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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 21, 2021 11:00am-11:31am BST

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hello. this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. senior taliban figures including the group's co—founder, mullah baradar, arrive in kabulfor talks about establishing a new government. thousands continue to crowd the perimeter at kabul airport, desparate to escape the taliban. greece has erected a aokm fence on its border with turkey amid wanings of many afghan civilians fleeing their country. a week after the earthquake in haiti, victims in the some of hardest—hit areas are still waiting for help. there have been clashes between police and anti—lockdown demonstrators in sydney and melbourne.
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animal welfare campaigners in the uk have welcomed new government proposals to stop puppy smuggling. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the man considered to be the political leader of the taliban, mullah abdul ghani baradar, has arrived in kabulfor talks on forming a government. it's another sign of the taliban tightening its grip on power in afghanistan, after its rapid takeover of the country. mullah baradar arrived in afghanistan earlier this week, after 20 years in exile. he travelled first to kandahar, which is seen as the spiritual home of the taliban. although baradar isn't the taliban's supreme leader, he is one of its most visible figures. last year, he became the first
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taliban leader to communicate directly with a us president after having a telephone conversation with donald trump. we'll get more on that in a moment, but first our correspondent secunder kermani has the latest from kabul. soldier shouting: get back! get back! panic and chaos close to kabul airport. british soldiers guarding a secure compound for those being evacuated. british passport holders in the crowd, desperately trying to get through. this is my british passport. like this uber driver from west london. he's got kids. we are waiting. how long have you been here waiting? i came morning, five o'clock. still, i'm waiting here. in the last three days, i'm trying to go inside... and they won't let you into the hotel? yeah. even though the embassy has told you to come here? yeah, he said i had to go here.
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even more distressing scenes at the main entrance to the compound. british soldiers trying to keep the crowd back. this is a scene of total and utter chaos. many of the people here don't have any permission to board an evacuation flight, but they are so desperate that they've just turned up here anyway. that's making it extremely difficult for those who have been told to come here by the british embassy to get through. my family, my newborn baby. amongst those trapped by the crowd, this former british army interpreter. his wife gave birth just two weeks ago and he's deeply worried about the baby. maybe i lose my kid and maybe she is not good. she is not good, my wife. you can't stay here. i can't stay here, look at the situation, look at the dirt on the floor here. and, until now, i'm here since morning, i came here, taliban lashed me on the back.
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most of the people here are in a state of total confusion. they don't know how they can, but just want to leave the country before the evacuation flights end. what makes you think you will be able to travel? this woman says she was a player on the national basketball team. i am so scared because i'm girl. my life is in danger. i'm... what... as the day goes on, some of those who are meant to be here eventually get through, including the family with the young baby. many others are still struggling, though. even more who want to leave, but can't, will be left behind. get back now! let's speak to our correspondent danjohnson. he's in the indian capital delhi covering
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events from there what is going on in kabul today? there is still chaos outside the airport, and no real solution to that, no clear way forward for how the foreign forces, the nations that are trying to get people out are going to overcome the crush, the crowds and the taliban checkpoints. and then we've got these talks happening now between the most senior leaders of the taliban and some other political figures across afghanistan. dialogue, discussions about how they're going to form a power structure of government for the future, and inclusive government, the taliban spokesman put it out there, effective second—in—command, mullah baradar, they're in kabul talking to people like hammond karzai, the previous president of the country after the us invasion, a moderate voice. and also america's most wanted terrorist, $5 million bounty on his
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head, yet he could be an integral part of this discussion now about the future of afghanistan, and he is said to be in charge of security in kabul, so in many ways the us are relying on him and his fighters allowing others to get through to get to the airport. there was reports this morning that hundred and 50 indians had been held hostage on their way to the airport, and the taliban denied that, they said they are questioning some people but not holding them hostage. although people were expecting safe passage to the airport, the practicalities have been really tough, and the fact that the taliban is admitting that it is checking people and questioning their movements and intentions would put even more fear into those who are scared to even make their way to the airport because they risk exposing themselves to the taliban and potentially giving hints to the history that they have working for
