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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 21, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 5:00pm. the pentagon has said the us remains in regular communication with the taliban, but there has been no change in what it describes as the enemy's situation despite extensive security threats. chaos and panic outside kabul airport, as the us advises its citizens not to travel there until they are asked — because of security threats outside the gates. senior taliban figures — including the group's co—founder, mullah baradar — are in kabulfor talks about establishing a new government. there have been clashes between australian police and anti—lockdown demonstrators in sydney and melbourne.
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good afternoon. the pentagon has said the us remains in regular communication with the taliban— but there has been no change in what it described as the enemy's situation despite extensive security threats. it comes after the us embassy advised its citizens not to travel to kabul airport until asked to — because of security issues outside its gates. the us says its helped 2,500 american nationals to leave
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the city over the past week. outside the airport, there are scenes of panic and chaos. us forces are firing shots into the air in an attempt to control the crowds, and images on social media show soldiers dealing with bodies. a pentagon spokesmen says he can't rule out the possibility of american troops going outside of kabul airport to get people. meanwhile, the taliban's co—founder and head of its political wing, mullah abdul ghani baradar, has arrived in kabul. a taliban official are the group is making progress in forming a government in afghanistan and aiming to improve the situation at the airport. in a briefing a short while ago, pentagon press secretary john kirby said there were a number of security concerns in and around the airport.
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the situation in the city is fluid and dynamic and you had seen the images over the last 2a, 48 hours images over the last 24, 48 hours yourself of the situation outside the perimeter of the airport and it changes. it changes almost by the hour and it changes in locations around the airport. it is very, very fluid and dynamic. i don't want to speak this state department, obviously, but like our military commanders, they are going to make decisions in real time about what is in the best interest of innocent civilians that have need to get to the airport and we want to get inside the security gates. this will change every day. there will be modifications to our assessment in what we think is in the best
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interests. we have said from the very beginning of this that we are going to try to do this in a safe and orderly way and that means making sure that nobody gets hurt. what you are seeing is a prudent notification to make sure that whatever movement there is to the jobs from outside the airport is done as safely as possible and that people have the information that need to make the best decisions for themselves going forward. need to make the best decisions for themselves going forward. the us army's major general william taylor gave an operational update on the evacuation of americans and afghanis from the country. the airport remain secure. us military personnel currently oversee flight operations in both us military, contracted aircraft, as well as foreign aircraft continue to operate within kabul airport.
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additionally, the us military has maintained the gate security at major gates and supported our state department colleagues in the processing of individuals to prepare for evacuation flights out of afghanistan. critical to getting americans and afghans at risk out of the dive situation requires additional space at intermediate spaces and safe havens at other locations. this impacts our throughput, as i discussed yesterday. two days ago, if you recall, the us military lifted nearly 6000 evacuees in a single day. in the last 24 hours. six planes and 32 charters departed kabul and through this combined effort, the total passenger count was 3800. also in the past 24 hours, a number of c17 is a moving,
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providing critical relief that will increase our input to those intermediate staging venues and finally, in the past 24 hours, three flights landed at an international airport. there are no afghans in just one week, since beginning this operation, have left afghanistan and will be transitioned to fort bliss today for further processing in this process. today one of the taliban's most prominent leaders, abdul ghani baradar, returned to afghanistan after years in exile. what do we know about him? well, he was one of the four men who founded the taliban back
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in 1994, and became a lynchpin of the insurgency, after the taliban were toppled by the us—led invasion in 2001. then, in 2010, he was captured in a joint us—pakistani raid. but he was released in 2018. it was hoped he would encourage the taliban to engage in peace talks with them. fast forward 2 years — and he signs a deal; not with the afghan government, but with the trump administration. it culminates in the withdrawal of us troops. we know what happens next. the taliban quickly take control of afghanistan. and then, after years in exile, he's finally able to return to the country. i've been spekaing to our security correspondent frank gardner. he explained how significant the taliban's political leader mullah abdul ghani baradar was to the movement. he is very significant because he was very close to the originalfounder of the taliban back in 1994. he is a relative moderate compared to some of his more extreme colleagues.
