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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 17, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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in their first news conference since taking control in afghanistan, taliban leaders have said they won't let afghanistan be used as a haven for terrorists. they also insisted women could be actively involved in society. uk government has announced further details of a resettlement scheme for afghan refugees. up to 20,000 people will be offered a route to set up home in the uk in the coming years. in other news, rescue work following the deadly earthquake which struck haiti on saturday has been hampered by heavy rains brought by tropical storm grace. more than 19— hundred people are now known to have died in the 7.2 magnitude quake. astronomers have captured some of the most detailed images ever seen of deep space. they've been created from radiowaves emitted by the galaxies.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are author and journalist yasmin alibhai—brown and henry zeffman, chief political correspondent at the times. hello correspondent at the times. again. a quick look at print hello again. a quick look at the print pages. 0n the front page of the times, its main headline is — the uk to admit 20,000 afghans. borisjohnson will offer those fleeing the taliban a safe legal route. similarly, the guardian leads with the latest announcement of how britain is set to take in 20,000 afghans fleeing the taliban. the prime minister said britain owed a debt of gratitude to all those who have worked with us to make afghanistan a better place over the last 20 years. big hearted britain to take 20,000 refugees—
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that's what the daily express leads with: women, children and religious minorities are set to be top of the list. 0n the front of the daily mirror, it also has how afghans will be able to settle in the uk. 5,000 refugees are set to come in this year. the i leads with the headline "trust us," say taliban. the taliban gave their first press conference after taking kabul. the group said women will have rights but within islamic laws. "true courage" — that's the big headline on the front of the metro. women in afghanistan have been holding up handwritten messages in the streets saying they want their rights and no force can ignore and stifle women. so that is a little flavour of what
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you will be waking up to tomorrow morning. let'sjust discuss you will be waking up to tomorrow morning. let's just discuss some of those, all the same story, but different strands, essentially, henry, you will kick us out, we will start with the front page of the times, this is your friend page. uk to admit 20,000 afghan. friend page. uk to admit 20,000 afuhan. , , , , afghan. yes, this is the big announcement _ afghan. yes, this is the big announcement from - afghan. yes, this is the big announcement from the . afghan. yes, this is the big - announcement from the government tonight about their plans to reset all 20,000 afghan refugees, people who are fleeing that taliban in the uk over what will probably be about five years. now, one important distinction to make is that this is a separate scheme from that thing that has been operating for several months now to get interpreters and other afghans who have helped british forces over the last 20 years out of the country. but it's something that brycejohnson was under pressure to deal, which is to make a generous commitment. the big caveat is that this is a number that
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the uk will take if it is able to provide safe passage. they say that if these people can plead that taliban, then they will arrange for them to come to the uk, but obviously, it's much easier said than done to get out of afghanistan while under taliban rule. so it's not necessarily the devil in the detail because the government speaking to various people this evening writing the story acknowledged that they do not yet know how feasible it is for many people to make it out of afghanistan. so it's an acknowledged difficulty, but 20,000 may not even be a number that becomes plausible under the nature of this new taliban rule in afghanistan. girls under the nature of this new taliban rule in afghanistan.— rule in afghanistan. girls and other minorities. — rule in afghanistan. girls and other minorities, will— rule in afghanistan. girls and other minorities, will they _ rule in afghanistan. girls and other minorities, will they be _ rule in afghanistan. girls and other minorities, will they be able - rule in afghanistan. girls and other minorities, will they be able to - minorities, will they be able to allowed to leave by the taliban? s is a farce. this is for drinking ice, — is a farce. this is for drinking ice, the _ is a farce. this is for drinking ice, the public in this country, and