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either the previous government or foreign forces. i either the previous government or foreign forces.— foreign forces. i want to ask you about security _ foreign forces. i want to ask you about security guards _ foreign forces. i want to ask you about security guards who - foreign forces. i want to ask you about security guards who were | about security guards who were working for the british, protecting the british embassy, and there was an issue about whether they would be able to come to the uk because they didn't work directly for the british government, but there is good news for those guards.— for those guards. yes, they worked throu . h for those guards. yes, they worked throu~h a for those guards. yes, they worked through a security _ for those guards. yes, they worked through a security contractor, - for those guards. yes, they worked through a security contractor, so i through a security contractor, so not directly as employees, but they were told they didn't need to come to work any more, that there was no future work for them, but also that they didn't for protected status, but they wouldn't be able to evacuate. those 125 guards are now being evacuated and will be safe because they said as such a visible presence on the street guarding the british embassy, they would have
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been among the first people among the risk for being attacked by the taliban, and when you have that situation we were not direct employees, but you are linked through contractors and different companies, it is difficult working out how best to protect people. they work for a massive global security firm which presumably has other employees in kabul that it will need to look after, but it shows you how complicated this who should take responsibility for making sure that anybody who is at risk is safer able to leave the country.— anybody who is at risk is safer able to leave the country. thank you very much, to leave the country. thank you very much. dan- — to leave the country. thank you very much, dan. and _ to leave the country. thank you very much, dan. and if _ to leave the country. thank you very much, dan. and if you _ to leave the country. thank you very much, dan. and if you want - to leave the country. thank you very much, dan. and if you want more i much, dan. and if you want more in—depth coverage, head to our website or you can download the bbc news app. there you'll find everything you need to know on who is leading the taliban today and who will potentially take charge of the new government. let's speak to narges ghafary
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in ohio, who is a former afghan refugee. thank you very much for talking to us. i wonder how you feel when you hear our correspondent talking about exiled taliban leaders returning in order to form a new government in your country. order to form a new government in your country-— your country. thank you. yes, i am far away from _ your country. thank you. yes, i am far away from that _ your country. thank you. yes, i am far away from that situation, - your country. thank you. yes, i am far away from that situation, it - your country. thank you. yes, i am far away from that situation, it is l far away from that situation, it is really heartbreaking for me because i have friends and family there, and i have friends and family there, and i worry for them. their life is in danger and they are going to be executed because of their social activity, because of what they have donein activity, because of what they have done in the country. so they are in fear, they are worried about their lives. ~ ., ., , ~ fear, they are worried about their lives. ~ . ~ ., fear, they are worried about their lives. ~ . ,, ., lives. what was it like for you crowinu lives. what was it like for you growing up — lives. what was it like for you growing up in _ lives. what was it like for you growing up in afghanistan? i | lives. what was it like for you - growing up in afghanistan? i used to be a refugee — growing up in afghanistan? i used to be a refugee too, _ growing up in afghanistan? i used to be a refugee too, then _ growing up in afghanistan? i used to be a refugee too, then it _ growing up in afghanistan? i used to be a refugee too, then it was - growing up in afghanistan? i used to be a refugee too, then it was war - be a refugee too, then it was war between afghanistan and russia. my family left the country, and when
