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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 20, 2021 4:00am-4:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lewis vaughan jones. our top stories: the taliban tighten their grip after taking over afghanistan, carrying out house—to—house searches for people who worked with western forces. the militants beat back the crowds at kabul airport, as afghans
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turn up in hope at abandoned western embassies. covid—19 hospitalisations are surging across the us, with the rates for children and adults under 50, hitting their highest levels yet. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. the taliban had promised there would be no retribution against those who worked with us forces. they also said afghans would be free to leave the country, if they had the right papers. but today both of those promises look uncertain. an intelligence briefing for the united nations says the taliban are stepping up their search for so—called
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"collaborators". that includes those who served in the afghan military or police. and the international airport at kabul remains chaotic. our correspondent in kabul, secunder kermani, reports. this is crowd control, taliban style. outside the airport, thousands of people desperate to leave. this is the road anyone being evacuated has to travel along. the taliban repeatedly stopped us filming. they don't like the images of so many afghans are fleeing their rule. they have denied claims they are at times preventing some afghans with valid documents from entering the airport. but many of those here don't have a visa. they are hoping somehow to leave. i want to go anywhere else other than here, says this man. but the embassies and offices are closed. what can i do? then taliban fighters bring
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the interview to an end. the taliban are everywhere you go in kabul. they are heavily armed. but for the most part, in the city, they are friendly. today, so more protests expressing defiance to their rule, rallying around the afghan flag. outside the canadian embassy, more chaos. hundreds of people frantically scribbling their names on pieces of paper hoping it will somehow lead to a visa. the embassy has already been evacuated. these people have no real information about what they can do to leave afghanistan, but they are desperate. they are asking us, is it too, will the canadians give me a visa? the fact is, most of these people will never get one. this family haven't spoken to anyone at the embassy, but heard rumours that if they turn up, they will find help.
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there is war, misery. i cannot even buy bread for my children, says this man. new footage today of the even more chaotic scenes at the airport earlier this week. some parents so desperate, they hand their children over. new details of the horrifying story of those who lost their lives. one of the young men clinging to a plane, clinging to it even after take—off, a talented footballer who had played for the national youth team. part of a generation of afghans now facing an uncertain future. a un document says the taliban are intensifying their hunt for people who worked with nato and us forces. people in the military, police and investigative units are thought to be at particular risk. this letter was highlighted in the report.
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it was written to an individual threatening this: "if you do not report to the commission, yourfamily will be arrested instead, and you are responsible for this. you and yourfamily members will be treated based on sharia law". here's one of the report's authors. the taliban in advance of moving in to all major cities in afghanistan, notjust kabul, is that they have a more balanced intelligence system, they have a list of individuals and even within the very first hours of moving into kabul, they began search of four government employees, especially intelligence services and special forces units, and this is not the action of random taliban groups seeking revenge. this involved issued written orders from the military commission of the taliban, and it involves actual intelligence, photographs and so on of the individuals they
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are searching for. i would like to stress that the taliban we are currently seeing is definitely a different animal than what we encountered 20 years ago. they are more advanced, they have much more improved financial system and intelligence system and the fact that they can commence this hunt forformer this hunt for former collaborators or individuals working with western intelligence services or in the special forces units, intelligence services or in the specialforces units, notjust special forces units, not just in specialforces units, notjust in kabul but elsewhere, shows that the taliban were very well—prepared on this. find that the taliban were very well-prepared on this. and we will keep you _ well-prepared on this. and we will keep you right _ well-prepared on this. and we will keep you right up - well-prepared on this. and we will keep you right up to - well-prepared on this. and we will keep you right up to date | will keep you right up to date with any other developments of course. let's look at covid—i9 in the us now. the number of people in hospital is surging, clear evidence the highly contagious delta variant is spreading among the unvaccinated. look at this graph: in 7 days to august the 16th, an average of 7a,000 people were in hospital with covid, up from 59,000 the previous week. but the numbers are more alarming when you drill down into the younger age categories.
