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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 21, 2021 10:30pm-11:00pm BST

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21. 21a perhaps in 26 perhaps in glasgow, parts of. 26 perhaps in glasgow, that would feel pleasantly warm. for the forecast for the rest of the week, staying dry, temperatures staying into the low 20s but may be a tendency for it to turn more clarity across the north and east of scotland and eastern england towards the end of the week —— to turn more cloudy.
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hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment but first the headlines. crowds continue to gather outside kabul airport, amid reports of chaotic scenes — as the us advises its citizens not to travel there until they are asked, because of security threats. senior taliban figures — including the group's co—founder, mullah baradar — are in kabulfor talks about establishing a new government. greece has erected a 25 mile fence on its border with turkey amid warnings of many afghan civillians fleeing their country. there have been clashes between australian police and anti—lockdown demonstrators in sydney and melbourne. animal welfare campaigners have welcomed new government proposals to stop puppy smuggling.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the the social commentatorjoanna jargue and the whitehall editor of the financial time, sebastian payne. first, let me bring you up—to—date with some of sunday's first pages. the independent reports on the deaths of four women in a crush at kabul airport, as crowds continue to gather in an attempt to be evacuated. the observer leads on warnings from the un that there could be widespread hunger, homelessness and economic collapse unless aid agreements are made. the sunday telegraph's front page story looks at criticism from former prime minister tony blair, who sent british troops into afghanistan 20 years ago. he says the uk has a "moral obligation" to stay until everyone who needs to leave the country has been evacuated. the sunday mirror also features those comments from mr blair, who added president biden�*s withdrawal from the country was "imbecilic".
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meanwhile, the sunday express features comments from the armed forces minister, who says british veterans who served in afghanistan should be proud of what they accomplished, despite the situation in kabul. so let's begin... let's start with the telegraph. joanna, do you want to kick us off tonight? blairslams joanna, do you want to kick us off tonight? blair slams beiden�*s imbecilic retreat. tonight? blair slams beiden's imbecilic retreat.— tonight? blair slams beiden's imbecilic retreat. tony blair has broken his _ imbecilic retreat. tony blair has broken his silence _ imbecilic retreat. tony blair has broken his silence about - imbecilic retreat. tony blair has broken his silence about the - broken his silence about the withdrawal from afghanistan by us trwps, _ withdrawal from afghanistan by us troops, which obviously there been a lot of— troops, which obviously there been a lot of criticism about that with the tastiness — lot of criticism about that with the tastiness. with the way that biden has withdrawn. in a way, i think for most _ has withdrawn. in a way, i think for most people — has withdrawn. in a way, i think for most people who even look at the headlines— most people who even look at the headlines that tony blair has commented on this, knowing the history— commented on this, knowing the history with him over 20 years ago, knowing _ history with him over 20 years ago, knowing that he was the one that actually _ knowing that he was the one that actually took us into afghanistan, i think_ actually took us into afghanistan, i think there — actually took us into afghanistan, i think there will be mixed feelings about_ think there will be mixed feelings about this. it's a bit like, for example. _ about this. it's a bit like, for example, when david cameron has anything _ example, when david cameron has anything to— example, when david cameron has anything to say with brexit.