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the taliban left, we came back to afghanistan with high hopes. however, now those hopes and dreams are at risk. for the women in afghanistan there is always fear and anxiety because you have to act based on some predefined expectations, otherwise you will be considered a bad girl or a bad woman. you will bejudged quickly for the tone of your voice, for the way you dress. you have to be careful to survive in such a situation because you have to meet those expectations. so situation because you have to meet those expectations.— situation because you have to meet those expectations. so what are your fears for women _ those expectations. so what are your fears for women in _ those expectations. so what are your fears for women in afghanistan, - fears for women in afghanistan, women and girls in afghanistan, right now? women and girls in afghanistan, riaht now? , ., right now? their life is in danger, and no one _ right now? their life is in danger, and no one can _ right now? their life is in danger, and no one can ignore _ right now? their life is in danger, and no one can ignore it. - right now? their life is in danger, and no one can ignore it. women| right now? their life is in danger, l and no one can ignore it. women of afghanistan have been fighting for 20 years to reach where they are now. we have an afghan girls
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robotics team, we have girls going to school to learn music, we have female and male football and basketball teams, they have achieved a lot and it was not easy for them to achieve all those things. they have to go through many challenges from social norms to lack of access to basic services, however they are going to lose all those achievements going to lose all those achievements go back to years ago. is going to lose all those achievements go back to years ago.— go back to years ago. is there an hinu go back to years ago. is there anything you _ go back to years ago. is there anything you can _ go back to years ago. is there anything you can say - go back to years ago. is there anything you can say to - go back to years ago. is there l anything you can say to women go back to years ago. is there - anything you can say to women in afghanistan right now to give them some hope? it is afghanistan right now to give them some hope?— some hope? it is difficult. i am in a safe place. _ some hope? it is difficult. i am in a safe place, but _ some hope? it is difficult. i am in a safe place, but they _ some hope? it is difficult. i am in a safe place, but they are - some hope? it is difficult. i am in a safe place, but they are in - a safe place, but they are in danger, and it is difficult to say something because now currently i'm not beside them. however, is an afghan girl who went through the same challenges, the same suffering, i would like to tell them, don't give up, don't lose your hope. raise
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your voice, speak up and don't be afraid. if you don't do it now, no one is going to do it for you. this is the right time to advocate for your rights, because the world is watching you. your rights, because the world is watching you-— your rights, because the world is watchin: ou. ., ~ , . watching you. thank you very much for talkin: watching you. thank you very much for talking to _ watching you. thank you very much for talking to us, _ watching you. thank you very much for talking to us, thank _ watching you. thank you very much for talking to us, thank you, - watching you. thank you very much | for talking to us, thank you, narges ghafary. greece says it's completed a 40—kilometre fence on its border with turkey and installed a new surveillance system, amid fears of refugees arriving from afghanistan. the greek citizens' protection minister said �*we cannot wait for the possible impact�* of the taliban's takeover of afghanistan. his comments came as president erdogan of turkey called on european nations to take responsibility for people fleeing the taliban. the british government has rejected a call to issue 10,000 temporary visas to eu workers — to tackle an estimated shortage of 75,000 lorry drivers. logistics uk — the trade body which represents
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freight businesses — says many restaurants and supermarkets are facing serious supply problems. but ministers say employers should invest in the domestic workforce — by offering higher wages — rather than rely on foreign labour. it's been nearly a week since a powerful earthquake hit southwest haiti, and there are still some areas that have yet to receive any help. more than 2,000 people are known to have died. an estimated 135,000 families have been displaced. that means they have no homes and no possessions. 0ur correspondent james clayton reports now from the small town of les anglais. to get to the small town of les anglais, you have to take the coastal road. the town is two hours from les cayes, and the road snakes through earthquake—scarred villages and even through a river.
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this is what's left of the town's church. a mass christening was about to begin just before the earthquake struck. the church had been filling up with people. dafica had woken up excited. her daughter was one of the dozens of children to be christened that day. translation: the church already had a lot of people inside, _ so i was looking for a good place to sit. i put my bag down and just as i was about to sit down, the earthquake struck. everyone started running but each side of the church was full of people. i was holding my baby. i tried to get out of the front. i was so nearly out and that's when it collapsed on me. dafica suffered injuries to her head, back and legs, but survived. her daughter esther died in her arms. translation: we were inseparable.