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in the 30 to 39 age group, infections have been on an upward trend since latejune, 30% higher than they were in january. and hospitalisations for under 18s are on a similar path. currently 2000 children are in hospital. well, i spoke to dr jeremy faust who is an emergency room physician at brigham and women's hospital. i began by asking what he made of these latest us covid—i9 trends. this continues to be a crisis of the unvaccinated. yes there are breakthrough hospitalisations, we are watching that but more or less the numbers we are seeing has everything to do with vaccination rates. the younger yougov, the fewer are vaccinated and the numbers add up. so was unfortunately predictable and i fear that we have let our guard down before letting the vaccine in. find letting the vaccine in. and what about _ letting the vaccine in. and what about this _ letting the vaccine in. and what about this reluctance, hesitancy, for younger people to get the vaccine. are we at a natural bottom now in that
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every one who is going to get vaccinated will get vaccinated or is that more that government and civil society can do to persuade more people to get vaccinated?— persuade more people to get vaccinated? u, ., vaccinated? one thing we can do is to make _ vaccinated? one thing we can do is to make it _ vaccinated? one thing we can do is to make it very _ vaccinated? one thing we can do is to make it very inconvenient i is to make it very inconvenient to make any other choice. so just like children have to have their vaccines up to date before they start school, for every other disease that we've vaccinated against, i would strongly urge schools to do the same for coronavirus for children who are eligible. so we can use the carrot and stick model, people do act on what they perceived to be their interest, think we should be winning on the science but honestly there are some people where the best way to win is a matter of convenience and we will take every vaccination we can get. will take every vaccination we can net. �* ., ., , can get. and what about this issue of booster _ can get. and what about this. issue of booster vaccinations? people who have had their two jabs or one jab depending on which vaccine they have received, this idea of a booster?—
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received, this idea of a booster? ~ �* , ., booster? well, there's two thin . s booster? well, there's two things to — booster? well, there's two things to think _ booster? well, there's two things to think about. - booster? well, there's two | things to think about. there are the immune compromised and there is everybody else. for there is everybody else. for the immune compromised we are really now learning that a second dose ofjohnson & johnson and a third dose for the mrna is not a booster, it is a completion of this series, for immune compromised people. so we need to take the immune compromised and give them one more dose than was initially planned because we see they have not had the protection, we see hospitalisations and the people with two doses and with a third dose we see it as safe and it has a real effect in terms of antibody levels which is what we can track. when it comes to the rest of us, i fear that we do not yet have the cyan, and they've moved the goalposts a little bit where i think that the administration here has set forth a plan to boost everybody, because there is a fear of waning immunity or delta breaking through but for the most part that has to do with infections and while
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infections are not great, they are not hospitalisations, and all the data that i have seen so far shows vaccines are holding strong, against hospitalisations and critical illness which is a miracle and thatis illness which is a miracle and that is something that we have to remember before we start putting third doses into people without knowing what the side—effect might be. find without knowing what the side-effect might be. and one more bit of — side-effect might be. and one more bit of covm-19 - side-effect might be. and one more bit of covid-19 use... . sydney's lockdown has been extended for at least another month. the decision has not come as a huge surprise, with daily covid—i9 cases growing at a rate rarely seen in australia since the pandemic began. 6a2 new cases in new south wales were announced on friday, and a further four deaths. in tougher measures parts of sydney most affected by the virus will be put under a night curfew. foreign aid has started to trickle into haiti, five days after a powerful earthquake killed more than 2,000 people and flattened tens of thousands of buildings. courtney bembridge has more.