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he spent eight years in prison in pakistan and he was only released in 2018. he has been instrumental in the peace talks you mention in doha. he has been very much at the forefront of those. i think the big questions now are whether this second iteration of taliban rule in afghanistan is going to be different from the earlier one. the public signs that they are putting out are that it will be. they're going to be less extreme. they are saying the things that people want to hear, the big question is once the spotlight is all of afghanistan and it will do so inevitably, are they going to revert type? 0ppressing women, suppressing human rights, carrying out all sorts of very brutal punishments, oppressing free media. or will they actually be a more normal country that is a part of the rest of the world? some countries, china and russia, are giving them the benefit of the doubt. they are reaching out to them already. the eu has withheld recognition...
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well, no one is in a rush to recognise them yet because they want to wait to see how the taliban form a government, how inclusive it is. i don't think western countries are going to be in a rush to do it because they want to see what kind of country it will be. mullah baradar�*s imput will be important. he is not the top man but very near to it. there are other people at the top. these people have been on the outside for 20 years. one has got a price on his head from the us. a bounty on his head. he is now in charge of securing kabul. that is the high echelons of taliban. but many people have pointed out that it is the discipline within the foot soldiers that could cause problems for
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the so—called taliban version two. how unified, disciplined is the taliban? who are they? they've been in incredibly effective fighting force. as soon as they found out that the us was leaving, that was it, that was a green light to them to accelerate their campaign and this will go down in military history as one of the most successful insurgent campaigns. it is desperately sad for all of those not only british people and others who fought and aid workers who helped afghanistan become a more progressive, fair and equitable place, which they now fear could be reversed, but also all those tens of thousands of afghans who have lost their lives trying to keep their country free from oppressive rule. it might not be as oppressive as we fear, but you've only got to look at the airport to see what tens of thousands of afghans
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think about what taliban rule is likely to be. they would have heard about it from their parents. they are terrified and there is no question that despite the fact that the taliban have said there is amnesty for those who serve the previous government, in practice, there are numerous reports of door to door, not even knockings. basically, the taliban going round with lists of the people who basically served the government that fought them and the people they are particularly after our the previous afghan intelligent and the special forces. some of those are now at the airport trying to get away as you can imagine because they are marked men. let's speak to our correspondent in washington, barbara plett usher. what was your main takeaway from that? element of the main message is that? element of the main message is that the situation around the airport is very fluid, very dynamic. there was a lot of discussion because the us embassy had put out a
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notice to americans to stay away from the airport because of the security concerns unless they specifically told to go and what the pentagon officials describe as a state that back situation that can change by the hour but they were not about what the security threats were. they did clarify that there was no reported change in the situation of the enemy, as they called it, around the airport. it seems to have been much more related to the surge, this desperate surgeon crush of people who are trying to get out and navigate those crowds. we know that the telephone, one of their ways of crowd control is to shoot in the air so it can change and become very dangerous. they did say that the military was capable of processing anyone who came to the gates, that they can open the gates
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to anyone with the right documents. when pressed, the general speaking said that the gate had been closed for short periods of time in the past 40 eight hours but it sounded to me like they were manning the gates and opening quickly and letting people in that they were able to get there. we do know that a number of americans, nearly 200, were airlifted by helicopter from a nearby hotel to the airport recently and they had been planning to walk and they had been planning to walk and then it was decided that on the ground it was too risky so they were airlifted. the pentagon spokesperson said as far as he knew there had been no other operations like that but he did not rule them out because he was describing this fluid situation and he also said we are working against time and space to get everyone out. they painted a bit more of a clearer picture of what was going on at the airport but they also said fights were continuing and 17,000 people had been lifted out since they began operations a week
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ago. 38 and been sent out in the past 48 hours. they were pressed on the possibility of the us engaging militarily. what was their response? they are focused on their mission, their non—combat mission to evacuate people. the reporter said you should be able to do that because until the end of august have the right to respond to requests from the afghan military if they want air support. they are very focused on this evacuation airport. they are very focused on this evacuation airport. greece says it's completed the construciton of a fence that stretches for nearly 25 miles, on its border with turkey — and installed a new surveillance system, amid fears of refugees arriving from afghanistan. the greek citizens�* protection minister said, �*we cannot wait for the possible impact�* of the taliban's
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takeover of afghanistan. his comments came as president erdogan of turkey called on european nations to take responsibility for people fleeing the taliban. earlier, i spoke to the freelance journalist daphne tolis who is in athens. she have us some more details on the wall. the 40 kilometre steel fence has been completed. the defence minister and the citizens protection minister were both yesterday, friday, there. they visited the wall, the border there. they said that greek borders will remain secure and impenetrable and that border forces are on alert for any possible wave of afghan refugees trying to cross into europe through greece. is this widely supported by the greek people?
