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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 19, 2021 1:30pm-2:00pm BST

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by azeem were upheld and that sadly, historically, azeem was the victim of inappropriate behaviour. this was clearly unacceptable, yorkshire side, and they expressed their profound apologies. yorkshire stopped short of any admittance of rafiq's claimed that he suffered racial abuse. rafiq's claimed that he suffered racialabuse. rafiq rafiq's claimed that he suffered racial abuse. rafiq has responded to the statement on social media, questioning the club's reference inappropriate behaviour. we should of course get more detail on all of this when the report is published. yorkshire say they aim to make eight and its recommendations available in the coming weeks. they hope that the report can be a catalyst, they say, for important changes at the club. thank you very much. time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes. so far this month we have seen their average amounts of rainfall, near average amounts of rainfall, near average temperatures, but one thing that sticks out it is been a pretty cloudy month. certainly over the next few days we will keep a lot of cloud. this is the view from space
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showing today's extensive cloud sheet. to the west, more cloud. this will bring outbreaks of rain in the next few days. today the cloud is taken off to bring wet weather. the wettest weather has been across the greater manchester area. it is putting eastwards 90 yorkshire and lincolnshire. the rain quite persistent for some across these areas. showers for wales and south—west england. northern ireland and scotland largely dry. for most it will stay pretty cloudy. some breaks in the cloud to give some glimpses of sunshine. 0vernight tonight it is a largely dry night. a lot of cloud around, a few mist patches, temperatures drifting down to between ten and 14 degrees. tomorrow, a change on the way for northern ireland. that weatherfront i showed you a moment ago is here and it will be bringing some rain across northern ireland through the day, with the rain turning heavier and steadier into the afternoon. further east, scotland, england and wales, a better chance of seeing more sunshine, before the cloud thickens in the west and rain
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approaches western scotland, north—west england and wales. even at this stage in the afternoon tomorrow we will hold onto some sunshine across parts of east england and the fat north of scotland. the weekend is looking pretty wet. an unsettled pattern. these weather fronts bringing persistent outbreaks of rain for a time on saturday. sunday sees showers follow. saturday the weather looks wet. this rain is moving more quickly than we were suspecting a few days ago. that means there is less chance for the temperatures to get particularly high in the east. 22, 20 three degrees. the rain heavier times as it moved eastwards. eventually, showers and brighter conditions for northern ireland, wales and the south—west of england. at the time we get to sunday they will be some rain loitering but really it is a day of sunshine and showers. the showers could be heavy and thundery and potentially quite slow moving across parts of the midlands, central, southern england and south—east england, and you will
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need to keep a close eye on them. better weather next week. high pressure building in. although it is going to be largely dry with a fair amount of sunshine around, there is no heatwave on the way. temperatures generally staying into the low 20s for most. but at least some cheery weather on the way. that is the latest. thank you. a reminder of our top story. dramatic new footage emerges of the continuing chaos outside kabul airport — as people try to flee the taliban. british troops are helping control the crowds and check people's documents. the government says they'll stay as long as the us are in control of the airport. that's all from the bbc news at one. so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are. good afternoon. it's 1.30pm and here's your latest sports news.