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this was a welcome sight for haitians waiting desperately for foreign haitians waiting desperately forforeign aid. translation: i don't have a job, don't have water, my house was destroyed, there is nothing. roads and bridges were badly damaged in the earthquake and heavy rains and has brought mudslides, hampering efforts to get help where it is most needed. translation:— where it is most needed. translation: , ., , translation: every family will receive 50 kilos _ translation: every family will receive 50 kilos of _ translation: every family will receive 50 kilos of food - translation: every family will receive 50 kilos of food for - translation: every family will receive 50 kilos of food for a - receive 50 kilos of food for a family— receive 50 kilos of food for a family of— receive 50 kilos of food for a family of five, it should last a month _ family of five, it should last a month. it is very basic aid, it is— a month. it is very basic aid, it is not_ a month. it is very basic aid, it is not enough, these people have _ it is not enough, these people have enormous needs, we need to help them — have enormous needs, we need to help them-— help them. haiti is the poorest country in _ help them. haiti is the poorest country in the _ help them. haiti is the poorest country in the americas - help them. haiti is the poorest country in the americas and i help them. haiti is the poorest country in the americas and it| country in the americas and it is still recovering from a 2010 earthquake which killed more than 200 thousand people. translation:— than 200 thousand people. translation: . ., ~ ., translation: hurricane matthew destro ed translation: hurricane matthew destroyed my _ translation: hurricane matthew destroyed my house, _ translation: hurricane matthew destroyed my house, i've - destroyed my house, i've rebuilt it. it was destroyed again. they have eight
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children. things are not good in my community.— children. things are not good in my community. thousands of --eole in my community. thousands of people have _ in my community. thousands of people have been _ in my community. thousands of people have been injured - in my community. thousands of people have been injured in - in my community. thousands of people have been injured in the| people have been injured in the latest quake and have been cut off from help stop the us air is reached some of the remote areas and took critical patients to port—au—prince while others are being treated in makeshift hospitals. there are also concerns about a looming public health crisis. the sanitation situation is quite critical and it is our hope that we don't have an outbreak of cholera, so we are preparing for a public health disaster. mil preparing for a public health disaster. �* disaster. all the while, tremors _ disaster. all the while, tremors are _ disaster. all the while, tremors are adding - disaster. all the while, tremors are adding to l disaster. all the while, i tremors are adding to the anxiety. translation: we are afraid to go _ anxiety. translation: we are afraid to go inside, _ anxiety. translation: we are afraid to go inside, so - anxiety. translation: we are afraid to go inside, so we - afraid to go inside, so we sleep on the ground in the street. , ., ., , sleep on the ground in the street. ., street. tens of thousands of buildings — street. tens of thousands of buildings have _ street. tens of thousands of buildings have been - street. tens of thousands ofj buildings have been reduced street. tens of thousands of i buildings have been reduced to rubble, many of them yet to be searched and officials say the death toll will continue to rise.
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well earlier i spoke to aid worker makayla from concern worldwide and asked what she had seen while on the ground in the earthquae affected areas. i was with concern worldwide in one of the most affected areas that we will conduct an observational visit. that we will conduct an observationalvisit. i that we will conduct an observational visit. i have a chance to talk to a lot of people about what they have experienced and three stood out in particular. the first was a man whose hotel building was dominic had collapsed. i met him and he had a face of disbelief. he told me that a few others inside had died and some had been severely injured. then he showed me a picture of what the hotel looked like before, it was this beautiful building and it was unrecognisable compared to what i saw before me. the second was a couple whose pharmacy had been destroyed when the building fell down. while their health was ok across the street, that was their main source of livelihood and what's