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it is widely supported, i would say, especially after last year, the events of february 2020, when thousands of refugees and migrants attempted to cross in large numbers from turkey's land border, the same border that divides greece and turkey, after turkish president erdogan said that the borders were open. so people tried to come through greece to move further to the european union, and following those events, that is what actually sped up the completion of this border, which was already announced that it would happen, but this made it faster to happen, to reinforce the existing border and to make an even more reinforced steel fence across this zone, which is actually one of the deadliest land borders
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for asylum seekers, migrants, refugees crossing into europe. so what is the turkish reaction to this? obviously this will leave them shouldering the burden. in fact, beyond turkey, how are greek and europe's neighbours viewing this? for example on the islands of lesbos, cos, the five greek islands that have bore the brunt of the refugee crisis for the last six years, they are mostly concerned about any possible wave of refugees. people who live by the borders are mostly concerned that this might trigger another big wave of migration to europe. but turkey as well has been hosting large numbers of syrian refugees, about 4 million, and 117,000 afghan refugees, according to the united nations refugee agency. greece, according to our migration and asylum minister, has 40,000 afghan refugees, half of which are already identified, recognised as refugees, and 20% of these are waiting
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still for their asylum claims to be processed. the british government has rejected a call to issue 10,000 temporary visas to eu workers — to tackle an estimated shortage of 75,000 lorry drivers. logistics uk — the trade body which represents freight businesses — says many restaurants and supermarkets are facing serious supply problems. but ministers say employers should invest in the domestic workforce — by offering higher wages — rather than rely on foreign labour. earlier, i spoke to alex veitch from logistics uk — i asked him how serious the situation is. it's serious and it's getting worse. we are making this call
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for 10,000 temporary visas for qualified, safe, eu nationals to come back to the uk and tide us over for the peak christmas period, the build—up to which starts now, to give us time to catch up from the missed driving tests and to reskill, retrain uk nationals to take up the manyjobs that are available in our sector. we see that wages are rising. we are working hand in glove with the government on reskilling, on apprenticeships, on trying to get people into our sector where there are jobs available for people impacted by covid. the problem is that it has been very difficult to actually get a driving test over the past year. two it's nobody�*s fault, it's due to covid restrictions at the dvsa and so we have a huge backlog of people waiting to take
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their tests to become a truck driver and so we think it's a reasonable ask to create 10,000 temporary visas, and we are saying that because there are many other sectors where the government has done exactly that. police have released an image of a man wanted in connection with a suspected double murder in central london. a 45—year—old woman and a 59—year—old man, were found dead, having sustained knife injuries. detectives told the public "not to approach" lee peacock, 49, eight who officers want to question — after they discovered two bodies at separate addresses, half a mile apart in westminster. (sot
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at this early stage we are retaining an open mind concerning motive, but we are treating these crimes as linked. i know this will cause concern amongst the community, but i would like to reassure the public that we have a dedicated team of officers who are tasked with finding lee, and i would once again appeal to anybody that sees him to call 999. let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures here in the uk. there were 32,058 positive cases and 104 people have died within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test in the latest 24 hour period.. looking at the vaccinations figures, 87.5% of those aged 16 and over in the uk population have received both jabs. around 300,000 carbon dioxide monitors are to be made available to schools in england next term, to help improve ventilation and lessen covid outbreaks. the department for education should said, the portable monitors could be used to identify areas where more air—flow is needed. however, the 25—million—pound order for co2 monitors has yet to be finalised, with only weeks to go before most schools return.
