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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 22, 2021 3:00pm-3:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the latest headlines. borisjohnson calls a meeting of g7 leaders on tuesday to discuss the situation in afghanistan. the situation at kabul airport is reported to be calmer — after chaotic scenes earlier — as thousands try to flee the taliban. former world leaders have criticised the us withdrawal from afghanistan — with former prime minister tony blair calling it unnecessary and tragic. the west has to understand that when we do something like this, the signal it sends out is one of inconstancy. it's one that says, look, if the going gets tough, we're out. a state of emergency has been declared in parts of new york state, as tropical storm henri is expected
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to make landfall. antibody tests are to be widely offered to uk adults for the first time — to try to find out how much natural protection people have after getting coronavirus. and don everly — who formed the everly brothers duo with his late brother, phil — has died at the age of 8a. hello, and welcome to bbc news. borisjohnson has said he will convene g7 leaders on tuesday for "urgent talks on the situation in afghanistan".
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the prime minister called on the international community to work together to ensure safe evacuations, and prevent a humanitarian crisis. nato officials say — over the past week — at least 20 people have died at kabul airport, where crowds of afghans have continued to gather in a desperate attempt to flee the country. the taliban blamed the chaos on the united states. but the uk's armed forces minister, james heappey, said the situation at the airport was improving, and that the royal air force had flown out more than 1,700 people in the last 2a hours. today the marshalling that the taliban are doing is making a big difference and so if people have had the instruction from the ministry of defence or the foreign office to come forward and to get on a flight, we encourage them to do so because we are getting people through now at a good rate. already this morning, 731 people have been successfully admitted and processed through the handling centre
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and are now ready to fly. so it is... for all that we've seen on the news over the last few days, and they have been the most awful images, the reality is things are flowing now quite well and we need people who are being told to come forward, to have the confidence to do so. that was the uk armed forces minister. the taliban have been giving their first response to the situation at the airport in kabul, blaming the chaos there on the americans. our correspondent, dan johnson, is monitoring developments from delhi. he told us more about the statement from the taliban and what was known about the current situation at the airport in kabul. the situation does seem calmer today in the streets around the airport. the taliban helping to organise the crowds, forming people into queues, which is making the processing effort more efficient and people are more quickly able to get through the gates into the airport,
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and then onto those flights. one development is that the us department of defence has announced that it will activate what it calls the civil reserve air fleet — that essentially means it commandeers a set of commercial airliners to help with the evacuation. so 18 airliners from different us airlines will now be taken over by the military and will support the evacuation effort. they won't be flown directly into kabul airport but they'll be used to collect people from the nearest air bases so that the military flights can focus on ferrying people out of kabul to whichever bases in the region are being used. qatar has been used extensively. the facilities there were said to be overcrowded and qatar had to turn people away for a time. so this will help move people on, either to the us or to other countries that have agreed to accept them. that's one development in the evacuation effort,
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but we have had a response from the taliban leadership to this whole situation. in a sense saying, "don't blame us, this is on the us." one of their senior figures released a statement in the last hour that said, "our victory and success have shocked the west. they cannot digest it. hence, they'll deliberately try to create panic and chaos just to make the situation look tense. the only place in chaos right now is kabul airport. people there are being shot and killed." he says, "the situation that is being created will have an impact on aviation across the country, and the us is trying to hide its defeat by putting this evacuation drama in place — actually creating panic among the general population." the taliban says, "if afghans want to travel abroad, they could do so in a normal way with valid visas and passports. but the us wants to do this differently, they are dragging people out of the country." i think that's the first signs of the divergence in viewpoint here, the perspectives between nato forces and the taliban very different on this.
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the taliban also saying that the us is encouraging its media outlets to find issues in the country and exaggerating very minor things. the taliban saying "this is not on us, this is a situation created by the us and other nations." another point that the taliban reportedly saying is that they're seeking clarity on the exit date, that august 31st date. i mean, they won't be the only ones, will they? many questions and lots of pressure being put on what will happen as we head towards august 31st. yeah, there's huge doubt amongst many nations that the evacuation operation can be completed by that august 31st deadline. so we've seen hints from the uk defence secretary, the armed forces minister that they would support an extension to that
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if the americans are able to stay, if they can agree that with the taliban, that uk forces at least would stay beyond that deadline to continue evacuating people. but it's reliant, really, on whether the us intends to do that and whether it is able to reach some sort of agreement with the taliban. by the tone of that latest statement, it doesn't sound like things are in a particularly good state. so we will have to see if that is possible or if the us even once to do that. joe biden has already said that he thought that all us citizens could be evacuated by the end of august, but how many people that would mean leaving behind in terms of afghans who may be eligible to leave the country is a major question, and the uk government has said that despite this huge effort which it is trying to ramp up, it does accept that some people will be left behind and will need to be processed through other countries after the military has left.
