. this is the wheels of islamic _ forgiven everybody. this is the wheels of islamic emirates. i forgiven everybody. this is the | wheels of islamic emirates. we forgiven everybody. this is the - wheels of islamic emirates. we are not a revenge in them. but we have not a revenge in them. but we have not taken revenge steps against anybody, but during the war, during the fight, there was no choice. somebody must have been harmed. in a
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war, it happens. it has been a 20 years that we are inviting. —— in fighting. we have defeated a very forceful pub. we have liberated our country —— forceful power. our own families have also lost, our people, our forces have died. families have also lost, our people, ourforces have died. in this situation, it was of out of our hands. it was a crisis, it was a war. we say sorry to those people who have lost. it is because of war. there is a loss in war, there is a death in war —— deaths in work. people who were not involved in the fighting, we did not do revenge. it just happened because there was a war. we were fighting. we have given
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amnesty to everybody, we want them to give us forgiveness. sat translation: please be quiet. it is at the thursday that he taliban _ it is at the thursday that he taliban have _ it is at the thursday that he taliban have entered - it is at the thursday that he taliban have entered kabul| it is at the thursday that he - taliban have entered kabul city, mr mujahid _ taliban have entered kabul city, mr mujahid deed. _ taliban have entered kabul city, mr mujahid deed, there _ taliban have entered kabul city, mr mujahid deed, there are _ taliban have entered kabul city, mr mujahid deed, there are no - taliban have entered kabul city, mrj mujahid deed, there are no security forces _ mujahid deed, there are no security forces here~ — mujahid deed, there are no security forces here. there _ mujahid deed, there are no security forces here. there are _
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mujahid deed, there are no security forces here. there are no _ mujahid deed, there are no security forces here. there are no security. forces here. there are no security guards _ forces here. there are no security guards in — forces here. there are no security guards in the _ forces here. there are no security guards in the city, _ forces here. there are no security guards in the city, but _ forces here. there are no security guards in the city, but the - forces here. there are no security guards in the city, but the city- forces here. there are no security guards in the city, but the city is. guards in the city, but the city is in a bit _ guards in the city, but the city is in a bit of— guards in the city, but the city is in a bit of crisis. _ guards in the city, but the city is in a bit of crisis. we _ guards in the city, but the city is in a bit of crisis. we feel- guards in the city, but the city is in a bit of crisis. we feel it - guards in the city, but the city is in a bit of crisis. we feel it is- in a bit of crisis. we feel it is not — in a bit of crisis. we feel it is not secure. _ in a bit of crisis. we feel it is not secure, people - in a bit of crisis. we feel it is not secure, people are - in a bit of crisis. we feel it is. not secure, people are worried. people — not secure, people are worried. people are _ not secure, people are worried. people are worried _ not secure, people are worried. people are worried that - not secure, people are worried. people are worried that there . not secure, people are worried. people are worried that there is not secure, people are worried. i people are worried that there is no security _ people are worried that there is no securi . . . . people are worried that there is no security-_ you - people are worried that there is no security._ you know| people are worried that there is no - security._ you know that security. translation: you know that when any government _ security. translation: you know that when any government left, _ security. translation: you know that when any government left, people - when any government left, people started looting. we had to be very serious about that. the city will come back to normal very quickly. it is an emergency situation, people, we need to control people who are trying to create chaos. trying to loot. we have started our operation.
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we are bringing every part of the city under security with our own forces, but we assure you that the forces, but we assure you that the forces of islamic emirate, that they will not be harming anybody, but when you see cars full of taliban, for love forces of emirate, that is because of security, we are trying to secure the city —— full of forces of emirate.