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obviously he has credible comments but people will feel slightly sensitive to acknowledge anything that tony — sensitive to acknowledge anything that tony blair wanted to say in this regard. i mean, it'sjustified to say— this regard. i mean, it'sjustified to saythat— this regard. i mean, it'sjustified to say that it was hasty obviously to say that it was hasty obviously to withdraw from afghanistan. however, i think that tony blair himself— however, i think that tony blair himself is— however, i think that tony blair himself is putting himself in a standing _ himself is putting himself in a standing for quite a lot of criticism _ standing for quite a lot of criticism as well, with people remembering his legacy with this whole _ remembering his legacy with this whole ordeal.— remembering his legacy with this whole ordeal. . , , v , whole ordeal. sebastien, picking up with what joanna _ whole ordeal. sebastien, picking up with what joanna was _ whole ordeal. sebastien, picking up with what joanna was saying, - whole ordeal. sebastien, picking up with what joanna was saying, tony l with whatjoanna was saying, tony blair has learnt the hard way as it were to be judicious with his comments on matters relating to the fight against islamist terrorism, because of course the controversy over whether the iraq war was started for the wrong reason and the rest of it. given the political consensus about going on back then, does he have a bit more credibility on this in terms of political voices in today's generation in
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westminster?— in today's generation in westminster? �*, ~ , ., , westminster? it's key to remember the difference _ westminster? it's key to remember the difference between _ westminster? it's key to remember the difference between the - westminster? it's key to remember the difference between the two. - westminster? it's key to remember i the difference between the two. when western forces invaded afghanistan it was through a nato alliance, a very different situation to iraq. i think when you look at why we originally went into afghanistan it was to deal with a very specific security threat, which was al-qaeda and osama bin laden following the 9/11 attacks. i think it's important to differentiate those two things because we have been through the chilcott enquiry which gave us large detail about all the right and wrongs of what happened with iraq. i think the interesting thing about this intervention by tony blair is that he has been quite silent this week but his institute has produced many papers on covid, and everyone has been saying when is blair going to say something. here is your answer. you can't fault him for not getting attention using language describing imbecilic the withdrawal from afghanistan. i think it is
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worth listening to this, because if you look at what he is saying it reflects the views of many in westminster, many mps, who within boris johnson's westminster, many mps, who within borisjohnson's government. i think really we know from the whole of last week that the uk did not want to withdraw, nor did many other nato allies. but the fact is, our hand was forced by america, that when america does eventually pull out its troops, which we expect to happen in the next week, the uk will have no choice because at that point security at kabul airport cannot be secured. so i think it's a bit early to play a plain girl, —— secured. so i think it's a bit early to playa plain girl, —— blame secured. so i think it's a bit early to play a plain girl, —— blame game. president biden has been incredibly robust in his press conferences. i think what blair says reflects many are feeling about this issue. what
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are feeling about this issue. what do ou are feeling about this issue. what do you make _ are feeling about this issue. what do you make of — are feeling about this issue. what do you make of blair _ are feeling about this issue. what do you make of blair 's _ are feeling about this issue. what do you make of blair 's comments? do you make of blair �*s comments? because very tangible demonstration of the west is not in a changing retreat? i of the west is not in a changing retreat? ., of the west is not in a changing retreat? . ., , �* ., ., retreat? i mean, with tony blair and the comments _ retreat? i mean, with tony blair and the comments he _ retreat? i mean, with tony blair and the comments he has _ retreat? i mean, with tony blair and the comments he has been - retreat? i mean, with tony blair and the comments he has been making i j the comments he has been making i think he _ the comments he has been making i think he has— the comments he has been making i think he has been using quite a lot of emotive — think he has been using quite a lot of emotive language that if he had been in _ of emotive language that if he had been in borisjohnson's position right— been in borisjohnson's position right now. — been in borisjohnson's position right now, he is obviously in such a comfortable — right now, he is obviously in such a comfortable position having been a former— comfortable position having been a former prime minister, and i think we see _ former prime minister, and i think we see that — former prime minister, and i think we see that a lot with theresa may as well, _ we see that a lot with theresa may as well, with some of her comments on prime _ as well, with some of her comments on prime minister's questions and parliament— on prime minister's questions and parliament this week. i think it's a very comfortable position for him to be in, _ very comfortable position for him to be in, whether it'sjustified or not _ be in, whether it'sjustified or not it's— be in, whether it'sjustified or not. it's debatable. but i think that he — not. it's debatable. but i think that he has built up a reputation now of— that he has built up a reputation now of making comments in a sense from _ now of making comments in a sense from the _ now of making comments in a sense from the outside of things without reallym _ from the outside of things without really... with the assurance really