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the world, — ice, the public in this country, and the world, and also the poor afghan people _ the world, and also the poor afghan people who will be looking desperately for anyway out i don't think_ desperately for anyway out i don't think this — desperately for anyway out i don't think this is names. i don't think it's well— think this is names. i don't think it's well manned. it'sjust, and some — it's well manned. it'sjust, and some ways, the equivalent of a pr stunt— some ways, the equivalent of a pr stunt that — some ways, the equivalent of a pr stunt that the taliban i trying to pull out — stunt that the taliban i trying to pull out. how are they going to leave? — pull out. how are they going to leave? how are mothers with their babies_ leave? how are mothers with their babies going to leave? i'm not going to exclude _ babies going to leave? i'm not going to exclude the men and boys, because they are _ to exclude the men and boys, because they are also _ to exclude the men and boys, because they are also going to be, they are already being arrested and punished, and god _ already being arrested and punished, and god knows what will happen to them _ and god knows what will happen to them how— and god knows what will happen to them. how are they going to get to them. how are they going to get to the border— them. how are they going to get to the border come across the border safety. _ the border come across the border safely, come to a place from where they can _ safely, come to a place from where they can get safe passage? and the anti—refugee asylum seeking attitudes in this country here have reached _ attitudes in this country here have reached a — attitudes in this country here have reached a fever pitch at the moment thanks— reached a fever pitch at the moment thanks to _ reached a fever pitch at the moment thanks to people like nigel barash. so i thanks to people like nigel barash. so hust— thanks to people like nigel barash. so ijust don't trust this
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governmental even do this minimal amount _ governmental even do this minimal amount i_ governmental even do this minimal amount. ., �* ~ ., governmental even do this minimal amount. ~ ., ., amount. i don't know if you are both aware, i amount. i don't know if you are both aware. i am — amount. i don't know if you are both aware, i am sure _ amount. i don't know if you are both aware, i am sure you _ amount. i don't know if you are both aware, i am sure you heard - amount. i don't know if you are both aware, i am sure you heard that - aware, i am sure you heard that there was a phone call between the us and the uk right next to mr johnson has spoken to president biden. interesting incident that mr biden. interesting incident that mr biden was more interested, or rather he didn't pay any notion of nation any more as a priority in afghanistan, whereas part of this phone call, the uk by stressing that they were going to carry on pushing they were going to carry on pushing the humanitarian side of things and offering support. what did you make offering support. what did you make of the contents of that call? weill. of the contents of that call? well, joe biden. — of the contents of that call? well, joe biden. as _ of the contents of that call? well, joe biden, as you _ of the contents of that call? well, joe biden, as you say _ of the contents of that call? well, joe biden, as you say has - of the contents of that call? well, joe biden, as you say has much i of the contents of that call? -ii joe biden, as you say has much more sceptical about the sort of nation—building notion of intervention for a very long time. when he was barack 0bama's new vice president more than 12 years ago, he opposed the troop surge in afghanistan, which he then went
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ahead with. sojoe biden for some time has taken a rather different stance on that, and i wasn't that surprised by his speech from the white house last night, which was perhaps a bit cold, that did surprise me, because this is a man who has made his name is sympathiser in chief, a publicly motor, and he was quite cold about the reality of the calculations he is very happy to admit that he has made. at the fact of the calculations does not surprise me at all. america, i spent last year in america reporting on the presidential election, and voters of all hues are fed up of what they call the forever war there. so it's not at all a surprise to me thatjoe biden who does have a very good earfor where to me thatjoe biden who does have a very good ear for where the centre of the american public is, you know, is basically declaring america out of the sort of worries that they
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prosecuted under, in this case, bush, 0bama and trump. yasmin you are takin: bush, 0bama and trump. yasmin you are taking us — bush, 0bama and trump. yasmin you are taking us to _ bush, 0bama and trump. yasmin you are taking us to the _ bush, 0bama and trump. yasmin you are taking us to the daily _ are taking us to the daily telegraph. you brought up uganda in the last press preview, and i said that uganda was one of the highest, has one of the highest amount of refugees. it's the highest on the african continent. it's taken them 1.4 million. but it's interesting, isn't it that they are asking uganda to help. they had set 0k. priti patel who has roots in uganda is asking europe to help. yes. patel who has roots in uganda is asking europe to help. yes, isn't that interesting, _ asking europe to help. yes, isn't that interesting, the _ asking europe to help. yes, isn't that interesting, the hide -- - asking europe to help. yes, isn't| that interesting, the hide -- hard that interesting, the hide —— hard line breaks — that interesting, the hide —— hard line breaks now wants the eu to cooperate — line breaks now wants the eu to cooperate with the uk, which is exactiy— cooperate with the uk, which is exactly how it should be. i think europe — exactly how it should be. i think europe has not conducted, and i am pro—european, has not conducted itsetf— pro—european, has not conducted itself honorably when it came to syrian _ itself honorably when it came to syrian refugees and other refugees. turkey— syrian refugees and other refugees. turkey has— syrian refugees and other refugees. turkey has been burdened with astonishing numbers and they need to