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when we went to the church, we were two, but i came back alone. i will never forget her. this is a town still in mourning. 22 people died here in the collapse, including many children. this man shows us belongings laid out in the cemetery across the street, including a christening veil, as yet uncollected. "sometimes i ask myself, does god exist?" he says. "it's too much, it's too much." nearly a week after this earthquake and the true scale of the devastation is still revealing itself, and that's why it's feared that the death toll here could rise further. some help has started to arrived here, desperately needed food and clothes. but this earthquake has turned communities upside down. trauma that may never heal. james clayton, bbc
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news, les anglais. a rare hurricane warning has been issued for parts of the north—eastern united states as tropical storm henri continues to strengthen. it's expected to hit portions of long island and connecticut on sunday. it would be the first hurrricane to hit the region for 30 years. the headlines on bbc news. senior taliban figures — including the group's co—founder, mullah baradar — arrive in kabulfor talks about establishing a new government. thousands continue to crowd the perimeter at kabul airport, desparate to escape the taliban. greece has erected a aokm fence on its border with turkey amid wanings of many afghan civillians fleeing their country australian police have clashed with thousands of people protesting against covid lockdowns in melbourne and sydney. it comes as a record number
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of covid cases were recorded in new south wales — the home of the country's biggest city, sydney. here's the state health minister. we are in a very serious situation here in new south wales with this particular variant of the virus. and if you can get either one of the two vaccines that have been made available, just go and get it. just go and get it. if you fit within the categories, go and get the vaccine. earlier the bbc�*s phil mercer gave me this update from syndey. there was chaos and violence right in the heart of australia's second biggest city, melbourne, for a couple of hours. thousands of demonstrators were confronting the police. the authorities say some people had turned up to demonstrate peacefully, but the vast majority were looking for trouble. they certainly founded. riot police had to support mounted units and there were times during the afternoon when it seemed
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that the police may well lose control the city centre. in the end, more than 200 people were arrested. there were other smaller, less dramatic rallies, protesting against australia's strict regime of lockdowns here in sydney and brisbane, adelaide and darwin, but all of the headlines will be around the unrest in australia's southern city of melbourne. loads and loads of people confronting the police, venting their anger at these are very strict lockdowns that now affect millions of australians. and what is the covid infection rate in new south wales? if you look at the national figures, victoria, since the pandemic began, australia has recorded about 42,000 coronavirus infections, so a sense of the early part of last year, 42,000 coronavirus infections have been documented across the entire nation.
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fewer than 1,000 people have died. so compared to many other countries, australia's situation is pretty good. that is because of various factors, strict lockdowns being one of them, also the closure of australia's international borders since march of last year. if you look at new south wales, for example, today, 825 new covid infections were reported. that is the worst daily figure for the whole of australia since the pandemic began. and thatjust gives you an indication as to how serious the outbreak is, especially here in sydney. a curfew will be imposed in a virus hit suburbs in the next 2a — 48 hours. this is australia's strictest ever lockdown, thousands of people who protested
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against any situation in various australian cities do not necessarily reflect the view of millions of australians who are staying home and trying to do the right thing. here, around 300,000 carbon dioxide monitors are to be made available to schools in england next term to help improve ventilation and lessen covid outbreaks. the department for education said the portable monitors could be used to identify areas where more air—flow is needed. however, the £25 million order for co2 monitors has yet to be finalised, only weeks before most schools return. lebanon is facing its worst economic crisis in modern times, as a fuel crisis continues to put pressure on the country. the shia militant group hezbollah says it has now made arrangements to import fuel from iran, despite us sanctions. the bbc�*s azadeh moshiri reports. with no electricity and, therefore, no lights,
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ahmad has to improvise to do hisjob. this is but one small example of how lebanon's months—long fuel crisis is affecting everyday life. translation: the living conditions are difficult i because of the power outage. sometimes we are forced to turn on a phone light so we can continue our work. there is no electricity, no petrol and no diesel. 78% of the population is now living below the poverty line, according to the united nations, and violence and protests have become a common occurrence. adding even more pressure, the country's central bank announced it was ending imported fuel subsidies last week. the decision has led lebanon's already troubled economy to collapse. restaurants and shops have been forced to close. and as fuel supplies dwindled, endless queues formed at petrol stations, with drivers hoping to fill up before any price hikes.