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translation: is a gunfight for the seat for the chair _ translation: is a gunfight for the seat for the chair you're _ translation: is a gunfight for the seat for the chair you're sitting - translation: is a gunfight for the seat for the chair you're sitting on i seat for the chair you're sitting on today— seat for the chair you're sitting on today -- — seat for the chair you're sitting on today -- is— seat for the chair you're sitting on today -- is the _ seat for the chair you're sitting on today —— is the fight... _ today —— is the fight... translation: - today —— is the fight... translation: i- today —— is the fight... translation: | havel today —— is the fight... i translation: i have to today —— is the fight... _ translation: i have to mention that fleeing afghanistan's soil was a very big game for us. we had invading forces here, we couldn't make an islamic government here. with invaders present. we have been talking to the government who have just left in qatar, doha. we repeatedly said we are talking. we
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heard that the city who said that in six months, we will be fighting, we will have the situation is normal and under control, but we could not continue like that. we did not want to fight. we had to be very strict. this fight was a four islamic rule, but now we will be forming an islamic government. we want a government that everybody is involved, all parties included. we don't want fighting. we want stability. underthose
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don't want fighting. we want stability. under those shoulders who died serving foreigners, i'm sorry, but i can't stand up for them. —— and of those soldiers who died serving foreigners. we took afghanistan in 11 days, but we want to talk of peace, we don't want to fight. if it is about fighting, we can do it, you sort. —— you saw it. but we are here for security, but now when you see how we will, you can see the government who just left, you can see. ourflag is our flag. when any government is formed, we will talk about it. but flag. when any government is formed, we will talk about it.— we will talk about it. but you removed _ we will talk about it. but you removed the _ we will talk about it. but you removed the afghan - we will talk about it. but you removed the afghan flag? i we will talk about it. but you i removed the afghan flag? yes, we will talk about it. but you - removed the afghan flag? yes, but now we have _
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removed the afghan flag? yes, but now we have not _ removed the afghan flag? yes, but now we have not formed _ removed the afghan flag? yes, but now we have not formed a - removed the afghan flag? yes, but. now we have not formed a government yet. there is no government yet, thatis yet. there is no government yet, that is why we are putting the islamic emirates flags everywhere. bbc english. translation: what is the difference between the taliban _ translation: what is the difference between the taliban yesterday - translation: what is the difference between the taliban yesterday and i between the taliban yesterday and now? _ translation: if you're asking ruestion translation: if you're asking question about _ translation: if you're asking question about ideology, - translation: if you're askingj question about ideology, there translation: if you're asking i question about ideology, there is translation: if you're asking - question about ideology, there is no deaf spins. we were always missing, we are still muslim, we believe in the same ideology —— there is no difference. but compared to the former taliban, there is expertise now, there is a difference between our experience, there is a difference in our expertise. that is
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a difference between a new forces of the taliban. we will leave at the law to the next government, which is also going to be implemented and which laws are suitable for the country. that is the responsibility of the future government. translation: thank you. question being asked. translation:
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you said you're going to form a government— you said you're going to form a government and _ you said you're going to form a government and ascends - you said you're going to form a government and ascends at - you said you're going to form a - government and ascends at present danny— government and ascends at present danny has _ government and ascends at present danny has left. _ government and ascends at present danny has left, afghans _ government and ascends at present danny has left, afghans have - government and ascends at present danny has left, afghans have no - danny has left, afghans have no rule, _ danny has left, afghans have no rule. no — danny has left, afghans have no rule. no law. _ danny has left, afghans have no rule, no law, in— danny has left, afghans have no rule, no law, in order. _ danny has left, afghans have no rule, no law, in order. how- danny has left, afghans have no rule, no law, in order. how are i danny has left, afghans have no i rule, no law, in order. how are you dealing _ rule, no law, in order. how are you dealing with — rule, no law, in order. how are you dealing with that? _ rule, no law, in order. how are you dealing with that? —— _ rule, no law, in order. how are you dealing with that? —— since - dealing with that? —— since president _ dealing with that? —— since president ghani _ dealing with that? —— since president ghani left. - dealing with that? —— since president ghani left. there dealing with that? —— since - president ghani left. there are a lot of— president ghani left. there are a lot of weapons _ president ghani left. there are a lot of weapons smuggling - president ghani left. there are a lot of weapons smuggling in - lot of weapons smuggling in afghanistan, _ lot of weapons smuggling in afghanistan, a _ lot of weapons smuggling in afghanistan, a lot— lot of weapons smuggling in afghanistan, a lot of- lot of weapons smuggling in . afghanistan, a lot of smugglers lot of weapons smuggling in - afghanistan, a lot of smugglers in afghanistan — afghanistan, a lot of smugglers in afghanistan. translation: - afghanistan, a lot of smugglers in afghanistan. translation: weapons are everywhere. _ weapons are everywhere, how do you deal with _ weapons are everywhere, how do you deal with that? — weapons are everywhere, how do you deal with that?— weapons are everywhere, how do you deal with that?_ we i weapons are everywhere, how do you| deal with that?_ we are deal with that? translation: we are forminu a deal with that? translation: we are forming a government, _ deal with that? translation: we are forming a government, lets _ deal with that? translation: we are forming a government, lets wait - forming a government, lets wait until it is formed. and about weapons smuggling, we are controlling our borders, no one is allowed to take one gun outside. whatever was used in fighting before