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australian police have clashed with thousands of people protesting against lockdowns in melbourne and sydney. it comes as a record number of covid cases were recorded in new south wales. here's the state health minister speaking earlier. we are in a very serious situation here in new south wales with this particular variant of the virus. and if you can get either one of the two vaccines that have been made available, just go and get it. just go and get it. if you fit within the categories, go and get the vaccine. the bbc�*s phil mercer has the latest from syndey. thousands of demonstrators were confronting the police. authorities say that some people had turned out to demonstrate peacefully, but the vast majority were looking for trouble. and they certainly found it. riot police had to support mounted units and there were times
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during the afternoon when it seemed that the police may well lose control of the city centre. in the end, more than 200 people were arrested. there were other smaller less dramatic rallies, protesting against australia's strict regime of lockdowns here in sydney and brisbane, adelaide and darwin. but all the headlines will be around the unrest in australia's southern city of melbourne. loads and loads of people confronting the police, venting their anger at these very strict lockdowns that now affect millions of australians. the government has announced plans to tighten rules on the importation of dogs to the uk — in response to a rise in puppy smuggling. plans include raising the minimum age for imported puppies from 15 weeks to 6 months — and banning heavily pregnant dogs. lebo diseko reports. hundreds of puppies brought into the country illegally
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are intercepted each year. the numberfound not to have met the uk's pet import rules more than doubling between 2019 and 2020 alone. many have health problems and had not been checked by certified vets. an increase too in the number with docked tales and cropped ears, more than 600% in the last five years. when it comes to ear cropping, we unfortunately have seen an increasing demand for dogs with cropped ears, a completely unnecessary and abhorrent mutilation which causes nothing but pain and has no medical benefits. it is done purely for look. we have seen an increase in their use in the media, social media influencers and celebrities which has led to an increase in public demand. the government is proposing
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new rules for puppy welfare standards, including raising the minimum age at which they can be imported from 15 weeks from six months, a ban on importing heavily pregnant dogs and a ban on importing dogs with cropped ears or docked tails. animal welfare campaigners have welcomed a consultation, saying it could bring it significant progress against the fight against such practices. we are delighted to see the government taking decisive action when it comes to importation of on puppies, pregnant dogs and dogs with cropped ears. it is something we have been calling forfor a long time and it is a real win for animal welfare. it is hoped these proposals are part of an eight week great britain wide consultation and will lead to new rules for what has been called a grim trade, and that they will prevent cruelty. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello. saturday saw quite a large amount of
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cloud babbling heavy rain for some. in contrast to the sunday as we look to sunnier skies and a of dry weather as well. the reason for the change, an area of low pressure moving to the east of the uk, it pushes into the continent and it will allow high pressure to build from the south—west. that high—pressure look set to continue building through sunday and monday and then it really established across the uk for the week ahead. so some of the rain that we see through the remainder of the night could be some of the heaviest. there will be some of the heaviest. there will be some heavier showers into the hours. for the majority, though, it becomes dry, a little misty and murky in places with lows of 13—15. here on sunday. weather is quite slow to make its way into the continent and will cloud into eastern england through the course of the day. much more sunshine, though, on offer across the board and with just late
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wednesday should feel a little warmer. there will, though, be some isolated showers developing and they are going to be quite slow—moving so some areas could pick up breakdown voice through sunday afternoon but those will be in the minority. 0verall sunday is much drier and brighter day. take a little dog, though, into the midlands and northern england through sunday afternoon and you can see some of the area is favoured. you can see there is more persistent showers. maybe some of the far south—east, too. high pressure really does take over as we look at monday and that will suppress activity in the atmosphere. perhapsjust a little bit more cloud drifting across of england on a breeze off the north sea. it is most unlikely. monday is a day of dry weather, light winds and some long spells of sunshine. temperature is getting closer to average the time of year with a couple of degrees are down across southern england. to the week ahead,
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though, that very keen to stay in place of a lot of fine word of outlooks and reasonable temperatures. just the chance for northerly wind across eastern counties later in the week.