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in the last couple of hours our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, landed at kabul airport — and she's given us this update. it hits you like a brick. the intensity, the urgency, the darkness of this hour. in every direction i look are the huge grey military transport planes from the united states and many other countries. military helicopters in the sky. and heading towards every single plane, a long queue of afghans. the lines don't seem to end. told they can only bring one suitcase, the clothes they are wearing as they leave their country behind. the country now controlled by the taliban. and it's notjust controlled by the taliban. and it's not just a controlled by the taliban. and it's notjust a country controlled by the taliban. and it's not just a country they are leaving, leaving behind the life they lived stop and the young educated generation, they like they built up, the dreams they cherished over 20 years. this whole scene here is so
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orderly and calm, butjust beyond this perimeter thousands more afghans, said to be 14,000 in this airfield controlled by the us military waiting to board, another 10,000 or more outside. a crush of people wanting to leave however they can. no one wanted this moment, expected this moment, will forget this moment. that was our international correspondent, who hasjust landed correspondent, who has just landed at correspondent, who hasjust landed at kabul airport herself. an update on what she is seeing. we will hopefully be speaking to her later here on bbc news. the us has ordered commercial airlines to provide passengerjets for the evacuation of americans
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and afghan refugees, only the third time such a thing has been done. they won't be flying to kabul, but rather used for moving evacuees from interim bases in the middle east, which have been overwhelmed. in kabul, defense secretary lloyd austin said the military was looking at different and creative ways to help get americans and their afghan allies into the airport. the former uk prime minister, tony blair, has said president biden�*s policy — which led to the withdrawal of troops from afghanistan — was "imbecilic". mr blair called the decision to leave "tragic, dangerous and an unnecessary abandonment" of the country. this morning, he urged the government to use its role as chair of the g7 group of nations to coordinate international efforts to help the afghan people. days after president biden said there's been no criticism from allies of his withdrawal of troops, in comes a scathing attack from the us's
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original ally back in 2001. you've now got this group back in charge of afghanistan. they will give protection and succour to al-anda. you've got isis already in the country trying to operate at the same time. you know, you look round the world and the only people really cheering this decision are the people hostile to western interests. tony blair himself has come under criticism, too, for his role in afghanistan. the world understands that whilst of course there are dangers in acting, the dangers of inaction are far, far greater. now does he have any regrets, and what would he say to families who lost loved ones? we went in there for very good reasons and we achieved a lot thanks to those british and american and other armed forces over the last 20 years. what i'd say to them is the sacrifice was not in vain. those 20 years, by the way, matter. it's notjust former prime
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ministers that have had a pop at the us president. his own predecessor, donald trump, who signed the original withdrawal deal with the taliban, levelled this attack at him to a rally of supporters. biden's botched exit in afghanistan is the most astonishing display of gross incompetence by a nation's leader, perhaps at any time that anybody's ever seen. but while downing street here say the current prime minister is not criticising the us, pressure continues to build on biden to extend his withdrawal deadline — as fears grow that not everyone will get out from the airport in time. ione wells, bbc news. we've heard that the prime minister has heard _ we've heard that the prime minister has heard that there will be this meeting — has heard that there will be this meeting of g7 leaders coming up on tuesday— meeting of g7 leaders coming up on tuesday afternoon. it won't be in person. — tuesday afternoon. it won't be in person. but — tuesday afternoon. it won't be in person, but it will be a coming together— person, but it will be a coming together of all those leaders to discuss — together of all those leaders to discuss the situation in afghanistan. the emphasis from the
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prime _ afghanistan. the emphasis from the prime minister today is that he wants— prime minister today is that he wants the _ prime minister today is that he wants the international community to be very— wants the international community to be very much working together on things— be very much working together on things like — be very much working together on things like ensuring safe evacuations, preventing a humanitarian crisis, but also supporting afghan people on the ground _ supporting afghan people on the ground as well. i understand that the prime — ground as well. i understand that the prime minister believes that the united _ the prime minister believes that the united nations is the key route to leading _ united nations is the key route to leading the humanitarian effort of the g7 _ leading the humanitarian effort of the g7 now that that nato mission has pretty— the g7 now that that nato mission has pretty much come to an end. and there's been — has pretty much come to an end. fific there's been another prime has pretty much come to an end. fific there's been another prime minister speaking in intervention of course. what sort of reaction