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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 19, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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the taliban are tightening their grip on afghanistan following their takeover, carrying out house—to—house hunts for those who collaborated with western forces. a taliban letter seen by the bbc threatens family members of targets, unless they surrender themselves. the us says it's evacuated 7000 people from kabul, in the five days since the taliban took control. as people scramble to leave the country, the un refugee agency is warning of a looming humanitarian crisis. there's mounting anger in haiti as aid agencies struggle to reach some of the areas worst hit by saturday's earthquake. over 2000 people were killed. the authorities in washington dc have arrested a man who threatened to detonate a bomb near the us capitol. police said they don't know the man's motives.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are times radio presenter calum macdonald and the chief executive of the think tank demos, polly mackenzie. tomorrow's front pages... the metro, and the desperate scene of a mother handing her daughter to an american soldier, begging him to save herfrom a life under the taliban. 0n the front page of the ft, a photo of women protesters in kabul carrying the afghan national flag in a show of defiance to the taliban. the telegraph reports on the remarks made by us presidentjoe biden. he hit back at britain and other nato allies, saying that they �*had a choice�* to stay in afghanistan despite the united states pulling out. according to the times, three of britain's most senior civil servants, whose departments are overseeing the evacuation from afghanistan, are currently on holiday despite the crisis unfolding in the country. it comes as pressure is mounting
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on the foreign secretary to resign amid claims that the crucial phone delegated to a junior minister to help airlift translators out of afghanistan never took place. that's on the front page of the mail. and an exclusive poll on the i reveals that most people in britain believe that the 20—year long mission in afghanistan has been a waste of time and lives. first papers focusing on afghanistan. we'll we�* ll start we'll start by looking at the times. they say whitehall chiefs holiday despite afghan debacle. former mod bosses on leave. i should say when we look at this, the government has responded with a statement of its own. all departments, mod and home office, the fact that a statement has come out at such length tells
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you the attention the government is paying to the story. {iii you the attention the government is paying to the story-— paying to the story. of course eo - le paying to the story. of course peeple must _ paying to the story. of course people must take _ paying to the story. of course people must take holidays - paying to the story. of course | people must take holidays and paying to the story. of course - people must take holidays and civil servants are no exception. 0r ministers. but this is an extraordinary circumstance. the collapse of the government that we supported for 20 years, and to be on holiday during this strikes me as surprising. it seems to me like the sort of thing that would be cancelled. i think the crucial question is the failure of intelligence. we were told by the us president and by our own prime minister the idea that the afghans would fall to the taliban the moment us troops were gone was fanciful and nonsensical. yet it was happened —— has happened in a matter of days. far faster than sources were aware.
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it's notjust coming back from their holidays, it's also a question of why was our intelligence failing so that we couldn't have prepared for this and been in a much better situation? i don't think anyone would be criticising the secretaries to be away, if also those potential refugees, those people we are —— who are supporting... that was going smoothly. it's not going smoothly. it seems like a bit of a lame excuse. �* ., ., , ., , , excuse. adding to that story is the sto in excuse. adding to that story is the story in the _ excuse. adding to that story is the story in the daily _ excuse. adding to that story is the story in the daily mail. _ this broke the story about dominic raab last night. i this broke the story about dominic raab last night.— raab last night. i think this is. .. serious questions _
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raab last night. i think this is. .. serious questions for _ raab last night. i think this is. .. serious questions for the - serious questions for the foreign secretary— serious questions for the foreign secretary and the permanent secretaries as well. i think one of the crucial— secretaries as well. i think one of the crucial details from the times front_ the crucial details from the times front page — the crucial details from the times front page is the suggestion from sources_ front page is the suggestion from sources that as we're alluding to, this of— sources that as we're alluding to, this of actuation plan could have been _ this of actuation plan could have been out — this of actuation plan could have been out by now had this operation been _ been out by now had this operation been coordinated more officially, quickly— been coordinated more officially, quickly and smoothly. the mail following up on the story today, and they are _ following up on the story today, and they are highlighting the barrage of friendly— they are highlighting the barrage of friendly fire the foreign secretary is now— friendly fire the foreign secretary is now exposed to as tory mps really push back— is now exposed to as tory mps really push back on this idea that it was him, _ push back on this idea that it was him, dominic raab, that didn't place the phone _ him, dominic raab, that didn't place the phone call to get this operation under— the phone call to get this operation under quicker. it's always interesting to consider the opposition are calling for resignation. the lib dems are and