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good afternoon. the us embassy in afghanistan, is advising americans not
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to travel to kabul airport, unless they've been instructed to do so, because of "potential security threats" at the gates. thousands of people are still massed outside the perimeter, desperate to board flights out of the country. it comes as the taliban's co—founder — and head of its political wing — mullah abdul ghani baradar, arrived in kabulfor talks on forming a new afghan government. here's frankie mccamley. chaos of consuming clouds near kabul airport. at the front, reports bodies are carried away from the crush, with us fighting for their lives. clear signs of tension is mounting. this man threatening people with a whip. the us is now advising its citizens not to travel to the airport unless specifically told to, but even those can't get through. translation: ~ ., ., ., ., translation: we have got a legal visa, man translation: we have got a legal visa. many peeple _ translation: we have got a legal visa, many people who _ translation: we have got a legal visa, many people who are - translation: we have got a legal visa, many people who are coming | visa, many people who are coming here don't have the right documents,
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but we have got the visa and they won't let's through. this but we have got the visa and they won't let's through. this morning, a lane won't let's through. this morning, a plane carrying _ won't let's through. this morning, a plane carrying 200 _ won't let's through. this morning, a plane carrying 200 evacuees, - won't let's through. this morning, a | plane carrying 200 evacuees, mainly security guards from the british embassy arrived in brize norton. in hiding amid the security guard tells me he and other colleagues have been left behind. we me he and other colleagues have been left behind. ~ ., ., left behind. we feel abandoned, we can't stay in — left behind. we feel abandoned, we can't stay in our _ left behind. we feel abandoned, we can't stay in our home, _ left behind. we feel abandoned, we can't stay in our home, it _ left behind. we feel abandoned, we can't stay in our home, it is - can't stay in our home, it is dangerous. sometimes i can't look at my kids. i was the one that putters at such high risk. if i knew this company would do this to us, i would never havejoined. company would do this to us, i would never have joined.— never have “oined. outside, banks are closed never have joined. outside, banks are closed for— never have joined. outside, banks are closed for the _ never have joined. outside, banks are closed for the seventh - never have joined. outside, banks are closed for the seventh day - never have joined. outside, banks are closed for the seventh day in l never have joined. outside, banksj are closed for the seventh day in a row. there is no cash in the machines. and hospitals are not running at full capacity because women are not turning up. the taliban's co—founder is now in the afghan capital, kabul. mullah abdul ghani baradar is expected to join talks on establishing a new government. so far, britain has
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evacuated just under 2,500 people, but time is running out as fears grow for those not here, in hiding, worried for their lives. frankie mccamley, bbc news. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner is here. mullah abdul ghani baradar is in a two, lots of reassurances this is a new taliban and not the old one we all know. i new taliban and not the old one we all know. ~ ., new taliban and not the old one we all know. ~' ., ., all know. i think there are two questions _ all know. i think there are two questions standing _ all know. i think there are two questions standing back- all know. i think there are two questions standing back at - all know. i think there are two questions standing back at it, | questions standing back at it, floating to the surface. 0ne questions standing back at it, floating to the surface. one is that there are a number of really chilling, disturbing reports which the un secretary general mentioned about kidnappings or people being coerced, door—to—door hunting down of people from the former regime. the question is, all thosejust one offset by a few hot—headed militants acting on their own, or are they part of a secret order issued from above? and the bigger question i think is whether, referring to what you were referring to there, the arrival of mullah abdul ghani baradar in kabul, is the new taliban
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really reformed? have they changed? and it depends which view you want to take. the chief of defence staff, britain's chief of defence staff general nick carter, has tended to be on the more optimistic side that they have learnt their lessons and they have learnt their lessons and they have learnt their lessons and they have seen how unpopular they have been with many people and they will try to be more inclusive. cynics would say actually, this is just window dressing, it is just lip gloss, they are saying the things the international community want to hear, but once internationalfocus moves from afghanistan, they will revert to type, oppressing women and imposing really strict hardline rule. we simply don't know the answer yet. we can guess, but we don't know. answer yet. we can guess, but we don't know-— answer yet. we can guess, but we don't know. . ~ ., , ., don't know. ok, frank, many thanks. programme — don't know. ok, frank, many thanks. programme occur. _ with so many people now hoping to escape afghanistan, turkey has warned of a new wave of migration, and called on european countries to take responsibility. greece has also built a new 25—mile fence and surveillence system along its border with turkey. the greek government says it
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won't wait passively for the possible impact of a refugee crisis, following the taliban takeover. here, police have released an image of a man wanted in connection with a suspected double murder in central london. a 45—year—old woman and a 59—year—old man were found dead, with stab wounds, at separate addresses in westminster. detectives have told the public not to approach lee peacock, who's 49, whom officers now want to question. the trial of the r&b singer r. kelly, who's accused of sexually abusing several women, has heard claims by his former tour manager that he bribed a government worker to obtain a fake id to marry the singer aaliyah, who was underage. she was 15 at the time. kelly is also accused of bribery, and denies all the charges. now, the government has announced plans to tighten rules on the importation of dogs into the uk, in response to a rise in puppy smuggling. they include raising the minimum age for imported dogs
