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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 20, 2021 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines at five. the taliban continues to tighten its grip on afghanistan — the secretary general of nato says he's deeply concerned about reports of human rights abuses by their fighters. they must put an end to violence around the country and uphold the human rights of all afghan citizens, men, women and children. about evacuating interpreters from the country was never made. an inquestjury has concluded that an attack in south london, by a convicted terrorist who'd been released from prison just ten days earlier, could have been prevented. in scotland — the snp
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and the greens agree a new power sharing agreement — but stop short of a formal coalition. a new covid drug treatment which involves injecting patients with anti—bodies that attacks the virus has been approved by the medicines regulator. and, nicholas cage stars as a truffle forager coming to terms with the loss of his beloved pig. see what anna smith make of this and the rest of this week's releases in the film review at 5.45. in afghanistan, the taliban is tightening its grip across the country and there are growing concerns
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about religious and media freedoms under the new regime. the human rights organisation amnesty international says the group murdered 9 men from the hazara minority last month; some of them were tortured. while the german broadcaster deutschewelle says taliban fighters carried out a door—to—door search to try to find one of its journalists — he'd left the country, but they shot dead one of his relatives. here, the prime minister is due to hold a cobra emergency meeting on the afghan situation this afternoon. our diplomatic correspondent paul adams has the latest. the long, desperate wait for relief. all around the heavily guarded airport, thousands of afghans are still desperate to get out. people with british and other western passports, hoping their names are on the list. this uber driver from west london was about to make it through. in the thick of it, british troops trying to make sense of the chaos.
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all around the airport, pockets of people waiting out in the open. with time running out, the operation is gathering pace. western nations want to have all of this done by the end of the month. we are focused on accelerating the evacuation as best we can. in the last 2a hours, we've brought out 963 people which is a significant acceleration on the 24—hour period before that and we'll at least match that number again today. in the city, a heavy taliban presence. fighters have flooded the streets, sending an unmistakable message complete control. it is a muslim shia festival, celebrated peacefully with no sign of interference from their new sunni masters. when the taliban last ruled the country, they persecuted shia hazaras. amnesty international says it
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may be happening again. there often reprisals against people for being associated with the government, or being associated with the americans. there was a lot of fighting with hazara ethnic militias supporting the us military in this area. whether it was an ethnic reprisal or government reprisal. we've seen all of this in the last few months as things have really deteriorated in afghanistan. but the taliban are keen to show another face. in the northern city of mazar—i—sharif, women studying as usual. is this propaganda and will it last? clearly, it's not enough to dispel the fears of those converging on kabul airport. this chaotic exodus has been going on for a week. how much longer will it last? our afghanistan correspondent secunder kermani has been
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to the british embassy in kabul, to see the situation there. and he posted this video on his twitter account. he describes the scenes as �*terribly chaotic�* — and says that some families who have the right permissions are stuck outside unable to get into the compound. and that includes several people who have worked in some capacity for the british embassy or armed forces. nato has been holding an emergency meeting of foreign ministers to discuss the unfolding crisis in afghanistan. they called on the taliban to allow people being evacuated to leave afghanistan, and vowed that the allies would remain in close coordination while operations continue. here's secretary general,
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jens stoltenberg: what we have witnessed in recent daysis what we have witnessed in recent days is a tragedy for the people of afghanistan. the situation remains very difficult and unpredictable. ministers discussed many different issues. first, the continuing of a creation of people from allied and other countries and afghans worked with us. this is our i immediate priority. therefore to they have worked around—the—clock to allow people to leave, around 800 nato civilian personnel have worked to keep the airport open. providing air traffic control, fuel and communications. i pay tribute to
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them as they work and very difficult circumstances. i also think the military forces nato allies, united states and the united kingdom and partners in securing the airport. and i think all of the acolytes who have pledged to receive afghans at risk. —— i think all the allies. the eyes of the world are on afghanistan. we expect the taliban to uphold their commitments and assure that afghans, that afghanistan does not again become a safe haven for international terrorism. the taliban must put an end to violence around the country and uphold the human rights of all afghan citizens, men, women and children. overthe