has there been to this? have we heard from downing street? irate to this? have we heard from downing street? ~ . �* ., , ., street? we haven't actually heard from downing _ street? we haven't actually heard from downing street _ street? we haven't actually heard from downing street today. - street? we haven't actually heard from downing street today. they| from downing street today. they haven't— from downing street today. they haven't really commented on some of the claims _ haven't really commented on some of the claims that have been made by tony blair — the claims that have been made by tony blair. interesting to note the downing _ tony blair. interesting to note the downing street sources in the last 24 hours _ downing street sources in the last 24 hours have said that contrary to the scathing attack that tony blair has launched on president biden and what he _ has launched on president biden and what he called an imbecilic commitment to ending for ever worse, downing _ commitment to ending for ever worse, downing street on the other hand have stressed that the prime minister— have stressed that the prime minister supports the us and isn't
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criticising — minister supports the us and isn't criticising the us, and that coordination is very important. and has also _ coordination is very important. and has also been saying that that relationship between president biden and prime _ relationship between president biden and prime minister borisjohnson is and prime minister borisjohnson is a good _ and prime minister borisjohnson is a good one — and prime minister borisjohnson is a good one. in my general reaction, it has— a good one. in my general reaction, it has treen— a good one. in my general reaction, it has been pretty mixed. some supportive, but some also criticising him for his own role in afghanistan as well, given that it was him — afghanistan as well, given that it was him that led the uk into afghanistan in 2001 alongside the us. people on the left of the party, particularly — us. people on the left of the party, particularly people like labour's john mcdonnell, quite critical of tony— john mcdonnell, quite critical of tony blair himself, saying that he had some — tony blair himself, saying that he had some front criticising president biden— had some front criticising president biden when it was blair that led the uk into— biden when it was blair that led the uk into some of the wars in the 21st—century that led to mass civilian — 21st—century that led to mass civilian loss of life. interestingly, on blair's point on this not— interestingly, on blair's point on this not being over and the need for everybody— this not being over and the need for everybody to stay until everybody has been — everybody to stay until everybody has been evacuated, interesting to note that _ has been evacuated, interesting to note that the defence secretary ben wallace _ note that the defence secretary ben wallace was also writing in the newspapers today, and that he says that white _ newspapers today, and that he says that while we may not be able to get everybody _ that while we may not be able to get everybody out in time, you s would
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have the _ everybody out in time, you s would have the uk's full support if the us did decide — have the uk's full support if the us did decide to stay a bit longer. just to— did decide to stay a bit longer. just to supplement what she said about the g7, we understand that on tuesday president biden will be a appearing virtually, discussing the situation in afghanistan. and it is the prime minister, borisjohnson, thatis the prime minister, borisjohnson, that is convening that meeting. president biden appearing virtually on tuesday the 24th at the g7 meeting. the time is quarter past three. borisjohnson has called a meeting of g7 leaders on tuesday to discuss the crisis in afghanistan. the area around kabul airport is reported to be calmer —
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after chaotic scenes earlier — as thousands try to flee the taliban advance. former world leaders have criticised the us withdrawal from afghanistan — with former pm tony blair calling it unnecessary and tragic. antibody tests are to be widely offered to uk adults for the first time — to try to find out how much natural protection people have after getting coronavirus. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's austin. we start with golf because the leaders have just tee'd off for the final round of the women's open at carnoustie in scotland. it's the final major of the season and there's increased prize money for the winner this year, too — making it the most lucrative tournament on the women's calander. and there's plenty of british
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interest in contention. sweden's anna nordqvist and denmark's nanna madsen were the joint overnight leaders — they're now locked in a six—way tie at the top on 9 under par. but scottish amateur louise duncan and england's georgia hall — the 2018 champion — are bothjust one shot back on eight under par. it's another busy day in the premier league. we're into the second half in the two early games and manchester untied havejust drawn level with southampton at st mary's. the home side were leading 1—0 thanks to an own goal from united midfielder, fred. tottenham are beating wolves 1—0 at mollyneux, thanks to a del alli penalty. harry kane is in the squad for the first time this season, he's been named on the bench. later arsenal are at
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home to chelsea. in the scottish premiership, dundee resuced a 2—2 draw against league leaders hibernian in the early game. dundee took the lead early on through former hibs strikerjason cummings, before martin boyle equalised for hibs from the penalty spot — against his former club. but after hibs took the lead through ryan porteous, paul mcgowan popped up with seven minutes to go to put dundee level, which meant the sides shared the points. hibs stay top of the table for now, on seven points. wild celebrations there. well, aberdeen or hearts could both go top with a win this afternoon — they're playing right now at tynecastle. champions rangers havejust gone a goal up against ross county — joe aribo with the goal there. and stjohnstone are taking on dundee united. those games have all kicked off at