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from 15 weeks to six months, and banning heavily pregnant animals. lebo diseko has the story. hundreds of puppies brought into the country illegally are intercepted each year — the numberfound not to have met the uk's pet import rules more than doubling between 2019 to 2020 alone. many suffer health problems and have not been checked by certified vets. an increase, too, in the number with docked tales and cropped ears — more than 600% in the last five years. the government is proposing new rules for puppy welfare standards, which include raising the minimum age at which puppies can be imported from 15 weeks to six months, a ban on importing heavily pregnant dogs, and an end to importing dogs with cropped ears or docked tails. when it comes to ear cropping,
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unfortunately, we have seen an increasing demand for dogs with cropped ears, an abhorrent and unnecessary mutilation, which causes nothing but pain and has no medical benefits, it's done purely for look. we have seen an increase in the media, by social media influencers and celebrities, which has led to an increase in public demand. animal welfare campaigners have welcomed the consultation, saying it could bring significant progress in the fight against such practices. it's hoped these new proposals — part of an eight—week, great britain—wide consultation — will lead to new rules, ending what's been called a "grim trade", and preventing cruelty. lebo diseko, bbc news. the latest government coronavirus figures show there were 32,058 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period — which means, on average, there were 31,698 new cases per day in the last week. the most recent figures show there almost 6,500 people in hospital
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with the virus on thursday. 104 deaths were recorded in the past 24 hours, with an average of 100 deaths a day in the past week. 0n vaccinations, 87.5% of adults in the uk have now had theirfirstjab, and 76.3% have had two. police in australia have clashed with thousands of anti—lockdown protestors in two of the country's biggest cities, making more than 250 arrests. in melbourne, police used pepper spray to break up the crowds, with some protestors having broken through police lines. while in sydney — where lockdown measures have just been extended for another month, due to record new infections — a thousand officers were deployed to keep order. around 300,000 carbon dioxide monitors could be made available to schools in england next month, to help improve ventilation and reduce the risk of covid. the department for education says the monitors will help identify where more airflow is needed.
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cricket — and rain has, mainly, held off — to allow the first ever finals of the hundred to be played at lord's. the women were in action first, with southern brave taking on 0val invincibles. joe wilson was watching. there might be 99 different opinions about the hundred, but one overriding reason for the tournament — bring cricket a new audience. southern brave fielding first. two established stars of english cricket. the catcher, danni wyatt, the bowler anya shrubsole. 0val invincibles had fran wilson. well, she loves shots like that, and if you were feeling the rain, focus on the flame. the final must go on. 121 was the total scored by the invincibles. chase that, southern brave. 0k. danni wyatt, caught, gone for none. well, don't stop there, marizanne kapp, go again. get another. batters�* game? not here. rain had stopped, torrential wickets falling. when you�*re supposed
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to whack every ball, it can all go wrong very quickly. a rapid descent. the score was 14—6 when kapp took this catch. simple as that. the invincibles looked it. and i can tell you in the past couple of minutes, the invincibles have completed their victory, foley —— bowling the brave out for 73, not a surprise. the men�*s players have finished warming up for their final. but a word about the crowd which has grown throughout the afternoon. officially just over 17,000, grown throughout the afternoon. officiallyjust over 17,000, which for a domestic women�*s cricket match in england is a record. indeed, thank you. that�*s it. have a very good evening.
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hello and welcome to the film review with me, anna smith. i�*m filling in for mark kermode to review this week�*s releases. if you�*re going to make a movie about an eccentric truffle hunter searching furiously for his stolen pig, then surely you want to cast nicolas cage. whistling.
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in pig, he plays a disheveled hermit who lives in the oregonian wilderness with his beloved foraging hog. when she�*s taken in a violent kidnapping, he doesn�*t stop to nurse his wounds. he heads straight into town. haunting the restaurants and bars of portland, this christ—like spectre will stop at nothing to find his pig. he�*sjoined in his search by alex wolf�*s truffle dealer, who lives in the shadow of his rich father. pig is billed as a thriller, but i think that�*s a misleading label. while there�*s some suspense, this is a gently paced story about the bond between human and animal, and the extraordinary power of sensory memories. like our hero, the script has little time for the pretensions of high—concept dining, but it has a great respect for the art of cooking. you can almost smell the truffles coming off the screen. and cage is tremendous —
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his dejected but proud figure consumed with the sadness that becomes infectious. pig really sneaks up on you emotionally. this delicate, delicious debut from michael sarnoski just opened at the edinburgh international film festival and is in cinemas now. you can consume it on digital from the 23rd of august. phone rings. who is this? static. owen? is that... i can�*t hear you. look out of the window.