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the s— resignation. the lib dems are and the s and — resignation. the lib dems are and the s and pr. the fact that there are -- the — the s and pr. the fact that there are —— the snp are. thatjoins the hours _ are —— the snp are. thatjoins the hoursand— are —— the snp are. thatjoins the hours and hours of criticism the prime _ hours and hours of criticism the prime minister faced in parliament earlier_ prime minister faced in parliament earlier this — prime minister faced in parliament earlier this week when mps were recalled — earlier this week when mps were recalled to discuss this. this is not been — recalled to discuss this. this is not been a _ recalled to discuss this. this is not been a good week for boris johnson — not been a good week for boris johnson and for some of his senior cabinet _ johnson and for some of his senior cabinet secretaries of.— cabinet secretaries of. sometimes there is an — cabinet secretaries of. sometimes there is an image _ cabinet secretaries of. sometimes there is an image which _ cabinet secretaries of. sometimes i there is an image which encapsulates a conflict or moment in time. in 2015, it was the young boy found did on a beach in turkey. this is another image on the metro. we don't know the name of the child, but the headline, the moment a desperate mother hands her tiny daughter to soldiers in kabul. we're beginning to see these individual stories out of that chaos.- stories out of that chaos. yeah, we've seen _ stories out of that chaos. yeah, we've seen lots _ stories out of that chaos. yeah, we've seen lots of _ stories out of that chaos. yeah, we've seen lots of people -
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stories out of that chaos. yeah, | we've seen lots of people asking stories out of that chaos. yeah, - we've seen lots of people asking the question, have the taliban change? are they somehow better? what we see is afghan citizens, especially those who supported the west, telling us what they believe, which is there is no way in which the taliban has reformed. they know what is coming and they are terrified of what is coming. it is genuinely impossible to imagine how desperate we would have to be to give up your child, your baby to unknown soldiers and hope to keep them safe. and to feel that people are so desperate to get out of the situation, just as desperate of those people yesterday who we saw clinging to the flues lodge, clinging to the wheels —— the fuselage, and then falling potentially we assume to their deaths. it shows you that for millions of afghan citizens, this question of may be the taliban are
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nice now has been answered, and they are certain the complacency we've seen from some government officials that these are somehow the compassionate taliban. it's extremely unlikely to turn out to be true. �* ., , ., , true. and he referred to the people cau~ht in true. and he referred to the people caught in the _ true. and he referred to the people caught in the planes, _ true. and he referred to the people caught in the planes, who - true. and he referred to the people caught in the planes, who fell - true. and he referred to the people caught in the planes, who fell out | caught in the planes, who fell out —— you referred. it was reported one was a 19—year—old who played for a youth team, a footballer who had a whole life ahead of him. these stories begin to add up, calum. i think, make no mistake, the taliban are the _ think, make no mistake, the taliban are the taliban. already today, there _ are the taliban. already today, there was— are the taliban. already today, there was a un document that apparently reported militants were going _ apparently reported militants were going door—to—door, hunting people down _ going door—to—door, hunting people down who— going door—to—door, hunting people down who had helped the uk, the us, nato forces, threatening their famiiies— nato forces, threatening their families if they didn't give them
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up. families if they didn't give them up a _ families if they didn't give them up. a news organisation in germany was tweeting earlier this evening that the — was tweeting earlier this evening that the family of one of their journalists, one person there had been _ journalists, one person there had been shot. — journalists, one person there had been shot, and someone else injured at the _ been shot, and someone else injured at the taliban search for the journalist who had escaped. it feels like, journalist who had escaped. it feels like. but _ journalist who had escaped. it feels like, but consensus feels like that may like, but consensus feels like that nray be _ like, but consensus feels like that may be the taliban are trying a different— may be the taliban are trying a different pr campaign to 20 years a-o, different pr campaign to 20 years ago. but _ different pr campaign to 20 years ago, but actually, their techniques and strategies in their violence is exactly— and strategies in their violence is exactly the same as the taliban that was driven— exactly the same as the taliban that was driven out 20 years ago. i did see an article _ was driven out 20 years ago. i did see an article in _ was driven out 20 years ago. i did see an article in a _ was driven out 20 years ago. i did see an article in a us _ was driven out 20 years ago. i c c see an article in a us paper, wondering whether or not they were even being advised by a pr firm, given the apparently coordinated nature of some of those moves seen in the capital kabul. throughout the day here, we've been reporting on other instances of the taliban acting much more menacing.
