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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 22, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the situation at kabul airport is reported to be calmer, after at least 20 people died in chaotic scenes this week as thousands of afghans try to flee the taliban advance. former world leaders have criticised the us withdrawal from afghanistan — with former uk prime minister tony blair calling it unnecessary and tragic. the west has to understand that when we do something like this, the signal it sends out is one of inconstancy. it's one that says, look, if the going gets tough, we're out. a state of emergency has been declared in parts of new york state,
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as tropical storm henri is expected to make landfall. antibody tests are to be widely offered to uk adults for the first time — to try to find out how much natural protection people have after getting coronavirus. and don everly — one half of the everly brothers duo with his late brother phil — has died at the age of 8a. hello, and welcome to bbc news. borisjohnson has said he will convene g7 leaders on tuesday for "urgent talks on the situation in afghanistan". the prime minister called on the international community to work together to ensure safe
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evacuations, and prevent a humanitarian crisis. nato officials say — over the past week — at least 20 people have died at kabul airport, where crowds of afghans have continued to gather in a desperate attempt to flee the country. the taliban blamed the chaos on the united states. but the uk's armed forces minister, james heappey, said the situation at the airport was improving. he said the royal air force had flown out more than 1,700 people in the last 2a hours. today the marshalling that the taliban are doing is making a big difference and so if people have had the instruction from the ministry of defence or the foreign office to come forward and to get on a flight, we encourage them to do so because we are getting people through now at a good rate. already this morning, 731 people have been successfully admitted and processed through the handling centre and are now ready to fly.
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so it is... for all that we've seen on the news over the last few days, and they have been the most awful images, the reality is things are flowing now quite well and we need people who are being told to come forward, to have the confidence to do so. the taliban have been giving their first response to the situation at the airport in kabul. our correspondent, danjohnson who's monitoring developments from delhi. yes, the situation does seem, today in the streets around the airport. the taliban are helping to organise, forming people into cues, which is making the processing effort more efficient and people are more
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quickly able to get through the gates into the airport, and then onto those flights. one development is that the us department of defence has announced that it will activate what it calls the civil reserve air fleet, cumin during a set of commercial airliners to help with the evacuation. so 18 airliners from different us airlines will now be taken over by the military, will support the evacuation effort. they be flown directly into kabul airport but they will be used to collect people from the nearest air bases so that the military flights can focus on ferrying people out of kabul to whichever bases in the region are being used. qatar has been used extensively. facilities there were said to be overcrowded and cat art had to turn people away for a time. so this will help move people on, either to the us or to other countries that have agreed to accept them. that is one development in
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evacuation airport, but we have had a response from the taliban leadership to this whole situation. in a sense saying don't blame us, this is on the us. one of their seniorfigures released this is on the us. one of their senior figures released a statement on the last hour that said our victory and success have shocked the west. they cannot process it. hence they will deliberately try to create panic and chaos just to make the situation look tense. "the only place in chaos right now are in kabul airport. place in chaos right now are in kabulairport. people place in chaos right now are in kabul airport. people there are being shot and killed. the situation thatis being shot and killed. the situation that is being created will have an impact on aviation across the country, and the us is trying to hide its defeat by putting this evacuation drama in place creating panic among the general population. " the statement says, "the us wants to do differently, they are dragging people out of the country." i think thatis people out of the country." i think that is the first signs of the divergence in viewpoint here, perspective between nato forces and the taliban very different on this.