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next up, a psychological horror, the night house. rebecca hall stars as beth, a teacher who is reeling from the sudden death of her husband, owen. she�*s left alone in the lakeside home that they shared, having vivid nightmares about a ghostly presence. rummaging around in owen�*s belongings, she finds sketches that tell a very strange story and tries to investigate while navigating her grief. there are plenty of effective scares in this film from director david bruckner, who helmed the rural horror, the ritual. figures flicker and loom in the shadows, and sudden sounds will have you jumping out of your seat. but the script also explores beth�*s internal fears. she is terrified to discover that she may not have known her husband as well as she thought. and she�*s also scared of her own mind.
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it�*s a potent combination, and it requires an excellent actress to pull it off. luckily, rebecca hall is exactly that. i�*ve loved her in everything from ben affleck�*s the town to angela robinson�*s professor marsden and the wonder women. she even brought a touch of class to godzilla versus kong. as beth, she�*s mesmerising, darting between denial, confusion and gallows humour — something that makes her colleagues visibly uncomfortable. after a terrific first two acts, the conclusion of the night house is convoluted and slightly disappointing. but i would still absolutely recommend this to horror fans who think that complex characters and psychological puzzles are just as important as bumps in the night. owen? it�*s in cinemas now.
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if you fancy a double bill of complex horrors, then there�*s a fascinating new british chiller called censor. set amid the moral panic around so—called "video nasties" in the 1980s, it stars niamh algar as enid, who works as a film censor. enid spends her working day watching graphic films to classify them for release. quiet and hard—working, enid�*s tragic past comes back to haunt her when one film reminds her of her missing sister. our mild—mannered heroine begins to unravel and move from the safety of the screening room into the seedy world of low—budget horrors. censor is a film of shocking twists and turns.
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so i won�*t to divulge much more of the plot. but i will say that it proves niamh algar to be a very versatile performer and barely recognisable from her other recent roles in raised by wolves. and calm with horses. there�*s also a darkly funny turn from michael smiley, who is so great at being humorously sinister. who�*s this? this is enid bayne, she is one of our censors. censor announces director and co—writer prano bailey—bond as a major talent who plays with intriguing ideas of visual flair. this story explores mental health and memory as well as politics, the media and power systems. there�*s a lot to chew on, and while this one�*s ending might also have you scratching your head, it�*s definitely a conversation starter. censor is in cinemas now. i need everyone�*s attention! hey, do you mind?
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i am trying to get my kids to sleep in here. oh, no! now i'm up all night. thanks. if you are after something a bit more cuddly you can watch at home at the kids, why not try the animated comedy extinct? basically, the story of time travelling talking doughnuts, extinct is bill and ted meets the secret life of pets with a dash of horrible histories. starting in 1835 in the galapagos islands, it introduces a species of animals called flummels. they�*re furry and round, with a hole in the middle. two of their number, siblings 0p and ed, end up plummeting through a mysterious time portal into future. discovering that flummels are now extinct, they hop through time and try to save their species. while extinct even features charles darwin... you get everyone to the beach, we�*ll meet you down there after we get the darwin guy�*s attention with the sky flowers. s ky flowers ? ..i wouldn�*t come here for insight into actual natural history or indeed quantum physics, but it�*s
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a witty, cute watch with a boundless supply of sight gags and characters who are amusingly slow off the mark — something that�*s usually a winner with kids. it�*s just landed on sky cinema and now. you�*re going on a journey, a journey through memory. all you have to do is follow my voice. i�*m a fan of the tv series westworld, so i�*ve been looking forward to reminiscence, a film written and directed by its co—creator, lisa joy. the dystopian sci—fi stars huthackman as nick, a detective living in a post—apocalyptic miami. along with his co—worker, played by thandiwe newton, he helps clients recover their memories, whether they want to recall a loved one or just find their keys. that�*s actually how nick meets may, by played by rebecca ferguson,
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a glamourous singer who disappears out of nick�*s life as quickly as she appeared. nick�*s search for her takes him in a dangerous and emotionaljourney. this has a great cast, and there are some fun ideas for fans of time—twisting tales, but sadly, the film just doesn�*t come together. both the dialogue and narration feel mannered and unoriginal. and while this eventually subverts some well—worn cliches, it does so very late in the day, so for most of the film they feel like exactly that — cliches. and by inviting you to recall everything from westworld to blade runner, reminiscence comes up very short in comparison. all you have to do is follow my voice. it�*s in cinemas now. we'd like to formally welcome you to japan. 0k, are you saying the same thing he said or is that to...? yeah. 0k, first of all, we would like to... to him, yeah? yes. ..formally accept your invitation to your country and show you a little bit of what we have to offer. she speaks japanese.
