Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 22, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

1:00 am
this is bbc news — i'm reged ahmad with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. desperate to escape, us troops fire tear gas in kabul to try to push back thousands trying to flee the taliban. translation: we've got a legal visa. - many people who are coming here don't have the right documents, but we've got the visa and they won't let us through. senior taliban figures — including the group's co—founder, mullah baradar — are in the afghan capital for talks about establishing a new government. britain's former prime minister, tony blair, who sent troops into afghanistan 20 years ago, says the uk has a moral obligation to stay until those who wish to leave — have escaped. the greek government builds a a0 kilometre fence on its border with turkey over concerns there'll be a surge in afghans seeking asylum.
1:01 am
and a state of emergency is declared in parts of new york state ahead of the forecast arrival of hurricane henri. hello and welcome to the programme. "don't go to kabul airport." that's what americans hoping to leave afghanistan have been advised — unless instructed to do so. the state department said it wanted to avoid creating large crowds — and us defence officials have expressed concern about the possibility of attacks by islamic state militants. a week after the taliban seized power, their co—founder, mullah abdul ghani baradar, is in the capital for talks on forming a new government. our security correspondent, frank gardner reports. crowds, chaos, confusion. the scene at kabul airport
1:02 am
grows ever more volatile as thousands of afghans clamour to leave the country. gunfire. taliban fighters are guarding the outside of the perimeter, but even some people with valid travel documents are not getting through. translation: we've got a legal visa. - many people who are coming here don't have the right documents, but we've got the visa and they won't let us through. britain's ambassador, sir laurie bristow, has been helping to process applications. he says the evacuation is the biggest challenge he's ever faced. but a pentagon briefing said the taliban had so far not prevented the evacuation. we've had no hostile interactions, no attack and no threat by the taliban. we remain vigilant. we have also not experienced any additional security incidents. elsewhere in kabul, normal life is slowly returning, but banks have been shut
1:03 am
and cash machines empty. there have also been reports of hospitals struggling without enough women turning up for work. taliban fighters, so long part of a violent insurgency, are in control, seen everywhere on the streets. the group's co—founder and political chief, mullah abdul ghani baradar, has arrived in kabul. he is expected to form part of the new taliban—dominated government. he spent the last few years leading the taliban delegation at peace talks with the us in qatar. the taliban don't yet control the entire country. the panjshir valley, north of kabul, is once more a centre of resistance to their rule. anti—taliban forces claim to have retaken three districts in the north. back at the airport, time is running out for the evacuation. once it ends and the world's attention shifts elsewhere, many fear that life under the taliban is going to get a lot harder.
1:04 am
frank gardner, bbc news. our correspondent, secunder kermani is in kabul has been speaking to the afghans who hope to be evacuated. he says the situation at the airport still seems extremely tense. well, it's still very chaotic. i was speaking earlier to one young afghan whose father worked for the american embassy for 20 years, they had been told to go to the airport to be evacuated, tried for two days straight, but they have simply given up, they've decided at the situation at the airport is even more dangerous than the prospect of life under taliban rule. we're also getting reports tonight in the us media that there are concerns amongst us defence officials about the possibility of an attack by the islamic state group on the airport.
1:05 am
it's sent a panic that many there who are camped out are feeling — it's really fuelled by the fact that international troops will be pulled out by the end of this month. that's when the evacuation process, it seems at the moment, at least, will end. and after that, many fear it'll be extremely difficult to fly out of the country. so time, they feel, is really running out for them. president biden�*s government has told us commercial airlines that they could soon be ordered to help transport people who've been evacuated from afghanistan following the taliban takeover. it's understood, if used, the civilian aircraft would not fly into afghanistan, but instead ferry evacuees from air bases in the middle east and germany. so as we were hearing there mullah abdul ghani baradar, has arrived in kabulfor talks on forming a government. but who is he — and why is his arrival so significant? he's among the few dozen original members of the taliban.
