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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 21, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. crowds continue to gather outside kabul airport, amid reports of chaotic scenes as the us advises its citizens not to travel there until they are asked, because of security threats outside the gates. senior taliban figures — including the group's co—founder, mullah baradar — are in kabulfor talks about establishing a new government. greece has erected a 25 mile fence on its border with turkey amid warnings of many afghan civillians fleeing their country. a state of emergency has been declared in parts of new york state ahead of the forecast arrival of hurricane henri. and animal welfare campaigners have welcomed new uk government proposals to stop puppy smuggling.
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the us embassy in afghanistan, is advising americans not to travel to kabul airport, unless they've been instructed to do so, because of potential security threats at the gates. thousands of people are still massed outside the perimeter, desperate to board flights out of the country. it comes as the taliban's co—founder and head of its political wing, mullah abdul ghani baradar, arrived in kabul, for talks on forming a new afghan government. here's frankie mccamley. chaos consuming crowds near kabul airport. at the front, reports bodies are carried away from the crush, with others fighting for their lives.
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clear signs tension is mounting. this man threatening people with a whip. the us is now advising its citizens not to travel to the airport unless specifically told to, but even those can't get through. translation: we have got a legal |visa, many people who are coming | here don't have the right documents, but we have got the visa and they won't let us through. this morning, a plane carrying 200 evacuees, mainly security guards from the british embassy, arrived in brize norton. in hiding this security guard tells me he and other colleagues have been left behind. translation: we feel abandoned, we can't stay in our _ home, it is dangerous. sometimes i can't look at my kids. i was the one that put us at such high risk. if i knew this company would do this to us, i would never have joined. outside, banks are closed for the seventh day in a row. there is no cash in the machines.
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and hospitals are not running at full capacity because women are not turning up. the taliban's co—founder is now in the afghan capital, kabul. mullah abdul ghani baradar is expected to join talks on establishing a new government. so far, britain has evacuated just under 2,500 people, but time is running out as fears grow for those not here, in hiding, worried for their lives. frankie mccamley, bbc news. as you just heard — a key figure at the kabul talks is the taliban co—founder, mullah abdul ghani baradar, our security correspondent frank gardner told us more about him. this is somebody who co—founded the entire movement back in 1994, along with mullah omar, his more famous brother—in—law, reportedly. so mullah baradar, he was born in afghanistan in 1968 and he co—founded a movement of islamic scholars started in the madrasahs.
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so taliban literally means students, it's plural for students. and they took over southern afghanistan in the mid—90s. initially they were very popular because at the time the country had gone from civil war, it was racked with corruption, as it has been recently, actually, but also by a lot of infighting between warlords. and there was then five years of pretty unpopular brutal taliban repressive rule. he played a part in that, he held various posts, various roles, he ended up as deputy defence minister, and when the taliban were expelled by the northern alliance, backed by the us, in 2001, he went into exile, he moved, he became part of the quetta shura in pakistan. he was arrested in karachi in 2010. the americans asked the pakistanis to arrest him. he spent eight years injail in pakistan. then, at the us�*s request, he was released from jail and he then became the head of the talks of the taliban delegation in doha in qatar, of the peace talks between the us and the taliban, and he was very important in that,
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very instrumental, very powerful religious figure. he is a mullah, so he is a religious scholar himself, and he has now... initially he arrived from qatar to kandahar, the spiritual home of the taliban, and now he is in kabul, and he is expected to be, i think, a very key figure in the new government, however inclusive it is going to be. he is already the political chief of the taliban. let's think more about what is happening at the airport. this evening the shadow foreign secretary lisa nandy published a letter she's written to the foreign secretary — she's asking him to urgently step up the evacuation efforts from afghanistan on the basis of what mps are hearing across party lines. we are completely overwhelmed. for the last_ we are completely overwhelmed. for the last few days i have had cases pouring _ the last few days i have had cases pouring into my inbox, people approaching me directly but also labour_ approaching me directly but also labour mps and liberal democrat mps