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they sing and rap. finally, a much—loved tv mockumentary comes to the big screen in peoplejust do nothing: big injapan. do you want to run through security at the exact same time? i�*d love nothing more. three, two, one... the series peoplejust do nothing catalogued the struggles of a fictional pirate radio station called kuru pt fm. openly influenced by the office, mc grindah and his hapless crew put the brent in brentwood with hilarious results. the cinematic debut uses a similarformula within a fish—out—of—water scenario.
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discovering that their track has been used on a japanese game show, the boys fly to tokyo, where they�*re thrown into the clutches of a smooth manager played by ken yamamura. meanwhile, their self—appointed manager chabuddy, played by asim chaudhry, gets into a series of disastrous mishaps. the culture clash comedy is fitfully amusing and will probably date quite quickly, but as ever this draws a steady stream of laughs from the sheer stupidity of its lovable characters, from delusional, self—aggrandizing grindah, played by allan mustafa, to amiable stoner steves, played by steve stamp. after watching these fellas many times from this very sofa, ifound it a real treat to laugh along with the crowd in the cinema, where it�*s showing now. thanks for watching the film review with me, anna smith. i�*ll be back next week. in the meantime, stay safe. ragga rap. would you like to translate for them? i'm not sure i can. .
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too big to translate. hello. after a soggy saturday, some drier prospect to comment for the week ahead as well, it should also be more in the way of sunshine as the big area of pressure builds towards the uk. last week, a lot of looming, persistent cloud and many around on saturday with outbreaks of rain affecting many areas through the day. still some showers around on sunday, most across eastern counties of england and the through saturday. but those showers should come fewer and further between as the day goes on. what�*s more in the way of dry weather. we should see a significant
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improvement in the sunshine as well. some showers are possible slow—moving ones producing rain and isolated thoughts from northern england and it runs through sunday afternoon but a bit warmer than saturday. we see the showers lingering into the evening as well. meanwhile building, building, building, calming things down and by the time we get into monday, some dry weather drifting round and overnight lows of 12—14 c and then there it is, in all its expansive lorry. this building area five measure looks keen to establish itself across the uk for the week ahead. a lot of fine weather in the next five days. monday, i think is a bit of sunshine around, not for the blue skies, a bit of a breeze and we just squeeze out the odd spot of shower. then towards the south—east,
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in contrast, oh so much drier. thanks to the help of that sunshine and as promised, here is the high parking up through the middle part. something we may see establishing itself is a little bit of early morning. a slight nod and the strength at this point in august the significant enough through the mornings. fine weather come up to 24 celsius in glasgow, 20 in cardiff. the cloud just redistributing itself a little more, favouring the us for some way in the sunshine. no heatwave by any means. improve the
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figures we saw last week. something that could change towards the end of the week is the hive. we may see the tail end of the weather front. the odd bit of wet weather. should see a northerly breeze towards the north sea and eastern counties, consequent the seeing some clout as well. overall, even into next weekend, it looks like the area of high pressure is very keen to stick around with just the chance to the end of the week into the early weekend of some cooler conditions along with north sea coast and some more stubborn crowd around here, too.
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this is bbc news the headlines at six: latest reports describe chaos and panic outside kabul airport — as the us advises its citizens not to travel there until they are asked, because of security threats outside the gates. senior taliban figures — including the group�*s co—founder, mullah baradar — are in kabulfor talks about establishing a new government. greece has erected a 25 mile fence on its border with turkey amid warnings of many afghan civillians fleeing their country. there have been clashes between australian police and anti—lockdown demonstrators in sydney and melbourne.

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