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or used in security forces, we have control of them. they are in our hands and nothing will go outside the country. please get a chance to foreign journalists now. —— give a chance. question being asked. translation: it is a question about the media. _ translation: it is a question about the media. a — translation: it is a question about the media. a lot _ translation: it is a question about the media, a lot of— translation: it is a question about the media, a lot of video— translation: it is a question about the media, a lot of video shared - translation: it is a question about the media, a lot of video shared on. the media, a lot of video shared on facebook —
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the media, a lot of video shared on facebook. �* . . the media, a lot of video shared on facebook._ you - the media, a lot of video shared on i facebook._ you should facebook. translation: you should ask this question _ facebook. translation: you should ask this question to _ facebook. translation: you should ask this question to have _ facebook. translation: you should ask this question to have that, - facebook. translation: you should ask this question to have that, they i ask this question to have that, they are shedding a lot of stuff. it has been 20 years. —— to facebook. they are sharing a lot of stuff also but why has it the freedom of speech lost its value as a? it is because of this. you should ask that question to facebook itself. please give internationaljournal some chance. translation: we have reports from rovinces translation: we have reports from provinces that _ translation: we have reports from provinces that some _ translation: we have reports from provinces that some people - translation: we have reports from provinces that some people have - translation: we have reports from | provinces that some people have been taken _ provinces that some people have been taken out _ provinces that some people have been taken out of— provinces that some people have been taken out of their— provinces that some people have been taken out of their homes _ provinces that some people have been taken out of their homes and - provinces that some people have been taken out of their homes and they - taken out of their homes and they have _ taken out of their homes and they have disappeared. _ taken out of their homes and they have disappeared. do _ taken out of their homes and they have disappeared. do you - taken out of their homes and they have disappeared. do you confirmj have disappeared. do you confirm that islamic— have disappeared. do you confirm that islamic emirates— have disappeared. do you confirm that islamic emirates has- have disappeared. do you confirm that islamic emirates has been. that islamic emirates has been behind — that islamic emirates has been behind that? _ that islamic emirates has been
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behind that? and _ that islamic emirates has been behind that? and another- that islamic emirates has been- behind that? and another question, in your— behind that? and another question, in your future — behind that? and another question, in your future government, - behind that? and another question, in your future government, those i in your future government, those politicians — in your future government, those politicians who _ in your future government, those politicians who have _ in your future government, those politicians who have left, - in your future government, those politicians who have left, there i in your future government, those i politicians who have left, there are leaders _ politicians who have left, there are leaders who — politicians who have left, there are leaders who have _ politicians who have left, there are leaders who have gone, _ politicians who have left, there are leaders who have gone, do - politicians who have left, there are leaders who have gone, do they. politicians who have left, there are i leaders who have gone, do they have a place _ leaders who have gone, do they have a place in _ leaders who have gone, do they have a place in your— leaders who have gone, do they have a place in your government? - a place in your government? translation: _ a place in your government? translation: it— a place in your government? translation:— a place in your government? translation: , ., , ., translation: it is a three days that we have taken _ translation: it is a three days that we have taken kabul, _ translation: it is a three days that we have taken kabul, your— translation: it is a three days that we have taken kabul, your first - we have taken kabul, yourfirst question. we have no story of murder or killings in provinces are kabul. we will investigate all of these cases you're talking about very seriously. but we have to remember that today the situation is different. it is a military situation, but we are trying to take control of everything and bring stability. and also, if you compare
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the last three days to the weeks, if you weeks in the past, the situation has changed a lot. people are not dying any more. we don't want any of our politicians to be outside the country, it is their home, our shared home, afghanistan is at their home, our home, we are one nation. we want them to come back, we want to be together, even though we have been at war, we have been through difficult times together, we have given amnesty to everybody, no one is going to be followed. and they are all allowed to come back. and talk to us. iam i am matthew and i am a contributing writer— i am matthew and i am a contributing writer for— i am matthew and i am a contributing writer for the — i am matthew and i am a contributing writer for the new— i am matthew and i am a contributing writer for the new york— i am matthew and i am a contributing writer for the new york times - writer for the new york times magazine _ writer for the new york times magazine. question - writer for the new york times magazine. question being | writer for the new york times -
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magazine. question being asked. translation: i want to ask about dru~s, the translation: i want to ask about drugs, the production _ translation: i want to ask about drugs, the production of— translation: i want to ask about drugs, the production of drugs, i drugs, the production of drugs, illegal drugs. what is your plan about that, that is produced in afghanistan? we are given the assurance that there will be no production of drugs in afghanistan. when we were in power, the cultivation of opium was zero. but during the government, the past government, the opium cultivation was on high, drug production was
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happening, but we would be against that. there would be no drug production, no drug smuggling. we saw today that our young people were on drugs. this was making me very, very sad, that are used, our young people were addicted. we, afghanistan, will not be a country of cultivation of opium any more. but we need international help for that. the international community needs to help us. we need to have help, funding. we will bring opium cultivation to zero account.