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do this— astonishing numbers and they need to do this right because it was a nato venture, _ do this right because it was a nato venture, and you know, ithinkjoe biden— venture, and you know, ithinkjoe biden has— venture, and you know, ithinkjoe biden has so— venture, and you know, ithinkjoe biden has so shocked and appalled me try biden has so shocked and appalled me by what _ biden has so shocked and appalled me by what he _ biden has so shocked and appalled me by what he has done because he has not only— by what he has done because he has not only not— by what he has done because he has not only not interested in nation—building, he seems to be totally— nation—building, he seems to be totally disinterested in thinking about— totally disinterested in thinking about the consequences of what america. — about the consequences of what america, the uk and others did 20 years— america, the uk and others did 20 years ago — america, the uk and others did 20 years ago. he cannot walk away from a situation _ years ago. he cannot walk away from a situation that you created and hereafter— a situation that you created and hereafter pretend that you have any kind of— hereafter pretend that you have any kind of moral soul. so, the scales fell kind of moral soul. so, the scales felt from — kind of moral soul. so, the scales fell from my eyes about joe biden over the _ fell from my eyes about joe biden over the last 48 hours, and this may prove _ over the last 48 hours, and this may prove to— over the last 48 hours, and this may prove to be — over the last 48 hours, and this may prove to be the end of the great american — prove to be the end of the great american imperial age. prove to be the end of the great american imperialage. part prove to be the end of the great american imperial age. part of me thinks _ american imperial age. part of me thinks thank god for that because they betrayed iraq, and now they have _ they betrayed iraq, and now they have betrayed afghanistan. let�*s
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they betrayed iraq, and now they have betrayed afghanistan. let's go to the front page — have betrayed afghanistan. let's go to the front page of— have betrayed afghanistan. let's go to the front page of the _ have betrayed afghanistan. let's go to the front page of the eye, - to the front page of the eye, justice, says that taliban, did you earlier today?— earlier today? no, of course not. certainly one _ earlier today? no, of course not. certainly one interesting - earlier today? no, of course not. certainly one interesting of- earlier today? no, of course not. j certainly one interesting of today as various members of the new ruling elite of afghanistan came before the cameras together for the first time was how much slicker that taliban does seem to be. they have had plenty of time to prepare for this holdup in qatar as many apparently have been. and they have clearly thought quite carefully about how to reintroduce themselves notjust about how to reintroduce themselves not just afghanistan about how to reintroduce themselves notjust afghanistan but about how to reintroduce themselves not just afghanistan but the world, because that's at this press conference today was pitched at no doubt. it was two of their global powers rather than to the people of afghanistan, and this is the crucial point, to whom i don't think any serious analyst thinks they will behave any differently to how that taliban previously behaved. they are going to be a repressive regime, and
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i don't think anyone, whatever they said in a press conference can possibly think otherwise. this said in a press conference can possibly think otherwise. as mink and i want possibly think otherwise. as mink and i want to _ possibly think otherwise. as mink and i want to pick _ possibly think otherwise. as mink and i want to pick up _ possibly think otherwise. as mink and i want to pick up on - possibly think otherwise. as mink and i want to pick up on one - possibly think otherwise. as mink and i want to pick up on one of i and i want to pick up on one of the things that was brought up at the press conference, and there is an at press conference, and there is an rrf trust year, so i am going to include this. he said that we are more than willing to control the drugs, basically you're going to have to pay us, though. basically you're going to have to pay us. though-— basically you're going to have to pay us, though. yes, listen, i am not going — pay us, though. yes, listen, i am not going to _ pay us, though. yes, listen, i am not going to listen _ pay us, though. yes, listen, i am not going to listen to _ pay us, though. yes, listen, i am not going to listen to anything . not going to listen to anything that's— not going to listen to anything that's being set at the moment for exactiy— that's being set at the moment for exactly the reasons that henry said. you know. _ exactly the reasons that henry said. you know, we are not going to harbour — you know, we are not going to harbour terrorists, we are not going to do— harbour terrorists, we are not going to do this, — harbour terrorists, we are not going to do this, that. just read between the tines. — to do this, that. just read between the lines. or— to do this, that. just read between the lines, or even the lines themselves. they have already decided — themselves. they have already decided on the autocratic method that they— decided on the autocratic method that they are going to use. the one thing _ that they are going to use. the one thing that's — that they are going to use. the one thing that's interesting from what you have — thing that's interesting from what you have just said is the role that qatar— you have just said is the role that qatar and — you have just said is the role that qatar and probably saudi arabia and these _ qatar and probably saudi arabia and these very— qatar and probably saudi arabia and these very rich oil nations, our allies— these very rich oil nations, our
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allies have _ these very rich oil nations, our allies have played in creating this return, _ allies have played in creating this return, facilitating the return of the taliban. are we going to ask questions — the taliban. are we going to ask questions about that? who is arming these _ questions about that? who is arming these guys? who is backing them? do we reatiy— these guys? who is backing them? do we really know? that these guys? who is backing them? do we really know?— we really know? that is the question. — we really know? that is the question, isn't _ we really know? that is the question, isn't it? - we really know? that is the question, isn't it? how- we really know? that is the question, isn't it? how will| we really know? that is the - question, isn't it? how will they find and run their country. let's just go back to the man himself. what did you think of the way he handled that press conference henry? that's the front page of the times. there is this quite fascinating here is certainly to journalists like us which is not to reporters who are very experienced in covering afghanistan, they are saying today, oh, wow, that's what he looks like because it turns out he had been a key voice for them to speak tail for many, many years if they wanted to speak to the taliban, but at the end of the phone.
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a few journalists, of the phone. a fewjournalists, in of the phone. a few journalists, in fact, of the phone. a fewjournalists, in fact, i think no journalists knew what he looks like until he stepped forward today. so that in and of itself is kinda fascinating, and clearly he is very eloquent and clearly, you know, has having doubts without these journalists over the years is well versed in how to present at that taliban is doing in a way which they think might be perceived a little bit less badly in the west and among people in afghanistan to object to the taliban. and many people in afghanistan rejected the taliban. as we keep saying, it's cannot be allowed to obscure the reality. it is publicly —— relations. but, you know, that taliban wanted to take control of afghanistan for a reason which is that they have a very different vision of how afghanistan should operate to how it has been under the reasons government. it’s under the reasons government. it's obviously been trained in optics and
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pr side of things as well. the first question was from a woman anti—encouraged questions from the international community, yasmin. yes, i think again, they have had a lot of— yes, i think again, they have had a lot of time — yes, i think again, they have had a lot of time to prepare for this. one thing _ lot of time to prepare for this. one thing that— lot of time to prepare for this. one thing that is— lot of time to prepare for this. one thing that is interesting is that they— thing that is interesting is that they do— thing that is interesting is that they do want to make a good impression. you know, partly because i impression. you know, partly because idon't _ impression. you know, partly because idon't even _ impression. you know, partly because i don't even think they could've expected — i don't even think they could've expected such an easy war because the west— expected such an easy war because the west was asleep, nato was asleep from our— the west was asleep, nato was asleep from our prime minister was on holiday. — from our prime minister was on holiday, joe biden was getting out, our foreign secretary was on holiday. — our foreign secretary was on holiday. how did our opposition leader— holiday. how did our opposition leader seem to have nothing to say over all— leader seem to have nothing to say over all of— leader seem to have nothing to say over all of these days when they were _ over all of these days when they were moving and moving, and obviously— were moving and moving, and obviously taking over the country? i think— obviously taking over the country? i think they— obviously taking over the country? i think they are quite surprised they have had _ think they are quite surprised they have had such an easy ride, so they feel they— have had such an easy ride, so they feel they can — have had such an easy ride, so they feel they can be a little bit generous and charming on day one or