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afghan citizens, men, women and children. over the years, afghan citizens, men, women and children. overthe years, made afghan citizens, men, women and children. over the years, made to�*s prison for the support of the international community have allowed the afghans to make unprecedented social economic and political progress. figs social economic and political progress-_ social economic and political naroress. �*, ., , progress. as we say, cobra has been meetin: progress. as we say, cobra has been meeting here _ progress. as we say, cobra has been meeting here in _ progress. as we say, cobra has been meeting here in london _ progress. as we say, cobra has been meeting here in london as _ progress. as we say, cobra has been meeting here in london as well- progress. as we say, cobra has been meeting here in london as well andl meeting here in london as well and there's lots going on in the let's speak to our washington correspondent barbara plett usher — we're expecting joe biden to speak later. this is an administration under pressure here.— this is an administration under pressure here. this is an administration under ressure here. , . ., pressure here. very much so and we exect pressure here. very much so and we expect president _ pressure here. very much so and we expect president joe _ pressure here. very much so and we expect president joe biden - pressure here. very much so and we expect president joe biden to - expect presidentjoe biden to respond to how this evacuation is being handled. they have been working very hard to wrap it up but we have been hearing details about that all week from the various departments and spokes and the
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situation on the ground is getting more desperate and expect mr biden to talk about what is happening, but the problems are, explain to americans of they are addressing the problems and see what's been going on and also he may repeat his pledge that the military will stay there until all americans are evacuated, evenif until all americans are evacuated, even if that means staying longer than his self—imposed deadline of august 31 although he is not made a similar categorical promise to afghan allies. we do not know, but you will address the bigger question on did it have to be this way, why did he have to leave the vulnerable before they were evacuated rather than after the withdrawal had been completed, when the enemy had taken over the capital. with the administration has been saying so far and whatjoe biden has said so far and whatjoe biden has said so far is a certain amount of chaos would've happened no matter when the
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americans withdrew, no matter when the afghan government felt, whether it was now or later and he has been quite defiant actually. he has blamed the afghan army for the rapid collapse and he has taken no responsibility for admitting any failure or mistakes in the execution of this decision to depart. we will see if the tone may also change. will be back with you when that briefing gets under way. thank you very much. we will talk about the british approach in a few minutes' time with the foreign office minister but we will talk about the british situation right now, specifically because boris johnson situation right now, specifically because borisjohnson has said in the last hour that he has full confidence. borisjohnson says he has full confidence in the foreign secretary dominic raab after it emerged he didn't phone the afghan foreign minister last
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friday when he was advised to, because he was prioritising security and capacity at kabul airport. earlier it emerged that a call requested by his officials to discuss getting interpreters out of the country wasn't made — by him or by a junior minister. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. the foreign secretary yesterday afternoon, on a conference call with g7 ministers. the government says it is doing everything it can to get british citizens and eligible afghans out of the country. last week dominic raab was on holiday and now he's under pressure for failing to make a call to afghanistan's foreign minister to try and speed up the evacuation of interpreters who worked with the uk. yesterday the foreign office said the call had been delegated to a junior minister. today, the government confirmed it hadn't happened at all. i don't think any one phone call at the back end of last week would have changed the speed at which the afghan government fell nor the speed at which we were able
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to get it up and running. the foreign secretary said he was privatising the situation here and getting as many people out as quickly as possible. he confirmed he asked someone else to make the call. but afghans who have settled in the uk are worried about how long there is to get others out under threat from the the taliban. there are terrorist groups who don't trust democracy, human rights, nothing at all. killing for them is just like playing with a toy, that's what it looks like for them. he says that collating up interpreter should be a priority. it should be an urgent action, but unfortunately it's not going to happen. labour says the government has been too slow and the foreign secretary should go.
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the senior aides around dominic raab were recommending he may buckle. they will not have been making that recommendation unless they had clear information which demonstrated it would be a very good thing to do and would deliver a positive outcome, potentially even save lives. ministers say they are meeting at pace to get people out of afghanistan and the prime minister will chair another meeting of the emergency cobra group this afternoon. but the government's critics say it was underprepared for the of the the taliban and that when it came, ministers acted too slowly. the foreign secretary shows no signs of resigning but pressure on him and the government continues. well, we can now speak to alistair burt, who was a conservative foreign office minister between 2010 — 2013, appointed by david cameron.