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question being asked. what kind of government the _ question being asked. what kind of government the people _ question being asked. what kind of government the people of _ question being asked. what kind ofj government the people of afghanistan should wait for? is it an exam an islamic emirate? are you forming a national unity government? are women and men allowed to go to government offices, and wine? it will be a strong islamic government. we will leave the politicians to form the government, we are talking about it, but we assure you that afghanistan will be assure you that afghanistan will be a strong islamic government. our
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values will be protected, and will be serving our people. we will show you that afghans will see themselves, they will be together in themselves, they will be together in the next government. we are talking about it. there are talks going on, and we are waiting for that information. we want the government organisations to start working again very soon, and everybody is allowed to come back and work according to islamic and sharia law. education, police, all sectors need women and men, and they are allowed to come. if you want, all of you, to be able to ask questions, please follow the order. one at a time.—
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to ask questions, please follow the order. one at a time. what happens to al-oaeda. _ order. one at a time. what happens to al-qaeda, are _ order. one at a time. what happens to al-qaeda, are you _ order. one at a time. what happens to al-qaeda, are you willing - order. one at a time. what happens to al-qaeda, are you willing to. . . ? | to al-qaeda, are you willing to...? who— to al-qaeda, are you willing to...? who will— to al-qaeda, are you willing to...? who will be — to al-qaeda, are you willing to...? who will be the leader now that you're _ who will be the leader now that you're here as well?— who will be the leader now that you're here as well? question being asked. how that — you're here as well? question being asked. how that your _ you're here as well? question being asked. how that your relationship - asked. how that your relationship with al-qaeda? _ asked. how that your relationship with al-qaeda? do _ asked. how that your relationship with al-qaeda? do you _ asked. how that your relationship with al-qaeda? do you still- asked. how that your relationship with al-qaeda? do you still have l asked. how that your relationship| with al-qaeda? do you still have a connection with them? translation: yeah, i have to talk about the foreign fighters. taste translation: yeah, i have to talk about the foreign fighters. we have to reassure — about the foreign fighters. we have to reassure that _ about the foreign fighters. we have to reassure that afghanistan - about the foreign fighters. we have to reassure that afghanistan will. to reassure that afghanistan will not be used against anybody. whoever
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wants to take advantage of our soil, our country, we will not be allowed, they will not be allowed. secondly, they will not be allowed. secondly, the government is being formed, there will be law and order, just a few days, the patients. very soon, there will be a government and a rule of law. we there will be a government and a rule of law-— there will be a government and a rule of law. ~ ., ., ., ., , rule of law. we were not allowed any foreianers rule of law. we were not allowed any foreigners who _ rule of law. we were not allowed any foreigners who wish _ rule of law. we were not allowed any foreigners who wish to _ rule of law. we were not allowed any foreigners who wish to threaten - rule of law. we were not allowed any foreigners who wish to threaten the l foreigners who wish to threaten the security— foreigners who wish to threaten the security of— foreigners who wish to threaten the security of other countries, any space _ security of other countries, any space in— security of other countries, any space in afghanistan, and we have assured _ space in afghanistan, and we have assured this. is second question,... is assured this. is second question,... is that _ assured this. is second question,... is that the _ assured this. is second question,... is that the government set up, we are still— is that the government set up, we are still working on it, hopefully we will— are still working on it, hopefully we will reach that stage soon.
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can you please mention to us about the situation — can you please mention to us about the situation of _ can you please mention to us about the situation of women _ can you please mention to us about the situation of women journalists i the situation of women journalists and women — the situation of women journalists and women working _ the situation of women journalists and women working in _ the situation of women journalists and women working in the - the situation of women journalists| and women working in the media? the situation of women journalists - and women working in the media? you say something. — and women working in the media? you say something. but— and women working in the media? you say something, but it _ and women working in the media? you say something, but it is _ and women working in the media? you say something, but it is not _ and women working in the media? you say something, but it is not clear. - say something, but it is not clear. can they— say something, but it is not clear. can they achieve _ say something, but it is not clear. can they achieve like _ say something, but it is not clear. can they achieve like in _ say something, but it is not clear. can they achieve like in the - can they achieve like in the previous— can they achieve like in the previous government - can they achieve like in the previous government like i can they achieve like in the - previous government like this, or no? . , ., previous government like this, or no? . , no? can you please repeat the question? _ no? can you please repeat the question? oussnon - no? can you please repeat the question? question being i no? can you please repeat the - question? question being asked. question? oussnon being asked. translation: — question? question being asked. translation: she _ question? question being asked. translation: she ask— question? question being asked. translation: she ask about - question? question being asked. i translation: she ask about female journalist, whether they will be able to work like before or journalist, whether they will be able to work like before- able to work like before or will the be able to work like before or will they be under— able to work like before or will they be under a _ able to work like before or will they be under a certain - able to work like before or will they be under a certain hijab, | able to work like before or will. they be under a certain hijab, or able to work like before or will- they be under a certain hijab, or is it specific which part they can work
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on? we are hoping the next government will be answering these questions. we want all our young people, our use, to be active, but i'm not in a position to explain all the rules. let the government be formed, let the laws come into force, then you will hear what they are allowed to not allowed to do.— will hear what they are allowed to not allowed to do. question being asked. not allowed to do. question being asked- how— not allowed to do. question being asked. how many _ not allowed to do. question being asked. how many media _ not allowed to do. question being i asked. how many media organisations have ou asked. how many media organisations have you answered? _ asked. how many media organisations have you answered? question - asked. how many media organisations have you answered? question being| have you answered? question being asked..