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the final women's golf major of the year is underway at carnoustie where sweden's madelene sagstroem has the early lead. she is six under par. she has impressed on the opening day and it's those drizzly and murky conditions in scotland. just one shot behind the favourite and olympic champion nelly korda. this is the leader board at the moment... just to be clear, sagstroem is five under par. disappointment at the
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bottom. the former manchester united and scotland striker denis law has revealed that he's been diagnosed with "mixed dementia". law, who is now aged 81, says he wants to be open about his condition and has revealed in a statement he is suffering from alzheimers and vascular dementia. law, who also played for manchester city and torino, says he and his family are getting support from the alzheimer's society charity. he says in his statement he wants to remain as optimistic as possible. tottenham fans want the answer to this one, where will harry kane be playing his football? the england captain hasn't travelled with the spurs squad for their european match tonight amid speculation over his future at the club. kane — who's been linked with a move
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to manchester city — is not in portugalfor spurs�* europa conference league play—off first leg against pacos de ferreira. it's thought kane's still working on his fitness and manager nuno espirito santo says he can't confirm whether he will be ready for their league game against wolves on sunday. what's happening behind the doors is harry is our player, he's preparing himself, he trained today and he's going to train tomorrow and again on friday. joining the group. and this is how we operate. we don't, we don't really pay much attention to what's being said outside regarding the situation. harry is our player, he's one of the best players in the world and we are very lucky to have him. yorkshire have admitted their former player azeem rafiq — who accused the club of racism — was "the victim" of what they call "inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour" and have offered him their apologies. rafiq said last year that instiutional racism at the club had left him close to taking his own life. an independent investigation commenced last september,
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with the ecb writing to the club this week to ask for a copy of the findings. 0n social media today, rafiq has questioned yorshire's reference to the phrase "inappropriate behaviour," claiming the club is fudging the issue. naomi 0saka says she felt "ungrateful" at points during the last year for being unable to appreciate her success. the world number two was speaking after coming from a set down to beat american teenager coco gauff in the second round of the cincinnati 0pen. 0saka withrdrew from the french open and wimbledon earlier this year to focus on her mental health: i've had a really weird year. i'm wondering if i was scared because sometimes i would see headlines of players losing, then the headline next day would be a collapse or, like, they aren't that great any more. so then i was thinking... me waking up every day, for me i should feel like i'm winning, you know? like, the choice
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to go out there, to play, to see fans, that people come out and watch me play, that in itself is an accomplishment. i'm not sure when along the way i started desensitising that. it started not being like an accomplishment for me. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. hundreds of firefighters in france have spent a third day battling a fast—moving fire near the french riveria. it's the latest in a string of deadly fires in the mediterranean in recent weeks, amid intense heatwaves. officials have blamed climate change. courtney bembridge reports. this is what firefighters are up against. a fast—moving fire fuelled by an intense heat wave. thousands of residents and tourists have been moved to safety, while others went back to inspect the damage after a terrifying escape.
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translation: the fire arrived about _ eight o'clock, it was so fast. it came from higher up. we tried to control the sparks but it was too intense, so we took refuge in the vineyards. europe has been ravaged by wildfires this summer, with record temperatures across the mediterranean. greece has been badly hit, this is the latest fire burning through one of the last pine forests near athens. residents here were caught by surprise at just how quickly the flames reached their homes. translation: we watched as it all burned, from - the front and from the back. and there was no—one, no—one here, no—one to warn the citizens here where there are houses. and we were running, we were running. greece has fought more than 100 wildfires this month
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alone, as they battle the severe heat wave in decades. scientists say it is another reminder of the impact of man—made climate change. courtney bembridge, bbc news. a wildfire near the californian city of sacramento has grown by a factor of eight in just 2a hours. the fire suddenly expanded on tuesday morning and within a day was consuming more than 53 thousand acres. —— was consuming more than 53,000 acres. two people have been seriously injured and thousands of residents have been evacuated from the eldorado national forest. it's one of many fires currently raging across the western united states. a group of gurkha veterans are now on day 12 of their hunger strike outside downing street, as part of a campaign for equal pension rights. gurkhas who retired before 1997 are not eligible for a uk armed forces pension. to force a change, the protestors say they're willing to starve to death. 0ur correspondent lebo diseko
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has been with them. they have served in the british army for more than 200 years, fighting side by side with soldiers born here in the uk. it is equal work with equal danger, but, for years, many gurkhas say they have had to struggle for equal treatment. it took a high—profile campaign, headed by the actressjoanna lumley, for most gurkhas to be allowed to settle in the uk. they won that fight in 2009. today a great injustice has been righted. we will not be looking behind us. we are paying tribute to the future and, for the people of great britain, what could be greater then to be able to open our arms and say the gurkhas are coming! now, another for equal pensions. these three hunger strikers say they are willing to starve themselves to death in order to achieve it.