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begins you are a couple of comments from him and he starts right talking about the evacuation efforts, those attempts to get people out of kabul who have worked in some capacity for the british government. let us hear those comments from the prime minister. ijust i just checked and ijust checked and the situation is getting somewhat better. we are seeing the stabilisation at the airport at the international airport and yesterday we were able to get out and about a thousand people and today, another thousand people and a lot of those new to eligible persons coming back to the country, they're coming back to the country, they're coming back to the country, they're coming back under the afghanistan resettlement and desistance
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programme. those of the people, the interpreters to those we owe debts of gratitude and honour and we will continue to work as we can over the next few days. continue to work as we can over the next few deve— next few days. taking a phone call, we know the _ next few days. taking a phone call, we know the phone _ next few days. taking a phone call, we know the phone call _ next few days. taking a phone call, we know the phone call did - next few days. taking a phone call, we know the phone call did not - we know the phone call did not happen, — we know the phone call did not happen, do stuff confidence in him? absolutely— happen, do stuff confidence in him? absolutely in the whole of the government has been working virtually round—the—clock, doing what we can to sort it out and to deal with the situation that has been long in gestation and to make sure that we get as many people back as possible and it is worth remembering and i've said this before, that it's worth repeating, that at the end of a 20 year cycle of engagement, there is a huge record to be proud of and afghanistan and it bears repeating
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that uk armed forces, uk diplomats, aid workers, did help change lives of literally millions of people in afghanistan, to help millions of women and young girls who would otherwise not have been educated and to stop terrorism from coming to this country and what i want to assure people is that our political and diplomatic efforts to find solutions for afghanistan, working with the taliban, of course, if necessary, will go on. and our commitment is lasting. share necessary, will go on. and our commitment is lasting. are you disappointed — commitment is lasting. are you disappointed and _ commitment is lasting. are you disappointed and the _ commitment is lasting. are you disappointed and the secretary| disappointed and the secretary trained — disappointed and the secretary trained to, led by people who would've _ trained to, led by people who would've gotten afghanistan but did not because he did make phone calls. i do not because he did make phone calls. i do not _ not because he did make phone calls. i do not think that's the case of the effort that the uk government
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has been making are really starting to payoff and as i said earlier on, the numbers yesterday were good and about a thousand and a thousand today, we've got, the situation is precarious no doubt. everyone can see the logistical identities, the cloud management difficulties, but the work will go on as fast as we can in this phase, but i repeat, this is the first phase. he says we've been able to get about a thousand people out today but the evacuation continuing or evacuation of tens. let's talk about that none of tens. let's talk about that none of those scenes we have been witnessing in kabul and the wider country. let's discuss it with the conservative foreign office minister. good evening and thank you
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for waiting to talk to us, but we did just want to hear those first comments from the prime minister. he made reference to the logistical challenges, the chaotic scenes. he said we are still getting people out in the us administration says this phase was always going to be chaotic. did it have to be this way, do you think? i chaotic. did it have to be this way, do you think?— do you think? i think we need to find out in _ do you think? i think we need to find out in due _ do you think? i think we need to find out in due course, - find out in due course, precisely where preparations were made from the time the united states said they were going to leave. and it is inevitable when it actually comes to the moment of leaving that there is an acceleration of concern. but what we also know is that the speed of collapse and change is much greater than people anticipated in the news to be a good review of that. but in essence, that's tomorrow's issue in
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tomorrow's problem. today is about the brief people working at the airport and diplomats were doing so much work to get people out. soldiers were trained to provide safe passage, that is where first thoughts and consideration should be. everyone else is a problem for another day, but having said that, those problems will mount and many dimensional, at the moment, none of them are good. find dimensional, at the moment, none of them are good-— them are good. and we're hearing about people _ them are good. and we're hearing about people who _ them are good. and we're hearing about people who worked - them are good. and we're hearing about people who worked in - them are good. and we're hearing about people who worked in some them are good. and we're hearing - about people who worked in some way, for britain, preps the armed forces, the embassy. they've got the correct documentation, the paperwork and we are hearing that they cannot even get to kabul airport. we can't rescue these people because they cannot get to the airport. that surely is a lack of preplanning. the truth is, if — surely is a lack of preplanning. the truth is, if the _ surely is a lack of preplanning. tue: truth is, if the airport surely is a lack of preplanning. tte: truth is, if the airport is surely is a lack of preplanning. tt2 truth is, if the airport is now ringed by the tele— band and forces that are not with the nato forces, and of course, the tragedy is there