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translation: ., . ~ asked.. translation: ., .~' . translation: you talked about that there will be a _ translation: you talked about that there will be a strong _ translation: you talked about that there will be a strong government, i there will be a strong government, an islamic government. who are talking? you are in talks about the next future government? who is involved? we want to know if they are coming. very soon you will be witnessing a new government, we have been talking to all sides, with all parties, we have been speaking, we have been in contact. we want everybody to be involved. we don't want people to be left out. whoever wants to serve the country, whoever wants to serve the country, whoever wants to serve the country, whoever wants to be in benefits of the
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country, yes, i have explained this, just give us time to form the government, and when our leaders are coming to afghanistan we will be making a decision on that very quickly. the government will be formed very, very quickly. and how many days do you think the next government will be formed? we just need to wait, because we are just coming out of war, out of fighting. wejust want just coming out of war, out of fighting. we just want to reassure that we need some time. question being asked- _ that we need some time. question being asked. one _ that we need some time. question being asked. one important - that we need some time. question being asked. one important part i that we need some time. question being asked. one important part is havin: being asked. one important part is having good. — being asked. one important part is having good, strong _ being asked. one important part is having good, strong relationship - having good, strong relationship with neighbouring countries.
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regional relationships. what are your plans for those relationships? ijust your plans for those relationships? i just said your plans for those relationships? ijust said before your plans for those relationships? i just said before that we want a good economy for improvement of our own economy, we want to have good relationships with all neighbouring countries, we want to have good relations for all our neighbours, firing close neighbours. we are trying our best. our relationship with our neighbouring are based on international laws, on islamic laws, and we believe that. thank you so much for coming, we have very little time, are press conferences ended, long life, thank you. we will see you again.
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long life, thank you. we will see you again-— you again. that was quite an extraordinary _ you again. that was quite an extraordinary experience. i you again. that was quite an i extraordinary experience. after you again. that was quite an - extraordinary experience. after 20 years without the tell in power in afghanistan we had a conference i was the taliban spokesman talking about the effect and impact, trying to offer a series of reassurances, zabihullah mujahid, he said, we still believe in ideology, but there is a difference in experience, 20 years of living outside afghanistan, as many of the leading people have. he began the conference with the statement. it is a proud moment for all of us, freedom is a legitimate right of every nation, the islamic emirate is now that our country is free, we are not interested in revenge campaign, we don't want afghanistan to be a battlefield any more. more. oursupreme leader afghanistan to be a battlefield any more. more. our supreme leader has issued amnesty for everyone. we are working on a political settlement to
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form an inclusive government there will be acceptable for all afghans. the short residency said that their lives will be safe, we will have special forces ensuring their security, and for the media they offered assurances that they will continue to report freely provided the respect islam, and for women and girls, girls can continue to be educated, women can continue to work within the limits of sharia law. let's speak to sana safi from the bbc afghan service. thank you for being in the studio this afternoon, you are watching and listening that. this afternoon, you are watching and listening that-— listening that. what if you take from it? lots _ listening that. what if you take from it? lots of _ listening that. what if you take from it? lots of pledges, - listening that. what if you take from it? lots of pledges, lots l listening that. what if you take l from it? lots of pledges, lots of good promises, lots of good assurances, but still very vague and very general. what does that mean to work within the islamic framework? what does that mean for women to have rights within the islamic framework? afghanistan is a muslim
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country, 99% of the population practised sunni islam. the women, they wear hijab is, and they go to masks that are devout muslims. what does that mean, for women to have work and study within the islamic framework? again, ithink work and study within the islamic framework? again, i think being fooled by this hour—long conference. all the good things, i would say, on paper, and people listening to that which think... paper, and people listening to that which think. . .— paper, and people listening to that which think... what was all the fuss about? what _ which think... what was all the fuss about? what was _ which think. .. what was all the fuss about? what was all— which think... what was all the fuss about? what was all the _ which think... what was all the fuss about? what was all the fuss - which think... what was all the fuss | about? what was all the fuss about? these are great _ about? what was all the fuss about? these are great guys! _ about? what was all the fuss about? these are great guys! but _ about? what was all the fuss about? these are great guys! but less - about? what was all the fuss about? these are great guys! but less than. these are great guys! but less than the rim—fire treatment power, they had sharia law. i was seven years old when they took power, they did not allow me to go to school. i missed education. i was a stone throw from the office and kind