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the taliban also saying that the us is encouraging its media outlets to find issues in the country and exaggerating very minor things. the taliban saying "this is not on us, this is a situation greeted by the us and other nations."— this is a situation greeted by the us and other nations." another point that the taliban _ us and other nations." another point that the taliban reportedly _ us and other nations." another point that the taliban reportedly saying - that the taliban reportedly saying is that they are seeking clarity on the exit date, that august 31 date. they won't be the only ones, will they? many questions and lots of pressure being put on what will happen as we head towards august 31. yeah, there is huge doubt amongst many nations that the evacuation operation can be completed by that august 31 deadline stop so we have seen hints from the uk defence secretary, the armed forces minister that they would support an extension to that if the americans are able to stay, if they can agree that with the taliban, that uk forces at least
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would stay beyond that i'd like to continue evacuating people. but it's reliant, really, on whetherthe continue evacuating people. but it's reliant, really, on whether the us intends to do that and whether it is able to reach some sort of agreement with the taliban. by the turn of that latest statement, it doesn't sound like things are in a particularly good state. so we will have to see if that is possible or if the us even once to do that. joe biden has already said that he thought that all us citizens could be evacuated by the end of august, but how many people that would mean leaving behind in terms of afghans who may be eligible to leave the country as a major question, and the uk government has said that despite this huge effort which is trying to wrap up, it does accept that some people will be left behind and will need to be processed through other countries after the military has left. �* ., , ., left. another line we understand that has been _ left. another line we understand that has been coming _ left. another line we understand that has been coming to - left. another line we understand that has been coming to us - left. another line we understand that has been coming to us via l left. another line we understand l that has been coming to us via the bbc monitoring service, they have been looking at local media. reports that a number of officials in
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provinces have been encouraged to sit down with the taliban, in terms of establishing or thrashing out what this new government is going to be looking like. what exactly are the taliban trying to achieve? could you just let us know what details you just let us know what details you have? you just let us know what details ou have? ., you just let us know what details ou have? . ~ ., you just let us know what details you have?— you just let us know what details ou have? . ~ ., , ., you have? yeah, we know they are in a sense national— you have? yeah, we know they are in a sense national talks _ you have? yeah, we know they are in a sense national talks going - you have? yeah, we know they are in a sense national talks going on - you have? yeah, we know they are in a sense national talks going on in - a sense national talks going on in kabul with leading figures from across the country about what sort of government will be put in place. but the taliban says it is also talking to regional provincial figures about bringing order in each town and village, each province across the country, because for a week now there hasn'tjust been chaos in parts of kabul but there have been situations right across the country. and we are hearing on the country. and we are hearing on the street, in the capital, that things like the banks haven't opened, the atm cash machines are not working, people cannot draw out money and they can't pay by credit card. even for people who have made
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the difficult decision to stay and try to live life under the taliban, already it is getting tricky. there is an urgent need to get some command and control, some power structure in place so that life can return to some degree of normality. but i'm sure afghans will be waiting to see exactly what on earth that sort of normality will be. we haven't really heard an update on how there is peace power talks are going, but it's involving some high—level figures, the most senior leadership of the taliban and moderate voices from the past like the former president, but also extreme voices, people represented from organisations regarded as a terrorist organisation by the us and many other countries. so really complicated talks, the taliban saying it wants an inclusive government, but what that means for some of afghanistan's minority communities is another issue. that is dan johnson. _ communities is another issue. that is dan johnson, there. _
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the independent�*s defence and security editor — kim sengupta — is in kabul and spoke to my colleague victoria derbyshire about the situation at the airport. i've just go back to my hotel. i've been at the airport most of the day, yes. we've been told here by the armed forces minister that it is slightly calmer there. is that right? it is slightly calmer there i would say now. certainly compared to yesterday, which was a particularly awful day. we saw four people, all women, crushed to death in front of us. after that, today is certainly a lot better. there are fewer crowds and at the moment at least they have been well marshalled, but the problem is that the situation here, as you know, changes by the day and changes by the hour, and so what will happen later on, for example,
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because the nights have been quite volatile, sometimes quite violent. we have to see. certainly during the course of the day it's been quieter than it has been for the last 48 hours or so. who is doing the marshalling outside the airport now, then? well, the main focal point is the space outside the british base, which is a hotel. now, that has become also a bit of a choke point because to go through to the control points of other countries which are evacuating people, the americans, the germans, the french, etc, they have to pass through this route. and because there has been a logjam in processing by the other countries, and also by the uk as well, you've had a huge number of people congregating outside the gates of this hotel.