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going to be looking for the same people that we might be looking forward to get out and they're going to stop them and we have no leverage whatsoever and i'm not sure what preplanning could've been done beyond getting people out from much lengthier period and that will need to be looked at. but the immediate issue now is as the films are showing to reporters, there are groups of taliban and a lack of unity there because some groups are letting people through and others are not. but the stories we hear are serious and people who may have been helpful to the united kingdom may not go through and this is a serious worry and to be depending on taliban consideration is a very weak position for allied forces to be in. and talking about potentially working with the taliban if necessary in the future, that is unpalatable to some people. is that
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the reality? is that a future that we are looking at as a nation? t5 we are looking at as a nation? t3 unpalatable to all. bearing in mind what the taliban did and the stories we are hearing at present. is it the reality? yes, and that is just the way life now has to be. but at the end of 20 years and bearing in mind all that is happened for that situation to have occurred, that is why we need a serious inquiry as to how this is all happening. i think we need to look at the implications of this and people talk about saigon in the united states in the past, i think this is worse than saigon. saigon happened before iraq, afghanistan. the situation is much worse. it's a darker world now were authoritarian regimes have gained strength in places where democracy is being threatened by extremism and
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everything else. and now we have people were absolutely against the things that we fought for over centuries with others. there are people in afghanistan who exactly what we it's not a western concept to want equality for women, to women, to want to sustain your own country and future. that is been part of what we have believed for years. how are you going to respond to this prismatic i think we need to look at that and in the meantime, the practical issues day today, you have to deal with those who are in charge of the day and maintain a relationship if you're going to do the best for the people you're supporting. but the evidence of presence is very sparse and how controllable their relationship is and we have lost whatever leverage he may have had and this is not a comfortable position for any of us to be in. ,.,
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comfortable position for any of us tobein. ,., , to be in. good teachers or views civen to be in. good teachers or views given your _ to be in. good teachers or views given your expertise. _ to be in. good teachers or views given your expertise. do - to be in. good teachers or views given your expertise. do you - to be in. good teachers or views l given your expertise. do you think dominic raab is safe or should he go do you feel? t dominic raab is safe or should he go do you feel?— do you feel? i think it is secondary to the scenes _ do you feel? i think it is secondary to the scenes that _ do you feel? i think it is secondary to the scenes that we have - to the scenes that we have witnessed. i know it's a matter of political interest here, but it's much more important that the get on with thejobs they much more important that the get on with the jobs they are doing and seek to protect those in difficulties and then we will look at the politics afterwards but it's of the most important thing today. —— not the most important thing today. the headlines on bbc news. the snp and the scottish greens have agreed a new power—sharing partnership at holyrood, bringing the greens into government for the first time anywhere in the uk. the move gives the scottish government a majority to pass legislation, including a new independence referendum bill. the snp leader and first minister nicola sturgeon explained
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why the deal was significant. working together to build a greener, fairer independent scotland is ground—breaking. ground—breaking in both scottish, and perhaps even more so, uk politics. most importantly, though, it is an agreement that meets the challenges and the opportunities of our time. scotland is, of course, more, much more than our politics, but it is through our politics that we express our hopes for a betterfuture, and then turn those hopes into reality. we live in a time when the challenges we face have rarely been greater — the climate emergency, recovery from a global pandemic, an assault by the uk government on the powers of our own parliament, and the consequences to our economy, society and our place in the world of a disastrous brexit that scotland did not vote for.
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yet despite the magnitude of those challenges, many of them global, today's politics can too often feelsmall, polarised, divided and incapable of meeting the moment. this agreement is intended to change that in scotland. lorna slater, co—leader of the scottish green partyjoins me now. good evening and a very big day for your party. good evening and a very big day for our la . , good evening and a very big day for our -a . ., good evening and a very big day for our -a . , ., ., your party. good evening and i have to sa , your party. good evening and i have to say. this — your party. good evening and i have to say, this deal _ your party. good evening and i have to say, this deal is _ your party. good evening and i have to say, this deal is not _ your party. good evening and i have to say, this deal is not a _ your party. good evening and i have to say, this deal is not a done - your party. good evening and i have to say, this deal is not a done deal. to say, this deal is not a done deal but we will publish a proposed deal that still needs to be approved by members of both parties, the scottish greens are a grassroots party and now it's up for the members to say whether or not they want to go ahead. you members to say whether or not they want to go ahead.— want to go ahead. you have to put it to the members _ want to go ahead. you have to put it to the members and _ want to go ahead. you have to put it to the members and how _ want to go ahead. you have to put it to the members and how will - want to go ahead. you have to put it to the members and how will you . want to go ahead. you have to put it to the members and how will you bej to the members and how will you be selling it to them? what is in it for you?