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more, they also had the cash register buried under the rubble which they depended on for their funds rubble which they depended on for theirfunds for the rubble which they depended on for their funds for the next month. and then finally i'd talked to a woman whose family was sleeping outside of their house that had caved in during the earthquake. we asked her if she had hoped to rebuild and she had hoped to rebuild and she said, eisele peanuts for a living, how can they afford to rebuild a home? while i was living that house is a very slight after—shock, so slight that i didn't even feel it myself but it sent everybody around me into a panic which i think shows the psychological effects that people are experiencing after having gone through that traumatic experience. it through that traumatic experience.— through that traumatic exerience. , ., , experience. it is heartbreaking to have heard _ experience. it is heartbreaking to have heard those _ experience. it is heartbreaking to have heard those stories . experience. it is heartbreaking| to have heard those stories and we are seeing pictures of the devastation as you are speaking. we know there are problems getting this aid to where it's needed, why are we're having these problems in this aid effort?— this aid effort? first they would say _ this aid effort? first they would say that _ this aid effort? first they i would say that humanitarian organisations and the government are on the ground
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responding, but this is a really challenging operational environment. first we havejust the scale of the needs. the haitian government is estimating that something like 500 thousand people are in need which is about 40% of the population, and then complicating that, many humanitarian organisations are based on port—au—prince and have to travel through gang controlled territories to reach this area the un has been able to arrange access for us which is how i was able to go this week but that is not secure and thatis week but that is not secure and that is not certain we will be able to access those roads in the future and on top of all we have physical challenges as well. roads have rubble on them still, some areas are unsafe to drive. we also have a tropical depression this week which dumped about ten inches of rain on the affected area which makes conditions even more difficult to travel but i think it is really important to
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emphasise here that international ngos, local ngos, the haitian government and the un are all working as hard and as quickly as we can to get aid to people who need it. capitol stay with us on bbc news, still to come: tra ns—atla ntic invasion — why these alien crabs are threatening biodiversity in the mediterranean. washington is assessing the political health of the world most powerful man. in political health of the world most powerful man. in fact, it was wrong- — most powerful man. in fact, it was wrong- in _ most powerful man. in fact, it was wrong. in south - most powerful man. in fact, it was wrong. in south africa i most powerful man. in fact, it was wrong. in south africa 97| was wrong. in south africa 97 people — was wrong. in south africa 97 people have been killed, one of the worst— people have been killed, one of the worst days of violence between rival black ribs. 500 have — between rival black ribs. 500 have died over the last ten days _ have died over the last ten da s. . ., , have died over the last ten da s. . ., ., , , days. czechoslovakia must be free! russia _
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days. czechoslovakia must be free! russia is _ days. czechoslovakia must be free! russia is absolving i days. czechoslovakia must be free! russia is absolving a i free! russia is absolving a national — free! russia is absolving a national day _ free! russia is absolving a national day of _ free! russia is absolving a national day of mourning l free! russia is absolving a l national day of mourning for the same mariners who died stop. the same mariners who died sto -. ., , ., , the same mariners who died sto. ,., stop. the pope has celebrated most before _ stop. the pope has celebrated most before a _ stop. the pope has celebrated most before a congregation i stop. the pope has celebrated most before a congregation of| most before a congregation of 2.5 billion people in his hometown. stay with us, chanted this ocean — hometown. stay with us, chanted this ocean of humanity. well, well, — this ocean of humanity. well, well, he — this ocean of humanity. well, well, he responded, want me to desert _ well, he responded, want me to desert room? —— rome. this is bbc world news. the latest headlines: the taliban are tightening their grip, following their takeover of afghanistan, carrying out door—to—door searches for people who worked with western forces. crowds have continued to mass around kabul airport amid chaotic scenes, with taliban fighters beating back some afghans trying to reach flights.
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south africa is one of the most unequal societies in the world. recent outbreaks of rioting highlighted some of the major social issues the country faces. with three out of four young people unemployed, what hope is there for the next generation? our reporter vumani mkhize has been to meet one young entrepreneur who's attempting to beat the odds and build a business in one ofjohannesburg's most challenging townships. around here, there are young men running around with guns, shooting at people, just doing a lot of gang type of things. roemello shembe injohannesburg roemello shembe in johannesburg is roemello shembe injohannesburg is a tough neighbourhood. it is an area that has struggled with drugs, gangs tourism and high unemployment a young entrepreneur is working hard to change that. entrepreneur is working hard to change that-— change that. this is my pop-up store in the _ change that. this is my pop-up store in the local _ store in the local neighbourhood. store in the local neiuhbourhood. ., ., ,, , neighbourhood. roemello shembe is 'ust 21