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they have gone almost two weeks without food and it is beginning to take its toll. dhan gurung, a diabetic, was rushed to hospital earlier this week, such were the concerns for his health. and although he is back in front of downing street, his wife fears for what could come next. we are very worried. he is very weak. that is why, please, i can't lose my husband. please save him. please. i cannot lose my husband. dhan gurung served as a corporal in the army for 15 years, but, like all gurkhas who retired before 1997, his pension isjust a fraction of what british—born members of the army get. these protesters say that is unfair and they want borisjohnson to do something about it. yesterday, around 100 supporters marched to parliament to make the point. they want the british and nepalese governments to set a date for high level talks about the veterans�* plight. only then will they be willing to postpone the hunger strike,
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and they are willing to do whatever it takes to get there. behind this hunger strike is if somebody dies, then there will be another person coming to take his place. that is going to be very sad. it is a very extreme action. and it is their decision to do this. and we have been forced, or rather they have been forced, to take this extreme action, because nobody is prepared to listen. a spokesperson for the ministry of defence said the uk government is committed to providing gurkhas a fair pension, including uplifts determined by formal review processes. and they say they are consulting with gurkha veteran groups and the government of nepal with more meetings scheduled next month. but there is little trust here at the protest opposite downing street in government efforts. instead, a quiet anger and determination to try to right what these veterans see as historical wrongs.
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the bosses of britain's biggest companies earned 86 times the average full—time wage last year. the median pay of a chief executive of a ftse—100 firm — the uk's blue chip company index — was £2.69 million in 2020, according to the independent research institute, the high pay centre. 0ur economics correspondent, andy verity explained that whilst pay packets are incredibly high, they were even higher two years ago. believe it or not it is going down from extremely exorbitant levels to just exorbitant levels. in 2019 the average pay was 107 times as much as the average worker. now it is a mere 86 times as much as the average worker is paid. the high pay centre says, well, to some extent that
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suggests the system is working. if you want your executive rewards to be in line with the companies, the companies haven't done very well in the pandemic, it's been a difficult economic time for many of those companies, and therefore it would make sense that with profits down the rewards should go down as well. but it isn't as simple as that. it's always been difficult, this justification that has been given for very high executive rewards, mainly if you want good shareholder value, improvements in the share price, better dividends, then you've got to have top talent. it's a bit like footballers, you've got to pay whatever it takes to get that top talent in order to get that good performance. but this year, it is interesting, the top paid guy in the top hundred companies listed on the london stock exchange was the chief executive of astrazeneca. you would have thought, well, maybe he doesn't deserve his rewards, the vaccine meant big profits, surely. well, no, what he did was offer to distribute
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the vaccine at no profit, and therefore that has cost the company's top line and their bottom line because they are distributing it at no profit. yet when you think about whether it has been a successful year for astrazeneca, probably most people would say yes. the improvements to the company's reputation, and also the good it has been seen to be doing to public health, are incalculable. even though it hasn't done much for astrazeneca's bottom line, i doubt the shareholders will begrudge him his salary. the headlines on bbc news... desperate scenes at kabul airport — a little girl is handed over to an american solider by people fleeing the taliban. britian pledges to remain, as long as the us controls the airport. british troops are helping control the crowds and check people's documents. new research finds both the pfizer and the astrazeneca jabs are still offering good protection against the more transmissable
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delta variant of covid. while thousands of people try desperately to flee the taliban in afghanistan some afghans are beginning a new life across the uk. some of those who worked closely with our armed forces have already arrived. portsmouth has welcomed three families with another six on the way. tom hepworth from bbc south today has been speaking to 0mar, an interpreter who helped train the afghan national army. we've disguised his identity because of threats against his family. normally as a patriot of britain you are a soldier without a gun. you face contacts, ied explosions, but
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the soldiers are protecting you. were you surprised at how quick the taliban advance was? to were you surprised at how quick the taliban advance was?— were you surprised at how quick the taliban advance was? to be honest it was a shock — taliban advance was? to be honest it was a shock for _ taliban advance was? to be honest it was a shock for me, _ taliban advance was? to be honest it was a shock for me, yes. _ taliban advance was? to be honest it was a shock for me, yes. how - taliban advance was? to be honest it was a shock for me, yes. how do - taliban advance was? to be honest it was a shock for me, yes. how do youj was a shock for me, yes. how do you feel about the _ was a shock for me, yes. how do you feel about the british _ was a shock for me, yes. how do you feel about the british and _ was a shock for me, yes. how do you feel about the british and americans| feel about the british and americans withdrawing? it is feel about the british and americans withdrawing?— withdrawing? it is hurting that you sent that withdrawing? it is hurting that you spent that much _ withdrawing? it is hurting that you spent that much money, - withdrawing? it is hurting that you spent that much money, that - withdrawing? it is hurting that you | spent that much money, that much lives. but, unfortunately, the thing that you want to do, it is hard, yes. to be honest, i'm glad i spent time with the government that wanted my country to be independent, wanted my country to be independent, wanted my country to be independent, wanted my country to be developed, and also my country to be developed, and also my national army. i worked with them. i also want to say thank you. i appreciate the work they have done for the afghan people, i appreciate them, and i'm also proud i worked as an interpreter. them, and i'm also proud i worked as an interpreter-— an interpreter. you've got family there.