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two or— generous and charming on day one or two or whatever it is, but you know don't _ two or whatever it is, but you know don't fall— two or whatever it is, but you know don't fall for— two or whatever it is, but you know don't fall for it to. if i am proved wrong _ don't fall for it to. if i am proved wrong and — don't fall for it to. if i am proved wrong and that they are a more civilised — wrong and that they are a more civilised and fair regime, i welcome you know. — civilised and fair regime, i welcome you know, apologise and say i was wrong, _ you know, apologise and say i was wrong, but — you know, apologise and say i was wrong, but i — you know, apologise and say i was wrong, but i don't think so. gk, wrong, but i don't think so. 0k, well the ft, _ wrong, but i don't think so. 0k, well the ft, part— wrong, but i don't think so. 0k, well the ft, part of— wrong, but i don't think so. oti, well the ft, part of their wrong, but i don't think so. ti, well the ft, part of their pr campaign today was that when in will be active within all parts of society. a caveat, we heard over and over again was within sharia. henry? as and that is obviously a very important caveat which cover us, well, which contains the sting in detail. again, you know, one of the things that has been so moving and powerful over the last few days has been winning, be they politicians, civic society activists, or just
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normal women who want to lead full and active lives in society saying that they are not going to leave afghanistan. they will stand up to the taliban and that they are going to be defiant, and obviously that takes courage beyond that which i could personally conceive of, but i don't think anybody really thinks that in the fullness of time they will be able to continue beating their lives as they have done, and thatis their lives as they have done, and that is obviously incredibly sad. i mean, sad doesn't dojustice that is obviously incredibly sad. i mean, sad doesn't do justice to the gravity of that situation, but no matter what the taliban said today, thatis matter what the taliban said today, that is what most people who know the country and know that taliban think is going to happen. same sub'ect, think is going to happen. same subject. but — think is going to happen. same subject, but let's _ think is going to happen. same subject, but let's turn - think is going to happen. same subject, but let's turn the - think is going to happen. same subject, but let's turn the front page of the metro, something many women in the west will take for granted, just standing in the streets and using your voice. that's the front page of the metro, true courage. the front page of the metro, true couraue. , ., i,
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the front page of the metro, true couraue. , ., ~ ., courage. yes, and you know, it is, as henry said. _ courage. yes, and you know, it is, as henry said. you _ courage. yes, and you know, it is, as henry said, you know, - courage. yes, and you know, it is, as henry said, you know, gosh, i. as henry said, you know, gosh, i would _ as henry said, you know, gosh, i would never— as henry said, you know, gosh, i would never be able to do that. but, you know. _ would never be able to do that. but, you know. if— would never be able to do that. but, you know, if you look at the origins of the _ you know, if you look at the origins of the faith, — you know, if you look at the origins of the faith, the profits's first wife — of the faith, the profits's first wife was _ of the faith, the profits's first wife was far older than him, a business _ wife was far older than him, a business woman for whom he worked. 0ne business woman for whom he worked. one of— business woman for whom he worked. one of his _ business woman for whom he worked. one of his other younger wives lead an army. _ one of his other younger wives lead an army. so — one of his other younger wives lead an army, so that sharia laws which were _ an army, so that sharia laws which were created by men long after the death— were created by men long after the death of— were created by men long after the death of the prophets where entirely created _ death of the prophets where entirely created for misogynist reasons as a way to _ created for misogynist reasons as a way to control women and, you know, it is not— way to control women and, you know, it is notjust _ way to control women and, you know, it is notjust these people, these men _ it is notjust these people, these men who— it is notjust these people, these men who hate women. i think this is a global— men who hate women. i think this is a global issue, and now they have the power— a global issue, and now they have the power they have craved over females — the power they have craved over females who have changed in 20 years _ females who have changed in 20 ears. ., , females who have changed in 20 ears, ., , . ., , females who have changed in 20 ears. , , females who have changed in 20 ears. , years. yasmin, can i 'ust stop you i'm auoin years. yasmin, can i 'ust stop you rm going to h years. yasmin, can i 'ust stop you rm going to jump _ years. yasmin, can i 'ust stop you in going to jump in _ years. yasmin, can i just stop you i'm going to jump in and - years. yasmin, can i just stop you | i'm going to jump in and make the i'm going tojump in and make the most of having you on with estimates. is it oppression and
