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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 22, 2021 10:30pm-11:00pm BST

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were working in the security services or work in poppy and many afghan taliban fighters also would work in the poppy economy. so... any kind of effort on the part of the taliban to deliver on its promise quickly would be enormously politically costly in addition to being financially costly for the group. a view on the future of the taliban from the brookings institution in washington, dc. time for a look at the weather with ben rich. rather cloudy weather we had to contend with last week. this week promises something a bit better, certainly largely dry with some warm spells of sunshine. having said that, no heatwave on the way and temperatures will be nothing exceptional for the time of year. but high—pressure family building in and taking control of our weather.
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that is why it is going to be mainly dry and settled, but the wind is in a clockwise action, so we will be pulling winds down from the north and not tapping into any of this heat across parts of southern europe. as we had to monday we start off with some distant mark, a lot of cloud around, but some spells of sunshine. it will stay murky and misty for the coasts and it will be gloomy for shetland. a small chance of a shower of a high ground in western scotland, wales and the south—west, but most places fine with light winds and spells of sunshine, so not feeling too bad, 21 to 24 sunshine, so not feeling too bad, 21 to 2a degrees, the 2a in parts of western scotland. any showers that do crop up in the west will fade, dry with some clear spells, but some areas of cloud and this cloud here may well work in two parts of england and then perhaps into the midlands and continue itsjourney west as we head through the day on tuesday. it will cloud over a bit of
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some parts of wales, may be the odd spot of drizzle. some misty and murky weather, clinging to these coasts north and west, but elsewhere further spells of sunshine, the highest temperatures across western scotland and may be parts of northern ireland, up to 2a or even 25 degrees. wednesday a similar day, best of sunshine in the west, more cloud filtering into eastern areas and also noticeable northerly winds starting to develop close to eastern coasts, so that will knock the edge of the temperatures here, the highest temperatures once again out towards the west. subtle changes on thursday, our area of high pressure would drift northwards, allowing this frontal system to work in, not a lot of rain with that, but a lot of cloud into eastern areas and coped with that strong northerly breeze it is going to feel really quite cool for eastern coasts, not quite cool for eastern coasts, not quite as cool further west, but even here temperatures, down a little as we head towards the end of the week.
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hello, this is bbc news with shaun ley. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first, the headlines. a meeting of g7 leaders will be held on tuesday to discuss the situation in afghanistan, as thousands of people continue trying to flee the taliban advance. thousands of afghans continue their days long vigil outside kabul airport,
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hoping to escape a country now in the hands of the taliban again. those who make it are still in shock at how quickly afghanistan capitulated. no—one expected it would be this quick. would be so sudden. and for these afghans, the crisis is just starting. in the us state of tennessee, rescue workers are continuing to look for dozens of people who are missing after severe flooding. at least ten people have died. more than 120,000 homes are without power across the us east coast, after tropical storm henri made landfall at rhode island. it's been downgraded from a hurricane, although many residents are still concerned about a possible storm surge. hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the writer
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and broadcaster mihir bose, and the former pensions minister, conservative peer baroness ros altmann. welcome to both of you, lovely to have you with us again. let me bring you up—to—date with what the papers are saying. afghanistan dominates most of the front pages. the ft leads on the news that the prime minister has convened a g7 meeting of world leaders next week to discuss the ongoing situation. the daily mail reports that borisjohnson is expected to plead with president biden to extend his withdrawal deadline, as fears grow that flights may be stopped within 48 hours. the telegraph also leads on that story, adding that uk forces are preparing for the possibility they will have to evacuate afghans through the country's land borders. the is front page story is the worsening tensions between british and us politicians and diplomats, afterformer prime minister tony blair described the us decision to withdraw from the country as "imbecilic". the guardian reports that the taliban have criticised the us for what it described as "anarchy" at kabul airport, suggesting that its own fighters
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were the only ones capable of restoring order. meanwhile, the metro focuses on the story of a british paratrooper who was filmed helping a baby and her mother over a wall at kabul airport to safety. so let's kick off, if we may come up with the ft, "johnson hosts crisis talks as role emerges for china and russia." . , . talks as role emerges for china and russia.“ . , ., . ., ., russia." china is a chair at the beat to make _ russia." china is a chair at the beat to make a _ russia." china is a chair at the beat to make a g7, _ russia." china is a chair at the beat to make a g7, we - russia." china is a chair at the beat to make a g7, we know. russia." china is a chair at the i beat to make a g7, we know that in afghanistan, we've seen horrific scenes so britain is trying to take steps, and clearly china and russia who stand to benefit from what's happening in afghanistan are being pulled in if they can, if they will take any steps, a security council resolution is being proposed. but i