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an interpreter. you've got family there- what _ an interpreter. you've got family there. what danger _ an interpreter. you've got family there. what danger are - an interpreter. you've got family there. what danger are they - an interpreter. you've got family there. what danger are they in l an interpreter. you've got family| there. what danger are they in at there. what danger are they in at the moment? the there. what danger are they in at the moment?— there. what danger are they in at the moment? , ., ., , the moment? the lives of thousands are at risk- — the moment? the lives of thousands are at risk. especially _ the moment? the lives of thousands are at risk. especially our _ the moment? the lives of thousands are at risk. especially our family, - are at risk. especially our family, and interpreters�* families. they broke into my home. they beat my brother. but my brotherjust wanted to escape. he told them, i�*m not his brother, i�*mjust living to escape. he told them, i�*m not his brother, i�*m just living in this house, i�*m renting, and i took this house. they said, no, we know your brother was working with them and where is he now? so they told my brother that they would kill him, as well. i don�*t want my brother... inaudible now he is paying for this. the sacrifice he is paying because of me. ., �* ., ., sacrifice he is paying because of me. ., ., ., sacrifice he is paying because of me. ., ., ~ ., ., me. you've got out. what sort of welcome did _ me. you've got out. what sort of welcome did you _ me. you've got out. what sort of welcome did you have _ me. you've got out. what sort of welcome did you have when - me. you've got out. what sort of welcome did you have when you | me. you've got out. what sort of i welcome did you have when you got me. you've got out. what sort of - welcome did you have when you got to britain? fist welcome did you have when you got to britain? �* ., , welcome did you have when you got to britain? �* .,, �* , welcome did you have when you got to britain? �* ., �* , ., ., britain? at least i'm very glad to find the chance _
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britain? at least i'm very glad to find the chance to _ britain? at least i'm very glad to find the chance to say _ britain? at least i'm very glad to find the chance to say i - britain? at least i'm very glad to | find the chance to say i appreciate the government of britain which helps us a lot. and also just one thing to remind them, please, our families are at risk. donations have been flooding in to north west charities who are getting ready to help refugees due to come from afghanistan. the government�*s still finalising the details of the scheme that�*ll see twenty thousand afghans come to the uk over the next four years. phil mccann reports. this is the kindness of the people of manchester in one room. this is what has been sent to this charity from across the city over the last two days alone. from across the city over the last two days alone-— from across the city over the last two days alone. none of us expected this. none two days alone. none of us expected this- none of — two days alone. none of us expected this. none of us _ two days alone. none of us expected this. none of us expected _ two days alone. none of us expected this. none of us expected the - this. none of us expected the support we�*ve got. but at the same time, this is what manchester does best. ~ ., time, this is what manchester does best. , . , time, this is what manchester does best. , ., , ., ., best. more planes arrived overnight from afghanistan, _ best. more planes arrived overnight from afghanistan, but _ best. more planes arrived overnight from afghanistan, but space - best. more planes arrived overnight from afghanistan, but space on - best. more planes arrived overnight. from afghanistan, but space on them is limited. we from afghanistan, but space on them is limited. ~ ., from afghanistan, but space on them is limited. ~ . ., ~ ., from afghanistan, but space on them is limited. ~ . .,~ ., ., is limited. we are taking out a wider government _ is limited. we are taking out a wider government personnel i is limited. we are taking out a i wider government personnel and is limited. we are taking out a - wider government personnel and other people. british citizens and people who work for us, the military, and