1:06 am
in his early 50s, he co—founded the taliban group and is one of the best—known. reported to have been one of mullah omar's most trusted commanders, he fled to pakistan after the us invasion in 2001 and was arrested in 2010 by security forces in an operation then considered to have dealt a fatal blow to the movement. mullah baradar was released in 2018 and moved to qatar — at the request of the us — to help bolster support for talks with them, acting as the taliban's chief ambassador. at one point, he spoke to president trump on the phone. he's been part of the taliban negotiating team in doha where he oversaw the signing of the withdrawal agreement with the americans. mark fallon is the director of clubfed and visiting scholar atjohn jay college of criminaljustice. he was also the us government's chief investigator responsible for bringing suspected
1:07 am
terrorists to justice before the military commissions at guantanamo bay in cuba. hejoins us from georgia. mark, thank you so much for your time. mark, thank you so much for yourtime. first mark, thank you so much for your time. first of all, we should say that he wasn't in guantanamo bay, but it may surprise many of people to note that many of the taliban and senior leaders did spend time in guantanamo bay.— senior leaders did spend time in guantanamo bay. yes, that's ri . ht. in guantanamo bay. yes, that's right- they _ in guantanamo bay. yes, that's right. they certainly _ in guantanamo bay. yes, that's right. they certainly dead, - in guantanamo bay. yes, that's right. they certainly dead, and | right. they certainly dead, and many of them spent many years they are. many of them spent many years the are. ., ,, many of them spent many years the are. ., i. , ., they are. can you tell us what exneriences _ they are. can you tell us what experiences they _ they are. can you tell us what experiences they would've - they are. can you tell us what | experiences they would've had in guantanamo bay and how they then managed to get out? well. then managed to get out? well, a number of _ then managed to get out? well, a number of circumstances. - then managed to get out? well, | a number of circumstances. many of the people that we had at guantanamo where they are based on bounties. so they were sold, it was kind of a human trafficking system where the us government was dropping flyers
1:08 am
to pay for prisoners. so many of the prisoners at guantanamo where sold by warlords and wound up there. many of them came to the bagram collection point at bagram air base and were subjected to some brutal treatment there as well as when they got to guantanamo. in that type of treatment has scarred many of them. during one of the hearings, one of what were known as the taliban and five swapped for bo bergdahl in 2014 by president 0bama. he had said there was a 25 year war between person to person village to village in afghanistan, city by city, province by private fans, tribe i try. and if you think that's a crime then every person in afghanistan should go to prison, or you should bring in here to guantanamo. now,
1:09 am
guantanamo to them and around the world is a symbol of torture injustice and oppression. so as long as president biden keeps it open and it's a subversion of the rule of law, he is going to have a lot of trouble with legitimacy and negotiating with people, especially those who have been to guantanamo and seen what happens down there. we have heard from the taliban spokesperson, specifically in that unusual news conference earlier this week that there will not be revenge, that everyone will be forgiven, but given what you are describing about some of the experiences in guantanamo bay with the taliban leadership, do you think that that is believable, or will there be some consequences now for the us? know, there's going to be consequences for generations to come. we invaded afghanistan in an operation called enduring freedom. we went down and then we started to become the
1:10 am
aggressor. we embraced cruelty as policy and human subjugation was rampant in the prison systems there, forward operating base says, with prisoner and detainee treatment. so what you have now is you are going to see that not only did it harbour resistance, but it brought fighters to the battlefield, so evenin fighters to the battlefield, so even in iraq, when we were taking and sustaining our greatest losses and casualties of us forces there, the number one reason that foreign fighters came to the battlefield was a booger red in guantanamo bay, so if you want a hard resistance and you want to have foreign fighters come to have foreign fighters come to the battlefield, what you need to do is employ torture the way it was indiscriminately utilised by the us and coalition forces in afghanistan. coalition forces in afu hanistan. ., , afghanistan. indeed, there was leadership _ afghanistan. indeed, there was
1:11 am