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that he _ really... with the assurance really that he doesn't have to face any of the repercussions in that sense. sebastien. — the repercussions in that sense. sebastien, one of the things it is on the front of the telegraph as the very disturbing picture of a young woman with blood running from her mouth who is being held by i think american soldiers. we have the pictures as well of people desperately trying to pick apart barbed wire and also stop themselves being crushed against a concrete slab on front of the independent. the fear is a sense of powerless less about this in whitehall, that this could all end really, really badly. this could all end really, really badl . ., ., ., y this could all end really, really badl . ., ., ., , ., badly. indeed, and do not try to make the situation _ badly. indeed, and do not try to make the situation even - badly. indeed, and do not try to make the situation even worse. | badly. indeed, and do not try to - make the situation even worse. but i have a feeling it might do in the next week because when the us troops to finally pull out from kabul, which we expect by the end of august but there are some reports in tomorrow's papers it could be as soon as tuesday, when that happens the uk will have no choice to leave. it doesn't matter how many people we got out, whether we've got out
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everybody or nearly everybody, that is it, it is a very clear line because the uk on its own cannot hold the security of kabul airport, and then we face the terrible situation of hundreds if not thousands of afghan nationals who have helped britain over the past 20 years being trapped in afghanistan, raising a new taliban regime that we know very little about. a report on the front pages about their actions, about knocking door to door looking for people who worked with western forces. they have tried to present themselves as this new caliban 2.0, or modernising force. but the fact is wejust or modernising force. but the fact is we just really don't know here. to return to mr blair's intervention, i think the point that everyone will view what he has to say thru a lens here, but in british politics at the moment we are thoroughly lacking an elder statesman. in parliament, we only have one former prime minister, gordon brown, david cameron, they
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are not in parliament, and i think it's a good thing that tony blair is speaking out in still being involved in the public debate here, because a lot of the politicians involved in the moment were not in parliament when this intervention happened, so i think having some grey hairs involved in this definitely helps a better debate.— involved in this definitely helps a better debate. ,, , ., , , better debate. sebastien, to pick up on that, better debate. sebastien, to pick up on that. since _ better debate. sebastien, to pick up on that, since you _ better debate. sebastien, to pick up on that, since you mentioned - better debate. sebastien, to pick up on that, since you mentioned it, - on that, since you mentioned it, there are quite a lot of noise in there are quite a lot of noise in the saturday papers suggesting an unease about dominic brah's roll at the foreign office among tory mps. the night before, saying that the government was overdue a reshuffle, and that this these events and covid had demonstrated a lack of depth among senior ministers. is that you just among the overlooked and the dispossessed, as it were, on the backbenches, are you picking it up more widely on the conservative side? i more widely on the conservative side? ~' ., more widely on the conservative side? ~ ., ., .., more widely on the conservative side? ~ ., ., ., side? i think no one can look at this government _ side? i think no one can look at this government and _ side? i think no one can look at this government and think- side? i think no one can look at this government and think it i side? i think no one can look at. this government and think it needs side? i think no one can look at - this government and think it needs a bit of a rejig at the top team, and even people within downing street
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all acknowledge that. i think boris johnson in private acknowledges that too. reshuffles are a very messy business that create enemies, you annoy people, and that is the two things that borisjohnson doesn't like doing. it has been put off several times. there was talk in my department at the end ofjuly but borisjohnson's sajid javid and boris johnson's sajid javid and rishi borisjohnson's sajid javid and rishi sunak were all penned at that point. there is no way you can do a reshuffle via zoom. i have heard that it may happen after the cop26 climate summit because borisjohnson will need to... quite a long time away. i do wonder whether the whole kerfuffle about this crisis will bring that reshuffle forward. my general consent on mr raab is that he is not necessarily going to go anywhere right now. the sunday times reports that it was borisjohnson who allowed him to stay on holiday