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they make up the whole plane usually. they make up the whole plane usuall . ~ ., , they make up the whole plane usuall. ~ ., , ., ., , usually. some afghans who've already been able to — usually. some afghans who've already been able to come _ usually. some afghans who've already been able to come to _ usually. some afghans who've already been able to come to the _ usually. some afghans who've already been able to come to the north-west. been able to come to the north—west include those who have worked as interpreters for the british military. there are worries they will be targeted by the taliban. 0ne will be targeted by the taliban. one of those interpreters has been moved to lancaster in the last two weeks with their family. we to lancaster in the last two weeks with their family.— with their family. we offered to take five families. _ with their family. we offered to take five families. so _ with their family. we offered to take five families. so far - with their family. we offered to take five families. so far we've| take five families. so far we�*ve only taken one. and that�*s because we�*ve not been able to get the accommodation for them. we�*ve not been able to get the accommodation forthem. not we�*ve not been able to get the accommodation for them. not because we couldn�*t take them. if it accommodation for them. not because we couldn't take them.— we couldn't take them. if it has been difficult _ we couldn't take them. if it has been difficult to _ we couldn't take them. if it has been difficult to find _ we couldn't take them. if it has - been difficult to find accommodation for five been difficult to find accommodation forfive families, if been difficult to find accommodation for five families, if there are 20,000 coming across to the uk over the next four years, will finding accommodation be difficult? we are lookin: for accommodation be difficult? we are looking for accommodation. - accommodation be difficult? we are looking for accommodation. we - accommodation be difficult? we are looking for accommodation. we did | accommodation be difficult? we are| looking for accommodation. we did a bit of a shout out yesterday and acquired two more homes. we are looking forward to, three, five bedroom houses for these families. homes are being donated as well as essentials like these.
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this summer, thousands of tourists flocked to hotspots across the uk — often renting short—term holiday lets. but, concerns have been raised about the amount of homes that then sit empty for the majority of the year — with one mp labelling it a "housing emergency". matt graveling reports. come on, come on. it�*s notjust humans who enjoy a little time in the country. it�*s an amazing job, and i tell you what, i wouldn�*t do anything else. i absolutely love it. but for dog walker brian, this peaceful paradise comes at a cost. the price of properties have almost trebled in the last five years. i�*m in a bit of a struggle at the moment with having to come back to live with my parents due
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to being priced out of properties. affordable houses in brian�*s hometown of keswick are scarce. nearly half are now holiday lets or second homes. elsewhere, over in wales, authorities in the county of gwynedd have introduced a 100% council tax premium on additional properties that are not a main residence. something some believe is unfair. we feel very, very discriminated against. there isn�*t an issue more important to us at the moment than this. to sort of say, you are in an identical house to somebody next door but you are having to pay 200% counciltax, or300%, is discrimination. back in the lakes, i spoke to local mp tim farron. he�*s launched a petition asking the government to change planning laws to give local authorities more powers to control the number of second homes and holiday lets. talking to a couple,
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just a few weeks ago, who paid £650 a month for a small flat above a shop in lovely ambleside. their children go to the local school, they both work in the hospitality industry. and they were served notice to quit, they have quit and they discover that that small two bedroom flat above a shop is now on the market for £1000 a week as a holiday let. jeanette has lived in the lakes for 58 years. long serving secretary of the ambleside rugby club, she says, as the people leave, so do local amenities and teams. we did have a period of three years where we didn't play at all, because we didn't have a team. because we've got so many people now living in the area, who are not local, they haven't got the interest.