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3pm. to some sad news now, and the former liverpool and england midfielder, terry mcdermott, has been diagnosed with dementia. the 69—year—old made more than 300 appearances for liverpool between 1974 and 1982. he announced he's in the early stages of dementia following tests — just days after the manchester united and scotland legend, denis law, was diagnosed with the condition. last month, it was announced that professional footballers in england will be limited to ten so—called "higherforce headers" a week in training. dawn astle's father, the former west brom and england strikerjeff astle, died in 2002. a neuropathologist said the death was due to a brain condition caused by heading footballs. she wants more to be done to help former professionals. this isn'tjust this isn't just about this isn'tjust about my this isn't just about my dad this isn'tjust about my dad or terry— this isn'tjust about my dad or terry or— this isn'tjust about my dad or
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terry or dennis, it's about the whole — terry or dennis, it's about the whole generation of footballers that played _ whole generation of footballers that played before him, that played with him, played before him, that played with him. and _ played before him, that played with him, and just importantly, the generation of players that are playing — generation of players that are playing now. because if football doesn't — playing now. because if football doesn't start to pull its finger out about— doesn't start to pull its finger out about this — doesn't start to pull its finger out about this and stop sweeping it under— about this and stop sweeping it under the carpet, the future generations of footballers will be a ticking _ generations of footballers will be a ticking time bomb, because this will not go _ ticking time bomb, because this will not go away. and finally, what a summer it's been for great britain's beth shriever — just three weeks after winning olympic gold in the bmx in tokyo, the 22—year—old has now been crowned world champion. shriver had a great start and that proved to be key. there was a crash just behind her that took out three riders, including defending champion alise willoughby. that gave shriver an advantage she never looked like losing. she's britain's second female world bmx champion, following in the footsteps of shanaze reade to wear
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the rainbow jersey. it's very hard to believe at the moment. i've been writing consistently all day. just wanted to go out there and have a good time like i did in tokyo. relaxed and happy. had an all right start and just dug and managed to take the win. i'm gassed, yeah. not a bad month for her at all. that is all of your sport for now. residents on the us east coast have been urged to prepare for one of the most powerful storms in years. hurricane henri has been downgraded to a tropical storm — but has triggered a state of emergency in parts of new york state. lebo diseko reports.
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it was meant to be a celebration of new york's triumph over the worst of the pandemic. at this star—studded concert, it was mother nature who stole the show. thousands of people told to leave for their own safety. please pay close attention to the following safety message. due to approaching severe weather, all persons should move quickly and calmly to the nearest exit. flash flooding has already hit, with up to six inches of rain and winds of up to 75 mph expected. the new york state governor is urging people to move to higher ground. new yorkers, please take this storm seriously. i know it's short notice. think super storm sandy. that was a category one. this is a category one. a state of emergency has been declared in parts of new york and around six million people in long island, connecticut and massachusetts are under a hurricane warning. trying to ready themselves
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for an event that on this part of the us coastline, is so rare. on saturday, hurricane grace tore through eastern mexico, leaving a trail of destruction. at least eight people have died, including a mother and six of her children. translation: i turned around to go l into the house and that's when the | roof came off the hill and they were all down there. my wife and my six children. although this storm has weakened and is predicted to ease by tomorrow, the potentialfor more flooding and further destruction continues. lebu diseko, bbc news. and he is speaking at the moment. new york governor andrew kernow. he is giving new yorkers an update, again confirming that it has been downgraded to a tropical storm. residents in the area of long
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island, around new york and new england, i've been told that they need to prepare for heavy rainfall and also flooding later today. a government minister in new zealand has acknowledged that the country's strategy of trying to eliminate the coronavirus may no longer be viable. chris hipkins said the delta variant posed big questions about how to deal with the disease in the long term. a growing covid outbreak, after six months without a local infection, has triggered a nationwide lockdown. in australia, the prime minister, scott morrison, warned that people would have to learn to start living with the virus. but he said lockdowns would continue until at least 70% of the population was fully vaccinated. don everly who together with his brother phil, had a string of uk hits in the 1950s and 60s has died at the age of 84.