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control, orare estimates. is it oppression and control, or are they threatened, i am trying to get my head around it. i think him and that is what i said in my— i think him and that is what i said in my column today that's, you know, and every _ in my column today that's, you know, and every part of the world to me 'ust and every part of the world to me just have — and every part of the world to me just have to— and every part of the world to me just have to look at the un reports from _ just have to look at the un reports from honduras to india to afghanistan, to south africa, there is my— afghanistan, to south africa, there is my belief is its comes from hatred — is my belief is its comes from hatred it _ is my belief is its comes from hatred. it comes from a place where which _ hatred. it comes from a place where which time _ hatred. it comes from a place where which time i— hatred. it comes from a place where which time i hear, we have had over 1400 _ which time i hear, we have had over 1400 women— which time i hear, we have had over 1400 women killed by men in the last decade _ 1400 women killed by men in the last decade. imagine if that was the number— decade. imagine if that was the number for black people murdered or jewish— number for black people murdered or jewish people murdered our muslim people _ jewish people murdered our muslim people murdered. we would be appalled. it comes from hatred, i am convinced _ appalled. it comes from hatred, i am convinced of— appalled. it comes from hatred, i am convinced of that. lets appalled. it comes from hatred, i am convinced of that.— convinced of that. lets go to the front page _ convinced of that. lets go to the front page of — convinced of that. lets go to the front page of the _ convinced of that. lets go to the front page of the daily mail, - convinced of that. lets go to the i front page of the daily mail, henry,
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and just summarise the story for us. well, the daily mail both describes and shows an image of one of those uk military evacuations taking off successfully coming with afghan refugees on it, but it also talks about some of the british citizens who are still struggling to make it out of kabul, including one briton who at one point today lost touch with his wife as she was trying to get there what he called a crash at the airport. and it's a reminder that that we have moved on to talking about the taliban who have taken over kabul and afghanistan, there are still lots of brits who at that government is trying to get out of the country, and it is still unclear how much longer they are going to be able to do so. for now, the only bit of afghanistan of america with help of the british control a phase the airport and air traffic control. they seem to basically be relying on the generosity of the taliban for that
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to remain the case. however long that will remain the case could really affect whether lots of these brats and citizens about other countries and afghan refugees do actually manage to make it out of the country. we actually manage to make it out of the country-— the country. we have got about a minute here. _ the country. we have got about a minute here, very _ quickly, 502 uk nationals have left afg ha nista n left afghanistan so far. yes, we have to also _ left afghanistan so far. yes, we have to also remember - left afghanistan so far. yes, we have to also remember there i left afghanistan so far. yes, we l have to also remember there are left afghanistan so far. yes, we i have to also remember there are a lot of— have to also remember there are a lot of british afghan british afghanistan people in afghanistan visiting _ afghanistan people in afghanistan visiting families the local dry cleaner— visiting families the local dry cleaner around the corner and he was in tears _ cleaner around the corner and he was in tears when — cleaner around the corner and he was in tears when i went in today saying his entire _ in tears when i went in today saying his entire family was there, and some _ his entire family was there, and some of— his entire family was there, and some of the people here had been visiting _ some of the people here had been visiting. he was desperately worried about— visiting. he was desperately worried about his _ visiting. he was desperately worried about his young sister. so we have british— about his young sister. so we have british afghan knees are also responsible for, and i hope we treat them _ responsible for, and i hope we treat them right— responsible for, and i hope we treat them right because they are british,