leadership in — afghanistan. indeed, there was leadership in the _ afghanistan. indeed, there was leadership in the us _ afghanistan. indeed, there was leadership in the us who - leadership in the us who believe that guantanamo bay was the right move, especially at the right move, especially at the beginning of the war. what kind of reprisals can be us expect specifically, do you think? ~ ., ., think? well, right now, we are wor in: think? well, right now, we are worrying about _ think? well, right now, we are worrying about reprisals - think? well, right now, we are worrying about reprisals to - think? well, right now, we are worrying about reprisals to getj worrying about reprisals to get our personnel outs, but there is going to be conditions in iraq that are going to be hernandez for decades. i mean, the taliban and is known for their ruthlessness, and they believe that we are known for our ruthlessness, and so we are going to have a lot of issues trying to negotiate with the taliban and right now because we lack legitimacy. we still have 39 people at guantanamo. many held in indefinite detention without trial, so as long as that remains a symbol of us torture, injustice and oppression, we are going to be negotiating from an inferior
1:12 am
position, because it's a manifestation of hypocrisy of imperial rule, and that is going to challenge the us and the uk for decades.— the uk for decades. mark, director — the uk for decades. mark, director of _ the uk for decades. mark, director of club _ the uk for decades. mark, director of club fed, - the uk for decades. mark, director of club fed, thank| the uk for decades. mark, - director of club fed, thank you so much for your time.- so much for your time. thank ou. —— our political correspondent chris mason explained what more mr blair had to say. he said it was tragic and unnecessary what was tragic and unnecessary what was happening. he said there is this moral obligation for uk to stay as long as necessary to get everyone out to has a right to come to the uk because they worked with british forces, but he's making a bigger argument here will stop he says, this is a 2700 word article that has
1:13 am
gone up on his website, this is a fight that's what he calls radical islam, a political ideology that perverts the religion and the taliban are symptomatic of that, and he says that the west has to show commitments, and if that is a long—term commitment, so be it. he compares it to the long—term challenge that the west faced in taking on communism. 0f in taking on communism. of course, the challenge for western governments, democracies, you have to have public well to maintain military presence, and that is the challenge those leaders face. , a, ,., let's get some of the day's other news. israel has carried out air strikes in gaza in response to what it calls riots instigated by the hamas organisation. the israeli army said its aircraft hit four hamas weapons and storage manufacturing sites. palestinian media spoke of explosions near a power station and close to a refugee camp in central gaza. the air strikes followed a protest on the border during which palestinian sources said israeli troops
1:14 am
shot and wounded more than 20 palestinians. the british government has rejected a call to issue ten—thousand temporary visas to eu workers — to tackle an estimated shortage of 75—thousand lorry drivers in the wake of brexit. logistics uk — the trade body which represents freight businesses — says supermarkets are facing serious supply problems. but ministers say employers should invest in the domestic workforce rather than rely on foreign labour. the trial of the r&b singer r kelly, who's accused of sexually abusing several women, has heard claims by his former tour manager, that he bribed a government worker to obtain a fake id to marry the singer aaliyah, who was underage. she was 15 at the time. kelly is also accused of bribery, and denies all the charges. with so many people now hoping to escape afghanistan, turkey has warned of a new wave of migration, and called on european countries to take responsibility. greece has also built a new 25—mile fence and surveillance system
1:15 am
along its border with turkey. the greek government says it won't wait passively, for the possible impact of a refugee crisis, following the taliban takeover. the freelance journalist daphne tolis is in athens. she have us some more detail about the wall. the 40—kilometre steel fence has been completed. the defence minister and the citizens protection minister were both yesterday, friday, there. they visited the wall, the border there. they said that greek borders will remain secure and impenetrable and that border forces are on alert for any possible wave of afghan refugees trying to cross into europe through greece. it is widely supported, i would say, especially after last year, the events of february 2020, when thousands of refugees and migrants attempted to cross in large numbers from turkey's
1:16 am
land border, the same border that divides greece and turkey, after turkish president erdogan said that the borders were open. so people tried to come through greece to move further to the european union, and following those events, that is what actually sped up the completion of this border, which was already announced that it would happen, but this made it faster to happen, to reinforce the existing border and to make an even more reinforced steel fence across this zone, which is actually one of the deadliest land borders for asylum seekers, migrants, refugees crossing into europe. this is bbc news — the headlines: the united states has asked its citizens to avoid going to kabul airport where thousands of people continue to gather in
1:17 am