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neighbourhood. roemello shembe isjust 21 years _ neighbourhood. roemello shembe is just 21 years old _ neighbourhood. roemello shembe isjust 21 years old but _ neighbourhood. roemello shembe isjust 21 years old but he - is just 21 years old but he believes his clothing brand, called antigang can be a positive force in the community. positive force in the communi .�* , community. antigang stands auainst community. antigang stands against police, _ community. antigang stands against police, thieves, i community. antigang stands against police, thieves, all i community. antigang stands| against police, thieves, all of those type of things.- those type of things. south africa 's unemployment i those type of things. south | africa 's unemployment rate africa �*s unemployment rate sits at just africa �*s unemployment rate sits atjust under 33% but for the youth the figure is much worse, a staggering 74% and as we saw with the recent loadings and writings across the country, there is a lot of satisfaction and for young people like roemello shembe the need to find creative and innovative ways to make a living. but in a stagnant economy, how important are entrepreneurs like roemello shembe to the future of south africa? . ., ., ., , africa? critical. the ma'ority of south africans i africa? critical. the ma'ority of south africans live i africa? critical. the majority of south africans live in i of south africans live in townships. if they cannot find an economically active role, then we have a serious problem as a society and the false it
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is incumbent on all of us to make sure that everybody has an opportunity to participate in the economy because, if they do not, we will have more and more social unrest. not, we will have more and more social unrest-— social unrest. roemello shembe has teamed _ social unrest. roemello shembe has teamed up _ social unrest. roemello shembe has teamed up with _ social unrest. roemello shembe has teamed up with the - social unrest. roemello shembe has teamed up with the local i has teamed up with the local mall to bring his designs to a wider market. i mall to bring his designs to a wider market.— mall to bring his designs to a wider market. i believe that if more of us — wider market. i believe that if more of us can _ wider market. i believe that if more of us can take _ wider market. i believe that if more of us can take a - wider market. i believe that if more of us can take a risk i wider market. i believe that if more of us can take a risk we | more of us can take a risk we can change the country and make it a better place. vumani mkhize, bbc news. sunny cheaper has died from covid complications. the actor was 82 years old. renowned for his role as a monster in quentin tarantino's phil kill bill. he reportedly contracted the virus at the end of last month. japanese media that he
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was treated without being hospitalised was later taken to hospitalised was later taken to hospital with worsening pneumonia. he gained his career and reached international audience one of the first act is to achieve stardom through martial arts. 30 years ago, a failed coup was launched in the then soviet union by hardline communist leaders, wanting to take power away from president gorbachev, who's reform programme was slowly opening up the country. it failed, largely due to massive civil resitance in the capital moscow. steve rosenberg reflects on the anniversary. it was the day the world held its breath. there had been a coup in a nuclear superpower. tanks rolled into moscow right up to red square. communist hardliners has seized power in the soviet union. but the people were not having any of it. defiance on the streets.
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and outside parliament. from russia's president boris yeltsin the coup collapsed. four months later, so did the country. the soviet union was consigned to history. dmitry had helped build the barricades outside parliament. he and his wife tatiana still remember their elation when the coup failed. i felt a great hope for a great new russia, democratic russia. where everyone has the right to influence all the things going on but now i feel that my hope failed. the economy is deteriorating, human rights deteriorating. the soviet union is returning. at the time the collapse of the coup
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was hailed as a victory of people power but in the years that followed, democracy failed to root itself in russia. that is partly because life became so tough here that in the eyes of many russians, the very concept of democracy became discredited. but it is also because for those running russia today, authoritarian rule is back in fashion. this year, the authorities cracked down hard on anti—government protests. and there have been police raids on government critics. so, where does that leave democracy? for many here a distant memory. this monument honours the three men killed in the 1991 coup. there are few visitors. there seems to be little interest in this moment in history when russians embraced freedom. steve rosenberg, bbc news. the fishing industry in southern france is becoming increasingly concerned about the spread of a foreign invader.
