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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 22, 2021 9:30am-10:01am BST

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good morning, this is bbc news with victoria derbyshire. we'll be taking a look at the morning's papers in a moment. first, the headlines at 9.333m. seven more people have died seven more british defence officials say seven more people have died at kabul airport, as thousands desperate to leave afghanistan crowd round the area. former world leaders criticise the us withdrawal. former british pm tony blair accuses president biden of following an "imbecilic" policy, and donald trump attacks mr biden. byjim's botched exit in afghanistan is the most astonishing display of gross incompetence by a nation's leader, perhaps at any time that anybody has ever seen —— biden�*s botched exit. a state of emergency is declared
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in parts of new york state ahead of the forecast arrival of hurricane henri. and coming up shortly, i'll be looking at the sunday papers with journalist and author shyama perera and martin bentham, home affairs editor at the evening standard. before the papers, sport and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. here's chetan. the former liverpool and england midfielder terry mcdermott has been diagnosed with dementia. the 69—year—old made more than 300 appearances for liverpool between 1974 and 1982. he announced he's in the early stages of dementia following tests. it comes just days after the former manchester united and scotland legend denis law confirmed he's been diagnosed with dementia. he said...
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in the premier league, liverpool made it two wins out of two as they beat burnley 2—0 at anfield. it's two wins from two now as goals from diogojota in the first half and sadio mane after the break sent them top of the table for the moment jack grealish, the £100—million signing from aston villa, scored his first manchester city goal in a 5—0 win over norwich. aheem sterling was also amongst the scorers for pep guardiola's side. listen, we are the same team except sergio went to barcelona and jack, we're the same guys, the same team we were last season. and last season was exceptional. all we have to do is do what we have to do today. everyone runs. you know the tough competition there on the bench. everyone has to be
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ready and this is them. good win for city. danny ings scored a superb volley on his aston villa home debut as they beat newcastle 2—0. a fantastic finish. anwar el ghazi scored the second from the penalty spot. elsewhere, brighton beat watford to make it two wins from two. david turnbull scored a hat—trick as celtic thrashed st mirren 6—0 in the scottish premiership. it's turnbull�*s first career hat—trick and one that lifts celtic to the top of the table for the first time in a year. elsewhere, motherwell won 2—1 at livingston. in the hundred oval invincibles won the women's final with more than 17,000 fans attending — a record. in the men's final, southern brave were the champions. more reaction to that shortly — but firstjoe wilson
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reports from lord's. there might be 99 opinions about the hundred, but one overriding reason for the tournament — find a new audience for cricket. 0val invincibles batting first against the women of the southern brave. and if you were feeling the rain, focus on the flame. the final must go on. 121 scored — chase that, southern brave. 0k, seemed reasonable. to marizanne kapp. the invincibles looked it — kapp finished it. southern braves 73 all out. and here are your first winners of the hundred — 0val invincibles with the trophy. over 17,000 in the crowd for that game. well, could southern brave men do any better than their women? that was the next question of lords as we moved on to the next final. paul stirling's approach to batting. that's basically it.
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birmingham's phoenix bowling here. he's 42 and his celebration, just like his career, goes on and on and on. now, where's that gone? the brave men hit 1a of them to make 168. now, phoenix at liam livingston, and there was no way of stopping him. he kept swinging, connecting until tim david looked up and threw and hit. and livingston was run out. oh, no! oh, yes! braves victory by 32 runs. so it ends this year. there is more to cricket than the hundred, but many this summer grasped it. joe wilson, bbc news, lord's. a fantastic day there at lord's. that is all your support for now. and now it is time for the papers.