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think what this shows, and this is the important point, is this situation has been created by the west, by western intervention — you mentioned that tony blair spoke about imbecilic, but it was tony blair who, 22 years ago, made that great speech saying the west should intervene and change regimes and government, bring goodness to the world. this was a new form of imperialism not all that removed from what alfred milner said more than a century ago. but this is what the west is now paying for, going into countries and not understanding what is there, and trying to change them. what's happened in afghanistan? a corrupt regime where the army and everything else, the president leaves and flies away with a pot of gold, things like that. and basically, we have created this mess. and instead ofjust bringing our hands, we should admit the mess we've created, and that goes back to several politicians, notjust what
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biden is doing at the moment. the seech to biden is doing at the moment. the speech to which he is referring to the game known as the chicago doctrine, because it was delivered in chicago. anyone who wants to find that can find the text and indeed the video of tony blair speaking. it's interesting, this is a role that boris johnson it's interesting, this is a role that borisjohnson can adopt because he's got the authority of being the chair of the g7 — a good opportunity, this, for thinking beyond the evacuation phase. as to what comes next and whether indeed we can in any way continue to influence the taliban? i we can in any way continue to influence the taliban?- we can in any way continue to influence the taliban? i must say that i think _ influence the taliban? i must say that i think boris _ influence the taliban? i must say that i think boris johnson - influence the taliban? i must say that i think boris johnson has - influence the taliban? i must say that i think boris johnson has got influence the taliban? i must say i that i think boris johnson has got a that i think borisjohnson has got a huge _ that i think borisjohnson has got a huge opportunity to try to bring the g7 together and help to stabilise the situation in afghanistan. the situation — the situation in afghanistan. the situation is clearly chaotic, we've -ot situation is clearly chaotic, we've got people's lives being lost in trying — got people's lives being lost in trying to—
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got people's lives being lost in trying to flee, and chaos at the airport — trying to flee, and chaos at the airport. there is 5000 or more us troops _ airport. there is 5000 or more us troops there, but they aren't actually— troops there, but they aren't actually being able to control what is going _ actually being able to control what is going on at the airport. and interestingly, the uk i believe will be trying — interestingly, the uk i believe will be trying to work with france to try to get— be trying to work with france to try to get a _ be trying to work with france to try to get a un — be trying to work with france to try to get a un resolution, which they are hoping — to get a un resolution, which they are hoping russia and china will also are hoping russia and china will aisoioin — are hoping russia and china will alsojoin in. if russia and china do 'oin alsojoin in. if russia and china do join with— alsojoin in. if russia and china do join with other countries, that would — join with other countries, that would he _ join with other countries, that would be a really positive sign because — would be a really positive sign because the risk is the west is losing — because the risk is the west is losing out— because the risk is the west is losing out in a big way and what's happening — losing out in a big way and what's happening in the middle east, and in some _ happening in the middle east, and in some of— happening in the middle east, and in some of the countries which are usually— some of the countries which are usually unstable, and we've been helping _ usually unstable, and we've been helping to— usually unstable, and we've been helping to keep peace there. and if russia _ helping to keep peace there. and if russia and — helping to keep peace there. and if russia and china take over and allow the terrorist — russia and china take over and allow the terrorist activities to continue and the _ the terrorist activities to continue and the repression of the populations to continue, then there
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really— populations to continue, then there really is _ populations to continue, then there really is a _ populations to continue, then there really is a serious threat to the west. — really is a serious threat to the west. not— really is a serious threat to the west, notjust within really is a serious threat to the west, not just within that country. at the _ west, not just within that country. at the moment we must focus on the people _ at the moment we must focus on the people within afghanistan who need to escape _ people within afghanistan who need to escape and need to leave british citizens— to escape and need to leave british citizens and those who helped us because — citizens and those who helped us because their lives are further at risk _ because their lives are further at risk but— because their lives are further at risk. but down the line, we definitely have an issue of how to protect _ definitely have an issue of how to protect our— definitely have an issue of how to protect our way of life in the last. the male — protect our way of life in the last. the male has a photo showing the scene at kabul airport, showing their working hand in glove or at least certainly very closely together by necessity. this headline, "don't cut and run yet, joe," there are sympathetic voices in washington who say that we are