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for another couple of days. when it comes to another reshuffle, it might expedite his move to another department. expedite his move to another department-— expedite his move to another department. thank you for that insiaht. department. thank you for that insight. joanna, _ department. thank you for that insight. joanna, do _ department. thank you for that insight. joanna, do you - department. thank you for that insight. joanna, do you want i department. thank you for that insight. joanna, do you want to j department. thank you for that - insight. joanna, do you want to take us onto the sunday people? this is a heartening story, really, given the general tone of coverage of immigration we normally get. yeah, a record number— immigration we normally get. yeah, a record number of _ immigration we normally get. yeah, a record number of brits _ immigration we normally get. yeah, a record number of brits are _ immigration we normally get. yeah, a record number of brits are offered - record number of brits are offered rooms— record number of brits are offered rooms to — record number of brits are offered rooms to afghans, and actually, earlier— rooms to afghans, and actually, earlier on— rooms to afghans, and actually, earlier on this week, i saw a gentleman on twitter actually tweet from wakefield, where i'm from, that he had _ from wakefield, where i'm from, that he had contacted wakefield council and offered a spare room. he was a pensionen — and offered a spare room. he was a pensioner. and i think it really shows— pensioner. and i think it really shows the _ pensioner. and i think it really shows the mood of the country at the moment— shows the mood of the country at the moment when it comes to refugees coming _ moment when it comes to refugees coming from afghanistan. i think this is— coming from afghanistan. i think this is a — coming from afghanistan. i think this is a story that we have all been — this is a story that we have all been a — this is a story that we have all been a part of, it has all been a part— been a part of, it has all been a part of— been a part of, it has all been a part of our— been a part of, it has all been a part of our homes, some people have had to— part of our homes, some people have had to service people within their families— had to service people within their families and they are very much... it
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families and they are very much... it doesn't — families and they are very much... it doesn't feel as if it is a humanitarian disaster that is very much _ humanitarian disaster that is very much removed from the fabric of our country— much removed from the fabric of our country and — much removed from the fabric of our country and our story. so it's no surprise — country and our story. so it's no surprise to— country and our story. so it's no surprise to me that there has been a record _ surprise to me that there has been a record number of donations. i know there _ record number of donations. i know there is— record number of donations. i know there is a _ record number of donations. i know there is a charity in manchester who have had _ there is a charity in manchester who have had massive donations of clothes — have had massive donations of clothes. obviously it even more amazing — clothes. obviously it even more amazing that people are willing to welcome — amazing that people are willing to welcome these refugees into their homes _ welcome these refugees into their homes from afghanistan. | welcome these refugees into their homes from afghanistan. i assume there's quite _ homes from afghanistan. i assume there's quite a _ homes from afghanistan. i assume there's quite a lot _ homes from afghanistan. i assume there's quite a lot more _ homes from afghanistan. i assume there's quite a lot more detail- homes from afghanistan. i assume there's quite a lot more detail on l there's quite a lot more detail on page five, which don't yet have. sebastien, that leads quite neatly with the sunday express. it kind picks upjoanna's point. perhaps a lot of us that have no direct connection with the services forget the numbers of men and women who have served in afghanistan over the 20 years. forgive me, say that
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again. 20 years. forgive me, say that aaain. , ., ., again. yes, no, i agree with you, and i again. yes, no, i agree with you, and i think— again. yes, no, i agree with you, and i think there's _ again. yes, no, i agree with you, and i think there's been - again. yes, no, i agree with you, and i think there's been a - again. yes, no, i agree with you, and i think there's been a lot - again. yes, no, i agree with you, and i think there's been a lot of. and i think there's been a lot of debate this week, and there will be for many years to come, about whether this was a waste of time, whether this was a waste of time, whether thousands of people have sadly lost their lives, billions of pounds have been spent, and if we are simply going back to a taliban regime, is there any point to it? and i think when you look at the comments by the veterans minister on the front page, look at the games that were made in terms of rights and freedoms given to women in afghanistan that didn't exist before, and it is really difficult debate. i think we will have to see where the country ends up, how it interacts, and ultimately is it going to be a source of terror problems for the rest of the world? because fundamentally that was the reason the rest of the countries got involved in the first place. in terms of the number of people have served out there, it means a lot of people feel a direct connection to