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translation: my car has been parked in a queue outside the filling _ station for two days, but i still have no petrol. is there anything more degrading and humiliating than this? despite months of this crisis, lebanon's divided political factions have still not found a solution, nor even managed to form a united government. the shia militant group hezbollah has now announced that a ship carrying iranian fuel is headed for lebanon, despite us sanctions. it may complicate matters, but for lebanon's people, all that matters is keeping the lights on. azadeh moshiri, bbc news. a 14—year—old boy's been arrested on suspicion of supplying a class a drug after the death of a 13—year—old in bournemouth. mehmet altun was taken to hospital on thursday evening afterfalling ill in bournemouth. dorset police say officers are awaiting results of a postmortem examination but believe he died
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of a drugs overdose. the united states has imposed sanctions on three more cuban officials. washington said the sanctions were in response to supposed violations of human rights during large anti—government protests last month. hundreds of demonstrators are still detained, following what activists say were summary trials. that is with no jury involved. from havana, will grant reports. july 11th was a day unlike any other in modern cuba. furious over dire shortages of food and medicine, blackouts, inflation and the coronavirus pandemic, thousands of protesters made one demand loudest of all. "liberty," they chanted. "freedom, change!" the police responded with force led by feared elite troops called "black berets". a month on, an estimated 800
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people remain injail. they include miriela cruz�*s son, dayron, even though she says he was nowhere near the protest at the time. she claims he's yet to have access to a lawyer. living with lung cancer, the strain on her is obvious. "i asked the police why he was being held and where. "they wouldn't tell me," miriela explains. she began to publicly call cuba a dictatorship, was arrested and is now facing charges too. many families say their relatives were tried with no lawyer present. the government insists the trials were fair and won't comment on individual cases. today, order has been restored in cuba via an ominous and constant security presence. after the pressure building for months finally erupted here, something fundamental appears to have shifted in cuban society — a potent combination of fear and respect for the authorities perhaps irreparably weakened. and it may prove to be
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beyond the political skills of the post—castro generation of leaders to ever fully claw it back. one of those top leaders is gerardo hernandez, who spent years in a us jail on spying charges. he blames the uprising on the six—decades—long us economic embargo and denies cuba mistreats its detainees. i can tell you as a policy, there's no torture in cuba. and what i can tell you for sure, because you saw yourself and the world has seen it, is that you don't see in cuba what you saw every day in colombia, in chile, in other places, police showing water and gas and beating people and even killing people. the biden administration has talked of giving support to the cuban people. but i put it to the state department that its refusal to lift the embargo makes a mockery of that policy. this is the moment for the cuban people. this was the cuban people
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themselves making demands of their government that was driven by, in large part, exhaustion with the government's inability to meet their needs. the sight of disenfranchised young people demanding an end to communism was this government's worst nightmare, and the crackdown only alienated people further. unless things improve soon, the authorities here know there will be more calls for change ahead. will grant, bbc news, havana. a new study suggests people swear less than they did 30 years ago. dr robbie love, lecturer in english language at aston university, did the research. how did you do the research? simply, we gathered — how did you do the research? simply, we gathered and _ how did you do the research? simply, we gathered and analysed _ how did you do the research? simply, we gathered and analysed transcriptsl we gathered and analysed transcripts of people conversing with each other, both collected in the 1990s but also in more recent years,