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it was another age. another place. a time, we are told, of chivalry, honour, and violence. lots and lots of violence. now you can try it out for yourself here in new york�*s central park. these are gladiators nyc, a group that meet up once a month, put on steel armour, and then attack each other. it�*s a combination of medieval combat and mixed martial arts. although there is much chivalry involved. inaudible inaudible iam inaudible i am nowhere near good enough to compete for any titles or medals. i
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don�*t have the time, the energy, the money for the kit, so i�*m just here for the violence. money for the kit, so i'm 'ust here for the violenceh for the violence. this is pretty curuellin for the violence. this is pretty gruelling stuff. _ for the violence. this is pretty gruelling stuff. the _ for the violence. this is pretty gruelling stuff. the armour. for the violence. this is pretty l gruelling stuff. the armour can weigh up to 45 kilos or more. it was all the brain child of a former gladiator of wall street who says he�*s trying to make a positive difference. we he's trying to make a positive difference-— he's trying to make a positive difference. ~ , _, ., difference. we 'ust hit the core of it, which difference. we 'ust hit the core of at, which is — difference. we 'ust hit the core of h, which is he — difference. we just hit the core of it, which is be healthy, _ difference. we just hit the core of it, which is be healthy, do - difference. we just hit the core of it, which is be healthy, do more l it, which is be healthy, do more fitness, and when you do more fitness, and when you do more fitness you eat more healthy, you change your lifestyle, now we are changing lives. it�*s change your lifestyle, now we are changing lives-_ changing lives. it's a free programme _ changing lives. it's a free programme available - changing lives. it's a free programme available to i changing lives. it's a free - programme available to anybody changing lives. it's a free _ programme available to anybody who is interested. a chance to improve your fitness, is interested. a chance to improve yourfitness, and, who knows, become a knight of the big apple. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. temperatures have been running quite close to normal this month, the amount of rain we�*ve seen for most places quite close to normal, as well but it�*s been a cloudy august and these cloudy skies really
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dominating the weather picture not just today but over the next few days, as well. the view from space shows extensive cloud coverage across the uk right now. to the west, an area of low pressure, and these fronts to the south—west will be bringing positive rain for friday and the weekend for most areas. through this afternoon we have fairly persistent rain heading across yorkshire and lincolnshire. that�*s where the wettest weather will be. a few showers here, too. drier weather for scotland and northern ireland. foremost, pretty cloudy, just a few breaks in the cloudy, just a few breaks in the cloud sheet and a few sunny spells coming through. 0vernight tonight, staying cloudy for most, could be some mist patches developing through the night time. temperatures drifting down between 11 and 1a degrees. staying relatively mild. friday, a greater chance of seeing a bit more in the way of sunshine for a time across england and wales, for northern scotland, as well. for the west and northern ireland, cloud will thicken and we have rain from
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the front i showed you. they will be moving east bringing the wet weather into northern ireland with heavy bursts. eventually the rain will fringe into parts of western scotland and north—west england and north—west wales, turning cloudy, dull, and damp. the best of any brightness across eastern and northern areas. through the weekend, those weather fronts will bring general outbreaks of rain across most areas of the uk. the rain tending to clearfor the most areas of the uk. the rain tending to clear for the second half of the weekend, so sunday arguably the better day of the weekend coming up. rain will be moving in on saturday. this looks to move on faster, meaning less chance for those temperatures to get much higher across eastern areas of england. generally high teams to low 20s, the rain heavy at times, particularly across england and wales, but pretty wet for parts of northern ireland and scotland. most of the rain clears through sunday, perhaps loitering across parts of eastern england. what follows is showers. they could be heavy,
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thundery, and slow—moving, perhaps the worst of these four central and southern england and the south—east. that�*s your weather for now. —— for central and southern england.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: desperate scenes at kabul airport — a little girl is handed over to an american solider by people fleeing the taliban. britian pledges to remain, as long as the us controls the airport. none of our planes are leaving empty. i have seen reports, i cannot vouch for other nations, but our aeroplanes never leave empty. if we have spaces on them, we offer them up have spaces on them, we offer them up to other nations. british troops are helping control the crowds and check people�*s documents. labour accuses the foreign secretary of putting interpreters�* lives at risk after he declined to make a phone call to get help evacuating
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them from afghanistan.

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