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and that's where the crush had taken place, that's where people have been injured, that's where people have died. here the marshalling is being done by british troops from the parachute regiment, some special forces. and beyond that by the americans. but the first line, if you like, being held are by uk forces. right. the taliban have criticised the chaos around the airport. could this have been organised better? well, the taliban are supposed to be helping the process to get under way, and certainly here there is liaison on a daily basis, between the british
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troops and the taliban. there has been liaison between the americans and the taliban as well. now, how sincerely taliban are in the system taking place is debatable. they seem to be operating a kind of tap—on, tap—off situation, and how much pressure they want to put on western troops. suddenly there is a surge of people coming in and then it will dry up for a while. but the other point worth considering is that the taliban don't control all the checkpoints. some of them are in the hands of other islamic troops. and taliban's remit does not necessarily run to those checkpoints. there are people who have been turned away from those checkpoints and from taliban checkpoints as well. people have disappeared at those checkpoints. so the taliban obviously, and the islamist, have got their own particular agenda, albeit that the taliban at least want to see western forces out and are not directly carrying out any acts against them.
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there are many religious minority groups in afghansitan, includings sikhs and hindus, and are worried about what their future under taliban rule will be like. i'm joined now by gurpreet singh anand, secretary—general of sikh council uk. he's in central london. i wonder if he could start what the situation is like in afghanistan, and what numbers we are talking about? we and what numbers we are talking about? ~ ., ., ., ~ ., and what numbers we are talking about? ~ ., ., , , ., about? we are looking at numbers of between 300-500. _ about? we are looking at numbers of between 300-500. at _ about? we are looking at numbers of between 300-500. at the _ about? we are looking at numbers of between 300-500. at the moment, | about? we are looking at numbers of - between 300-500. at the moment, most between 300—500. at the moment, most seeks and _ between 300—500. at the moment, most seeks and hindus have gone to a gurdwara — seeks and hindus have gone to a gurdwara in kabul and they have all congregated there. they have been visited _ congregated there. they have been visited by— congregated there. they have been visited by the taliban. the visit
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was not — visited by the taliban. the visit was not a — visited by the taliban. the visit was not a friendly one. previously under taliban rule they all had _ previously under taliban rule they all had to— previously under taliban rule they all had to wear yellow patches on their_ all had to wear yellow patches on their clothing to identify them as being _ their clothing to identify them as being from a minority. the rights of minorities— being from a minority. the rights of minorities are not really respected by the _ minorities are not really respected by the taliban, despite the over to yours. _ by the taliban, despite the over to yours. ho — by the taliban, despite the over to yours, no one has trust or faith in what _ yours, no one has trust or faith in what may— yours, no one has trust or faith in what may happen. so yours, no one has trust or faith in what may happen-— yours, no one has trust or faith in what may happen. so what are they hoinu will what may happen. so what are they hoping will happen? _ what may happen. so what are they hoping will happen? obviously - what may happen. so what are they hoping will happen? obviously they j hoping will happen? obviously they have got safe haven for now within the religious temple, but what are they hoping it's going to happen? what do they need? the they hoping it's going to happen? what do they need?— what do they need? the sikhs gurdwara. _ what do they need? the sikhs gurdwara, previous _ what do they need? the sikhs gurdwara, previous gurdwarasj what do they need? the sikhs i gurdwara, previous gurdwaras in kabul. _ gurdwara, previous gurdwaras in kabul, have been attacked and bombed — kabul, have been attacked and bombed. they have suffered as a result _ bombed. they have suffered as a result of— bombed. they have suffered as a result of terrorism. so they are not feeling _ result of terrorism. so they are not feeling totally safe. the sikhs and