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going by the 31st, that's just not feasible. i going by the 31st, that's 'ust not feasible. . . , going by the 31st, that's 'ust not feasible. . ., , ,, feasible. i certainly hope the us and joe feasible. i certainly hope the us and joe biden — feasible. i certainly hope the us and joe biden in _ feasible. i certainly hope the us and joe biden in particular - feasible. i certainly hope the us and joe biden in particular will l and joe biden in particular will reconsider the current position. i think— reconsider the current position. i think when— reconsider the current position. i think when they set the 31 august deadline. — think when they set the 31 august deadline, nobody expected this lightning speed take over by the taliban— lightning speed take over by the taliban that has taken place. and clearly, _ taliban that has taken place. and clearly, many more lives are at risk _ clearly, many more lives are at risk and — clearly, many more lives are at risk. and unless the us does stay longer, _ risk. and unless the us does stay longer, there could well be huge bloodshed for huge risks for so many people _ bloodshed for huge risks for so many people. and one would hope that after— people. and one would hope that after all— people. and one would hope that after all these years of being in the country that the american administration would recognise the key role _ administration would recognise the key role it— administration would recognise the key role it is playing now it needs to continue — key role it is playing now it needs to continue to play while we try to -et to continue to play while we try to get those — to continue to play while we try to get those people whose lives are so severely _ get those people whose lives are so
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severely at — get those people whose lives are so severely at risk, or foreign nationals— severely at risk, or foreign nationals who unexpectedly need to flee the _ nationals who unexpectedly need to flee the country because nobody expected kabul to be overrun like this, _ expected kabul to be overrun like this, that — expected kabul to be overrun like this, that the us should maintain its presence there at least for some more _ its presence there at least for some more weeks while we get this job done _ more weeks while we get this 'ob done. �* , more weeks while we get this 'ob done. �*, ., ,. ., more weeks while we get this 'ob done. �*, ., , , done. it's fascinating, seeing this hoto on done. it's fascinating, seeing this photo on the _ done. it's fascinating, seeing this photo on the front _ done. it's fascinating, seeing this photo on the front of— done. it's fascinating, seeing this photo on the front of the - done. it's fascinating, seeing this photo on the front of the daily i photo on the front of the daily mail, because you think not so long ago, and british troops have not beenin ago, and british troops have not been in a combat role for some time, but not so long ago, the guys on top of the wall there would have been doing their best to kill the guys at the bottom, and the whole thing was driven by a particular ideology and philosophy that the british, as you were saying, partly inspired by that chicago speech were determined to route? , ., ., .., , chicago speech were determined to route? , ., ., , , route? yes, i mean, of course this is a very interesting _ route? yes, i mean, of course this is a very interesting picture, - route? yes, i mean, of course this is a very interesting picture, and l route? yes, i mean, of course this is a very interesting picture, and i | is a very interesting picture, and i think it shows that the taliban is trying to present this to image. this is a different taliban, yes,
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islamic state and so on have said that — but this is not the taliban that — but this is not the taliban that ruled afghanistan in which the west removed after the 9/11 attacks. and if you like, this is the taliban trying to have a pr campaign to show its a different one. i think headline saying "don't cut and run yet, joe" — i don't think boris johnson has much pressure to apply on biden, and biden is following from what donald trump agreed with the taliban, lets her member, he did a deal that the us would withdraw, biden hasjust a deal that the us would withdraw, biden has just followed that deal. as far as one can make out, biden's administration it's time —— believes it's time to leave, and frankly the us should have known what would happen because the regime it created was not a stable one. it was a corrupt regime, the regime did not have the allegiance of the people —
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in fact, i would say the taliban has greater allegiance with the people than the region did that sustained in the area for so long. the headline might be very eye—catching but i don't suspect the us will actually delay its withdrawal. biden has taken his position, he wants to bring the troops home, and he believes that is popular with the americans, and i think that is what we will see, i'm afraid.— americans, and i think that is what we will see, i'm afraid. what about the front story _ we will see, i'm afraid. what about the front story of _ we will see, i'm afraid. what about the front story of the _ we will see, i'm afraid. what about| the front story of the independent? abaco afghan asylum—seekers in the uk trapped in limbo"? this abaco afghan asylum-seekers in the uk trapped in limbo"?— uk trapped in limbo"? this is a very interestin: uk trapped in limbo"? this is a very interesting story _ uk trapped in limbo"? this is a very interesting story about _ uk trapped in limbo"? this is a very interesting story about afghan - interesting story about afghan refugees who've already come to this country. now we've said we were take about 5000, but what the story has set as of the home office has refused to say if it has halted processing about 3000 applications, and what it will do about them. and really, we need to look, given the work that these africans did for us,