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kandahar, and if you this thing against them, can you really hold them accountable for that? assurances to the international community and ngos. it's perk, more than 50% of the population live under the poverty line, there are so many other problems that they are dealing with, so they need the international community to work with them and to help them, so because they are going to give them assurances, but i'm pretty sure they will be one rule for the international community, the international community, the international staff, and people that he said, don't worry about anything, your safety and your property, but there will be another rule for the afghans. there will be another rule for the aft hans. ~ . ., ,., ., there will be another rule for the af hans. . ., ., ,., ., ., afghans. what about what i quoted, we still believe _ afghans. what about what i quoted, we still believe in _ afghans. what about what i quoted, we still believe in the _ afghans. what about what i quoted, we still believe in the same - we still believe in the same ideology, but there is a difference in our experience. certainly for the
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leading figures, baradar is on his way back to afghanistan, one of the leading negotiators, they've lived and experienced in islamic countries, but islamic countries to take a different interpretation of what it means to be an islamic republic. i what it means to be an islamic reublic. ~' ., , what it means to be an islamic reublic. ~' . , , ., republic. i think it means several thins republic. i think it means several things including _ republic. i think it means several things including that, _ republic. i think it means several things including that, one - republic. i think it means several things including that, one that i republic. i think it means several. things including that, one that they had been abroad for the past 20 years, they have interacted with outsiders, notjust americans in guantanamo bay, because five of them out there, five of the negotiating team members were in guantanamo bay as prisoners, so they have interacted with the international community with americans, then they were in the gulf states, they interacted with the arabs, and other muslims, so they have learned in that sense, but this time round they will be altering the government afghanistan on their own if they impose a sort of rules and
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regulations in restricted versions and interpretations... thea;r regulations in restricted versions and interpretations. . .— and interpretations... they don't want 'ust and interpretations... they don't want just five — and interpretations... they don't want just five years _ and interpretations... they don't wantjust five years and - and interpretations... they don't want just five years and kicked . and interpretations... they don't i wantjust five years and kicked out. they are talking about an islamic emirates, long—term model of government. emirates, long-term model of government.— emirates, long-term model of government. . ., ., , government. that, and also they will all aft hans government. that, and also they will all afghans to — government. that, and also they will all afghans to accept _ government. that, and also they will all afghans to accept them. - government. that, and also they will all afghans to accept them. if - government. that, and also they will all afghans to accept them. if you i all afghans to accept them. if you look at the currents of the previous president of afghanistan, amrullah saleh, whojust president of afghanistan, amrullah saleh, who just described president of afghanistan, amrullah saleh, whojust described himself president of afghanistan, amrullah saleh, who just described himself as the president... the legitimate caretaker president, _ the president... the legitimate caretaker president, he - the president... the legitimate i caretaker president, he tweeted. yes, and he's fled to an area that is historically a stronghold for anti—taliban elements or groups, so the taliban are hoping that people like amrullah saleh or his followers would hopefully come together and accept them as there are legitimate
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representatives if they moderate our stance, so that's what they mean by we have changed, but their ideology is the same. talk we have changed, but their ideology is the same-— is the same. talk about the leadership _ is the same. talk about the leadership of _ is the same. talk about the leadership of the _ is the same. talk about the leadership of the taliban, i is the same. talk about the i leadership of the taliban, who is the same. talk about the - leadership of the taliban, who will talk about what they mean by an inclusive government, but this is a system that will depend on ultimately the word of one man? essentially and effectively, yes. the way things work, they do say that according to sharia, the way things always worked with them is there was one ultimate supreme leader, then you have... iatt there was one ultimate supreme leader, then you have. . .- leader, then you have... at the moment. _ leader, then you have... at the moment. the — leader, then you have... at the moment, the leader, _ leader, then you have... at the moment, the leader, he - leader, then you have... at the moment, the leader, he used i leader, then you have... at the | moment, the leader, he used to leader, then you have... at the - moment, the leader, he used to be a preacher, she was invited to become the leader of the faithful, as is
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called, in 2016, when his previous leader was killed, so he is the leader was killed, so he is the leader now and he has three deputies, and commissions. and they will operate? so they will be national but operating out of... supreme leader, three deputies, people responsible for health, education, developmentand people responsible for health, education, development and so on, so we haven't really seen hibatullah akhundzada so far, we've only seen baradar, the founder or co—founder of the taliban movement, and he has been negotiating with the americans. the peace deal that he has negotiated, he was arrested in pakistan in 2010 by the pakistani authorities because he tried to negotiate a peace settlement with the afghan government, and the
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americans, but then he was released in 2018, apparently allegedly after the international involvement or pressure on pakistan to have these guys negotiating an end the violence, so he is the leader of the political wing of the taliban, and then you have a third deputy, and suv then you have a third deputy, and guy who is the son of the ex leader, he is said to be in his 30s, and he lacks military experience, so he was just brought in because he was the son of mullah omar. fascinating stuff. . ~ son of mullah omar. fascinating stuff. . ,, , ., ., son of mullah omar. fascinating stuff. . ,, ., ., ,, ., , stuff. thank you for talking to us and for your— stuff. thank you for talking to us and for your patience. _ stuff. thank you for talking to us and for your patience. i - stuff. thank you for talking to us and for your patience. i hope - stuff. thank you for talking to us and for your patience. i hope we | and for your patience. i hope we will talk again. a lot of talk about over the coming days and weeks.