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selling it to them? what is in it for ou? , ., , selling it to them? what is in it for ou? , . , ., for you? this deal is intended to be transformational _ for you? this deal is intended to be transformational for _ for you? this deal is intended to be transformational for scotland. - for you? this deal is intended to be transformational for scotland. we l transformational for scotland. we are really making history here, nothing like this is happened in uk politics before. but we have seen around the world as governments begin to recognise the urgency of action on the climate crisis that they are bringing in with them. germany, new zealand and other places. it represents a significant shift in the scottish government approach to the area to bring us in and be really welcome and that because we are the people with the expertise to take practical actions to drive down admissions in scotland as well as do some really brilliant things for the people of scotland like introduce a new deal for tenants of this goes ahead and i will begin changing for a lot of people. will begin changing for a lot of --eole. �* ., . , ., will begin changing for a lot of --eole. ., , ., people. and other policies that you outlined, people. and other policies that you outlined. or— people. and other policies that you outlined, or all— people. and other policies that you outlined, or all of _ people. and other policies that you outlined, or all of those _ people. and other policies that you outlined, or all of those new - outlined, or all of those new discussions, does the s and pf to
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accept all of those return forgetting your support stop till everything and the policy document is items that we have fully agreed. this is not a manifesto, we have had due diligence done and this is going to be delivered in all of those actions will be delivered by us and if approved by members during this time of parliament. tt’s if approved by members during this time of parliament.— time of parliament. it's a makes it so different- _ time of parliament. it's a makes it so different. you _ time of parliament. it's a makes it so different. you will _ time of parliament. it's a makes it so different. you will see - time of parliament. it's a makes it so different. you will see if- time of parliament. it's a makes it so different. you will see if you i so different. you will see if you look at the document, there are excluded areas in the scottish green party and the scottish government and the s in p have significantly different policies in some areas but we want to make this a different type of politics. we know we disagree on some areas but that doesn't mean we can't work together like grown—ups to get things done in areas we have common agreements. and if our areas we have common agreements. and if your members go for it and others go forward, once the deal is absolutely formalised, what is
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political discussion about thereafter prismatic is it about a green energy, renewables, rent controls that you've mentioned? was that all about scottish independence?- that all about scottish independence? that all about scottish indeendence? �* , ., . that all about scottish indeendence? �*, ., ., ., independence? it's about all of those things. _ independence? it's about all of those things. we _ independence? it's about all of those things. we are _ independence? it's about all of those things. we are facing - independence? it's about all of those things. we are facing a l those things. we are facing a climate crisis as well as needing to recover from the global pandemic and what is in this agreement should be transformational for people of scotland. there are those to tackle poverty, families, accelerate the renewable industry in scotland and tens of thousands ofjobs. a common vision and many areas and a lot of it is straight out of the manifesto. this is a best chance ever to actually get some significant parts of our manifesto implemented in the real world. , , _ of our manifesto implemented in the realworld. , , , ., ~ real world. very busy evening. thank ou ve real world. very busy evening. thank you very much- _ real world. very busy evening. thank you very much. co-leader _ real world. very busy evening. thank you very much. co-leader of - real world. very busy evening. thank you very much. co-leader of the - you very much. co—leader of the scottish green party. now, we're
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going to turn our attentions to covid—19. today uk's medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency has approved the covid— antibody therapy, ronapreve. the drug has been shown to prevent infection and also reduce the need for hostpital treatment. unlike other covid treatments, this treatment attacks the virus and has so far proved to be effective and continues to work against new varients. i'm joined by professor penny ward who is a professor of pharmaceutical medicine at king's college london. good evening. this might be new to a lot of people — good evening. this might be new to a lot of people watching. _ good evening. this might be new to a lot of people watching. so, _ lot of people watching. so, explain, we touched briefly on what it does but what sort of patients would really benefit from this and and what interesting technic instances we talked about this being used? this is an infusion of antibodies
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which reduces the viral load in patients who have been infected with and have symptoms of covid—19, provided it started within three days of first developing symptoms and contacts of individuals who had covid—19 infections to prevent them from becoming infected and ill. it can also in hospital, and people who have not developed antibodies, following vaccination, reduce the likelihood of death. so, it is really an important treatment that is available and the first that we could successfully use the community. could successfully use the community-— could successfully use the community. could successfully use the communi . �*, ,, , community. it's good news but is rice . antibodies are expensive to produce, so it's an expensive medicine, but you have to look at it in the context that if somebody has to go into hospital with covid, then they