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given the help they gave our troops, we need to look at these figures. for instance, ifound it we need to look at these figures. for instance, i found it very strange that priti patel should have suddenly trumped up a figure of 5000 — where did that come from? compared to other countries, we are taking much fewer afghan refugees despite the claim or in some circles that we are taking a lot of refugees. the fact that these refugees are in limbo does not say much for us, and for our humane policies of which we are so proud. it’s for our humane policies of which we are so proud-— are so proud. it's difficult, in terms of _ are so proud. it's difficult, in terms of definitions, - are so proud. it's difficult, in terms of definitions, this, i are so proud. it's difficult, in i terms of definitions, this, because just a few weeks ago, the home office would've said these afghans 0ffice would've said these afghans have no right to asylum, it's a perfectly safe country, we will send them home particularly if they came in boats across the channel after a long overland journey. now, in boats across the channel after a long overlandjourney. now, because of the nature of what's happening in that country, of course we have to take a different position.— take a different position. well, i 'ust think take a different position. well, i just think we — take a different position. well, i just think we are _ take a different position. well, i just think we are in _ take a different position. well, i just think we are in such - take a different position. well, i just think we are in such a i just think we are in such a different—
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just think we are in such a different position now. we are duty— bound different position now. we are duty—bound morally and, as a matter of honour, _ duty—bound morally and, as a matter of honour, to — duty—bound morally and, as a matter of honour, to ensure that the people we led _ of honour, to ensure that the people we led to— of honour, to ensure that the people we led to believe in afghanistan would _ we led to believe in afghanistan would have a brighter future, people who risk— would have a brighter future, people who risk their lives to help us — we must _ who risk their lives to help us — we must take — who risk their lives to help us — we must take them in. we cannotjust turn our— must take them in. we cannotjust turn our backs on them. and that is why i_ turn our backs on them. and that is why i feel— turn our backs on them. and that is why i feel so — turn our backs on them. and that is why i feel so sad that joe turn our backs on them. and that is why i feel so sad thatjoe biden hirnself— why i feel so sad thatjoe biden himself is— why i feel so sad thatjoe biden himself is not living to what i would've _ himself is not living to what i would've thought was the duty of the west to _ would've thought was the duty of the west to demonstrate to people whose lives depended and still depend on the freedom that we suggested they could enjoy. we must notjust run away~ _ could enjoy. we must notjust run away~ that — could enjoy. we must notjust run away. that cut and run — i'm sorry, i away. that cut and run — i'm sorry, i really _ away. that cut and run — i'm sorry, i really think— away. that cut and run — i'm sorry, i really think that we have our western— i really think that we have our western honour on the line and our way of— western honour on the line and our way of life — western honour on the line and our
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way of life on the line. if we don't take in_ way of life on the line. if we don't take in these refugees, these people who tried _ take in these refugees, these people who tried their best to help us and trust _ who tried their best to help us and trust us _ who tried their best to help us and trust us against the background of violence _ trust us against the background of violence that they were facing domestically, and we leave them to their fate _ domestically, and we leave them to their fate to be killed or their families— their fate to be killed or their families to be killed, who will never— families to be killed, who will never trust us in the west again? what _ never trust us in the west again? what does — never trust us in the west again? what does that say about our standards? and what does it say about _ standards? and what does it say about our— standards? and what does it say about our long—term determination to protect— about our long—term determination to protect and _ about our long—term determination to protect and uphold what we believe are the _ protect and uphold what we believe are the right values? you know, we don't _ are the right values? you know, we don't believe that sharia law is a law that — don't believe that sharia law is a law that most people would be happy to live _ law that most people would be happy to live under. maybe some wood, but the young _ to live under. maybe some wood, but the young people in afghanistan — we've _ the young people in afghanistan — we've been there for 20 years, thev've — we've been there for 20 years, they've never known the kind of repression _ they've never known the kind of repression that the taliban regime, even if— repression that the taliban regime, even if it— repression that the taliban regime, even if it is— repression that the taliban regime, even if it is slightly less repressive than it was before.