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the everly brothers had six uk number one singles, including — cathy's clown, walk right back and all i have to do is dream. phil died in 2014. this report from our entertainment correspondent, david sillito. # dream, dream, dream.#. the everly brothers — in the years between elvis joining the army and the arrival of the beatles, it was their brand of heartache and harmony that ruled the airwaves. a career that began when donnie, here on the right, was just eight years old. they had a 50—minute radio show on saturdays, known as little donnie. and i used to get to read the commercials. be sure if you have corns and calluses, send for foster's 30 minute wonder corn and callous remover. $1 will bring you a big one ounce bottle.
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the brothers phil and don were soon singing on the radio show and when their father, a kentucky coalminer with musical aspirations moved the family to tennessee, they landed a record deal at the home of country music. nashville. they sing the beatles, simon and garfunkel, crosby, stills and nash, they all took inspiration from their clean—cut close harmony. but as the 50s turned into the 60s, the everly brothers quickly began to look out of date. # way down in golden green year. don began to write more songs, but the hits didn't come and the strains began to show.
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doing a duet in the music business the kind a duet that phil and i are, close harmony, nose to nose right up on stage every night when we were working, that puts a lot of strain on the relationship. the brothers finally split midway through a concert in 1973. applause they sing ten years later, there was a brief reunion, but don, outgoing, liberal, was in many ways the opposite of his more conservative brother. they went years without speaking. but when phil died in 2014, it was a reminder of what they could only do together. the heartache and harmony of the everly brothers. don everly, who has died at the age of 84.
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and it's weather time here. hello. high pressure is making a big comeback across the uk for the week ahead. last week, we were talking very much about cloud and grey skies. this week we should be switching to talking about long spells of sunshine, fingers crossed. we've still got quite a bit of cloud to get rid of, though, from the east of the uk through the remainder of the day. it will continue to produce some isolated but quite heavy showers. most of those, though, fading away into the small hours of monday as the high really begins to build and the low pulls away. lows of 11—14 c. for monday daytime, there will be some patchy cloud roaming around across the uk, but this big area of high pressure will be establishing all the while. we could perhaps get a few showers across the highlands of scotland and perhaps a cooler breeze off the north sea into east anglia and the far south—east. overall, a lot of fine weather,
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some longer spells of sunshine and the return of some warmth. 23 in london and glasgow. hello, this is bbc news with me, lukwesa burak. the headlines... president biden is to attend a virtual meeting of g7 leaders on tuesday, convened by borisjohnson to discuss the situation in afghanistan. thousands of people are trying to flee the taliban advance. former world leaders have criticised the us withdrawal from afghanistan, with former prime minister tony blair calling it "unnecessary and tragic". the west has to understand that when we do something like this, the signal it sends out is one of inconstancy. it's one that says, "look, if the going gets tough, we're out." a state of emergency has been declared in parts of new york state, as tropical storm henri is expected to make landfall. antibody tests are to be
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widely offered to uk adults for the first time, to try to find out how much natural protection people have after getting coronavirus. now on bbc news... ..the media show. hello. are you finally in a position to make some money out of social media? well, the big name companies do very nicely, thank you, out of what you post and what you share, but have the tables turned in favour of the individual? can we all make cash with our latest musical composition or the recipe we lovingly demonstrate if we're a little bit smarter about it? well, websites like patreon offer fans the ability to pay their favourite artists and writers directly. tiktok and facebook have started offering cash to the most popular creators.
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so, is there money to be made in the so—called creative

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