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and, them right because they are british, and. you _ them right because they are british, and, you know, whether it they will be prioritised, ijust rememberwhen it was— be prioritised, ijust rememberwhen it was like _ be prioritised, ijust rememberwhen it was like when ugandan nations were _ it was like when ugandan nations were thrown out and it was the white briton _ were thrown out and it was the white briton sewer prioritised over all others — briton sewer prioritised over all others i— briton sewer prioritised over all others. i hope lessons have been learned, — others. i hope lessons have been learned, because that was incredibly unfair~ _ learned, because that was incredibly unfair~ i_ learned, because that was incredibly unfair. i mean, i can't get my head around _ unfair. i mean, i can't get my head around what's happening, going to happen— around what's happening, going to happen in— around what's happening, going to happen in the next few days. apparently i don't have henry knows this, or— apparently i don't have henry knows this, or i _ apparently i don't have henry knows this, or i can— apparently i don't have henry knows this, or i can tell me. we apparently i don't have henry knows this, or i can tell me.— this, ori can tell me. we haven't iot this, ori can tell me. we haven't got long- — this, ori can tell me. we haven't got long- are _ this, ori can tell me. we haven't got long. are american - this, ori can tell me. we haven't got long. are american still - this, or i can tell me. we haven't. got long. are american still there, is that right? _ got long. are american still there, is that right? yeah, _ got long. are american still there, is that right? yeah, that's - got long. are american still there, is that right? yeah, that's right, i is that right? yeah, that's right, and america. — is that right? yeah, that's right, and america, the _ is that right? yeah, that's right, and america, the national- is that right? yeah, that's right, i and america, the national security adviser to joe and america, the national security adviser tojoe biden today couldn't even confirm that they were definitely able to get them out, just that that that was their intention. so the next few days, as yasmin says, it's going to be really quite tricky. yasmin says, it's going to be really quite tricky-— quite tricky. 0k, thank you both, and i am quite tricky. 0k, thank you both, and i am sure — quite tricky. 0k, thank you both, and i am sure you _ quite tricky. 0k, thank you both, and i am sure you will _ quite tricky. 0k, thank you both, and i am sure you will all - quite tricky. 0k, thank you both, and i am sure you will all be - quite tricky. 0k, thank you both, | and i am sure you will all be tuned in to their recall of parliament tomorrow. a lot going on, actually, this week. but yasmin, henry, thank
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you very much indeed, and do you know what, i learned a lot this evening. so fantastic thank you very much. thank you, and thank you for joining us on the papers. from all of the team good night. hello, i'm mark edwards with your sports news. we start with cricket, and liam livingstone put on a devastating display of power to lead birmingham phoenix directly into the final of the hundred, they hammered northern superchagers by eight wickets to book their place in saturday�*s showpiece at lords. superchargers were put in to bat and thanks to tom kohler—cadmore's 71 off 44 balls set the visitors a solid target of 144. but livingstone silenced the lively leeds crowd. the phoenix captain smashed the highest score of the tournament so far — 92 not out from just 40 balls including an incredible ten sixes
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as his side raced to victory with a massive 26 balls remaining. there was a sensational individual performance from eve jones as birmingham phoenix all—but secured a place in the women's hundred eliminator with a 14—run victory over northern superchargers. in a winner takes all clash with the loser heading home, jones stroked a brilliant 64 from 47 balls to keep their tournament hopes alive as craig templeton reports. the countdown was on for both northern superchargers and birmingham phoenix. a win would mean semifinal qualification, lose, it would be elimination. it did not take long for shafali verma to show her intentions. shot, that's been powerfully hit. this was also powerfully hit but also misdirected. phoenix worn down afterjust three balls. help would come in the form of the two joneses, first from their captain amy, but after she was dismissed,
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evejones took over with the big hits, even managing to pick out her recently departed skipper in the dugout. she would eventually go for a brilliant 64, the target was 148. a target the superchargers captain, lauren started to take a chunk out of. she managed a 50, but her side were stopped in their tracks is something special. evejones proved she's as handy in field as she is with the bat. that moment prove to be the turning point, the superchargers wickets started to tumble. when alice went, the task was insurmountable. and it is birmingham who make the semifinals. the phoenix had a slow start to this tournament, but with three wins in a row, are they rising at the right time? craig templeton, bbc news. staying with circket, after defeat to india in the second test yesterday, head coach chris silverwood has warned players face losing their places as england