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hindus— feeling totally safe. the sikhs and hindus are looking to be evacuated out of _ hindus are looking to be evacuated out of afghanistan. there is not many— out of afghanistan. there is not many of— out of afghanistan. there is not many of them left their and we really— many of them left their and we really need the help of governments from around the world, including the uk government, to start getting people _ uk government, to start getting people out. we understand there are some _ people out. we understand there are some who _ people out. we understand there are some who may not have travel documents and aid is going to be required — documents and aid is going to be required in — documents and aid is going to be required in helping them to get travel— required in helping them to get travel documents sorted out. afghanistan isjust not safe. the fear on — afghanistan isjust not safe. the fear on the sikhs community is of genocide — fear on the sikhs community is of renocide. ~ ., ., fear on the sikhs community is of renocide. ~ . ., , ., fear on the sikhs community is of renocide. ~ . ., , ., , ., genocide. what have you been hearing from the uk government? _ genocide. what have you been hearing from the uk government? they - genocide. what have you been hearing from the uk government? they will i genocide. what have you been hearing| from the uk government? they will be able to help with evacuating? so far the uk government _ able to help with evacuating? so far the uk government has _ able to help with evacuating? so far the uk government has not - the uk government has not acknowledged that there is an issue with minorities. they are looking at obviously— with minorities. they are looking at obviously getting support staff and interpreters and people who helped
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the british and americans out of afghanistan, but that hasn't extended to minorities. we really need _ extended to minorities. we really need the — extended to minorities. we really need the uk government to come forward _ need the uk government to come forward. it's not a big task for a government like the uk. the uk is a powerful— government like the uk. the uk is a powerful nation. they can handle getting _ powerful nation. they can handle getting 300—500 people out of afghanistan. getting 300-500 people out of afghanistan-— getting 300-500 people out of afghanistan. getting 300-500 people out of afuhanistan. ., ., ., ., afghanistan. how are you going to raise that concern? _ afghanistan. how are you going to raise that concern? obviously - afghanistan. how are you going to raise that concern? obviously you | raise that concern? obviously you need to get that message across. what are you going to do?- need to get that message across. what are you going to do? we've had sikhs organisations, _ what are you going to do? we've had sikhs organisations, members - what are you going to do? we've had sikhs organisations, members of- what are you going to do? we've had sikhs organisations, members of the | sikhs organisations, members of the countil— sikhs organisations, members of the council raising this with the government, united sikhs have been raising _ government, united sikhs have been raising this _ government, united sikhs have been raising this with their local mps and the — raising this with their local mps and the government. but so far we have _ and the government. but so far we have hot— and the government. but so far we have not had any response from the government. have not had any response from the government-— have not had any response from the government. ., ., , ,, ~' , , . , government. have any sikhs been able to make their— government. have any sikhs been able to make their way _ government. have any sikhs been able to make their way to _ government. have any sikhs been able to make their way to some _ to make their way to some neighbouring countries to find
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refuge? neighbouring countries to find refu~e? ~ �* ., neighbouring countries to find refu~e? ~ �* . ., ,, ~ , refuge? we've heard that some sikhs manared refuge? we've heard that some sikhs mana . ed to refuge? we've heard that some sikhs managed to get _ refuge? we've heard that some sikhs managed to get to — refuge? we've heard that some sikhs managed to get to india _ refuge? we've heard that some sikhs managed to get to india but - refuge? we've heard that some sikhs managed to get to india but the - managed to get to india but the numbers— managed to get to india but the numbers getting out is small. the problem _ numbers getting out is small. the problem is — numbers getting out is small. the problem is that where the gurdwara is in kabul— problem is that where the gurdwara is in kabulwere problem is that where the gurdwara is in kabul were most sikhs and hindus— is in kabul were most sikhs and hindus are _ is in kabul were most sikhs and hindus are located at the moment, 'ust hindus are located at the moment, just to _ hindus are located at the moment, just to get — hindus are located at the moment, just to get to the airport there are 16 checkpoints. so you've got to negotiate — 16 checkpoints. so you've got to negotiate across 16 checkpoints. the control— negotiate across 16 checkpoints. the control of— negotiate across 16 checkpoints. the control of what is happening locally on the _ control of what is happening locally on the ground or locally, the taliban— on the ground or locally, the taliban may not be looking to assist any minorities. yesterday, 72 sikhs were _ any minorities. yesterday, 72 sikhs were helped while trying to get to the airport. they were refused entry at the _ the airport. they were refused entry at the airport and were held by the taliban— at the airport and were held by the taliban for— at the airport and were held by the taliban for a short while. luckily they— taliban for a short while. luckily they all— taliban for a short while. luckily they all got released, but the worry is that— they all got released, but the worry is that trying to even get from the