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let's have a look at the sunday morning papers. with me are journalist and author sharma perera and martin bentham, tomorrow's front pages starting with. the observer warning that there could be went spent hunger, collapse if things are not organised recklessly. the sunday telegraph looks at criticism from the former prime minister tony blair. he sent troops into afghanistan 20 years ago. he says the uk has a moral obligation to stay until everyone who needs to leave the country has been evacuated. the sunday mirror also reports those comments from mr blair who says president biden�*s
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withdrawal followed an imbecilic policy. and any foreign minister... let's talk to our guests this morning shyama and martin. tony blair is wauain shyama and martin. tony blair is waging against — shyama and martin. tony blair is waging against the _ shyama and martin. tony blair is waging against the dying - shyama and martin. tony blair is waging against the dying of - shyama and martin. tony blair is waging against the dying of the l waging against the dying of the light and what he clearly sees in the document as the abandonment of democracy as at the least worst governing solution. he obviously has perfect material here. it is a little bit late, but what he is raging against is our loss of confidence in western values, our inability to commit to anything, which i think it's something we have seen across the us with a try. and
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now, of course, with our own dishevelled government in number ten. —— number10. it seems to regard the bringing of democracy as a utopian delusion and intervention, virtual of any sort, as a full set in. the world is now uncertain of where the west stands because it is so obvious that the decision to withdraw from afghanistan in this way was not driven by grand strategy, but by politics. he has encapsulated, i think, strategy, but by politics. he has encapsulated, ithink, what strategy, but by politics. he has encapsulated, i think, what a lot of the newspapers have been saying and are leaping on this morning. they love the word imbecilic. that is being quoted quite a lot, but actually, it has the overall piece that blair has written on his website that i think is really engaging us. website that i think is really engaging na— website that i think is really ennuain us. , �*, , engaging us. yes. martin, let's be clear about _ engaging us. yes. martin, let's be clear about what _ engaging us. yes. martin, let's be clear about what tony _ engaging us. yes. martin, let's be clear about what tony blair - engaging us. yes. martin, let's be clear about what tony blair is - clear about what tony blair is calling on the cynic because if you look at the headlines on papers, —— calling imbecilic. you think he is calling imbecilic. you think he is
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calling joe biden's decision to withdraw, but it is much more a political slogan of ending the forever worse.— political slogan of ending the forever worse. , , , , forever worse. yes, but it ties very much into — forever worse. yes, but it ties very much into the _ forever worse. yes, but it ties very much into the specifics _ forever worse. yes, but it ties very much into the specifics of - forever worse. yes, but it ties very much into the specifics of this - much into the specifics of this withdrawal as well. it is both of these — withdrawal as well. it is both of these -- — withdrawal as well. it is both of these. —— forever wars. we were just hearing _ these. —— forever wars. we were just hearing from — these. —— forever wars. we were just hearing from my fellow reviewer that the broader confidence that was in trying _ the broader confidence that was in trying to— the broader confidence that was in trying to stand up for our values and believe they are the right ones, it was_ and believe they are the right ones, it was 20 _ and believe they are the right ones, it was 20 years ago when people were looking _ it was 20 years ago when people were looking at— it was 20 years ago when people were looking at the taliban and what was happening — looking at the taliban and what was happening in afghanistan is absolutely horrific and yet, clearly do not _ absolutely horrific and yet, clearly do not try— absolutely horrific and yet, clearly do not try struck a deal with the taliban— do not try struck a deal with the taliban which has led to this. the execution — taliban which has led to this. the execution of that has been a disasier— execution of that has been a disaster and clearly blair focuses on that_ disaster and clearly blair focuses on that as — disaster and clearly blair focuses on that as well, but he is right to say we _ on that as well, but he is right to say we actually need to remember that some — say we actually need to remember that some of the values that western democracy— that some of the values that western democracy stand for a good values. but on _ democracy stand for a good values. but on the — democracy stand for a good values. but on the specifics, he is also very— but on the specifics, he is also very clear— but on the specifics, he is also very clear that there was no need to withdraw— very clear that there was no need to withdraw immediately, no need to withdraw— withdraw immediately, no need to withdraw at all, which is what he is