an attempt to flee afghanistan. while thousands of people try to board flights out of afghanistan, many afghan refugees are also flocking to neighbouring countries, and a key destination is iran. while iran has welcomed the us exit, their relationship with the taliban is a strategic — but complicated one. with me to discuss is the bbc�*s azadeh moshiri. thank you so much forjoining us. can you give us an idea historically what the taliban's relationship with iran has been, and what it is at the moment?— been, and what it is at the moment? as he said, it's a complicated _ moment? as he said, it's a complicated one, - moment? as he said, it's a complicated one, and - moment? as he said, it's a complicated one, and part| moment? as he said, it's a i complicated one, and part of thatis complicated one, and part of that is because afghanistan is such an important country to iran. they are strategically and economically very tight because of the trade that passes through the border, but also in terms of culture and religion. afghanistan is home to so many shieh muslims. so it's important to understand historically why there has been a bit of antagonism between the
1:18 am
taliban and in the iranians, and that's mainly because of religion. the taliban is a sunnl religion. the taliban is a sunni, and iran is sunni —— erie muslim. so there is a deep divide there. the strength 2001 us—led invasion in they were bitter enemies. a key event is a 1998 and the afghan town when the taliban assassinated 11 iranian diplomats and a journalist. this is something that i must trigger were between the taliban and iran. instead, iran opted to cooperate with the us to top of the taliban. now, when the us invasion happened, things changed and there was a very different calculation for the iranians, and they decided to in fact cooperate with the taliban. the us accuses them of having supplied weapons and money, something that iran denies. eitherway, they denies. either way, they haven't denies. eitherway, they haven't been shy of showing that their preferred option is collaboration between
1:19 am
all afghan political factions, including the taliban. so much so that earlier injuly, tehran hosted top afghan officials as well as taliban figures to see if they could reach some sort of agreement. so, really, it's historic enmity, but now a tacit cooperation. he could describe it as the enemy of my enemy is my friend. it’s enemy is my friend. it's interesting _ enemy is my friend. it's interesting here - enemy is my friend. it's interesting here that. enemy is my friend. it's interesting here that you talk about that, because we have heard a little bit about how pakistan is accused of assisting the taliban and to think that iran perhaps has that relationship as well really gives you a sense that there is far more going on here than people might realise. in terms of moving forward, what have i run�*s leaders been saying about the future relationship they may have at the taliban?— the taliban? they've been fairly muted _ the taliban? they've been fairly muted in _ the taliban? they've been fairly muted in terms - the taliban? they've been fairly muted in terms of i fairly muted in terms of commenting on the taliban specifically, but they have been very positive about the us exit. the president has gone so far as to say this is an
1:20 am
opportunity for lasting peace and security, reviving life, and security, reviving life, and yet when it comes to the taliban, he has refrained from criticising them, which already is an important factor here. so it does seem like what they are trying to engender is some sort of cooperation, because the challenge ever iran as they want to preserve those economic ties, so much passes through the border, fuel, water, that they depend on, but the key challenge is security. they want to make sure that shieh muslims are protected. the taliban and so far has seemed to allow that. it made a show of allowing the muslim celebration of but sure to be celebrated in kabul. few people went out of fear, but they want to make sure that she and muslim communities aren't targeted and also that afghanistan doesn't become a breeding ground for terrorist groups that will target those communities. so a bit of a wait and see right now. it communities. so a bit of a wait and see right now.— and see right now. it certainly is commanded _ and see right now. it certainly is commanded is _ and see right now. it certainly is commanded is a _ and see right now. it certainly| is commanded is a relationship to watch. thank you so much for
1:21 am
putting us in the picture. hurricane grace has torn through eastern mexico after making landfall for a second time, and has killed at least eight people. the deaths and the worst damage were in veracruz state, where the storm came ashore early on saturday. the hurricane weakened to a tropical storm as it moved inland north of mexico city, but high winds and downpours were reported to be causing more flooding. a state of emergency has been declared in parts of new york state ahead of the forecast arrival of hurricane henri. new york's governor, andrew cuomo said he had spoken to president biden who agreed to the declaration, which will release funds before the hurricane makes landfall on sunday. mr cuomo said heavy rain, flooding and power cuts should be expected. nicholas isabella is a storm chaser and joins me now from long island in new york. nicholas, thank you so much for