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are going to cost a great deal more than this single treatment will cost. so i'm kind of expecting that the government will target those who are at highest risk of severe disease, that is people who either have not responded particularly well to vaccine, immunosuppressed individuals and some people with older age and others severe comorbidities. that might make them at risk of having more severe disease if they become infected. rates, but in terms of the messaging around the some of the fact that this is now available presumably, any research or any scientist i've spoken to over the last 18 months would say that they still want to get the message out that people should go and get a vaccine. absolutely. the best way preventing yourself from becoming ill or very dangerously with covid is to go and get your vaccine and complete the vaccine course. but what this does
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is give us a second arm if you like, particularly for those people for whom vaccination might not provide full protection. that basically means people who have immune suppressed therapies of some sort or other and may not have responded well to vaccination as healthy young people. well to vaccination as healthy young --eole. ., , well to vaccination as healthy young --eole. . , ., �*, people. rates, ok, that's interesting. _ people. rates, ok, that's interesting. and - people. rates, ok, that's interesting. and could - people. rates, ok, that's. interesting. and could there people. rates, ok, that's- interesting. and could there be similar treatments or drugs like this. are they perhaps already in development? presumably this isn't ultimately going to be the only one. absolutely. they are two or three antiviral medicines which are oral medications which are likely to be less expensive than this one, but maybe have to be taken two or three orfour maybe have to be taken two or three or four times a day at home after a person becomes unwell. there are also other similar treatments antibody combinations produced by other companies, which i expect to also be submitted for approval in
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the not—too—distant future. so this happens to be the first one, but there are more on the way. in part may come at us give us that second arm to our management strategy. vaccine being the first and primary way of protecting the population and this giving us the opportunity to tree breakthrough infections and highly susceptible people. right. is a aood da highly susceptible people. right. is a good day today- _ highly susceptible people. right. is a good day today. thank _ highly susceptible people. right. is a good day today. thank you, - highly susceptible people. right. is a good day today. thank you, well, j a good day today. thank you, well, it's nice to — a good day today. thank you, well, it's nice to be _ a good day today. thank you, well, it's nice to be able _ a good day today. thank you, well, it's nice to be able to _ a good day today. thank you, well, it's nice to be able to say _ a good day today. thank you, well, it's nice to be able to say that - a good day today. thank you, well, it's nice to be able to say that in i it's nice to be able to say that in relation to covet, is to? tt is relation to covet, is to? it is indeed stop _ relation to covet, is to? it is indeed stop thank _ relation to covet, is to? it is indeed stop thank you - relation to covet, is to? tt 3 indeed stop thank you very much, really interesting to talk to you. that is professor penny ward their from king's college in london talking about that new treatment for covid—19. now it's time for all the latest sports news. here is austin hale lead. that evening. the second round of golf�*s women's open is trying to close, and it looks like england's georgia hall will be in a great position heading into the weekend. the 2018 champion is in the clubhouse. she is tied for
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the lead on seven under par. she had one of the early tee times and shot at three underground of 69 to top the leaderboard alongside american nina haringey. a brilliant second round from georgia hall. meanwhile, scottish amateur louise duncan, she has four shots back. she's on three under. so she is still in the hunt over the weekend. world number one nelly korda is still out on the course now, the overnight leader has dropped back to 4 under — so she's still 3 shots off georgia hall's lead... very happy with the way i played. i felt like i played better than yesterday. a bit more consistent. managed some good part pots and birdie pots. i'm happy with that. i've done it before. i've won this event. it gives me a lot of
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confidence knowing that i can do it. in four days of golf is very long, so we've still got 36 holes to play, but i've given myself the best position i can. that should be an exciting weekend. the first of the eliminators is underway in cricket's hundred tournament, and it's going right down to the wire. the winners of both games will go through to tomorrow's final. this evening southern brave play trent rockets in the men's competition. but right now the oval invincibles are hosting the birmingham phoenix. the invicnibles batted first and after losing their openers forjust 15 runs — marizanne kapp steadied the ship — she top scored with 37 as the invincibles reached 114 from their 100 balls — so a moderate target but the phoenix have made hard work of it. they've lost wickets at regular intervals and it's cost them, eventually losing that game. so the invincible is through to tomorrow's final. there's another packed weekend ahead in the premier league. new tottenham boss nuno espirito
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santo comes up against his former club wolves for the first time on sunday. spurs made a brilliant start to the season when they beat champions manchester city last weekend — but santo admits he still doesn't know if harry kane will feature: he trained today, he trained today, he changed that, he's going to change my, and tomorrow he will make a decision. i'm sorry to keep on saying the same things, but this is how we work. it's a day by day situation. the decisions are made when we feel that we should make them, and we are going to take the decision who is going to travel tomorrow. anfield will be full for the first time in 18 months tomorrow as liverpool host burnley. but some reds supporters were criticised for homophobic chanting at norwich last weekend, prompting managerjurgen klopp to meet with lgbtq fans�* representatives. klopp says he hopes it sends the right message.