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in britain _ labour mps and liberal democrat mps in britain who have been in touch too with— in britain who have been in touch too with faces two cases they are trying _ too with faces two cases they are trying to— too with faces two cases they are trying to escalate with the foreign office _ trying to escalate with the foreign office but cannot get an answer, the phones _ office but cannot get an answer, the phones are _ office but cannot get an answer, the phones are ringing and ringing and nobody— phones are ringing and ringing and nobody is — phones are ringing and ringing and nobody is responding and when they -et nobody is responding and when they get through, they find no system to escalate _ get through, they find no system to escalate the cases, in the last few minutes— escalate the cases, in the last few minutes i— escalate the cases, in the last few minutes i have had a friend approached me with a case of a family— approached me with a case of a family with young children eligible to get— family with young children eligible to get on— family with young children eligible to get on planes but they are in a mass _ to get on planes but they are in a mass of— to get on planes but they are in a mass of people outside kabul airport yards from _ mass of people outside kabul airport yards from the gate, the british military— yards from the gate, the british military are looking for them but cannot— military are looking for them but cannot find them. they can see the gates— cannot find them. they can see the gates but— cannot find them. they can see the gates but cannot get there, meanwhile shots are being fired, peopie _ meanwhile shots are being fired, people threatened with violence and they are _ people threatened with violence and they are terrified. what people threatened with violence and they are terrified.— they are terrified. what do you think and make _ they are terrified. what do you think and make a _ they are terrified. what do you think and make a difference? i they are terrified. what do you - think and make a difference? what sort of military policing, perhaps with allies, are you asking to be set up? with allies, are you asking to be set u? ~ with allies, are you asking to be set u - ? ~ ., with allies, are you asking to be set u? . ., ., with allies, are you asking to be setu? . set up? we are asking the government to work with — set up? we are asking the government to work with nato _ set up? we are asking the government to work with nato allies _ set up? we are asking the government
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to work with nato allies to _ set up? we are asking the government to work with nato allies to make - to work with nato allies to make sure there — to work with nato allies to make sure there is a security operation troth— sure there is a security operation both at— sure there is a security operation both at the — sure there is a security operation both at the airport and the barren hotel— both at the airport and the barren hotel where britain is processing the applications from eligible people. we are asking them to be more _ people. we are asking them to be more flexible about documentation, if you _ more flexible about documentation, if you carry— more flexible about documentation, if you carry the documentation showing — if you carry the documentation showing you have worked with all four the _ showing you have worked with all four the united kingdom and makes you a _ four the united kingdom and makes you a target for the taliban and particularly women are very afraid of doing _ particularly women are very afraid of doing that. we are asking the government to work with the united states— government to work with the united states to _ government to work with the united states to see a extend the agreement at the _ states to see a extend the agreement at the airport because it expires on august— at the airport because it expires on august the — at the airport because it expires on august the 31st and we will not have -ot august the 31st and we will not have got people out by then and control will revert — got people out by then and control will revert to the taliban. so a number— will revert to the taliban. so a number of— will revert to the taliban. so a number of things that we desperately want the _ number of things that we desperately want the government to step up effons— want the government to step up efforts or— want the government to step up efforts or lights will be lost. the 31st is efforts or lights will be lost. the list is the _ efforts or lights will be lost. tie: 31st is the deadline, efforts or lights will be lost. tt;e: 31st is the deadline, if efforts or lights will be lost. tt9 31st is the deadline, ifjoe biden says it is extended, could that make a difference? it says it is extended, could that make a difference?— a difference? it would make all the difference in _ a difference? it would make all the difference in the _ a difference? it would make all the difference in the world, _ a difference? it would make all the difference in the world, we - a difference? it would make all the difference in the world, we will. a difference? it would make all the difference in the world, we will notj