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let us have a look at the i. uk public verdict on afghanistan, britain's 20 year mission. waste of time and lives, most readers believe. 60% say the uk should give asylum to every afghan who every worked with the military.- worked with the military. looking back, it's clear _ worked with the military. looking back, it's clear that _ worked with the military. looking back, it's clear that the _ worked with the military. looking back, it's clear that the taliban i worked with the military. looking | back, it's clear that the taliban 20 back, its clear that the taliban 20 years ago was a hotbed of terrorism and the international community mobilise in defence of america and to protect america after the atrocities of 9/11. it's not as simple as saying we should never have done that, we should never have done anything about that. the reality is that the mission to eradicate terrorism or to eradicate extremism from afghanistan has clearly been a failure that no hope,
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whether it was part of the original mission or not, of establishing a liberal democracy. none of that has been successful. it has been heartbreaking to hear soldiers, former soldiers who served in afghanistan speaking of their depression over the fact that they saw their fellow soldiers died, buried, injured and maimed, and it feels like it is for nothing. it feels like it is for nothing. it feels like it is for nothing. it feels like the question is what do we need to now? it is important for the government to pay attention to the government to pay attention to the compassionate stance that so many british people are taking in a sense that those who served alongside us, afghan citizens who put themselves at risk, should be brought to safety. we quite rightly
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in my view have opened, made a very generous offer to hong kong citizens to come to the uk and potentially hundreds of thousands eligible. when it comes to afghans who served directly our military commanders, we're being abstemious, we're being... we need to have lots and lots of paperwork before we can let anyone through. i think this is just the public would like to see us be more generous when it comes to those refugees. fin more generous when it comes to those refu . ees. " more generous when it comes to those refu~ees. " ., ,, , , refugees. on the 11th of september, 2001, the taliban _ refugees. on the 11th of september, 2001, the taliban rule _ refugees. on the 11th of september, 2001, the taliban rule death - refugees. on the 11th of september, 2001, the taliban rule death againstj 2001, the taliban rule death against man. 0n 2001, the taliban rule death against man. on september 2021, they will still. what was a bit in the middle about? �* . . . still. what was a bit in the middle about? �* , . ., , ., about? it's a great question. i think what _ about? it's a great question. i think what it _ about? it's a great question. i think what it feels _ about? it's a great question. i think what it feels like - about? it's a great question. i think what it feels like is - about? it's a great question. i think what it feels like is it's l about? it's a great question. i think what it feels like is it's a of duty— think what it feels like is it's a of duty on— think what it feels like is it's a of duty on behalf of those who went into seemingly conquer afghanistan
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20 years— into seemingly conquer afghanistan 20 years ago, and the speech from president _ 20 years ago, and the speech from president biden where he stood squarely— president biden where he stood squarely behind his decision to withdraw— squarely behind his decision to withdraw us troops and place the blame _ withdraw us troops and place the blame entirely to afghans, saying they didn't fight back hard enough, to paraphrase, i don't know to paraphrase, idon't know if that's— to paraphrase, i don't know if that's acceptable. is america still a superpower? i supposed it is. certainiy— a superpower? i supposed it is. certainly the most the country with the greatest army and forces in the world _ the greatest army and forces in the world i_ the greatest army and forces in the world most— the greatest army and forces in the world. ijust feel like if you're involved _ world. ijust feel like if you're involved to this extent 20 years, yotr've _ involved to this extent 20 years, you've committed lives and billions, trillions— you've committed lives and billions, trillions of— you've committed lives and billions, trillions of dollars. it isn't in the — trillions of dollars. it isn't in the interest to build something that's— the interest to build something that's sustained and last, i think it's all— that's sustained and last, i think it's all too— that's sustained and last, i think it's all too easy to blame afghanistan. and tactically, the withdrawal of us intelligence —— intelligence have largely been blamed for the afghan armies and the