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arguing _ withdraw at all, which is what he is arguing that we could have maintained a presence there. it could _ maintained a presence there. it could have _ maintained a presence there. it could have been a relatively light touch— could have been a relatively light touch presence and would have bolstered the afghans and clearly, what we _ bolstered the afghans and clearly, what we have seen, is at the removal of strategic _ what we have seen, is at the removal of strategic air support, for example, and military firepower, even _ example, and military firepower, even in _ example, and military firepower, even in very limited quantity, which was cruciai— even in very limited quantity, which was crucial for the afghan armed forces— was crucial for the afghan armed forces confidence and their technical and so on ability has led to this _ technical and so on ability has led to this massive collapse. he's actually— to this massive collapse. he's actually attacking both of those points — actually attacking both of those points and i think is right to do so, frankly _ points and i think is right to do so. frankly-— so, frankly. shyama, let's talk about dominic _ so, frankly. shyama, let's talk about dominic raab _ so, frankly. shyama, let's talk about dominic raab in - so, frankly. shyama, let's talk about dominic raab in at - so, frankly. shyama, let's talk about dominic raab in at the l so, frankly. shyama, let's talk - about dominic raab in at the sunday telegraph as well. according to the paper, who he is suggesting we are going to have to rely on an order to help moderate the taliban as they afghanistan going forwards. {hind afghanistan going forwards. china and russia he _ afghanistan going forwards. china and russia he is— afghanistan going forwards. c�*i “lag and russia he is suggesting, which of course makes you sort of extremely anxious. we would not take their gs equipment because we did not trust china not to be bugging us all. we have had russians on our
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soil poisoning people and these only two countries in which we are going to rely to help us get out of this mess or, at least, to navigate this mess. you could not make it up, really. in mess. you could not make it up, reall . , . ., ., , really. in the times, dominic raab is as ones going — really. in the times, dominic raab is as ones going to _ really. in the times, dominic raab is as ones going to have _ really. in the times, dominic raab is as ones going to have a - really. in the times, dominic raab is as ones going to have a phone i is as ones going to have a phone call that he will take to secretary of state antony blinken to persuade them to put pressure on them to stay in afghanistan at the airport for longer in order to make sure as many british, us civilians and also afghan civilians who worked with the allies can get out. yes. afghan civilians who worked with the allies can get out.— allies can get out. yes. and i think that seems — allies can get out. yes. and i think that seems to _ allies can get out. yes. and i think that seems to be _ allies can get out. yes. and i think that seems to be imperative, - allies can get out. yes. and i think. that seems to be imperative, doesn't it? because _ that seems to be imperative, doesn't it? because there has been, in essence, — it? because there has been, in essence, an intelligence failure to assess— essence, an intelligence failure to assess the — essence, an intelligence failure to assess the speed of the decline of afghanistan and the fall of the country— afghanistan and the fall of the country to the taliban, nobody was expecting — country to the taliban, nobody was expecting this, especially in westminster and washington, clearly. they clearly should have foreseen it, i they clearly should have foreseen it. ithink— they clearly should have foreseen it, i think and that is going to have —
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it, i think and that is going to have to — it, i think and that is going to have to he _ it, i think and that is going to have to be looked at how on earth that mistake was made but given that has happened, there has not been the time to— has happened, there has not been the time to get— has happened, there has not been the time to get people out that was expected and the only way to rectify that, if— expected and the only way to rectify that, if it _ expected and the only way to rectify that, if it can be rectified at all for those — that, if it can be rectified at all for those who are actually able to -et for those who are actually able to get to _ for those who are actually able to get to kabul is to give them more time _ get to kabul is to give them more time to— get to kabul is to give them more time to get out. the scenes at that airport— time to get out. the scenes at that airport are — time to get out. the scenes at that airport are absolutely horrendous. there _ airport are absolutely horrendous. there are — airport are absolutely horrendous. there are an awful lot of people trying _ there are an awful lot of people trying to — there are an awful lot of people trying to get out, there are not enough — trying to get out, there are not enough lights and so on and the processing of the mall and it is clear— processing of the mall and it is clear that _ processing