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difference in the world, we will not be able _ difference in the world, we will not be able to — difference in the world, we will not be able to get british citizens out and the _ be able to get british citizens out and the afghans who helped us by that deadline, we desperately need the united states to step up and support— the united states to step up and support us. in response to lisa nandy�*s letter, a spokesperson for the foreign, office said... with so many people now hoping to escape afghanistan, turkey has warned of a new wave of migration, and called on european countries to take responsibility. greece has also built a new 25—mile fence and surveillance system along its border with turkey. the greek government says it won't wait passively, for the possible impact of a refugee crisis, following the taliban takeover. a state of emergency has been declared in parts of new york state ahead of the forecast arrival of hurricane henri. new york's governor, andrew cuomo said he had spoken
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to president biden who agreed to the declaration, which will release funds before the hurricane makes landfall on sunday. mr cuomo said heavy rain, flooding and power cuts should be expected. the freelance journalist daphne tolis is in athens. iam going i am going to declare a state of emergency declaration for island, new york city, westchester, hudson valley and the capital district region. we are working with power companies, i have told them clearly and convincingly in my opinion that this is what we pay the power companies to do, to be ready. is. we have seen this movie before. we don't pay power companies to be ready to prepare powerful sunny days. we pay them to prepare power when it is hard and to recover
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quickly after a storm. meanwhile in mexico at least eight people have died after hurricane grace made landfall, causing severe flooding and mudslides. the category 3 hurricane produced maximum sustained winds of 125 miles per hour when it arrived in veracruz state in the early hours of the morning. the nearby river actopan burst its banks, and the storm also caused power cuts and brought down trees. the british government has rejected a call to issue ten—thousand temporary visas to eu workers — to tackle an estimated shortage of 75,000 lorry drivers in the wake f brexit. logistics uk — the trade body which represents freight businesses — says many restaurants and supermarkets are facing serious supply problems. but ministers say employers should invest in the domestic workforce — by offering higher wages rather than rely on foreign labour.
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alex veitch from logistics uk has been explaining the scale of the problem. it is serious and it's getting worse. we are making this call for 10,000 temporary visas for qualified, safe eu nationals to come back to the uk and tide us over for the peak christmas period, the build—up to which starts now, to give us time to catch up from the missed driving tests and to reskill and retrain uk nationals to take up the manyjobs available in our sector. we see that wages are rising. we are working hand in glove with the government on reskilling, on apprenticeships, on trying to get people into our sector where there are jobs available for people impacted by covid. the problem is that it has been very difficult to actually get a driving test over the past year. it is nobody�*s fault, it is due to covid restrictions at the dvsa, so we have a huge backlog of people waiting to take their test to become a truck driver,
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so we would like these 10,000 temporary visas. we think it is a reasonable ask. there are many other sectors where the government has done exactly that. the headlines on bbc news... crowds continue to gather outside kabul airport amid reports of chaotic scenes — as the us advises its citizens not to travel there until they are asked, because of security threats outside the gates. senior taliban figures — including the group's co—founder, mullah baradar — arrive in kabulfor talks about establishing a new unity government. let's get more on afghanistan. i'm joined now by nadene ghouri, author and journalist who has written extensively on afghanistan. she is part of an international coalition of people trying to help afghans flee from the taliban.
