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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 23, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the prime minister will ask joe biden to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the 31st of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights — but ministers say they'll need cooperation from the taliban. although they might be the seven most powerful people on the planet meeting to discuss what they want to do, they don't get to make the decision of themselves — the taliban get a vote, as well. a member of the afghan security forces has been killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport — us and german troops were involved. two policemen got out the car and the way they walked in, i knew what they were going to say. in an emotional interview,
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a widow tells the bbc how her husband took his own life after relapsing into a gambling addiction. as all 16— and 17—year—olds are offered their first coronavirus vaccine, a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed — warning of the effects long covid. are you a young person suffering with long covid? tell me what it's been like for you by tweeting me or using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. and the boxing olympic silver medallist ben whittaker achieves his dream — becoming mayor of wolverhampton for a day.
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hello and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister is expected to ask president biden to delay withdrawing the last american forces from afghanistan to allow more time for the evacuation effort at kabul international airport. borisjohnson will make the request at an emergency meeting of leaders from the g7 countries tomorrow. us troops are due to leave kabul airport in just over week, but several thousand people remain there, desperate to flee the country and escape the taliban. they include afghans who worked for the british military. the uk says it has evacuated more than 1,800 people from afghanistan on eight flights in the last 2a hours. nine more flights are expected in the next 2a hours. president biden has warned of a risk of attacks from so—called islamic state militants, and says he hopes he won't have to delay the airlift. this morning the german military reports a member of the afghan security forces has been killed
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in an exchange of fire with unidentified gunmen at the north gate of kabul airport. the first of our reports is from our political correspondent, chris mason. queueing to get out, clinging on to possessions, to children. frightened and fleeing to an uncertain future. the thing that i think we've all learned over the last week or so is that the timelines around which we plan are not always completely in our own control. now obviously, the more time that we've got, the more people we can evacuate and that's what we're pushing for. the ministry of defence says 5,725 people have been evacuated from afghanistan in the last ten days. more than 1,000 uk armed forces personnel are currently deployed in kabul. caught out and wrong—footed by the speed of the taliban's
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capture of afghanistan a week ago, western powers have been grappling to salvage what they can ever since. the limitations are obvious for all to see. president biden wants all american troops out by the end of the month. the uk is pressing for them to stay longer. the prime minister will make that case directly to the president tomorrow. there's discussions going among us and the military about extending. our hope is we will not have to extend. but they're going to be some discussions i suspect on far along we are in the process. the government is also exploring how hubs could be set up in neighbouring countries to help afghans reach the uk once flights out of kabul are no longer possible. chris mason, bbc news. us vice president kamala harris has been speaking in singapore this morning — as part of a tour of the region.
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she said the us withdrawal from afghanistan will be examined in time but the focus now is on getting people out. there is no question there will be — and should be — a robust analysis of what has happened. but right now, there's no question that our focus has to be on evacuating american citizens, afghans who worked with us, and vulnerable afghans — including women and children. that has to be our primary focus, and where we are placing our attention on the issue of afghanistan. and to that end, we have seen a successful drawdown of the embassy and, thankfully, without any american casualties. we have seen thousands of people who have been evacuated from the airport in
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afghanistan, where the united states military, doing a very hard and difficult work, were able to contain that airport so that we could successfully evacuate the people who have been evacuated so far. so as the president has said, listen, this is a difficult mission, there is no question about that, but our focus has to be on the task at hand. as it relates to america's relationship around the world, i am standing here in singapore because of our commitment to a long—standing relationship which is an enduring relationship which is an enduring relationship with the indo pacific region, with southeast asian countries, and in particular with singapore. countries, and in particular with singapore-— countries, and in particular with sina-aore. . ._, ., , ,, . singapore. kamala harris, us vice resident. let's get more on those reports from the airport in kabul saying a member of the afghan security forces has been killed in an exchange of fire with unidentified gunmen. let's speak to our correspondent, danjohnson, who's covering the story from delhi.