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sharia — repressive than it was before. sharia law— repressive than it was before. sharia law is very different, especially for women, from the kind of law— especially for women, from the kind of law that _ especially for women, from the kind of law that we are used to in the west _ of law that we are used to in the west. i�*ll— of law that we are used to in the west. �* , , , of law that we are used to in the west.�* , ,, ., of law that we are used to in the west. �* , ., ., west. i'lljust pass over the front west. i'll 'ust pass over the front ofthe west. i'lljust pass over the front of the metro. — west. i'lljust pass over the front of the metro, if _ west. i'lljust pass over the front of the metro, if we _ west. i'lljust pass over the front of the metro, if we take - west. i'lljust pass over the front of the metro, if we take a - west. i'lljust pass over the front of the metro, if we take a look. of the metro, if we take a look at it for people who — it's a photograph of a corporal, unnamed paratrooper who was photographed lifting a baby out of the crowd and the crushed by sky news last week, he's not rained for obvious reasons, ,. i he's not rained for obvious reasons, "i was just doing my duty." let's move on — this is an interesting one, on the front of the telegraph, covert emergency means flu jabs may not be affected this winter. i had my first flu jabbed at the age of 52, and my first thought was i didn't want my immune system weakened against the onslaught of covid. i weakened against the onslaught of covid. ., ,., ., weakened against the onslaught of covid. ., ., , , ., , covid. i also had my first flu 'ab last year. d covid. i also had my first flu 'ab last year. and d covid. i also had my first flu 'ab last year, and my i covid. i also had my first flu 'ab last year, and my thinking i covid. i also had my first flu jab last year, and my thinking was | covid. i also had my first flu jab i last year, and my thinking was the same _ last year, and my thinking was the same what— last year, and my thinking was the same. what we do know is that every
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year, _ same. what we do know is that every year. we _ same. what we do know is that every year, we don't know for sure whether the current— year, we don't know for sure whether the current year's flu jab will actually _ the current year's flu jab will actually be effective against the flu viruses that are circulating that _ flu viruses that are circulating that particular year. but this year, the evidence needed to be gathered, and usually is gathered to try and best inform the manufacturing of the vaccines _ best inform the manufacturing of the vaccines has been in short supply. i believe _ vaccines has been in short supply. i believe figures like 94% lower, in terms _ believe figures like 94% lower, in terms of— believe figures like 94% lower, in terms of the evidence that's been gathered — terms of the evidence that's been gathered. people aren't flying around — gathered. people aren't flying around the world so much over the last 12 _ around the world so much over the last 12 months, which has also meant that a _ last 12 months, which has also meant that a lot _ last 12 months, which has also meant that a lot of— last 12 months, which has also meant that a lot of the data sharing and information sharing, and the evidence _ information sharing, and the evidence that would have been gathered for different diseases in different countries in the way the flu virus — different countries in the way the flu virus is — different countries in the way the flu virus is spreading hasn't been available — flu virus is spreading hasn't been available. so it is possible that this year's— available. so it is possible that this year's flu vaccine is even more
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of a potential hit and miss them the vaccines— of a potential hit and miss them the vaccines often are. the of a potential hit and miss them the vaccines often are.— vaccines often are. the 9496 figure here is about _ vaccines often are. the 9496 figure here is about genetic— vaccines often are. the 9496 figure here is about genetic sequencing, | here is about genetic sequencing, basically data that is supplied that is, according to this, the world health organization makes the recommendation back in february about what we will have to do for later this year, but doing so off the back of a big fall last autumn because covid lockdowns and the rest of it that was available is making a bit of a lucky dip this year?- bit of a lucky dip this year? that's ri . ht, bit of a lucky dip this year? that's riaht, and bit of a lucky dip this year? that's right. and the _ bit of a lucky dip this year? that's right, and the fact _ bit of a lucky dip this year? that's right, and the fact that _ bit of a lucky dip this year? that's right, and the fact that two i bit of a lucky dip this year? that'sj right, and the fact that two of you - i right, and the fact that two of you — i also had a flu jab last winter, i normally get one, the question thatis i normally get one, the question that is raised here and what this story illustrates is how we determine what the flu jabs should be. because one of the things that's happened as a result of covid is borders have been closed, and there's been a 62% drop in shipments of influenza surveillance samples. that determines what exactly is the