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nadene, tell us something about the group you are involved with, how it came into being to try to help people get out? came into being to try to help peeple get out?— people get out? (inaudible) we are struggling _ people get out? (inaudible) we are struggling with - people get out? (inaudible) we are struggling with your . people get out? (inaudible) - we are struggling with your sound, nadene, i think we will try to come back and get your sound. i am nadene, i think we will try to come back and get your sound. i am sorry about that- — back and get your sound. i am sorry about that. the _ back and get your sound. i am sorry about that. the group _ back and get your sound. i am sorry about that. the group is _ back and get your sound. i am sorry about that. the group is made - back and get your sound. i am sorry about that. the group is made up i back and get your sound. i am sorryj about that. the group is made up of anybody— about that. the group is made up of anybody who served or worked in afghanistan, soldiers, aid workers, diplomats, — afghanistan, soldiers, aid workers, diplomats, journalists, we have come together— diplomats, journalists, we have come together in— diplomats, journalists, we have come together in the last few weeks as we have scrambled to get intelligence from the _ have scrambled to get intelligence from the ground to find out who is under— from the ground to find out who is under the — from the ground to find out who is under the most immediate threat from the taliban, _ under the most immediate threat from the taliban, get names together, coitate _ the taliban, get names together, collate them and get those names over to _ collate them and get those names over to the relevant governments to id over to the relevant governments to go on _ over to the relevant governments to go on the _ over to the relevant governments to go on the evacuation list. but it staggers— go on the evacuation list. but it staggers me that those lists were not drawn — staggers me that those lists were not drawn up in advance, we knew who those _ not drawn up in advance, we knew who those most _ not drawn up in advance, we knew who those most vulnerable afghans would
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be so why— those most vulnerable afghans would be so why was it left up to volunteers? completely beyond me. some _ volunteers? completely beyond me. some of— volunteers? completely beyond me. some of the cases that have passed me this _ some of the cases that have passed me this week, female high court judges. — me this week, female high court judges, female afghan army cadets, members _ judges, female afghan army cadets, members of the afghan national sports _ members of the afghan national sports team, women, boys and girls, really— sports team, women, boys and girls, really high—profile cases we should have known were at risk and lots and lots of _ have known were at risk and lots and lots of afghan journalists. many are in hiding. _ lots of afghan journalists. many are in hiding, many are getting calls, there _ in hiding, many are getting calls, there is— in hiding, many are getting calls, there is a — in hiding, many are getting calls, there is a lot of fear, people are giving _ there is a lot of fear, people are giving up — there is a lot of fear, people are giving up on the evacuation effort, we are _ giving up on the evacuation effort, we are hearing today at the airport a woman— we are hearing today at the airport a woman with two children on one of the flightless two has been going for three — the flightless two has been going for three days, 15 hours a day with the kids— for three days, 15 hours a day with the kids in— for three days, 15 hours a day with the kids in that crush, i got a whatsapp from her and she said, "i cannot— whatsapp from her and she said, "i cannot do— whatsapp from her and she said, "i cannot do it — whatsapp from her and she said, "i cannot do it again, i am giving up, iam— cannot do it again, i am giving up, iam going— cannot do it again, i am giving up, i am going to die in that crowd." i had somebody this morning we have tried to _ had somebody this morning we have tried to get — had somebody this morning we have tried to get on a flight, he was told to— tried to get on a flight, he was told to go— tried to get on a flight, he was told to go to the airport but not
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which _ told to go to the airport but not which entrance gate, he has been running _ which entrance gate, he has been running around the airport all day and managed to get through the taiiban— and managed to get through the taliban checkpoints only to be turned — taliban checkpoints only to be turned away and not able to get in, he is _ turned away and not able to get in, he is still— turned away and not able to get in, he is still at — turned away and not able to get in, he is still at the airport and will try tuesday overnight. it is a shambles— try tuesday overnight. it is a shambles of an evacuation process. -- and _ shambles of an evacuation process. -- and he _ shambles of an evacuation process. —— and he will try to stay overnight. -- and he will try to stay overnight-— -- and he will try to stay overnight. -- and he will try to stay overniaht. ~ i. , , :, ,, :, -- and he will try to stay overniaht. ~ ,, :,~ :, , overnight. when you speak to people who sa i overnight. when you speak to people who say i cannot _ overnight. when you speak to people who say i cannot go _ overnight. when you speak to people who say i cannot go through - overnight. when you speak to people who say i cannot go through anotherl who say i cannot go through another day of that with the kids, what other options do they have if they are scared to go home?