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inability— blamed for the afghan armies and the inability to— blamed for the afghan armies and the inability to function. that's a flaw inability to function. that's a flaw in the _ inability to function. that's a flaw in the strategy. perhaps it wasn't nation—building to begin with, but there _ nation—building to begin with, but there were certainly elements of it. surety— there were certainly elements of it. surety we _ there were certainly elements of it. surely we can all see that. it has to be _ surely we can all see that. it has to be asked why we had no more humanity— to be asked why we had no more humanity dealing with people if i can. we will look at other stories, including one in the daily telegraph. autumn boosters, i have on the front page, could be limited to the most vulnerable. the government is still deciding if it should go to all over 50s, given the rest of the world still needs them. would it be more narrow? where is the story? flit would it be more narrow? where is the sto ? _, , would it be more narrow? where is thesto ? , the story? of course the developed world, countries _ the story? of course the developed world, countries are _ the story? of course the developed world, countries are juggling - the story? of course the developed world, countries are juggling their. world, countries are juggling their domestic politics. with the reality that this is a global pandemic. that's the problem. unless the disease can be suppressed everywhere, and remains a problem everywhere. and the priority now is
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ensuring that vaccines are getting to the developing world, middle income countries who are still struggling to vaccinate their populations. so, we have to balance the trade—off. it's notjust a question of whether infection can pass, it's also whether a new variance might emerge. 0r pass, it's also whether a new variance might emerge. or the worst possible situation escaped the vaccine altogether. so, it is complex to work out both the epidemiology of this and the politics, but it does seem like this suggestion is that those booster vaccines are more likely to be limited to the most vulnerable populations. the equation of that may change. populations. the equation of that may change-— populations. the equation of that ma chance. ., . , may change. one way to look at this is to see what _ may change. one way to look at this is to see what israel _ may change. one way to look at this is to see what israel is _ may change. one way to look at this is to see what israel is doing, - is to see what israel is doing, because israel is a few weeks ahead of everyone else in this pandemic. it is now instituting its own
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booster shots. it is now instituting its own boostershots. hospitaladmissions have gone up. they have found that among older people, there is waning protection in those vaccines. for a government looking to protect its own citizens, boosterjabs for the elderly seems like a pretty straightforward decision. i do know one uuote straightforward decision. i do know one quote in _ straightforward decision. i do know one quote in the _ straightforward decision. i do know one quote in the telegraph - straightforward decision. i do know one quote in the telegraph from . straightforward decision. i do know. one quote in the telegraph from ceja saying _ one quote in the telegraph from ceja saying the _ one quote in the telegraph from ceja saying the uk is lacking data to demonstrate —— from sage. i do think as well. _ demonstrate —— from sage. i do think as well, hearing from other professors, doctors, scientists, experts — professors, doctors, scientists, experts on _ professors, doctors, scientists, experts on this, there is concern that the — experts on this, there is concern that the vaccine programme isn't enough _ that the vaccine programme isn't enough at — that the vaccine programme isn't enough at this point in time. we are seeing— enough at this point in time. we are seeing rising cases and 100 deaths a day at _ seeing rising cases and 100 deaths a day at the _ seeing rising cases and 100 deaths a day at the moment, and the warning today— day at the moment, and the warning today on— today on times radio is as we head today on— times radio is as we head into winter, this is not a great
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situation to be in. it certainly feels — situation to be in. it certainly feels like _ situation to be in. it certainly feels like there's a ways to go. we've — feels like there's a ways to go. we've seen rising cases in scotland as well— we've seen rising cases in scotland as well as — we've seen rising cases in scotland as well as a — we've seen rising cases in scotland as well as a result of that. schools in engiand — as well as a result of that. schools in england and elsewhere in the uk will begin— in england and elsewhere in the uk will begin to go back in the coming weeks _ will begin to go back in the coming weeks i_ will begin to go back in the coming weeks. i think we're edging towards a new— weeks. i think we're edging towards a new phase where the world is certainly— a new phase where the world is certainly more open in the uk, and internationally. we're entering this new chapter where boosters are interesting thoughts, but i'm not sure we — interesting thoughts, but i'm not sure we done enough in the previous chapter _ let's look at our final paper, the daily mirror. dennis law, speaking of dementia. there's a
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picture of danis law —— denis law. at the heartbreaking disease that is devastating to see family and loved ones go through, but i think it's so important that people who are experiencing this speak out in support of both research and compassion especially for those carers looking after people through those potentially awful long years of the experience of dementia, which on both sides can be so heartbreaking. i think one questions that rises here is specifically whether there is a link between football and hiding the ball and dementia, which is one of those smaller questions —— heading the ball. i smaller questions -- heading the ball. . ., ., ., , ball. i want to lead the last world to callum mcdonald. _ ball. i want to lead the last world to callum mcdonald. a football. ball. i want to lead the last world | to callum mcdonald. a football or ball. i want to lead the last world - to callum mcdonald. a football or an icon, what are your thoughts?