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thank you, expertise on the taliban. let me talk to andrew fox. i guess you were listening to that with mixed emotions? imo. you were listening to that with mixed emotions?— you were listening to that with mixed emotions? ., ., , �* mixed emotions? no, it wasn't mixed at all is very — mixed emotions? no, it wasn't mixed at all is very clear _ mixed emotions? no, it wasn't mixed at all is very clear they _ mixed emotions? no, it wasn't mixed at all is very clear they were - at all is very clear they were putting on a show for the worlds media, they need international aid, their children are in danger of starvation, before this turmoil. in terms of the country that had a banner about to preside over, you can see why the taliban are saying all the right things to the worlds press in order to make sure they get aid money flying that way, to maintain control of the country. in maintain control of the country. in terms of how it stands, presumably there is no way back. i wonder how
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you feel left but the amount of effort that you and your colleagues made over trying to kind of move afghanistan forward beyond the fighting, to a different society, one that is shaped by afghan hopes and potential, but was a lot more tolerant than the one that existed when the televangelist in control. yeah, we've got a large number of serving personnel who are deeply upset. the perception is, we did our best, we did what i was asked of us by our government and chain of command, and i think this isjust a frustration and helplessness that comes with the fact that it has for the so quickly. comes with the fact that it has for the so quickly-— comes with the fact that it has for the so quickly. what now for you is the so quickly. what now for you is the priority? _ the so quickly. what now for you is the priority? what _ the so quickly. what now for you is the priority? what are _ the so quickly. what now for you is the priority? what are you - the so quickly. what now for you is the priority? what are you most i the so quickly. what now for you is i the priority? what are you most keen that the british government should focus on? , ., , , ., ., , focus on? obviously we have got very limited options, _ focus on? obviously we have got very limited options, so _ focus on? obviously we have got very limited options, so my _ focus on? obviously we have got very limited options, so my first _ limited options, so my first priority is that we get them home
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safely with their mission complete, focusing on helping people stuck in afghanistan who are in danger of execution or torture and execution by the taliban. people who work for us. we still have thousands of them in afghanistan. it's exceptionally difficult for them to get to the airport now, we've got a safe area inside the airport, where we can process people, hopefully we can get the flights out, but if you're outside the airport at the moment, you are in a really dark place if you are in a really dark place if you are in a really dark place if you are an afghan who assisted, because there have been door—to—door calls with the taliban, the lifts to remote lists of enemies as they call it, people being threatens, people who are trying to keep their mobile
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phones are sanitised as possible without any incriminating evidence on it, and it's a desperate situation for those people and their families. it situation for those people and their families. ., , �* ., ., families. it doesn't matter what you and i think. — families. it doesn't matter what you and i think. but— families. it doesn't matter what you and i think, but you _ families. it doesn't matter what you and i think, but you don't _ families. it doesn't matter what you and i think, but you don't think- and i think, but you don't think that some of the people that you've been talking to wood by that amnesty promised by the organisations supreme leader, saying they are not interested in revenge, anyone who comes knocking on your door doesn't speakfor comes knocking on your door doesn't speak for the comes knocking on your door doesn't speakfor the taliban. comes knocking on your door doesn't speak for the taliban. that is not the sort of afghanistan we want, we don't want to start it with bloodshed.— don't want to start it with bloodshed. ~ . , ., , don't want to start it with bloodshed. ~ . , . , bloodshed. what they have 'ust said in that press — bloodshed. what they have 'ust said in that press conference h bloodshed. what they have just said in that press conference does - bloodshed. what they have just said in that press conference does not i bloodshed. what they have just said in that press conference does not in | in that press conference does not in any way tally with what i'm getting off the ground from friends and colleagues, so i seen units that i've worked with being executed because they were in a firefight with the taliban, they ran out of ammunition, they surrendered and was summarily executed. i've seen photos of people who are dragged out of their homes and shot in the street.