— other options do they have if they are scared to go home? where else could they go? _ are scared to go home? where else could they go? some _ are scared to go home? where else could they go? some people - are scared to go home? where else could they go? some people are . could they go? some people are talking _ could they go? some people are talking about fleeing into the mountains, the lady said she could not face _ mountains, the lady said she could not face it— mountains, the lady said she could not face it tomorrow, people are trying _ not face it tomorrow, people are trying to— not face it tomorrow, people are trying to persuade her that might be the best— trying to persuade her that might be the best thing to do but she described how the taliban were urinating — described how the taliban were urinating over herand described how the taliban were urinating over her and her children to try— urinating over her and her children to try to— urinating over her and her children to try to humiliate them, can you imagine — to try to humiliate them, can you imagine your terrified children, then— imagine your terrified children, then doing that? it urgently needs to be _ then doing that? it urgently needs to be sorted out because there is no piedge _ to be sorted out because there is no pledge running evacuation flights if peopie _ pledge running evacuation flights if people cannot get into the airport and to— people cannot get into the airport and to not—
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people cannot get into the airport and to not even tell people which entrance — and to not even tell people which entrance they need to go to is just crazy _ entrance they need to go to is just crazy at— entrance they need to go to is just crazy. at imc in a mood change, as i said, _ crazy. at imc in a mood change, as i said. lots— crazy. at imc in a mood change, as i said. lots of— crazy. at imc in a mood change, as i said, lots of people are losing faith— said, lots of people are losing faith in— said, lots of people are losing faith in the evacuation programme and personally i feel it is the final— and personally i feel it is the final heartbreak to tell somebody they wiii— final heartbreak to tell somebody they will be evacuated and they go to the _ they will be evacuated and they go to the airport thinking they will -et to the airport thinking they will get out — to the airport thinking they will get out -- _ to the airport thinking they will get out —— i am seeing any change. the person— get out —— i am seeing any change. the person i— get out —— i am seeing any change. the person i had been evacuated today— the person i had been evacuated today is— the person i had been evacuated today is under very serious threat, the taiiban— today is under very serious threat, the taliban have told him they will make _ the taliban have told him they will make an _ the taliban have told him they will make an example of him, he has done something _ make an example of him, he has done something they see as very own isiamic, — something they see as very own islamic, we had to get him out today, — islamic, we had to get him out today, so— islamic, we had to get him out today, so to think you will survive and then— today, so to think you will survive and then be — today, so to think you will survive and then be stuck in the airport because — and then be stuck in the airport because she did not know which gate to -o because she did not know which gate to go to _ because she did not know which gate to go to is _ because she did not know which gate to go to is beyond heartbreaking. | to go to is beyond heartbreaking. i can to go to is beyond heartbreaking. can hear to go to is beyond heartbreaking. i can hear your heart bleeding to go to is beyond heartbreaking. t can hear your heart bleeding when i am hearing about all the work you have done, thank you for taking the time to speak to us on bbc news, nadene ghouri. sport, and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre.
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good evening. we'll start with the day's football around europe and liverpool were comfortable 2—0 winners over burnley at anfield in the english premier league. jurgen klopp said he was particularly pleased to be playing in front of a crowd again at anfield for the first time since a champions league match in march 2020. goals from diogojota and sadio mane ensured liverpool made it two wins from two in the premier league so far this season. obviously we had some issues on a private basis during the week, we had to deal with that but the team did incredibly well, two games, six points, next week chelsea, quite a different game, let's keep going. premier league champions manchester city, put five goals past newly promoted norwich city. city had lost to tottenham on the opening weekend of the season but their 100 million pound man, jack grealish scored on his home debut as pep
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guardiola's side won 5—0. the important thing is the first victory, that is most important. after he scored, he arrived, sooner or later we will get the final third and more aggressive to score a goal, notjust and more aggressive to score a goal, not just looking and more aggressive to score a goal, notjust looking to assist, though in that, but it is just two weeks. it was good today, his first day with us. the day's other results, there was a fabulously acrobatic volley from danny ings on his debut for aston villa as they beat newcastle 2—0. patrick viera's first home game in charge of crystal palace finished 0—0 against brentford. there was an entertaining first game in 17 years with a full stadium in the premier league at elland road which ended in a 2—2 draw between leeds and everton. and in the late game brighton beat watford 2—0, for their best ever start