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gurdwara — is that trying to even get from the gurdwara to the airport is a task in itself— gurdwara to the airport is a task in itself without help from the international community. how long are they able _ international community. how long are they able to _ international community. how long are they able to stay _ international community. how long are they able to stay in _ international community. how long are they able to stay in the - are they able to stay in the gurdwara for? obviously we are hearing about shortages of money, for a start. you will as well. what is the plan?— for a start. you will as well. what is the plan? what is the strategy? at the moment, _ is the plan? what is the strategy? at the moment, yes, _ is the plan? what is the strategy? at the moment, yes, they - is the plan? what is the strategy? at the moment, yes, they can - is the plan? what is the strategy? - at the moment, yes, they can survive for a few— at the moment, yes, they can survive for a few days. but we don't know what _ for a few days. but we don't know what the — for a few days. but we don't know what the future holds. but the taliban — what the future holds. but the taliban come again and start confiscating supplies? so we really do not _ confiscating supplies? so we really do not know what the future holds and this _ do not know what the future holds and this is— do not know what the future holds and this is imminent danger for the sikhs _ and this is imminent danger for the sikhs community. to and this is imminent danger for the sikhs community.— sikhs community. to keep us up-to-date — sikhs community. to keep us up-to-date with _ sikhs community. to keep us up-to-date with what - sikhs community. to keep us. up-to-date with what happens sikhs community. to keep us - up-to-date with what happens and any up—to—date with what happens and any development. for now, thank you very much. thank you. you're watching bbc news. an afghan woman has given birth on board a us evacuation aircraft in germany.
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the us air mobility command said on twitter that the mother was travelling with her family from kabul to the ramstein air base in germany when she went into labour. after she began experiencing complications, the aircraft commander decided to descend in altitude to increase air pressure in the aircraft, which helped stabilize and save the mother's life". once the plane landed, us military medics came aboard and delivered the child. both mother and baby are well and have been taken to a nearby medical facility. the former prime minister, tony blair, has said president biden's policy — which led to the withdrawal of troops from afghanistan — was "imbecilic". mr blair called the decision to leave tragic, dangerous and an unnecessary abandonment of the country. this morning, he urged the government to use its role as chair of the g7 group of nations
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to co—ordinate international efforts to help the afghan people. days after president biden said there's been no criticism from allies of his withdrawal of troops, in comes a scathing attack from the us's original ally back in 2001. you've now got this group back in charge of afghanistan. they will give protection and succour to al-qaeda. you've got isis already in the country trying to operate at the same time. you know, you look round the world and the only people really cheering this decision are the people hostile to western interests. tony blair himself has come under criticism, too, for his role in afghanistan. the world understands that whilst of course there are dangers in acting, the dangers of inaction are far, far greater. now does he have any regrets, and what would he say to families who lost loved ones? we went in there for very good reasons and we achieved a lot thanks
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to those british and american and other armed forces over the last 20 years. what i'd say to them is the sacrifice was not in vain. those 20 years, by the way, matter. it's notjust former prime ministers that have had a pop at the us president. his own predecessor, donald trump, who signed the original withdrawal deal with the taliban, levelled this attack at him to a rally of supporters. biden's botched exit in afghanistan is the most astonishing display of gross incompetence by a nation's leader, perhaps at any time that anybody's ever seen. but while downing street here say the current prime minister is not criticising the us, pressure continues to build on biden to extend his withdrawal deadline — as fears grow that not everyone will get out from the airport in time. ione wells, bbc news. and ione is with me now.