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if you can help something for me can help clarify _ if you can help something for me can help clarify it, then it's our duty to do— help clarify it, then it's our duty to do that, _ help clarify it, then it's our duty to do that, and that's what we did. and if— to do that, and that's what we did. and if the — to do that, and that's what we did. and if the response was good on that, _ and if the response was good on that, great. job done. so cimino, we can carry— that, great. job done. so cimino, we can carry on — that, great. job done. so cimino, we can carry on because it's obviously an important thing to talk about, no doubt _ an important thing to talk about, no doubt about that. and arsenal have confirmed the permanent signing of midfielder martin odegaard from real madrid. the norweigen scored 2 goals in 20 appearances on loan with the gunners last season. he's joined for a fee in the region of 30 million pounds. odegaard's unlikely to take part in sunday's game against chelsea though, as his visa application process is ongoing. alexander lacazette will also be missing — he's got covid—19, as has chelsea's christian pulisic. we'll have more for you in sportsday at half past six. thanks, austin, see you again. thanks— thanks, austin, see you again. thanks very— thanks, austin, see you again. thanks very much indeed. thousands of people, desperate to leave afghanistan, are continuing to circulate kabul airport. we are building up to a press
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briefing, statements, really, from the us president, joe biden, an emergency cobra meeting this afternoon, an emergency meeting of nato foreign ministers and of course, we are still seeing those scenes of people desperate to get out of the country, about 18,000, we think have been gotten out so far. but still, many, many more people trying to leave. joining me now from cambridge is dr marissa quie — an associate lecturer at the university of cambridge. thank you forjoining us this evening. i hope you can hear us. t evening. i hope you can hear us. i can hear you. evening. i hope you can hear us. i can hearyou. i evening. i hope you can hear us. i can hear you. i know _ evening. i hope you can hear us. i can hear you. i know you - evening. i hope you can hear us. i can hear you. i know you have - can hear you. i know you have been in touch with _ can hear you. i know you have been in touch with people, because - can hear you. i know you have been in touch with people, because you | in touch with people, because you have experience of people from and you are in touch with people, as i understand, are trying to leave. what stories are you hearing? that is the case- — what stories are you hearing? that is the case- i _ what stories are you hearing? tngt is the case. i worked on the peace programme with ministers. many of my colleagues are still in afghanistan.
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they are afghan nationals. the peace programme is framed as being afghan owned and led. they dealt with very sensitive materials, including disbandment of illegally armed groups. that's band database says were full of the information that we had on them, and their lives are now definitely at risk. and particularly the women activists who are involved in including women and the peace programme. it is very difficult to advise them because they say should we go straight to the airport or not? unfortunately, the british programme is very narrow. and although the uk supported the disbandment of illegally armed groups and the peace programme, they didn't work directly for the uk government. so on the application form, they can't fit. and the bespoke programme is not yet up and
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running, and people are saying they don't know if they will be alive tomorrow to apply for it when it does possibly go online. then;r tomorrow to apply for it when it does possibly go online. they are literally saying — does possibly go online. they are literally saying to _ does possibly go online. they are literally saying to you, _ does possibly go online. they are literally saying to you, some - does possibly go online. they are literally saying to you, some of. literally saying to you, some of them, we don't know whether we well be alive tomorrow.— be alive tomorrow. literally. that's what one of— be alive tomorrow. literally. that's what one of them _ be alive tomorrow. literally. that's what one of them said _ be alive tomorrow. literally. that's what one of them said to _ be alive tomorrow. literally. that's what one of them said to me - be alive tomorrow. literally. that's| what one of them said to me today. and his wife is also in danger. i don't want to say too much about her details, but she is a lecturer at kabul university. so when in who have been placed, you know, at the forefront of our efforts to promote democracy and to promote women's rights and equality, they are facing existential risk. i5 rights and equality, they are facing existential risk. is it rights and equality, they are facing existential risk.— existential risk. is it fair to say that both _ existential risk. is it fair to say that both you _ existential risk. is it fair to say that both you and _ existential risk. is it fair to say that both you and all— existential risk. is it fair to say that both you and all the - existential risk. is it fair to say l that both you and all the people that both you and all the people that you know and are talking to out there, therefore i feel there is no chance of the taliban and being different in any way to how they