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that country which wouldn't have been the case before, and therefore that might explain this wave of... contribute to this wave of sympathy towards the afghan people. totally, and i think towards the afghan people. totally, and | thinkthis — towards the afghan people. totally, and i think this was _ towards the afghan people. totally, and i think this was symbolised - towards the afghan people. totally, and i think this was symbolised in l and i think this was symbolised in the house of commons this week where you saw several former soldiers who served in the conflict all roughly around the same time, danjervis, johnny mercer, they spoke with a kind of passion i haven't seen any house of commons in over a decade. people spoke really from their heart about the sites they had seen, the plight of the afghan people, and i think rory stewart, we get a big figure in british public life he was a public connection with that. that is really a symbol of why people feel so sorry about this whole thing and decide where this is ended. and maybe presidentjoe biden was right, that leaving was always going to be difficult and pulling off a plaster from a very sore wound, but when you
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look at this, there is no way you can feel a big sadness and we have to just hope that it turns out the best for the people of afghanistan who have been through so much in their lifetimes.— their lifetimes. joanna, let's end on the sunday — their lifetimes. joanna, let's end on the sunday times _ their lifetimes. joanna, let's end on the sunday times and - their lifetimes. joanna, let's end on the sunday times and this . on the sunday times and this wonderful photograph in many ways. i wonderful photograph in many ways. i wonder how many men and women have done that over the past 20 years, british or other international trips. just posing and getting a bit of air after another exhausting tour of air after another exhausting tour of duty. of air after another exhausting tour of du . , ., of air after another exhausting tour of du . , . ., , of duty. yes, i mean, the images from this week, _ of duty. yes, i mean, the images from this week, from _ of duty. yes, i mean, the images | from this week, from afghanistan, have been— from this week, from afghanistan, have been both devastating... when we saw— have been both devastating... when we saw earlier in the week women putting _ we saw earlier in the week women putting their children over the fence — putting their children over the fence to— putting their children over the fence to soldiers, but also there have _ fence to soldiers, but also there have been— fence to soldiers, but also there have been some quite heart—warming, if we can— have been some quite heart—warming, if we can even call them that, images — if we can even call them that, images from soldiers just if we can even call them that, images from soldiersjust reminding that usually the image of soldiers and a _ that usually the image of soldiers and a war—torn environment is very much _ and a war—torn environment is very
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much distressing... and a war-torn environment is very much distressing. . ._ much distressing... sorry to interruot- — much distressing... sorry to interrupt. suddenly - much distressing... sorry to interrupt. suddenly they - much distressing... sorry to l interrupt. suddenly they have much distressing... sorry to - interrupt. suddenly they have become aid workers and nurses and all the rest of it. thank you so much, joanna and sebastien. they will be back with all the front pages. we will have a theme or by 11:30pm. coming up next, its click. i will be back at 11. jump on in.
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thank you. so you're not using the steering wheel at all? you're using a... oh, wow! laughter which way are we going? which way are we going! i'm at nasa in houston, where lucienjunkin is taking me for a spin. using both a steering wheel and a joystick, you can point this vehicle in one direction and drive it in another. you feel the forces in your tailbone. oh, i can feel the forces in my tailbone! laughter and if that seems really confusing, well, it is. but this is drive—by—wire technology, which means the onboard computer works out which way you want to go, and then calculates what to do with the wheels. all right, so, we'll just go this way...
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this is just one of many experiments into how we might live, work and drive on the moon or mars. although this vehicle may also pave the way for smarter cars in smarter cities back down here on earth, where i have to say, parking may be one of the coolest things you get to do. no way! come on, man. but before we start driving around celestial bodies, we need to get there first. in the days of the moon landings, only two competing countries were locked in battle, driving space exploration forward. now, in the race back to space, the power�*s shifting. china's chang'e—6 probe was the first spacecraft to land on the far side
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of the moon. and europe, india and japan are all pushing forward with their own space programs. back in the us, nasa plans to get back to the moon by 2026, but now it has competition from private individuals — an idea that would have been laughable 50 years ago. rival billionaires elon musk, founder of spacex, and jeff bezos, who owns blue origin, are racing to populate the moon and mars. but what kind of person would actually be on these spacecraft? the first people to go to mars will be risk—taking adventurers accepting that they may have one—way tickets or have a small chance of return, and they will be probably financed or sponsored by one of these private companies. at nasa, we discovered a little—known department where these risk—taking adventurers live.