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hello to you, dan. what can you tell us about this incident, dan? is there any suggestion as to who these attackers were? that there any suggestion as to who these attackers were?— attackers were? that is not clear et. attackers were? that is not clear yet- there _ attackers were? that is not clear yet- there was — attackers were? that is not clear yet. there was a _ attackers were? that is not clear yet. there was a firefight - attackers were? that is not clear yet. there was a firefight at - attackers were? that is not clear yet. there was a firefight at the l yet. there was a firefight at the airport early this morning involving afghan forces. we believe they are remnants of the afghan army that were left behind at the airport, soldiers who refused to surrender to the taliban last week and have been helping the international forces to secure the airport and process evacuees onto flights. 0ne secure the airport and process evacuees onto flights. one of those soldiers has lost his life, three have been injured, and this firefight also involved german defence forces and us soldiers, although we don't understand any of those were injured. as to who was responsible, it is still unclear. the us embassy in kabul advised its citizens to stay away from the airport and the streets around it, not just airport and the streets around it,
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notjust because of the crowded scenes, but also because of enteric threat from its militants in the country. whether what has happened this morning is anything to do with that, we will have to wait and see and whether any lives have been lost in that violence. it is another indication of the threat to the evacuation operation, the challenges it faces. as we felt something was getting into a routine, starting to calm down after the chaotic scenes we have witnessed over the last week. �* �* ., . , , week. and the armed forces minister here, week. and the armed forces minister here. james — week. and the armed forces minister here, james heappey, _ week. and the armed forces minister here, james heappey, saying - week. and the armed forces minister here, james heappey, saying this - here, james heappey, saying this morning it is known that is come in his words, want to get a hit on western forces, adding to the pressure in an already chaotic situation around kabul. looking at the country more broadly, talk to us about that security situation in other parts of afghanistan. you were talking about afghan security forces who had not wanted to surrender to the taliban. there are pockets of resistance to the taliban in other
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parts of afghanistan, as well. there are. in particular— parts of afghanistan, as well. there are. in particular the _ parts of afghanistan, as well. there are. in particular the region - parts of afghanistan, as well. there are. in particular the regionjust - are. in particular the regionjust north of kabul. it is a traditional stronghold of resistance, is on whether talybont was not able to wield power last time they had control of afghanistan and somewhere that hasn't yet given into them this time. they were even reports of districts around their whether taliban had gained power in the last two weeks, having been reclaimed by resistance fighters. these may be remnants of the afghan national army, that some leading political figures from the previous government, the former vice president is there in the region, trying to organise some sort of resistance force. remnants of the northern alliance, the resistance army that fought against the taliban at the time of the original us invasion in 2001, so there are reports of fighting there, but how effective that resistance can be in terms of whether they can just hold the regent they currently are
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keeping the taliban back from or whether they can actually extend their power and take territory back again is something we will have to wait and see in the days and weeks to come. it is unclear exactly how big that forces, how powerful, strong, well—equipped it is and what the degree of fighting is with the taliban at the moment but it illustrates the risk notjust in kabul, just to the evacuation efforts, but to the everyday lives of afghans living right across the country. of afghans living right across the count . ., ~ _, , of afghans living right across the count . ., ~ , . country. dan, thank you very much. dan johnson — country. dan, thank you very much. dan johnson monitoring _ country. dan, thank you very much. dan johnson monitoring the - dan johnson monitoring the situation. let's get more from our political correspondent nick eardley. hello to you, and as we mentioned in the introduction, the prime minister expected to ask president biden to delay withdrawing the last american forces from afghanistan. a number of factors at play in all of this decision—making. what level of influence do you think borisjohnson can bring to bear all of this? it is a really good _ can bring to bear all of this? it 3 a really good question, and to be honest we don't know the answer because we have seen over the last couple of weeks in the uk quite a
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lot of frustration from government ministers and from mps about the way that president biden went about the withdrawal of american troops from afghanistan. the hope the uk government has now is that in that g7 meeting tomorrow it can put some pressure on president biden to extend the deadline by which he wants to remove us troops. he wants them out by the 31st of august, although when we heard from him last night he did hint that that was not an absolute deadline. he was prepared to discuss potentially moving that back. the reason this matters so much is because ministers in london are pretty clear that they can't do this without the us backing, both the number of troops at kabul airport and the infrastructure they have put in place around the airport. without that that the uk seems to think it just can't operate these evacuations in the same way that it is at the