of the mall and it is clear that people will not get out if that _ clear that people will not get out if that deadline is —— processing of the month — if that deadline is —— processing of the month. people will not get out of that— the month. people will not get out of that deadliness up to. the americans are security at the airport. — americans are security at the airport, they have the military capabilities and other countries frankly— capabilities and other countries frankly don't. even in probably hours. — frankly don't. even in probably hours, although we have a relatively strong _ hours, although we have a relatively strong armed force, depleted over recent— strong armed force, depleted over recent years, of course, so that is 'ust recent years, of course, so that is just reality — recent years, of course, so that is just reality that we desperately need _ just reality that we desperately need them to stay longer to get the people _ need them to stay longer to get the people we _ need them to stay longer to get the people we want to get out and other people _ people we want to get out and other people want to get out and the
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americans want to get out really. shyama, — americans want to get out really. shyama, the sunday times is also reporting that borisjohnson has privately called presidentjoe biden sleepyjoe, which was a donald trump's name for him will stop yes. whether there is truth in this, we will never know because boris will come of course, deny it as he did the barb is coming from dominic cummings. the truth is, we will have no idea what any government thinks of anything —— we have no idea what our government thinks of anything because it never tallies with what we see and if the actions that they take are always behind the curve rather than ahead of it. i think this isjust rather than ahead of it. i think this is just another bit of butter apocryphal story telling, i'm sure he calls everybody names are —— borisjohnson he calls everybody names are —— boris johnson apocryphal story telling. boris johnson apocryphal story tellinu. ~ ., telling. wallace writing in the sunday times _ telling. wallace writing in the sunday times today. - telling. wallace writing in the sunday times today. he - telling. wallace writing in the sunday times today. he is i telling. wallace writing in the - sunday times today. he is saying that if people can't get out, they
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have to find their own way out. that is a statement _ have to find their own way out. that is a statement of _ have to find their own way out. that is a statement of the _ have to find their own way out. that is a statement of the obvious. if evacuation — is a statement of the obvious. if evacuation flights are finished, people — evacuation flights are finished, people have to find their own way out. people have to find their own way out the — people have to find their own way out. the reality of what that his is a. out. the reality of what that his is a, increasingly difficult or very difficult — a, increasingly difficult or very difficult to do that. should very life—threatening to get out of afghanistan and of those people who come out _ afghanistan and of those people who come out of afghanistan are then going _ come out of afghanistan are then going to — come out of afghanistan are then going to be trying to get essentially, whether it is here and elsewhere — essentially, whether it is here and elsewhere. if it is here, for e>
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in that— of them having to risk their lives in that perilous way is really absolutely sickening, isn't it? according to the front .a i e isn't it? according to the front -a~e of isn't it? according to the front page of the — isn't it? according to the front page of the independent, - isn't it? according to the front. page of the independent, people isn't it? according to the front - page of the independent, people are also risking their lives by simply going to the airport. at their own reporter witnessing four people killed outside a british base adjacent to the airport yesterday. absolutely. it is, excuse me, a rotten study to be covering. this i imagine our reporters, our journalists will end up as traumatised as many of our troops and those people getting involved. we're not forgetting the human cost, we are constantly covering the human cost, but actually, i wonder now if it is time to step away from this because this is going to be ongoing for weeks and possibly and actually consider what we can do in the long term to make things better. we have touched, the papers are touched on this morning and i may havejumped the gun with russia and china, but they also are saying that they are relying on pakistan and turkey to