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proper jab that determines what exactly is the properjab or the flu for that particular year, and that is the collateral effect of the measures taken to combat covid. so i think what the story suggests is that, come winter, we might have quite a big flu crisis on our hands because you know, the jabs we've got may not work or the flu variant that will be prevalent will not be affected by the jab. so even if we don't have a lockdown and covid is dealt with, we probably need to be careful about the flu virus that is coming. keeping those facemasks on hand to come up we have a new political slogan to look forward to, according to the guardian, "jobs you can raise a family on." to the guardian, "jobs you can raise a family on"— a family on." yes, this is the labour party. _ a family on." yes, this is the labour party, which - a family on." yes, this is the labour party, which has i a family on." yes, this is the i labour party, which has pledged to do a major overhaul of the universal
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credit system — which labour has never been happy with. the universal credit system is claimed by about 6 million people, and the amount of money they've claimed — they had a £20 a week uplift which will end in october, and the party of course trying to formulate policies which will be different to what the ruling party has and presenting an image of having policies that could make it a government, though that looks very unlikely, it will come up with schemes that say that uplift should remain, and the universal credit system should be considerably changed. i system should be considerably chanced. ~ ., �* , changed. i know you'll be licking our li -s changed. i know you'll be licking your tips on _ changed. i know you'll be licking your lips on the _ changed. i know you'll be licking your lips on the figures - changed. i know you'll be licking your lips on the figures at i changed. i know you'll be licking your lips on the figures at this i your lips on the figures at this one, but you're slightly frustrated because we have page two — all we are told is that the shadow pension secretary is proposing a reduction in the universal credit taper rate.
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so basically how much you lose for every extra pound you work. that's ri . ht, every extra pound you work. that's right, effectively _ every extra pound you work. that's right, effectively there's _ every extra pound you work. that's right, effectively there's a - every extra pound you work. that's right, effectively there's a 6396 i every extra pound you work. that's right, effectively there's a 6396 tax| right, effectively there's a 63% tax rate if _ right, effectively there's a 63% tax rate if you — right, effectively there's a 63% tax rate if you are on universal credit, which _ rate if you are on universal credit, which is _ rate if you are on universal credit, which is higher than the highest tax rate faced _ which is higher than the highest tax rate faced generally speaking across the country. so clearly if you reduce — the country. so clearly if you reduce that rate, if you allow people — reduce that rate, if you allow people to keep more from any extra pound _ people to keep more from any extra pound they— people to keep more from any extra pound they earn, that'll be a better incentive _ pound they earn, that'll be a better incentive to — pound they earn, that'll be a better incentive to increase earnings in the current— incentive to increase earnings in the current universal credit. but that adds — the current universal credit. but that adds to the cost of universal credit— that adds to the cost of universal credit itself, because it can raise less in_ credit itself, because it can raise less in tax. — credit itself, because it can raise less in tax, if you like, then the cost _ less in tax, if you like, then the cost is — less in tax, if you like, then the cost is higher. but i think what jonathan — cost is higher. but i think what jonathan reynolds wants to do is show— jonathan reynolds wants to do is show that— jonathan reynolds wants to do is show that labour is on the side of working _ show that labour is on the side of working people. this is a new deal for low—paid working people. if working people. this is a new deal for low— paid working people. if you are on— for low— paid working people. if you are on the — for low— paid working people. if you are on the flow earnings and still working. — are on the flow earnings and still working, you will get universal credit — working, you will get universal credit. and also, i think they want to differentiate themselves from the
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conservative government which is saying _ conservative government which is saying they'll take away the £20 uplift _ saying they'll take away the £20 uplift - — saying they'll take away the £20 uplift - i— saying they'll take away the £20 uplift — i suspect labour will suggest _ uplift — i suspect labour will suggest it wants to increase universal credit so that £20 stays. might _ universal credit so that £20 stays. might be _ universal credit so that £20 stays. might be interesting for those delivery drivers who are quoted in one newspaper today as earning less than national minimum wage. let's end on the financial times again — another story that might surprise people with big fear, "women on boards paid 40% less than men." we think of the problem of pay differentials as being big, but i suspect a lot of us assume that women at the very top or in a position where they are able to argue for a much better deal than women further down in employment. doesn't look like that's the case. absolutely not, and the figures are staggering. the 0ns shows that for ordinary— staggering. the 0ns shows that for ordinary working people, the gender