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moment. we have been hearing this morning from the armed forces minister in the uk, james heappey, about whether or not he thinks that pressure is likely to pay off. there is discussion tomorrow for g7 leaders about whether or not we can extend, but let's be clear — although they might be the seven most powerful people on the planet meeting to discuss what they want to do, they don't get to make the decision of themselves — the taliban get a vote, as well. the decision of themselves — the taliban get a vote, as well. and that's why, in this building, we are continuing to work towards a deadline of the 31st of august and we are trying to make sure that every minute counts in bringing out as many people as possible before that time. and that is an uncomfortable but governments are facing up to it and admitting an uncomfortable position for them to be in, that ultimately the taliban has a big say in what happens next and whether they can extend that deadline, should they wish to. what sort of plans are
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being made or discussions with the taliban beyond the next few days are? looking to that sort of short to medium term, you know, contacts, trying to build contacts, trying to build some sort of working relationship? i build some sort of working relationship?— build some sort of working relationship? build some sort of working relationshi - ? ~ , , relationship? i think this will be one of the _ relationship? i think this will be one of the big _ relationship? i think this will be one of the big questions - relationship? i think this will be one of the big questions for - relationship? i think this will be one of the big questions for g7 | one of the big questions for g7 leaders tomorrow because in the conversations that the prime minister has been having with his counterparts around the world, one thing downing st keeps telling us is that he is pressing for countries to work together to decide when they want to recognise any new government in kabul and want to recognise any new government in kabuland it want to recognise any new government in kabul and it seems to be that thatis in kabul and it seems to be that that is likely to be at least in part because borisjohnson and some of his allies, the french president emmanuel macron, want to put pressure on the taliban to make sure they are upholding some of the promises that they have made to the international community in interviews we have seen in last few
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days, like respecting human rights, like women's rights, as well. i think that is going to be something that comes up in that g7 discussion tomorrow. i suppose there is also the wider question of, as well as the wider question of, as well as the evacuation of now, what happens in the medium term when it comes to potential refugee crisis in and around afghanistan? 0ne potential refugee crisis in and around afghanistan? one thing the government in london is like the idea helps around the region —— hubs around afghanistan, which would allow people fleeing the taliban to go there and claim asylum in the uk from a remote destination. not a huge amount of detail about that yet but ministers have confirmed it is taking place. so remember that there have been about 6000 people evacuated by the uk since the airlift started around ten days ago the airport but we think there are
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at least 4000 people who are definitely eligible to come to the uk left in afghanistan, potentially thousands more who could be a part of the new extended schemes that the government here has announced. so there is a lot of work to do. qm. there is a lot of work to do. 0k, thank you _ there is a lot of work to do. 0k, thank you very _ there is a lot of work to do. 0k, thank you very much. _ with me now is the chief executive of save the children — inger ashing. thank you so much forjoining us today on bbc news. i know that save the children has been in afghanistan since 1976. currently how many of your staff are in the country? we currentl your staff are in the country? - currently have 2300 staff members, a bit more than half of them community—based in country, and of course they are really demoralised by the situation, fearing for their country, the children they are there to set for their own safety. what to set for their own safety. what have they been _ to set for their own safety. what have they been telling _ to set for their own safety. what have they been telling you - to set for their own safety. what have they been telling you about their ability to carry out their work since the taliban took over?
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since the situation on the ground is very unstable, we and other ngos and the un have been forced to pause most of our operations in country, having our staff, making sure they are in safe locations. right now we are in safe locations. right now we are waiting and seeing what is happening on the ground, but we are as an organisation committed to stay and deliver and most of our staff are determined to go out again to the front line, serving as doctors, teachers, etc, making sure they are supporting children in their communities.— supporting children in their communities. ., ., , communities. you have been there since 1976, — communities. you have been there since 1976, save _ communities. you have been there since 1976, save the _ communities. you have been there since 1976, save the children - communities. you have been there since 1976, save the children is - communities. you have been there since 1976, save the children is a l since 1976, save the children is a saying it won't stop now. what is the pathway to that? is it discussions with the taliban? let me answer by saying _ discussions with the taliban? let me answer by saying that, _ discussions with the taliban? let me answer by saying that, as _ discussions with the taliban? let me answer by saying that, as an - answer by saying that, as an organisation, we have been there for 40 years and we have always had the focus on the rights of the children first, making sure they survive, learn and are protected. even before