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to a premier league season. on to italy, and it's the first day of the season in serie a. champions inter milan beat genoa 4—0, a winning start for new coach simone inzaghi. inter were 2—0 up within half an hour and finished with four goals without reply. sassuolo beat hellas verona 3—2. while in the later games, lazio are 3—1 up against empoli with around 15 minutes left and atalanta have a 1—0 lead over torino with around 20 minutes to go. borussia dortmund suffered their first defeat of the new season as they were beaten 2—1 by frieburg. vincenzo grifo opened the scoring in the sixth minute. roland sallai got their second. wolfsburg secured their second win, a 2—1victory over hertha berlin. and bayer leverkusen finished 4—0 up against borussia moenchengladbach — all the bundesliga results are on your screen. and in spain, barcelona are taking
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on athletic bilbao in the late game which kicked off around 20 minutes ago — it's their first away match since lionel messi left. the current score is 0—0. mallorca beat alavez 1—0 while the two other games ended in a draw. and at the aig women's open in carnoustie there has been plenty of movement on the leaderboard throughout day three — there were eight different leaders during the third round but one of the stand out golfers was scottish amateur louise duncan, with a four—under par round of 68 which moves the 21 year old to just two shots off the lead. former major champions anna nordquist of sweden and denmark's nanna koerstz madsen both impressed today and they are the join leaders going into the final round on sunday. it is great, obviously want to be
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there, i need to see if i can, my nerves and remember i am playing good golf right now. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in sportsday at half past ten. now, losing a sense of smell is one of the most common symptoms of covid—19. for many it's a big nusiance but for a food critic, it can be devastating. that's what happened to michele crippa, a gastronome and "super taster" in italy. we can speak to michele now from milan. thank you for being with us on bbc news, what suddenly happened to you last march? :, ~ news, what suddenly happened to you last march? :, ,, , :, news, what suddenly happened to you last march? :, ,, i. . :,, last march? thank you. well, last march i last march? thank you. well, last march i think— last march? thank you. well, last march i think that _ last march? thank you. well, last march i think that our _ last march? thank you. well, last march i think that our life - last march? thank you. well, last march i think that our life was - march i think that our life was completely changed. personally, mine changed on march the 17th. we were in total lockdown in italy and that night, the night before i had a slight fever, the morning after at
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9:40 ami was settled down for breakfast and i was pouring in my cup of espresso, instead of coffee i only tasted hot water, not perfumed, not toasted. i understood i had contracted the coronavirus. i not toasted. i understood i had contracted the coronavirus. i know that lasted — contracted the coronavirus. i know that lasted for _ contracted the coronavirus. i know that lasted for months _ contracted the coronavirus. i know that lasted for months and - contracted the coronavirus. i know. that lasted for months and months, so what sort of things would you normally do that you could not? the most normally do that you could not? t“t9 most incredible thing, after 16 months i still have problems with my senses. at first i had the total loss of the ability to perceive perfumes, but nowadays i still have this problem because i was finding
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things repulsive that would normally be pleasant, such as lemon zest, so it is completely affecting my professional life, and even my skin or the skin of my fiance is different. or the skin of my fiance is different-— or the skin of my fiance is different. , :, ,:, :, , :, or the skin of my fiance is different. , :, :, , :, :, different. tell us about how you are retrainin: different. tell us about how you are retraining yourself _ different. tell us about how you are retraining yourself to _ different. tell us about how you are retraining yourself to get _ different. tell us about how you are retraining yourself to get your - retraining yourself to get your senses back? i retraining yourself to get your senses back?— retraining yourself to get your senses back? :, , :, :, , senses back? i really want to help others, (inaudible) _ others, (inaudible) . together we created and developed precise olfactory training to recover the lost sense. we have a