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i've seen primary school children being sent home. i'm aware of these door to door knocking in kabul, and what they've said compared to what is happening on the ground there is a huge disconnect.— a huge disconnect. andrew fox, there, a huge disconnect. andrew fox, there. thank— a huge disconnect. andrew fox, there, thank you _ a huge disconnect. andrew fox, there, thank you very _ a huge disconnect. andrew fox, there, thank you very much - a huge disconnect. andrew fox, there, thank you very much forl there, thank you very much for talking to us. three tours of duty in afghanistan and still very much involved in trying to help those who worked, as he says, in the military and the british and americans during that period of time. joining me now are lorna and john norgrove of the linda norgrove foundation — they are the parents of the british aid worker who was killed in afghanistan in 2010. the foundation aims to support the education, health and childcare for women and children affected by the war in afghanistan. i don't know if you had the opportunity to listen to some of the news conference and what you made
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and what you heard. trite news conference and what you made and what you heard.— and what you heard. we haven't listened to _ and what you heard. we haven't listened to it _ and what you heard. we haven't listened to it in _ and what you heard. we haven't listened to it in detail, - and what you heard. we haven't listened to it in detail, to - and what you heard. we haven't listened to it in detail, to be - listened to it in detail, to be frank, we've been too busy, but it's kind of reassuring that the taliban are trying to say that they are trying to take a moderate stance, and i think that is a lot more encouraging, given the hard right from the beginning, but possibly in afghanistan there are different factions of the taliban, foreign fighters involved who are working alongside them, and it remains to be seen how these factions are going to be for the people at the centre. flan be for the people at the centre. can ou be for the people at the centre. can you remind — be for the people at the centre. can you remind us— be for the people at the centre. can you remind us what your daughter is doing and what she was trying to achieve what she was out there? most ofthe achieve what she was out there? most of the time she _ achieve what she was out there? most of the time she was _ achieve what she was out there? most of the time she was in _ achieve what she was out there? iia'ifrsii of the time she was in afghanistan she was working for the united nations, and she worked on the environmental programme setting up
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national parks in afghanistan. it's got amazing diversity and a lot of wildlife, and then she worked for the united nations actually building things, and then she was working for a development company which was contracted to us aid doing it a large development project of eastern side of the country. leroihtztt large development pro'ect of eastern side of the country.— side of the country. what about the work that the _ side of the country. what about the work that the foundation _ side of the country. what about the work that the foundation as - side of the country. what about the work that the foundation as were i work that the foundation as were doing now? what is it that is being donein doing now? what is it that is being done in terms of trying to help women and girls? what is the work has ongoing? the women and girls? what is the work has ongoing?— women and girls? what is the work has ongoing? the ma'or work at the moment is has ongoing? the major work at the moment is sponsoring _ has ongoing? the major work at the moment is sponsoring girls - has ongoing? the major work at the moment is sponsoring girls or - has ongoing? the major work at the | moment is sponsoring girls or young women _ moment is sponsoring girls or young women to— moment is sponsoring girls or young women to go to university. most of them. _ women to go to university. most of them. we've — women to go to university. most of them, we've got 75 medical students, midwifery— them, we've got 75 medical students, midwifery and nurses training, we've not midwifery and nurses training, we've got women _ midwifery and nurses training, we've got women studying other subjects
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such as _ got women studying other subjects such as it— got women studying other subjects such as it and economics and so on. you must _ such as it and economics and so on. you must be — such as it and economics and so on. you must be very proud of the work thatis you must be very proud of the work that is being done in your daughter's name in afghanistan. yes. daughter's name in afghanistan. yes, we are giving — daughter's name in afghanistan. yes, we are giving a _ daughter's name in afghanistan. yes, we are giving a lot _ daughter's name in afghanistan. yes, we are giving a lot of _ daughter's name in afghanistan. yes, we are giving a lot of women an opportunity to study, and to go on to have _ opportunity to study, and to go on to have careers, and we hope that this will— to have careers, and we hope that this will be — to have careers, and we hope that this will be able to continue. | to have careers, and we hope that this will be able to continue. i was atoin to this will be able to continue. i was going to say. _ this will be able to continue. i was going to say. the _ this will be able to continue. i was going to say, the women - this will be able to continue. lines going to say, the women themselves are obviously very, very concerned that they will not be able to continue going to university, and we are receiving continual e—mails asking if we can support them, so we sincerely hope we will be able to continue with the courses. yes indeed, continue with the courses. yes indeed. and — continue with the courses. yes indeed, and i _ continue with the courses. yes indeed, and i suppose that's very much the hope, that when the taliban talk about girl still being able to be educated, women still be able to work, that that will actually be delivered on the ground, and that
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will actually see the kind of work to your organisation and others are doing continue, and people will feel some sense of confidence about the future. thank you so much for speaking to us and for your patience in waiting for us while we heard the rest of that news conference. victoria derbyshire will be here with all the news at five, thank you for your company, here is the weather. another disappointing late summers day today, cool breeze still blowing, is that shelter from the breeze across wales and the west country, under the blanket of cloud as most of us are, temperatures only 17 or 18 degrees, and there could be a little drizzle store leftover around some of those western hills. the cloud will probably still be around overnight tonight and lower onto the hills, and it could be a few pockets of light rain or drizzle here and there, stop with a covering
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of cloud, temperatures like last night, whether showing its hand in the northern isles, we should see a bit more sunshine across many parts of scotland after a dull start elsewhere. the cloud should continue to thing a little bit, or quite so gloomy, generally dry weather on wednesday. temperatures more widely up wednesday. temperatures more widely up to a reasonable 20 or 21 celsius.
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good afternoon. this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the headlines at 5pm: in their first press conference since taking control of afghanistan, the taliban claim they don't wish to take revenge — and say women can be educated and go to work if they live according to sharia law. translation: i reassure all residents of kabul - that we protect them. they are safe, and now all our fighters are across kabul city and we will be taking care of the security. but the evacuation continues — a spokesperson for the pentagon confirms the us military are communicating with the taliban, in an effort to evacuate citizens. our commanders at the airport are in communication with taliban commanders on the ground outside the airport.

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