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absolute legend, and as we've alluded — absolute legend, and as we've alluded to, this statement from denis— alluded to, this statement from denis law— alluded to, this statement from denis law is heartbreaking and it will be _ denis law is heartbreaking and it will be a — denis law is heartbreaking and it will be a statement that is so familiar— will be a statement that is so familiar for so many people across the uk _ familiar for so many people across the uk he — familiar for so many people across the uk. he says things like how he's 'ust the uk. he says things like how he's just so— the uk. he says things like how he's just so sad _ the uk. he says things like how he's just so sad he won't be able to sign autographs — just so sad he won't be able to sign autographs any more, and it'sjust things— autographs any more, and it'sjust things like — autographs any more, and it'sjust things like that that really humanise this awful condition. he said it _ humanise this awful condition. he said it hoped it won't happen to you _ said it hoped it won't happen to you you — said it hoped it won't happen to you. you make jokes about it, but then— you. you make jokes about it, but then you — you. you make jokes about it, but then you get frustrated and worried. he does— then you get frustrated and worried. he does say as well, i'm going to have _ he does say as well, i'm going to have tackle — he does say as well, i'm going to have tackle this head on, excuse the pun. have tackle this head on, excuse the pun that's_ have tackle this head on, excuse the pun. that's exactly how he will approach — pun. that's exactly how he will approach this. all too familiar. i think— approach this. all too familiar. i think these questions are being asked. — think these questions are being asked, but at the moment, i think one way— asked, but at the moment, i think one way is— asked, but at the moment, i think one way is the way the community rallies— one way is the way the community rallies around and there's been statements from them, outpouring of love of— statements from them, outpouring of love of what will be a difficult
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coming — love of what will be a difficult coming period for denis law and his family _ coming period for denis law and his family |_ coming period for denis law and his famil . coming period for denis law and his famil. ., , ., family. i say as an english man, what a player- _ thank you both so much. that's it for the papers this evening. thank you so much to my guests. see you in a bit. hello, i'm marc edwards. thank you forjoining us. plenty of british clubs in action across europe tonight, but it was a very disappointing one for a much—changed tottenham hotspur side. they lost 1—0 away at pacos de ferreira in the first leg of their europa conference league play—off. no one from the 11 that started the win over man city at the weekend featured and it showed — lucas silva with the only goal of the game for the portuguese side just before half—time. it leaves spurs boss nuno espirito santo with plenty to ponder ahead of the second leg next week.
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this is football and its ups and downs. you realise this is a situation, and you have to bounce back. tomorrow we work and go to the next one. good part of football is it gives a chance immediately, and we have a chance sunday. scottish premiership side st johnstone drew one all away to austrian club lask in their europa conference league play—off. chris kane opened the scoring, but lask's mamadou karamoko netted a second—half penalty to level the first leg. earlier on, aberdeen lost their first leg 1—0 against qarabag in baku. and a step up from that, in the europa league, the scottish premiership champions ranges beat armenian club alashkert 1—0 in the first leg of their play—off at ibrox — alfredo morelos with the goal for steven gerrard's side — who were down to ten men. the former manchester united and scotland striker denis law has been diagnosed with dementia. the 81—year—old says he has
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alzheimer's and vascular dementia, and is the latest former player to reveal he's got the degenerative brain disease. his former united teammate sir bobby charlton was diagnosed with the condition last year. law won the european cup, two english titles and the fa cup in his 11 years at old trafford. manchester city and england defender lucy bronze has undergone successful surgery on her right knee. bronze said on social media that she has been managing 'a lot of pain over the last season', but is now in rehabilitation and 'focused on a healthy recovery�*. manchester city have not put a time frame on when she will return to training. it's been an exciting first day of the women's open golf at carnoustie where england's georgia hall had a share of the lead before dropping a shot on the final hole. hall bogeyed the 18th here, leaving her on 4 under par, one shot off the leaders. joining her in a tie for second is the scottish amateur louise duncan, who impressed on the back 9, picking up two birdies and then an eagle here on the 14th.