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provide refuge for those refugees who can escape from afghanistan. those are countries that are quite sympathetic towards islamist fundamentalist dogma, even if they are not violent or themselves involved in any kind of terrorism, that distill sympathy. i just that we are going to all at the wrong people for help —— they still feel sympathy. really, we should be providing that help. i think that is clear and everything that is being set across the press, right and left. martin, the sunday exress right and left. martin, the sunday express writer _ right and left. martin, the sunday express writer frontpage - right and left. martin, the sunday express writer frontpage says - right and left. martin, the sunday l express writer frontpage says never stopping proud, the armed forces minister saying to those who served in afghanistan. i do not know about you, martin, buti in afghanistan. i do not know about you, martin, but i feel like i have spent the week talking to former british soldiers who serve there and a lot of them are actually questioning their work of an, looking at what has happened in the last seven days. i do looking at what has happened in the last seven days.— last seven days. i do not think they should. last seven days. i do not think they should- for— last seven days. i do not think they should. for those _ last seven days. i do not think they should. for those who _ last seven days. i do not think they should. for those who fought - last seven days. i do not think they should. for those who fought to i
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should. for those who fought to secure _ should. for those who fought to secure places that fell some time ago. _ secure places that fell some time ago. of— secure places that fell some time ago, of course and elsewhere in trying _ ago, of course and elsewhere in trying to— ago, of course and elsewhere in trying to do something positive in the country, i think of course, it has a _ the country, i think of course, it has a massively dispiriting and i understand why people feel that way. on the _ understand why people feel that way. on the other hand, they did to do 0n the other hand, they did to do something, they did achieve, first of all. _ something, they did achieve, first of all, progress for people who were there _ of all, progress for people who were there during the time before this horrible — there during the time before this horrible return of the taliban, for one, _ horrible return of the taliban, for one. and — horrible return of the taliban, for one, and secondly, of course, they did also— one, and secondly, of course, they did also actually reduce any terrorist _ did also actually reduce any terrorist threat and get rid of al-qaeda, basically, from that countrv — al-qaeda, basically, from that country. the threat from islamic state _ country. the threat from islamic state and — country. the threat from islamic state and al-qaeda are resurfacing there _ state and al-qaeda are resurfacing there and _ state and al-qaeda are resurfacing there and the head of mi5 recently saving _ there and the head of mi5 recently saving a _ there and the head of mi5 recently saying a victory for the taliban, before — saying a victory for the taliban, before this all involved, of course, at the _ before this all involved, of course, at the time — before this all involved, of course, at the time it seems unlikely. a victory— at the time it seems unlikely. a victory for— at the time it seems unlikely. a victory for the taliban, would be seen _ victory for the taliban, would be seen as— victory for the taliban, would be seen as a — victory for the taliban, would be seen as a propaganda victory by them and scratch _ seen as a propaganda victory by them and scratch made by the islamist sound _ and scratch made by the islamist sound alarm islamic state and so on and they— sound alarm islamic state and so on and they would use it to galvanise their support —— by the islamist is an istamic— their support —— by the islamist is an islamic state. going back to the armed _ an islamic state. going back to the armed forces minister, it was the case _ armed forces minister, it was the
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case that— armed forces minister, it was the case that afghanistan was a haven for al-qaeda, case that afghanistan was a haven foral-qaeda, it's case that afghanistan was a haven for al-qaeda, it's no longer became a haven _ for al-qaeda, it's no longer became a haven for— for al-qaeda, it's no longer became a haven for them and that was a positive — a haven for them and that was a positive step and all the advances that occurred, far from perfect, of course. _ that occurred, far from perfect, of course. but — that occurred, far from perfect, of course, but we were advances for women's — course, but we were advances for women's rights under the health care of children— women's rights under the health care of children and so on, so it is not as if— of children and so on, so it is not as if nothing _ of children and so on, so it is not as if nothing was achieved. something was achieved. unfortunately, a lot of it has been thrown _ unfortunately, a lot of it has been thrown away by the disaster that has happened _ thrown away by the disaster that has happened in the last few days. and he sa s, happened in the last few days. and he says. and _ happened in the last few days. and he says. and it _ happened in the last few days. and he says, and it is _ happened in the last few days. situc he says, and it is reported happened in the last few days. fific he says, and it is reported by happened in the last few days. elic he says, and it is reported by the express, we gave a war—torn nation a taste of freedom, we give them space for an education and that can never be taken away. for an education and that can never be taken away-— be taken away. one can imagine. i think that is _ be taken away. one can imagine. i think that is right. _ be taken away. one