1:22 am
your time. you have been watching the storm. what are some of the early signs that you have been seeing? because it hasn't made landfall yet. i am seeing this term currently moving north towards long island and the northeast coast right now. i'm watching closely to try to pinpoint the exact landfall 0k shannon. i am also noticing people really preparing for the storm which is really important. it's been over 30 years since new york has seen a storm like this before, so i'm glad to see a lot of people are evacuating and making other preparations and making other preparations and taking it seriously. what and taking it seriously. what sort of damage _ and taking it seriously. what sort of damage are - and taking it seriously. what sort of damage are you - and taking it seriously. what sort of damage are you already seeing? are you seeing storm surges, things like thatjust as it approaches? surges, things like that 'ust as it approaches?�* surges, things like that 'ust as it approaches? yes, all day today noticed _ as it approaches? yes, all day today noticed the _ as it approaches? yes, all day today noticed the waves - as it approaches? yes, all day today noticed the waves on i as it approaches? yes, all day| today noticed the waves on the south shore of new york getting bigger and bigger and bigger and coming closer to the boardwalk and to the neighbouring communities along the south shore of long island. these areas are right on the water and they are the most prone to storm surges when the
1:23 am
storm arrives. 50 prone to storm surges when the storm arrives-— storm arrives. so once this storm arrives. so once this storm hits. _ storm arrives. so once this storm hits, what _ storm arrives. so once this storm hits, what kind - storm arrives. so once this storm hits, what kind of i storm arrives. so once this - storm hits, what kind of damage could we see? the storm hits, what kind of damage could we see?— could we see? the biggest rep at the storm _ could we see? the biggest rep at the storm is _ could we see? the biggest rep at the storm is going - could we see? the biggest rep at the storm is going to - could we see? the biggest rep at the storm is going to be - could we see? the biggest rep at the storm is going to be a i at the storm is going to be a storm surge, so ocean water, breaching into the streets of long island. you can expect up to four to six feet of water, so a lot of people that live in this area, their homes could get flooded out. the other issueis get flooded out. the other issue is the strong winds that are accompanying the storm as well. a lot of trees and power could be out. we had a similar storm last year, and over 100,000 people were without power, so i am expecting the same today. power, so i am expecting the same today-— power, so i am expecting the same toda . ., ., , same today. you mentioned this, but it is unusual _ same today. you mentioned this, but it is unusual to _ same today. you mentioned this, but it is unusual to see _ same today. you mentioned this, but it is unusual to see a - but it is unusual to see a storm like this hit this part of the us coast. absolutely. it's very uncommon, - of the us coast. absolutely. it's very uncommon, so - of the us coast. absolutely. it's very uncommon, so i . of the us coast. absolutely. i it's very uncommon, so i storm like this, a lot of people might not be used to it, or sometimes they may not take it seriously, but this is a very seriously, but this is a very serious storm. like i said, it hasn't happened in over 30 years. hasn't happened in over 30 ears. ., hasn't happened in over 30 ears, ., , , ., , hasn't happened in over 30 ears. ., , , , years. how prepared is this art of years. how prepared is this part of the _ years. how prepared is this part of the us _ years. how prepared is this part of the us then - years. how prepared is this part of the us then if - years. how prepared is this part of the us then if it - years. how prepared is this part of the us then if it is l years. how prepared is this | part of the us then if it is so unusual to see such a powerful
1:24 am
storm on its way? the unusual to see such a powerful storm on its way?— storm on its way? the best thing that _ storm on its way? the best thing that people _ storm on its way? the best thing that people can - storm on its way? the best thing that people can do i storm on its way? the best thing that people can do to j thing that people can do to prepare is leave, evacuate, go west into a safer area. you can't really control what mother nature does, so that's the best thing you can do. is the best thing you can do. is it possible that we will see this storm lose its speed and lose its power? because sometimes we see that with these sorts of hurricanes. we think there's going to be a lot of damage, but actually, it tends to lose a lot of its power. tends to lose a lot of its ower. . �* , , tends to lose a lot of its ower. ., h , ., power. that's definitely a possibility- _ power. that's definitely a possibility. the _ power. that's definitely a possibility. the water i possibility. the water temperature off of new york and new england are very cold. right now, the hurricane is located in warm water, so as it moves north, it is anticipated to weaken a little bit, but the affects will still be the same, especially with the coastal flooding. mil especially with the coastal floodinu. �* . ., .,, flooding. all right, nicholas isabella, storm _ flooding. all right, nicholas isabella, storm chaser, i flooding. all right, nicholas l isabella, storm chaser, thank you very much for taking us through what is to be expected with hurricane on do to hit the us east coast. and finally, images have been released after an afghan mother was assisted off a us air force plane, after