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recordings of conversations that members of the public submitted, and then by analysing the frequencies of swear words, then by analysing the frequencies of swearwords, i then by analysing the frequencies of swear words, i was able to compare how the frequencies had changed, both words that were more popular and words that have become less popular between the 1990s and the present day. i popular between the 1990s and the present day-— present day. i don't believe we swear less _ present day. i don't believe we swear less than _ present day. i don't believe we swear less than 30 _ present day. i don't believe we swear less than 30 years i present day. i don't believe we swear less than 30 years ago. | present day. i don't believe we i swear less than 30 years ago. yes, i was uuite swear less than 30 years ago. yes, i was quite surprised _ swear less than 30 years ago. yes, i was quite surprised when _ swear less than 30 years ago. yes, i was quite surprised when i _ swear less than 30 years ago. yes, i was quite surprised when i found i was quite surprised when i found this as well, because research does suggest that people think they swear more, so intuitively you'd think that would be the case. it is hard to say exactly why it might be that people swear less. it is certainly not the case that they don't swear much, swearing is still a very normal part of everyday casual conversation, but it is slightly less. it may be because of the functions that we typically form one swearing. we may be performing those functions in terms of the meaning by using other words that might not be
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considered so taboo, but we do still swear a lot, just not quite as much. do you have any sense of whether there are some swear words which were used to find a really offensive that are potentially more acceptable now, or not? that are potentially more acceptable now. or not?— now, or not? yes, absolutely, and i think the best — now, or not? yes, absolutely, and i think the best example _ now, or not? yes, absolutely, and i think the best example of— now, or not? yes, absolutely, and i think the best example of that i now, or not? yes, absolutely, and i l think the best example of that would be the f—word, which is now the most popular swear word of all, which wasn't the case in the 90s, that the bl—word. f—word is much more common thanit bl—word. f—word is much more common than it was, which suggests that has weakened. that suggests it has weakened. that suggests it has weakened both syntactically, the positions in sentences it can take, but also in terms of its meaning. of course it has the core meaning related to sexual intercourse, but it has a much more generic meaning which can be used from all sorts of
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functions from humour to surprise, angen functions from humour to surprise, anger, etc. so it is extremely versatile, which makes it highly useful, but perhaps more tolerated than before because it is now so common. 50 than before because it is now so common. ., , .,, ., common. so the f-word is the top of the swearing — common. so the f-word is the top of the swearing charts _ common. so the f-word is the top of the swearing charts for _ common. so the f-word is the top of the swearing charts for people i common. so the f-word is the top of the swearing charts for people in i the swearing charts for people in britain, yes? the swearing charts for people in britain. yes?— the swearing charts for people in britain, yes? absolutely, it is the old britain, yes? absolutely, it is the gold medal— britain, yes? absolutely, it is the gold medalwinner, _ britain, yes? absolutely, it is the gold medalwinner, yes. - britain, yes? absolutely, it is the gold medalwinner, yes. it i britain, yes? absolutely, it is the gold medalwinner, yes. it is i britain, yes? absolutely, it is the. gold medalwinner, yes. it is funny when ou gold medalwinner, yes. it is funny when you put— gold medalwinner, yes. it is funny when you put it — gold medalwinner, yes. it is funny when you put it like _ gold medalwinner, yes. it is funny when you put it like that. - gold medalwinner, yes. it is funny when you put it like that. thank i gold medalwinner, yes. it is funny| when you put it like that. thank you very much for talking to us. take care. now it is time for a look at the weather. i hope you're doing all right. many of us will see some heavy, thundery downpours today. hello, hello, everyone, i hope you're doing all right. now many of us will see some heavy, thundery downpours today. we'll see some bright spells in the mix, however. on balance, i think tomorrow will be a better day, but we'll still see some showers. so this is how it's looking.
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this is the weather front. it's wriggling around so it'll introduce some slow—moving downpours and some thundery spells, more than likely behind this as we head through the afternoon. something brighter ahead of it, however. it'll be breezy across southern and south—western parts and today's top temperatures reaching about 20 or 21 celsius. so today, the weather front is here, but it's very slowly moving away from us. and then we move into something drier as we head through this evening. you can see it here. and really it'll start to fizzle out through tonight. it was quite mild and muggy last night with some mist and fog patches forming. some of these are likely again tonight and i think our temperatures more than likely getting down to about 13 or m celsius. over the next couple of days, then, high pressure builds so it should settle down. hello, this is bbc news. it is 11:30am. i am victoria derbyshire. _ the headlines: senior taliban figures — including the group's co—founder, mullah baradar — arrive in kabulfor talks about establishing a new government.
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thousands continue to crowd the perimeter at kabul airport, desparate to escape the taliban.

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