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there's a three—way tie for the lead, which includes the world number one nelly korda as well as madelene sagstrom and kim sei young. they all finished on 5 under. yeah, i thought it was pretty strong — yeah, i thought it was pretty strong. like you say, my last major, i strong. like you say, my last major, i was _ strong. like you say, my last major, i was tied _ strong. like you say, my last major, i was tied for— strong. like you say, my last major, i was tied for sixth, so it gave me a lot— i was tied for sixth, so it gave me a lot of— i was tied for sixth, so it gave me a lot of confidence coming into this week _ a lot of confidence coming into this week i'm — a lot of confidence coming into this week. i'mjust a lot of confidence coming into this week. i'm just so happy to be here and i_ week. i'm just so happy to be here and i really— week. i'm just so happy to be here and i really love playing this event — yorkshire county cricket club say their former player azeem rafiq, who accused the club of racism, was "the victim" of what they call "inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour" and have offered him their apologies. rafiq said last year that institutional racism at the club had left him close to taking his own life. an independent investigation started last september, with the ecb writing to the club this week to ask for a copy of the findings. rafiq has questioned yorkshire's reference to "inappropriate behaviour" and has told us it's been a difficult and frustrating 12 months. a year of pain, a year of trying to
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get people to listen, a year of giving them the opportunity to do the right thing, and what we end up with instead, racism and inappropriate behaviour. imean... i'm frustrated, i'm pretty angry. iam... to try and even say that these are historical things — yes, they are historical things, yes, those things are from ten years ago, but predominantly, most of my allegations are to the people that are still there in leadership positions. this is about my second spell with the club with all of them, and i'm pretty sure are still in positions of power. glamorgan have won the first one—day trophy in their history after beating durham in the royal london cup final at trent bridge. having been put into bat by durham, a captain's innings of 82
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from kiran carlson helped them recover from 51—2, to finish on 296 for 9 — paving the way for victory by 58 runs. veteran michael hogan, who's been with glamorgan for seven years, relishing taking the final wicket. in super league, it was an emotional night at headingley — as rhinos legend rob burrow, who is battling motor neurone disease, received a hero's welcome from fans as he returned to the stadium. the rhinos went on to beat huddersfield giants i8—i2. tries from ash handley, richie myler and rob lui secured the victory. earlier, warrington wolves against league leaders catalans dragons was postponed because of several covid—i9 cases in the dragons' camp. and reigning champion primoz roglic is back in the lead at the vuelta a espana after a thrilling finish to stage six. the last mile of the stage was uphill and saw the slovenian hunting down magnus cort nielsen, but the dane held on to claim his first stage win of this year's race. but second place was enough
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for roglic to move back to top of the standings. britain's adam yates is up to 11th, but more than a minute behind. and that's all the sport for now. bye— bye. hello. after what's been a relatively cloudy and relatively cool week so far for many of us, the weather is set to change a little bit through friday and into the weekend. it will briefly turn a little bit warmer. it will also start to turn a lot wetter because low pressure is pushing in from the west. this frontal system bringing rain very early on on friday across northern ireland. that will push eastwards over the coming days. but ahead of that weather front, we draw in a southerly wind, bringing some slightly warmer air in our direction. but many of us are going to start off on quite a cloudy note on friday. for england, wales and scotland, most places will be dry, just the odd spot of rain. but for northern ireland, this heavy rain working its way in.
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that will persist into the afternoon, rain extending into southwest scotland, maybe getting into western fringes of england and wales. further east, a few sunny spells will start to develop. turning quite breezy, particularly for western coasts, but with that breeze coming up from the south, it'll feel a little bit warmer. and given some sunshine, eastern england could see highs of around 21i degrees. as we head through friday night, our band of rain will move a little further eastwards. it's likely to dry out a little bit across northern ireland by saturday morning, some mist and murk and low cloud on what will be a pretty mild night. a mild start to saturday with our band of rain working erratically eastwards and heavy bursts running along it. eastern parts of england will see a little bit of sunshine for a time. northern ireland should brighten up, too, along with the far west of scotland, wales and the southwest, but some thundery showers could break out here later. highest temperature is likely to be across eastern england if we see some sunshine, maybe up to 25 degrees. but for the second half of the weekend, this frontal system continues to journey eastwards.
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we end up with a little area of low pressure lingering close to eastern counties of england, so still the potential for some rain here. quite windy for some of these eastern coasts as well. elsewhere, some sunny spells, a scattering of showers, but we lose that southerly flow, we lose that slightly warmer feel. now, into next week, high pressure looks set to establish itself, but the winds generally will be coming down from the north. to see any sort of heat wave, we'd need the winds to come up from the south, but that's not going to happen. so, there is some pleasant weather to come through next week. a bit more in the way of sunshine, a lot of dry weather, but no real heat wave. temperatures generally around the low 20s.
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welcome to newsday — reporting live from singapore — i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. the taliban tighten their grip after taking over afghanistan — carrying out house—to—house hunts for those who collaborated with western forces. the militants beat back the crowds at kabul airport — as afghans turn up in hope at western embassies — long abandoned. these people have no real information on what they can do to leave afghanistan but they are desperate. in fact, they're coming to us. is a true? with the canadians give me a visa. the fact is, most of these people will get one.
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people will never get one.

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