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were bowled out for 120 on the final day. both openers failed to score and silverwood accepts changes may have to be made. i'd rather give somebody one too many chances than not enough — and we have invested in people. we give people plenty of opporunity. but at the same time, clearly, i don't want to start ripping things up. but at some point, we have to thinking potentially of manoeuvring things a little bit to find a better balance and something that works. from my point of view i have to be open—minded, but that may be something that has to hapen, and i might have to keep my eyes open to it. england will begin the t20 world cup in october with a repeat of the 2016 final against holders west indies. the windies won that in dramatic fashion with four successive sixes off ben stokes in the final over. south africa and australia join england and the west indies in their super 12s group along with two yet—to—be—determined qualifiers, who could be ireland or scotland. football, and fulham are the early
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pace setters in the championship after beating millwall at the den tonight, and they really raced out of the blocks. it took just three minutes for the visitors to take the lead, with aleksander mitrovic poking home from fabio carvalho's cross. and the youngster then went from provider to goal—scorer himself just five mins later. benik afobe scored late on for millwall but it finished 2—1 with fulham staying at the top of the league. and huddersfield claimed theirfirst league win of the season, beating preston north end at the king smith stadium thanks to an own goal from sepp van den berg. elsewhere in the championship stoke city's promising start to the season continued as they claimed an impressive 3—1victory at swansea city, theyre in second. while there were also wins for luton town, coventry city and bristol city. the chelsea striker tammy abraham has completed his move to italian serie a side roma for a fee of 34 million pounds. he's signed a five year deal which is understood to include a buy—back clause set at £68m.
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abraham was chelsea's joint top scorer last season but found his opportunities limited after thomas tuchel took over mid season and even more so with the big money arrival of romelu lukaku from inter milan. abraham has won six england caps and scored 30 goals in 82 appearances for chelsea, having joined them at the age of seven. to tennis — johanna konta has been beaten in the first round of the cincinnati 0pen by world number 23 karolina muchova. konta won the first set but following a rain delay, muchova came back to take the second and deciding set, winning 3—6, 7—6, 6—2. mark selby is through to the second round of the british open after beating shaun murphy. it was a tightly contested match that went to a deciding fifth frame, with selby taking it. he'll now face either ali carter or lei peifan in the next round. and dutch cyclist fabiojakobsen has won stage four of the vuelta a espana — the third and final
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grand tour of the year. the deceuninck-quickstep rider came out on top in a hotly—contested sprint finish. britain's adam yates remains a minute and 21 seconds behind leader rein taramae in the general classification standings after finishing safely in the peloton. and that's all the sport for now. from me, mark edwards, and the rest of the team, bye—bye. hello there. sunshine was very limited on tuesday, but we did see some good spells of sunshine across southeastern—central parts of scotland, where temperatures reached close to mid 20s celsius. the next few days, though, we're holding onto a lot of cloud once again, and it's going to feel pretty cool for the time of year. winds coming in off the atlantic on a west—northwesterly breeze, moisture—laden air, plenty of cloud, some spots of drizzle across northern and western hills. but again, by tuesday, the best of the sunshine, central—eastern scotland, east of the pennines, southeast wales and southwest england. it's here where we'll see the best
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of the temperatures. quite a breeze coming in from the northwest, but particularly around northern and western areas. 0n coasts and hills, it'll be very noticeable. temperatures, low 20s where we get any brightness. otherwise, it's high teens for many of us. as we move into thursday, it looks like it's going to be a similar story with plenty of cloud around. could see some showery bursts of rain pushing across england and wales. a little bit of sunshine around where we'll see temperatures reach the low 20s again. otherwise, for most, into the high teens.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: the taliban leader says the rights of women will be respected as long as they adhere to islamic laws. translation: there | will be nothing against women in our ruling. our people accept our women are muslims. they accept islamic rules. if they continue to live according to sharia, we will be happy. they will be happy. the uk government announces up to 20,000 afghans will be resettled in britain in the long term. how is china responding to the developments in afghanistan, and how will they approach relations with the taliban? we'll be talking to an expert on the region. also in the programme... the authorities in haiti now say more than 1900 people
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have died following saturday's powerful earthquake.

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