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were 20 years ago. as your absolute sense that some of the discussion that's been filtering around in recent days that they have changed a bit, they are a little bit more modern. is thatjust not the case as far as you're concerned? if modern. is thatjust not the case as far as you're concerned?— far as you're concerned? if you go oane, far as you're concerned? if you go online. or — far as you're concerned? if you go online. or if— far as you're concerned? if you go online, or if you _ far as you're concerned? if you go online, or if you look _ far as you're concerned? if you go online, or if you look at _ far as you're concerned? if you go online, or if you look at the - far as you're concerned? if you go online, or if you look at the bbc l online, or if you look at the bbc story, i watched it earlier today. i was showing attala band beating people who wear interpreters and people who wear interpreters and people who wear interpreters and people who they believe acted on behalf of western governments. the action has to be detailed and's currency rather than words. i spoke last night with minister who i worked with for the peace programme, and he is still the chief negotiator in delhi, and many former afghan governments are still committed to an inclusive political settlements, which is critical. but what that
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attala band are in delhi, the political arm is saying versus actions on the ground, including forced marriage as using civilians, potentially as shields, human shields, and collecting information and that people are carrying with them on their way to the airport in order to get on evacuation flights that goes against the kinds of things that they are saying in delhi. �* ., delhi. and when we hear the prime minister say. _ delhi. and when we hear the prime minister say. as — delhi. and when we hear the prime minister say, as he _ delhi. and when we hear the prime minister say, as he has _ delhi. and when we hear the prime minister say, as he has in - delhi. and when we hear the prime minister say, as he has in the - delhi. and when we hear the prime minister say, as he has in the last i minister say, as he has in the last hour that at some point, they may have to have a discussion with attala band. i'm interested in your reaction to that, and also the notion that there is one taliban. i mean you are touching on it's not one cohesive for us with a solid structure in the way that we might think of a firm grouping, a firm political organisation. the taliban
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are absolutely _ political organisation. the taliban are absolutely not _ political organisation. the taliban are absolutely not a _ political organisation. the taliban are absolutely not a homogenous| are absolutely not a homogenous group. they have been described as a network of networks. i would say that lots of the violence on the ground that we are seeing in films, including the films that have been put online by the bbc come from the fact that many of the foot soldiers who i dealt with have experienced violence from the government and from the west. so maintaining discipline for them is very problematic, but i think that the international lot, the principle of safe conduct has to be honoured, and we have to press the attala band to honour that. ministers, as i said last night, he says he believes that taliban still crave international legitimacy, and we know that they want international aid, despite having a huge amount of wealth in terms of illicit... funds. we know
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that that is our leverage and we need to use that. fight! that that is our leverage and we need to use that.— that that is our leverage and we need to use that. and can that be used quickly _ need to use that. and can that be used quickly enough? _ need to use that. and can that be used quickly enough? we - need to use that. and can that be used quickly enough? we are - need to use that. and can that be i used quickly enough? we are talking about people who want to leave now. some of them have all the right documentation and they can't even get to the airport as we know. so documentation and they can't even get to the airport as we know. 543i get to the airport as we know. so i think safe get to the airport as we know. sr i think safe conduct, safe passage, international law is critical. i don't understand why it is that we haven't yet set up alternative points that civilians can go through for extraction flights. the airport now is basically like if you take the road to the airport, you are basically putting you know, sign on your back saying i am a target. that's how the afghan civilians who i've talked to feel and how women feel especially at risk. so we need to do more, and we need to do more quickly. in the bespoke programme
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has been more thanjust quickly. in the bespoke programme has been more than just political chat and something in the newspaper. it has to be something rail.— it has to be something rail. doctor marissa, thank _ it has to be something rail. doctor marissa, thank you _ it has to be something rail. doctor marissa, thank you so _ it has to be something rail. doctor marissa, thank you so much - it has to be something rail. doctor marissa, thank you so much for. it has to be something rail. doctor. marissa, thank you so much for your insight. thank you. i hope we will speak again. insight. thank you. i hope we will speak again-— speak again. thank you so much. that's from _ speak again. thank you so much. that's from the _ speak again. thank you so much. that's from the university - speak again. thank you so much. that's from the university of - that's from the university of cambridge who over many years has worked, as he gathered there, and government circles and trying to broker peace in afghanistan. clearly an awful lot of people there, and we know that so many of them are still trying to get out. there is that news briefing coming up from the biden administration. we will bring you more news on that and much more “p you more news on that and much more up in the six o'clock news. now, here in bbc news, with the time a little after quarter to six p:m., just before the top of the hour, of course, we will bring in the fall weather prospects, but right now, being friday at this time, it is time for the film revealed. ——
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——now on bbc news, anna smith presents the film review.

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