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right now, there are four astronauts inside a spacecraft on a mission to phobos, one of mars' two moons. whispers: but they're actually in there. yes, in this tiny habitat, volunteers are locked away for 65 days on a simulated mission, with cameras and scientists monitoring their every move. this is nasa's human exploration research analog — hera for short. inside the module, the crew is poked and prodded
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in different psychological experiments, from sleep deprivation to diminished privacy, all to fine—tune a critical component that could make or break any future mission to mars — the humans inside the spacecraft. the primary purpose of hera is to learn about the effects of isolation and confinement on people. so a lot of the studies that we do are behavioural or psychological in nature, looking at the type of isolation from people. so you're really only talking to or in contact with the other crew members that are in the vehicle with you or mission control that's supporting you. yeah, astronauts on future missions to mars have more to worry about than the toxic soil, the deadly atmosphere and high levels of radiation. they also have to worry about each other. and it's hard to say which of these would be
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more likely to result in someone's death. and it's consistent, low—level stress over time. little things start to grate on you because the stress kind of heightens how you react to the things around you. so the sound of somebody chewing the cereal next to you might be fine at first. and then, 65 days later, you really, really don't like that sound. even for an astronaut, the psychological demands of a journey to mars will be extraordinary. the spacecraft will only be the size of a small flat, and the round—trip will take almost three years. add in four different personalities cooped up together and you may run into some problems. and with a range of characters needed, you never know who you could end up with.
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mission as closely as possible. and nasa's scientists throw in lots of elements to try and ensure that the volunteers forget that they're actually part of an experiment. if mcc talks to the crew, they ask a question, it takes five minutes to get to the crew, and then they answer, it takes five minutes to get back. so a ten—minute round—trip for a question and answer. so the whole idea of creating a mission scenario, you're going to phobos and you're,
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you know, you're going to do an eva, you're going to pilot a small spacecraft to the surface. you know, all that keeps them really excited and engaged in the simulation. the goal here is notjust to study the effects of isolation and confinement, but also to work out how to put together the perfect team for extreme space travel. it's all about the mix. and that's one of the things that we're looking at, is what is that right mix? or given the particular mix of people, you know, you have, let's say, one strong personality and three less strong personalities, what would we expect that to play out like? so what kind of roles do you need to have a successful team for a space mission? and they were looking notjust at the functional roles, you know, a commander ora medic, an engineer, but they're also looking at the social roles and found that those were just as, if not more important for those long—duration missions — having somebody that's providing humour or entertainment for the crew, that's way more important.
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and it won'tjust be down to humans to decide what the right social mix would be. masses of data is generated from these experiments, making successful social interactions quantifiable. one of the research studies that's actually going on is looking at a way to get a little bit ahead of the personality problem by developing an algorithm where you can take the background information on an individual�*s personality tests, that sort of information, plug it into the system, and based on the characteristics of all the people that you're putting in that team, figure out how they're going to work together, whether it's the right mix of people. unlike these potential martian voyages, we may think that three years in isolation is a bit bonkers. however, from jeff bezos to buzz aldrin, many are dreaming of trips to, and even living on, the red planet. but lord martin rees, britain's astronomer royal,
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doesn't actually think that most of us are suited to space. nowhere in the solar system anywhere is as comfortable as the top of everest or the south pole. and so that's why i think the idea of mass emigration is a bit crazy. we have to bear in mind that space is not a place for human beings, except for adventurers, the kind of people who do go to the south pole and top of everest. what do the hera crew think about the experiment? well, we caught up with them, unsurprisingly out in the fresh air, shortly after they left the habitat. you know, we're all very similar. if we had one very extroverted person, maybe a strong personality that was slightly different than the group, that might have negatively affected the outcome. if you put four extroverts in there together, they're going to drive each other crazy eventually. maybe four introverts aren't going to be able to come together as a team as much, because they're more
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inwardly focused. you want a good blend of people who are adaptable to not only the situation, but to each other�*s personalities. you have a mission to mars. the goal is so huge that you're extremely motivated. - i mean, the aim of the analog is to be one step closer- to put humans on mars. i can barely imagine - being in such a situation. your motivation is so huge, i think that even you can i overcome anything. i'm afraid that's all we have time for in the short version of click. if you have any comments on this fascinating journey, we would love to hear from you. fascinating journey, we would love to hearfrom you. we are on fascinating journey, we would love to hear from you. we are on social media, youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter. thank you for watching. we will see you soon.
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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. gunfire us troops fire smoke tear gas in kabul to try to push back thousands desperate to escape the taliban. translation: we have a legal visa. many people who are coming here don't have the right documents, but we have the visa and they won't let us through. senior taliban figures — including the group's co—founder, mullah baradar — are in the afghan capital for talks about establishing a new government. a state of emergency has been declared in parts of new york state ahead of the forecast arrival of hurricane henri. anti—lockdown protests in australia turn ugly. more than 200 are arrested.

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