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over the last four years, more and more blue crabs have been found in the mediterranean. originally from the north atlantic, they are consuming fish stocks and damaging nets. the bbc�*s tim allman has the story. this man has been fishing these waters for years. they normally catch eels but in recent years they call is mostly full of crabs, lots and lots of crabs. translation:— crabs, lots and lots of crabs. translation: seems there are crabs, we translation: seems there are crabs. we no — translation: seems there are crabs, we no longer— translation: seems there are crabs, we no longer catch i translation: seems there are crabs, we no longer catch eels l crabs, we no longer catch eels and we no longer have any income. it is worse this year. last year we got a few eels but this year nothing, nothing, nothing. the crab is all over the lagoon, everywhere. the blue crab _ the lagoon, everywhere. the blue crab has _ the lagoon, everywhere. the blue crab has been _ the lagoon, everywhere. the blue crab has been described as one of the hundred most
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invasive species in the terrain in. they eat eel, muscles, small fish. they have a voracious appetite that could threaten local biodiversity. translation: it threaten local biodiversity. translation:— threaten local biodiversity. translation: it is a species that comes — translation: it is a species that comes from _ translation: it is a species that comes from the - translation: it is a species i that comes from the north-east that comes from the north—east coast of the united states and across the ocean probably in the ballasts of large ships. it grows fast, it is opportunistic, eat anything and reproduces quickly. you opportunistic, eat anything and reproduces quickly.— opportunistic, eat anything and reproduces quickly. you can say that again- _ reproduces quickly. you can say that again. one _ reproduces quickly. you can say that again. one single - reproduces quickly. you can say that again. one single female l that again. one single female crab can lay around 2 million eggs. one suggestion these fishermen could start selling the crabs themselves. it's flash is said to have a subtly sweet flavour. perhaps the hunter will become the hunted. tim allman, bbc news. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ l vaughanjones.
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i'm lewis vaughan jones. i'm lewis vaughanjones. this is bbc news. bye—bye. hello. after what's been a relatively cloudy and relatively cool week so far for many of us, the weather is set to change a little bit through friday and into the weekend. it will briefly turn a little bit warmer. it will also start to turn a lot wetter because low pressure is pushing in from the west. this frontal system bringing rain very early on on friday across northern ireland. that will push eastwards over the coming days. but ahead of that weather front, we draw in a southerly wind, bringing some slightly warmer air in ourdirection. but many of us are going to start off on quite a cloudy note on friday. for england, wales and scotland, most places will be dry, just the odd spot of rain. but for northern ireland, this heavy rain working its way in. that will persist into the afternoon, rain extending into southwest scotland, maybe getting into western fringes of england and wales.
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further east, a few sunny spells will start to develop. turning quite breezy, particularly for western coasts, but with that breeze coming up from the south, it'll feel a little bit warmer. and given some sunshine, eastern england could see highs of around 2a degrees. as we head through friday night, our band of rain will move a little further eastwards. it's likely to dry out a little bit across northern ireland by saturday morning, some mist and murk and low cloud on what will be a pretty mild night. a mild start to saturday with our band of rain working erratically eastwards and heavy bursts running along it. eastern parts of england will see a little bit of sunshine for a time. northern ireland should brighten up, too, along with the far west of scotland, wales and the southwest, but some thundery showers could break out here later. highest temperatures likely to be across eastern england if we see some sunshine, maybe up to 25 degrees. but for the second half of the weekend, this frontal system continues to journey eastwards. we end up with a little area of low pressure lingering close to eastern counties of england, so still the potential
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for some rain here. quite windy for some of these eastern coasts as well. elsewhere, some sunny spells, a scattering of showers, but we lose that southerly flow, we lose that slightly warmer feel. now, into next week, high pressure looks set to establish itself, but the winds generally will be coming down from the north. to see any sort of heat wave, we'd need the winds to come up from the south, but that's not going to happen. so, there is some pleasant weather to come through next week. a bit more in the way of sunshine, a lot of dry weather, but no real heat wave. temperatures generally around the low 20s.
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this is bbc news — the headlines: an intelligence paper submitted to the united nations suggests the taliban are attempting to track down people who worked with the nato—led coalition in afghanistan. the document says the taliban have lists of those who worked for the military, police and investigative units and have threatened their families. us officials say they're looking to fly 6,000 people out of afghanistan over the coming hours, as their much—criticised withdrawal gains pace. a state department spokesperson said 20 flights were expected to take off from kabul. in the us, the number of people in hospital with covid is surging — evidence the delta variant is spreading among the unvaccinated. in the 30 to 39 age group, infections have been on an upward trend sincejune, and are now 30%—higher than they were in january. now on bbc news — hardtalk.

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