can imagine. i think that is right. also, _ be taken away. one can imagine. i think that is right. also, the - be taken away. one can imagine. i think that is right. also, the other| think that is right. also, the other thing _ think that is right. also, the other thing that— think that is right. also, the other thing that they should be proud of as a professionaljob they did as welt _ as a professionaljob they did as welt they— as a professionaljob they did as well. they were asked toj as a professionaljob they did as well. they were asked to j job and they went — well. they were asked to j job and they went to do the job and did it very professionally. i think they should — very professionally. i think they should he — very professionally. i think they should be very proud of that and i do not _ should be very proud of that and i do not think what has happened now, the political decision going back to the political decision going back to the first— the political decision going back to the first study we reviewed, the political — the first study we reviewed, the political blunder of trying to rush out and — political blunder of trying to rush out and not forcing what was going to happen. —
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out and not forcing what was going to happen, that should not detract from the _ to happen, that should not detract from the very fine job that many, many— from the very fine job that many, many people did in the intervening years _ firstly, let's talk about some different stories now. front page of a times, wanted, prisoners to help and food shortages and shops. yes. and food shortages and shops. yes, this is because _ and food shortages and shops. isis this is because obviously we and food shortages and shops. i2: this is because obviously we have been talking about the fact that, which goes first, the eggs or chicken is from a shellsbecause we now have a complete sort of lack of clarity in the food chain because we have lost of lorry drivers, farm workers, delivery drivers, we have lost everything along that chain, food manufacturers and restaurants are apparently scrambling to recruit prisoners to help ease the desperate shortage of workers. that is also added to by covid—19 and brexit. it has a lack of hgv drivers are fruit
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pickers and factory workers. they are now suggesting that those prisoners who are allowed out on a day release could be employed to help make up the shortfall. what day release could be employed to help make up the shortfall. what do ou think help make up the shortfall. what do you think of — help make up the shortfall. what do you think of that? _ help make up the shortfall. what do you think of that? what _ help make up the shortfall. what do you think of that? what do - help make up the shortfall. what do you think of that? what do i - help make up the shortfall. what do you think of that? what do i think i you think of that? what do i think of it? i you think of that? what do i think of it? i think _ you think of that? what do i think of it? | think it _ you think of that? what do i think of it? | think it is _ you think of that? what do i think of it? | think it is a _ you think of that? what do i think of it? i think it is a really - you think of that? what do i think of it? i think it is a really good - of it? i think it is a really good idea. i think it is very helpful that studies of theirs are out at the moment when we are managing bringing in of refugees from afghanistan because actually, we lost over 1 afghanistan because actually, we lost over1 million europeans who went over during covid, so there is actually space for people who will come in and work. it is quite clear we have not got enough people on the ground to do it. why not prisoners? that should be part of rehabilitation, surely? ithink that should be part of rehabilitation, surely? i think it is a great idea. perhaps teaching them to read and write at the same time because 70% of them can't. and maybe we will have less risk of autism. . maybe we will have less risk of autism. , _ , ., autism. the times says a -- recivatism. _
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autism. the times says a -- recivatism. i _ autism. the times says a -- recivatism. i think— autism. the times says a -- recivatism. i think the - autism. the times says a -- recivatism. i think the whole autism. the times says a -- - recivatism. i think the whole story is 10096 a good — recivatism. i think the whole story is 10096 a good thing _ recivatism. i think the whole story is 10096 a good thing for _ recivatism. i think the whole story is 10096 a good thing for the - recivatism. i think the whole story | is 10096 a good thing for the reason is 100% a good thing for the reason 'ust is 100% a good thing for the reason just let _ is 100% a good thing for the reason just let out — is 100% a good thing for the reason just let out. clearly one of the challenges for, and i report quite a bit challenges for, and i report quite a hit over— challenges for, and i report quite a hit over the — challenges for, and i report quite a bit over the years on presence, one of the _ bit over the years on presence, one of the things you immediately see in all present— of the things you immediately see in all present reports and assessments is to go— all present reports and assessments is to go to _ all present