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we've got the g7, what can we expect? in we've got the g7, what can we exect? ., , we've got the g7, what can we exect? , ., expect? in the last couple of minutes. _ expect? in the last couple of minutes. we _ expect? in the last couple of minutes, we have _ expect? in the last couple of minutes, we have heard - expect? in the last couple ofj minutes, we have heard that expect? in the last couple of- minutes, we have heard that the prime _ minutes, we have heard that the prime minister has confirmed that they will— prime minister has confirmed that they will be this meeting of g7 leaders — they will be this meeting of g7 leaders coming up on tuesday afternoon. i understand it will be virtual _ afternoon. i understand it will be virtual the — afternoon. i understand it will be virtual. the emphasis from the prime minister— virtual. the emphasis from the prime minister today is that he wants the international community to be very much _ international community to be very much working together on things like ensuring _ much working together on things like ensuring safe evacuations, preventing a humanitarian crisis, but also — preventing a humanitarian crisis, but also supporting afghan people on the ground as well. i understand that the — the ground as well. i understand that the prime minister believes that the prime minister believes that united nations is the key route to leading _ that united nations is the key route to leading the humanitarian effort of the _ to leading the humanitarian effort of the g7 — to leading the humanitarian effort of the g7 now that that nato mission as we _ of the g7 now that that nato mission as we have _ of the g7 now that that nato mission as we have seen is pretty much come to an _ as we have seen is pretty much come to an end _ as we have seen is pretty much come to an end. �* �* , as we have seen is pretty much come to an end. �* v , as we have seen is pretty much come to an end. . �*, , ., ., to an end. and there's been another prime minister _ to an end. and there's been another prime minister speaking, _ to an end. and there's been another prime minister speaking, former - prime minister speaking, former prime minister speaking, former prime minister speaking, former prime minister tony blair. what sort of reaction has never been to this? have we heard from downing street? we haven't— have we heard from downing street? we haven't heard from downing street today~ _ we haven't heard from downing street today. interesting to note that
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downing — today. interesting to note that downing street sources in the last 24 hours _ downing street sources in the last 24 hours have said that contrary to the scathing attack that tony blair has launched on president biden and what he _ has launched on president biden and what he called an imbecilic commitment to ending for ever worse, downing _ commitment to ending for ever worse, downing street on the other hand have stressed that the prime minister— have stressed that the prime minister supports the us and isn't criticising — minister supports the us and isn't criticising the us, and that that coordination is very important. and it's also— coordination is very important. and it's also been saying that that relationship between president biden and boris _ relationship between president biden and borisjohnson is a good one. in terms _ and borisjohnson is a good one. in terms of— and borisjohnson is a good one. in terms of more general reaction to the comments made by tony blair, it has been _ the comments made by tony blair, it has been pretty mixed. some supportive but some also criticising him for— supportive but some also criticising him for his— supportive but some also criticising him for his own role in afghanistan as well, _ him for his own role in afghanistan as well, given that it was him that led the _ as well, given that it was him that led the uk — as well, given that it was him that led the uk into afghanistan in 2001 alongside _ led the uk into afghanistan in 2001 alongside the us. we have had people on the _ alongside the us. we have had people on the left _ alongside the us. we have had people on the left of the party, particularly people like john mcdonald, quite critical of tony blair— mcdonald, quite critical of tony blair himself, saying that he had some _ blair himself, saying that he had some front criticising president biden— some front criticising president biden when it was blair that led to the uk _ biden when it was blair that led to the uk into some of the words in the zist the uk into some of the words in the 21st century — the uk into some of the words in the 21st century that led to massive
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civilian — 21st century that led to massive civilian loss of life. interestingly, on blair's point about— interestingly, on blair's point about this not being over and they need _ about this not being over and they need for— about this not being over and they need for everybody to stay until everyone — need for everybody to stay until everyone has been evacuated, interesting to note that the defence secretary _ interesting to note that the defence secretary ben wallace was also writing — secretary ben wallace was also writing in — secretary ben wallace was also writing in the newspapers today and he says _ writing in the newspapers today and he says that while we may not be able to _ he says that while we may not be able to get everybody out in time the you _ able to get everybody out in time the you 5 — able to get everybody out in time the you s would have the uk's full support— the you s would have the uk's full support if— the you s would have the uk's full support if the us did decide to stay longer _ support if the us did decide to stay loner. ., ~' ,, , support if the us did decide to stay loner. ., ~ ,, , . ., longer. thank you very much for that. residents on the us east coast have been urged to prepare for one of the most powerful storms in years. hurricane henri has been downgraded to a tropical storm, but it's triggered a state of emergency in parts of new york state. lebu diesko reports. it was meant to be a celebration of new york's triumph over the worst of the pandemic. at this star—studded concert, it was mother nature who stole the show.