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-ap ordinary working people, the gender gap is _ ordinary working people, the gender gap is about 15%. that's bad enough, but when _ gap is about 15%. that's bad enough, but when it— gap is about 15%. that's bad enough, but when it comes to top paid women, non-exec— but when it comes to top paid women, non—exec women, about average £104.000 — non—exec women, about average £104.000 - — non—exec women, about average £104,000 — now that's a pretty good salary. _ £104,000 — now that's a pretty good salary. but _ £104,000 — now that's a pretty good salary, but men in the same positions _ salary, but men in the same positions get over £170,000. if you are an _ positions get over £170,000. if you are an executive in one of the ftse 300 companies, as a woman you will earn about— 300 companies, as a woman you will earn about £1.5 million — that's nice, _ earn about £1.5 million — that's nice. but— earn about £1.5 million — that's nice. but as _ earn about £1.5 million — that's nice, but as a man, it's about £25 million _ nice, but as a man, it's about £25 million and — nice, but as a man, it's about £25 million. and one wonders how one justifies _ million. and one wonders how one justifies that. yes, we've made big progress. — justifies that. yes, we've made big progress. a — justifies that. yes, we've made big progress, a lot more women on boards now, progress, a lot more women on boards now. and _ progress, a lot more women on boards now. and in_ progress, a lot more women on boards now, and in 2015 it was only about a fifth of— now, and in 2015 it was only about a fifth of board positions were women. it is fifth of board positions were women. it is now— fifth of board positions were women. it is now over a third. so we've made — it is now over a third. so we've made improvements on the numbers to make a _ made improvements on the numbers to make a number of women on the boards, — make a number of women on the boards, but — make a number of women on the boards, but not made improvements enough _ boards, but not made improvements enough in _ boards, but not made improvements enough in the parity between what men and _
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enough in the parity between what men and women are paid at these levels _ men and women are paid at these levels. ~ ., ., ., ., ., levels. we are out of time for now, i'll cive levels. we are out of time for now, ill give you — levels. we are out of time for now, ill give you a _ levels. we are out of time for now, i'll give you a chance _ levels. we are out of time for now, i'll give you a chance to _ levels. we are out of time for now, i'll give you a chance to respond i levels. we are out of time for now, i'll give you a chance to respond to| i'll give you a chance to respond to the story on our next paper review, if i may, it raises the question about whether those companies are removing themselves from public listing not having to give information that would reveal this. that's it for the papers this hour. mihir bose and baroness altmann will be back at 11.30pm for another look at the papers. goodbye for now. stand by for the weather coming next with susan powell. hello. sunny skies made decent inroads across the uk on sunday. some eastern counties were stuck with thicker cloud and showers, but through the week ahead, there should be some decent sunshine on the way for almost all areas at some stage. there will be nuances, though, day—to—day. sunday certainly, as i said, eastern counties did struggle with more cloud on the backend of an area of low pressure, also producing some late showers as we move in the monday. those will continue to fade out,
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but with a little bit of cloud out there, there could be a few patches of mist and fog because of the moisture on the ground. as we go into the small hours, our temperatures dip somewhere between 11—14 celsius. there goes the weekend's low, off into the continent from monday, and here builds our high which will stay with us throughout the week ahead. centred up across the uk on monday, light winds, largely sunny skies, perhaps a little bit more of a breeze off the north sea across east anglia, forfar southeastern counties of england. but a return of some warmth for 23 celsius in glasgow and london. the high's still centred across us on tuesday, so a very similar story. perhaps, if anything, more of an easterly breeze along the south coast, slightly greater chance of some cloud feeding into the midlands and east anglia. overall, a dry story with a good deal of sunshine. temperatures up to 24 celsius by this stage in glasgow, perhaps a little cooler for london if we see some cloud
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drifting in this far south. wednesday and thursday, here's one of those nuanced changes i was talking about — the high drifts further north, the isobars start to feed in from the northeast, meaning the chance of cooler winds off the north sea, certainly cooling eastern coastal counties, and also i think bring in some more cloud here. the winds just about manage to stay away from the shores through most of wednesday for the northeast, so temperatures still 19—20 celsius in newcastle and hull, but i think for thursday we could lose a good 3—4 degrees off the highs here in contrast to the start of the week. but at the end of the week, the high moves again — it looks like, at the moment, it should bring us in a more easterly wind and lift the temperatures up once more. certainly across the western side of the uk, they're fairly steady through the weekend,
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and there's a lot of fair weather.

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