reports and assessments is to go to the point just made, all present reports and assessments is to go to the pointjust made, the bil is to go to the pointjust made, the big factors — is to go to the pointjust made, the big factors that stop people reoffending when they come out, the biggest _ reoffending when they come out, the biggest risk factors are not having somewhere to live, and not having a 'ob somewhere to live, and not having a job so _ somewhere to live, and not having a job so there — somewhere to live, and not having a job so there have been some employers, james timson is one, most famously. _ employers, james timson is one, most famously, who have committed themselves and had long—standing links with — themselves and had long—standing links with prisons to get people out of prisons _ links with prisons to get people out of prisons to come to work for them and give _ of prisons to come to work for them and give them new careers. there have _ and give them new careers. there have been— and give them new careers. there have been others. and in those cases. — have been others. and in those cases, those people tend to, clearly not 100% _ cases, those people tend to, clearly not 100% successful, but largely successful in stopping people going back into _ successful in stopping people going back into crime or have a very much better— back into crime or have a very much better rate — back into crime or have a very much better rate than happens otherwise so i better rate than happens otherwise so i think— better rate than happens otherwise so i think the more employers that can take _ so i think the more employers that can take on — so i think the more employers that can take on people who may have challenges at the outset, but part
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of trying — challenges at the outset, but part of trying to rehabilitate people is trying _ of trying to rehabilitate people is trying to — of trying to rehabilitate people is trying to deal with those challenges and help— trying to deal with those challenges and help them reintegrate into the workforce. — and help them reintegrate into the workforce, into society and, of course. — workforce, into society and, of course. you _ workforce, into society and, of course, you can understand that somebody— course, you can understand that somebody might come out of prison with the _ somebody might come out of prison with the best of intentions, but if they have — with the best of intentions, but if they have no home, nojob, unfortunately, it is all too easy for them — unfortunately, it is all too easy for them to slip back into the bad ways— for them to slip back into the bad ways that — for them to slip back into the bad ways that they were in before. so it is absolutely critical. i think it is absolutely critical. i think it is fantastic this is going to happen and that— is fantastic this is going to happen and that it — is fantastic this is going to happen and that it be by necessity, but frankly— and that it be by necessity, but frankly it — and that it be by necessity, but frankly it is better we try to deal with some — frankly it is better we try to deal with some of the people of challenges inherent society than bringing — challenges inherent society than bringing people in the case of... we might— bringing people in the case of... we might have — bringing people in the case of... we might have some very talented people of europe _ might have some very talented people of europe who have gone home because of europe who have gone home because of covid _ of europe who have gone home because of covid and _ of europe who have gone home because of covid and so on, but actually from _ of covid and so on, but actually from a — of covid and so on, but actually from a society point of view it is very— from a society point of view it is very good — from a society point of view it is very good we are trying to deal with some _ very good we are trying to deal with some of— very good we are trying to deal with some of these people coming out of prison. _ some of these people coming out of prison, getting back into society and giving them a proper chance of a new future — shyama, front page of the observer, caddo drivers paid less than sp an hour. tell us they studied —— 0cado drivers. paid less than £s an hour.
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they are driving 0cado goods but are not employed by 0cado, the rapid delivery service 0cado zoom, nikkei delivery service 0cado zoom, nikkei delivery type service that you get which luckily for us, you can get something from the co—op for £1 a9, they will collect it and deliver it. sainsbury is a 3.a9 or waitrose, £a a9. 0bviously, sainsbury is a 3.a9 or waitrose, £a a9. obviously, in this particular case, they have been collecting for 0cado. what we never know is how much those individual drivers are earning power. it is said here that they are paid? 0cado sunak, they are paid less than £s they are paid? 0cado sunak, they are paid less than £5 per hour. you need to examine your concert and is sketch you're going to order anything —— 0cado zoom. thea;r sketch you're going to order anything -- ocado zoom. they caught one of the delivery _ anything -- ocado zoom. they caught one of the delivery drivers, _ anything -- ocado zoom. they caught one of the delivery drivers, don't - one of the delivery drivers, don't they question like they do.