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sensory kit containing 20 small bottles, we have the most popular essences for the italian population like lemon, mushrooms, coffee and the like. , :, :, :, the like. sorry, i am running out of time but i — the like. sorry, i am running out of time but i want _ the like. sorry, i am running out of time but i want to _ the like. sorry, i am running out of time but i want to let _ the like. sorry, i am running out of time but i want to let our - the like. sorry, i am running out of time but i want to let our viewers l time but i want to let our viewers know, you are helping others with the same problem?— the same problem? yes, we have olfactory classes, _ the same problem? yes, we have olfactory classes, training - the same problem? yes, we have olfactory classes, training them i the same problem? yes, we have| olfactory classes, training them to regain their smell using these olfactory training kits to reconnect their memories, because the memory is not affected. we should start to smell again, is not affected. we should start to smellagain, be is not affected. we should start to smell again, be reconnected with memory. this is a way to at least try to solve the problem.- memory. this is a way to at least try to solve the problem. thank you so much for— try to solve the problem. thank you so much forjoining _ try to solve the problem. thank you so much forjoining us _ try to solve the problem. thank you so much forjoining us and - try to solve the problem. thank you so much forjoining us and good - try to solve the problem. thank you | so much forjoining us and good luck with your continued recovery, michele crippa. the government has announced plans to tighten rules
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on the importation of dogs into the uk, in response to a rise in puppy smuggling. lebo diseko has the story. hundreds of puppies brought into the country illegally are intercepted each year. the numberfound not to have met the uk's pet import rules more than doubling between 2019 and 2020 alone. many have health problems and had not been checked by certified vets. an increase too in the number with docked tails and cropped ears, more than 600% in the last five years. the government is proposing new rules for puppy welfare standards, including raising the minimum age at which they can be imported from 15 weeks from six months, a ban on importing heavily pregnant dogs and a ban on importing dogs with cropped ears or docked tails. when it comes to ear cropping unfortunately we have seen increased demand for dogs with cropped ears, and apparent mutilation which causes nothing but pain and has no medical benefit, it is done purely for
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looks. we have seen increasing their use in the media, by social media influencers and celebrities which has led to an increase in demand in the public. animal welfare campaigners have welcomed a consultation, saying it could bring it significant progress against the fight against such practices. it is hoped these proposals will lead to new rules, ending what has been called to a grim trade, and preventing cruelty. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello. saturday saw quite a large amount of cloud sitting across the uk. bearing heavy rain for some. quite a contrast, then, for sunday as we look to sunnier skies and a loss of dry weather as well. the reason for the change,
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we move an area of low pressure away to the east of the uk, it pushes into the continent and that will allow for high pressure to build from the south—west and that high pressure looks set to continue building through sunday into monday and then really establish across the uk for the week ahead. some of the rain we see through the remainder of the night could be some of the heaviest we see now for a good few days in some parts of the uk. there will be some heavy showers into the small hours across northern and eastern england but for the majority it becomes dry, a little misty and merck in places with lows of 13—15 c. —— a little misty and murky. sunday, the low quite slow to make its way into the continent, will see some showers and a bit more cloud into eastern england through the course of the day. much more sunshine on offer across the board and with just light winds, we will feel a bit warmer
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but there will be isolated showers developing and we will see them quite slow moving because that will not be much wind so some areas could have quite big downpours through sunday afternoon but those will be in the minority. overall sunday in much drier, brighter day. take a little look into the midlands and northern england through sunday afternoon where you can see some areas that are perhaps favoured, some of the more persistent showers and some on the far south—east of england, too. but the high pressure really does take over as we look to monday and that will suppress activity in the atmosphere, perhaps a little bit more cloud drifting across the south—east of england on a breeze off the north sea from time to time, squeezing some rain out of that but it's most unlikely with monday a day i think of dry weather, light winds and some long spells of sunshine. temperatures getting closer to average for the time of year, still a couple degrees down across southern england. through the week ahead, though, that high very keen to sit in place,
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some fine weather in the outlook, reasonable temperatures, just a chance of some northerly wind across eastern counties later in the week, calling things a little. —— cooling things a little.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... crowds continue to gather outside kabul airport, amid reports of chaotic scenes — as the us advises its citizens not to travel there until they are asked, because of security threats outside the gates. senior taliban figures — including the group's co—founder, mullah baradar — are in kabulfor talks about establishing a new government. greece has erected a 25 mile fence on its border with turkey amid warnings of many afghan civillians fleeing their country. there have been clashes between australian police and anti—lockdown demonstrators in sydney and melbourne.

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