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thousands of people told to leave for their own safety. please pay close attention to the following safety message. due to approaching severe weather, all persons should move quickly and calmly to the nearest exit. flash flooding has already hit, with up to six inches of rain and winds of up to 75 mph expected. the new york state governor is urging people to move to higher ground. new yorkers, please take this storm seriously. i know its short notice. think super storm sandy. that was a category one. this is a category one. a state of emergency has been declared in parts of new york and around six million people in long island, connecticut and massachusetts are under a hurricane warning.
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trying to ready themselves for an event that on this part of the us coastline, is so rare. on saturday, hurricane grace tore through eastern mexico, leaving a trail of destruction. at least eight people have died, including a mother and six of her children. translation: i turned around to go l into the house and that's when the | roof came off the hill and they were all down there. my wife and my six children. although this storm has weakened and is predicted to ease by tomorrow, the potentialfor more flooding and further destruction continues. lebu diseko, bbc news. a government minister in new zealand has acknowledged that the country's strategy of trying to eliminate the coronavirus may no longer be viable. chris hipkins said the delta variant posed big questions about how to deal with the disease in the long term. a growing covid outbreak — after six months without a local infection —
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has triggered a nationwide lockdown. in australia, the prime minister, scott morrison, warned that people would have to learn to start living with the virus. but he said lockdowns would continue until at least 70% of the population was fully vaccinated. if you're an adult in the uk who tests positive for covid—19, you could be invited to take part in a new programme that aims to find out more about the effectiveness of vaccinations. from tuesday, up to 8,000 volunteers a day who receive a positive pcr result will be asked to check whether they have developed antibodies. our reporter, chi chi izundu has more. this research is trying to work out whether people get antibodies from vaccinations or the virus itself. antibodies are part of the body's natural defence system and they can take time to develop. most people make antibodies within 28 days of being infected or vaccinated, but it can take longer. unlike some other blood tests, you don't need to fast
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and you can do the test at any time of day, just don't do your test — or post your test — on a saturday as it might sit in the post for too long. any other day is fine. for the first time from tuesday, any adult in england, scotland, wales and northern ireland who has a positive pcr test will be offered the chance to have two antibody finger prick tests at home. check that your test is addressed to you before starting. this is especially important if other members of your household are also having the test done. lay your kit out on a low table and get familiar with the components. the two tests — one to be taken as soon as you test positive, and the other 28 days later, will look for a response to the vaccination, and the other will look at past infection only. the uk health security agency is working alongside nhs test and trace to monitor levels of antibodies in positive cases. they hope to test up to 8,000 people
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a day and will also use the data collected to help provide further insight into vaccines, especially when it comes to different variants. but people are still being reminded that testing positive for antibodies doesn't mean you're immune and that they should still follow government guidance if they display any symptoms of the virus. chi chi izundu, bbc news. don everly, who together with his brother phil had a string of uk hits in the 1950s and '60s, has died at the age of 84. the everly brothers had 6 uk number one singles, including cathy's clown, walk right back and all i have to do is dream. don and his brother split in the 1970s as musical tastes changed. phil passed away in 2014. this report from our entertainment correspondent, david sillito. # dream, dream, dream.#. the everly brothers, in the years between elvis joining the army and the arrival
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of the beatles, it was their brand of heartache and harmony that ruled the airwaves.

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