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basically the problem has been articulated that there is a supply chain— articulated that there is a supply chain issue here. you have a company like 0cado— chain issue here. you have a company like 0cado who are using contract lahour— like 0cado who are using contract labour and — like 0cado who are using contract labour and so like 0cado who are using contract labourand so on like 0cado who are using contract labour and so on and perhaps that is not enough — labour and so on and perhaps that is not enough scrutiny going on as to what's _ not enough scrutiny going on as to what's happening there. the problem is the _ what's happening there. the problem is the people cannot survive on this type of— is the people cannot survive on this type of income. trying to live on 5p per, type of income. trying to live on 5p per. which — type of income. trying to live on 5p per. which is — type of income. trying to live on 5p per, which is the result of what they— per, which is the result of what they are — per, which is the result of what they are getting in some cases, according — they are getting in some cases, according to the story —— £5 is clearly— according to the story —— £5 is clearly not _ according to the story —— £5 is clearly not sustainable for people. it is clearly not sustainable for people. it is all _ clearly not sustainable for people. it is all about managing your supply chaih _ it is all about managing your supply chaih it— it is all about managing your supply chain. if you're doing this thing which _ chain. if you're doing this thing which has — chain. if you're doing this thing which has happened increasingly over the last— which has happened increasingly over the last few decades, i suppose, where _ the last few decades, i suppose, where companies use contractors to dojohs _ where companies use contractors to dojohs for— where companies use contractors to dojobs for them, it is managing and making _ dojobs for them, it is managing and making sure — dojobs for them, it is managing and making sure the contractors you are using _ making sure the contractors you are using are _ making sure the contractors you are using are doing the right thing and making _ using are doing the right thing and making sure their staff are treated property— making sure their staff are treated properly because otherwise you get this, properly because otherwise you get this. you _ properly because otherwise you get this, you ship off your work to somebody— this, you ship off your work to somebody else and have something happening which you come as a
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company. — happening which you come as a company, perhaps would not tolerate. just reading _ company, perhaps would not tolerate. just reading a bit more into the story. payslips are seen by the observer show that one particular 0bserver show that one particular worker earned an estimated five quid an hour in the first week of august and £2 91 in the last week ofjuly. this is not enough to survive on, this driver said, i'm struggling. it is part owned by marks & spencer is, you might own this. they said 0cado is a mac works with a number of suppliers, and expects them to hold the high standards. that's it for the papers. thank you shyama and martin.
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hello, hello everyone. i think your doing all right. we cite pics of lorraine, claude yesterday and thunderstorms. today for the majority, we will see a bit of an improvement. it is not a clear—cut story in that everyone will see sunny spells and gorgeous weather. we do have some scattered showers are in, some of which may be heavy. thanks to what you see here, very little on the satellite image. this is an area of high pressure. the cloud here, it is a weather front moving away from us. if i flip over to the pressure chart, you can see high. it is building. we will see these weather fronts moving away from us and they will bring —— brought some heavy rain this morning. they are leaving the south—eastern and eastern parts of the west is best, really. we will see bright sunny spells developing across parts of northern ireland, wales and the south—west of england and notice a line of showers to scotland, the north of england and part of the midlands and down towards the south—east. to the use
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of this, we hang on to a lot of the low cloud, may and marked in places and are generally quite monochrome overhead. furtherwest, brighter. overhead. further west, brighter. breezier to overhead. furtherwest, brighter. breezier to the south and today's top temperatures properly getting to about 22 or 23 celsius. in the sunshine, feeling pleasant enough. we will take it. towards the night, further heavy showers for any time, thundery, slow—moving in nature as well. i think most of these will tend to lose a lot of their energy and fizzle out. the return of some low cloud, mist and fog in places and should be largely dry. as with last night, it will be quite a mild, muqqy last night, it will be quite a mild, muggy night with lows of 1a or 15 celsius. the big picture for the next couple of days shows this — a big area of high pressure draped across the uk. dry, settled weather, it is good news because we should see plenty of that. what we will also tend to see is a bit of cloud cover, mist and work hanging on in there. i will have quite a key
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north—easterly or easterly breeze. along eastern coastal parts, we are cranking down the temperatures as a result. further inland and west, temperatures potentially getting to the mid—or low to mid 20s, so feeling warm, feeling pleasant enough. high pressure sticks around as we cast an eye upon tuesday and into wednesday. we are hanging on to the dry settled conditions for the next couple of days. looking good with some sunshine. stay safe, see you soon.
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parts, this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm victoria derbyshire. british defence officials say seven more people have died at kabul airport — as thousands desperate to leave afghanistan crowd round the area. former world leaders criticise the us withdrawal — former british pm tony blair accuses president biden of following an 'imbecilic�* policy — and donald trump attacks mr biden. biden's botched exit in afghanistan is the most astonishing display of gross incompetence by a nation's leader perhaps at any time that anybody�*s ever seen. leader perhaps at any time

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