1:25 am
she delivered a baby on board. the mother went into labor and began experiencing complications during an evacuation flight from a base in the middle east. upon landing at ramstein air base in germany, a medical crew boarded the aircraft and helped deliver the baby in the cargo bay. and i'm pleased to let you know the mother and her baby girl are doing well. of christ, many of those dramatic scenes as people flee afghanistan. —— of course, many of those dramatic scenes... a reminder of our top story as crowds continue to besiege kabul airport, the united states is trying to find ways of getting people out of afghanistan safely and quickly. americans hoping to leave following the taliban takeover a week ago have been advised not to travel to the airport unless instructed. defence officials have warned of possible attacks by a local we will keep an eye on events
1:26 am
in afghanistan as they continue to unfold as they have been throughout the week. stay with us on bbc news. hello again. saturday was always going to be the slightly dodgier day of the weekend in terms of weather, and we have a lot of cloud. most of us saw some fairly heavy rain as well. that was the grey skies that we had in wales, for a time, with the rain coming down. a bit misty over the hills, as well. since then, the rain band has been progressing its way northwards and eastwards, and it will continue to do so over the next few hours, as well. that said, i reckon it will stay pretty wet across parts of eastern scotland, down the eastern side of england for the next few hours, with some heavy rain coming in across northern england, east midlands, east anglia. we've still got some more rain to come, as well across parts of the south east. but all the while, it
1:27 am
will turn a little bit drier across western areas. 13—15 celsius as you start the day. there will be some mist and fog patches to watch out for. eastern scotland, probably over the pennines, eastern areas of england, as well. now, sunday morning, we'll probably have some fairly thick cloud running in across parts of east anglia, south east england, still with some patches of rain expected here. into the afternoon, the skies brighten up and there will be some showers. some of them quite heavy for central and eastern scotland, central and eastern england. dry with sunshine for south—west england and wales, northern ireland and western areas of scotland. then, into next week, it looks like high pressure is going to be with us, and it's going to be bringing the air from scandinavia. so no heatwave in the forecast, but it will be a pleasant spell of weather. it's going to be largely dry with some sunshine to look forward to. so that settling down process really gets under way on monday, with most of us having a dry day with some sunny spells. in the sunshine, it's august, it's going to feel warm in that sunshine with temperatures widely climbing into the low 20s, peeking around 22 celsius in glasgow, birmingham, and cardiff, as well. into tuesday's forecast, and again it's another largely fine day. you could find a view mist and fog patches for the early risers, but otherwise looking fine
1:28 am
with spells of sunshine. the wind is coming onshore around parts of east anglia and kent, keeping temperatures here on the coastal strip probably around 19—20 celsius. the highest temperatures across western areas. 24 perhaps in glasgow. that really would feel pleasantly warm. and as we look at the forecast through the rest of the week, you can see the weather does stay dry. temperatures stay in the low 20s. there may be a tendency though for it to turn a bit cloudier across the north and east of scotland and eastern england towards the end of the week.
1:29 am
1:30 am
this is bbc news, the headlines. crowds continue to gather outside kabul airport, amid reports of chaotic scenes — as the us advises its citizens not to travel there until they are asked, because of security threats outside the gates. pentagon officials described the situation around the airport gates as fluid and dynamic. greece says it's completed a forty—kilometre fence on its border with turkey, amid fears of a fresh surge of migrants from afghanistan. greece was on the front line of the migrant crisis in twenty fifteen when more than a million people crossed from turkey into the eu. hurricane henri is making its way towards the us, prompting the authorities in new york to declare a state of emergency. it's expected to hit the country's northeastern coast later on sunday, and could be the first hurricane to reach new england in thirty years. the government has announced plans to tighten
1:31 am
rules on the importation of dogs to the uk, in response

17 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on