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this escalated situation, over half of the population were in need of humanitarian assistance, more than 10 million children, and we know that half of all children under five are expected to suffer from acute malnutrition this year as the world is facing the biggest famine. their needs are bigger than ever. we will stay in country and we will deliver programmes as soon as it is safe to do so, but we will always uphold human rights, children's rights, and make sure that that is a strong message to whatever government we have in country. message to whatever government we have in country-— have in country. there has been a lot of focus _ have in country. there has been a lot of focus on _ have in country. there has been a lot of focus on people _ have in country. there has been a lot of focus on people trying - have in country. there has been a lot of focus on people trying to i have in country. there has been a| lot of focus on people trying to get out of kabul airport, we have seen a hydrating images of people handing over babies, young children, to foreign troops, so desperate are they to get their children out of they to get their children out of the country. i don't know... you have mentioned that a lot of your work has had to be suspended, but has to save the children had any involvement in that process or does
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your focus go to mainly be on working with children who will not be leaving afghanistan? taste working with children who will not be leaving afghanistan?— working with children who will not be leaving afghanistan? we will do both, be leaving afghanistan? we will do both. because _ be leaving afghanistan? we will do both, because from _ be leaving afghanistan? we will do both, because from our _ be leaving afghanistan? we will do| both, because from our perspective there are two things where the international community needs to support afghanistan, the country and its people. the first is making sure there is humanitarian access so that we can support all the children and their community throughout the country. because the crisis is worse than ever and we will see famine and we will see a famine crisis in afghanistan that is one of the worst we have ever seen, so humanitarian access work in country but of course at the same time we need to make sure the humanitarian community is are aligned, that the international community need to make sure there is safe passage for afghans needing to leave the country, so that's a focus of ours. 0f leave the country, so that's a focus of ours. of course we have our own staff members who are at risk, and where we are working to make sure
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that we do what we can to support and help them in whatever way possible. and help them in whatever way ossible. ., ~ , ., and help them in whatever way ossible. ., ~ i. and help them in whatever way ossible. ., ~ . ., and help them in whatever way ossible. ., . ., possible. thank you so much for your time today. — possible. thank you so much for your time today. inger _ possible. thank you so much for your time today, inger ashing, _ possible. thank you so much for your time today, inger ashing, ceo - possible. thank you so much for your time today, inger ashing, ceo at - time today, inger ashing, ceo at save the children.— flash coming in on wires from writers, quoting taliban sources saying that the taliban will not accept an extension of the august 31 deadline for western forces to leave. that is just coming from reuters, one source at the moment. it needs to be checked out but that is very much the topic of the moment as this evacuation process continues at kabul international airport. we have heard that the prime minister borisjohnson is going to ask the us presidentjoe biden to keep us forces at the airport beyond the sist forces at the airport beyond the 31st of august deadline to try to facilitate getting more people out of the country, a huge amount of pressure at the airport already and
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fears that that window up to the sist fears that that window up to the 31st of august simply isn't enough time to get everybody out. so the taliban, are going to tell sources, quoted on the reuters agency, will not accept the extension of the august deadline for western forces to leave. we will try to find out some more information about that and bring that to you as soon as possible, but clearly that will be a huge concern to all of those working to try to get people out of the airport at kabul. we will come back to afghanistan a little later in the programme, but now... a widow who lost her husband to a gambling addiction is urging the government to stop online betting companies from giving away free bonuses — which allow you to bet without depositing any money. luke ashton took his own life in april after he started gambling again while on furlough during lockdown. jayne mccubbin has been speaking to his wife, annie. i looked out of the window and his van wasn't there.
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and then the panic set in. i rang the police and they came round and took a statement. around about four o'clock on the 22nd of april, i looked out the window and two policemen got out the car and the way they walked in, i knew what they were going to say. annie's husband luke had taken his own life. she had no idea why until police handed back his telephone. gosh, i can't even describe the shock. i saw betting activity that must have consumed him from morning till night. it just escalated. it became uncontrollable. and i knew — i knew why he'd done it. the gambling commission estimate there are around 350,000 problem gamblers here in the uk.
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luke had previously beaten an addiction but, when lockdown hit, the 40—year—old was furloughed. that's when annie says the first of many free bets landed in his e—mails, and luke was drawn back in. there's no doubt about it. the only people that knew about luke's addiction were luke and the company. and at no point did they step in and do anything about it. there was a free bet that dropped into his account the day he disappeared. by that point, he had already, you know, decided on what he was doing. last year, a house of lords report found that for every person with a problem, six more were harmed. that's 2 million people harmed by divorce, crime, loss of work, of homes and, ultimately, loss of life. that report found that 60% of gambling companies' profits come from the 5% of customers who have a problem.
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and studies show that covid made online gambling numbers soar. search "free bets" online and you will find a staggering number. onjust one page, offers from 54 companies. £1,700 worth of free bets, if you were to sign up. and that's just the first page that pops up on the internet. it's terrifying. there is no other word for it. it's terrifying. they are inducements, so they are the free cigarette, or the free shot of heroin. it's your first shot| of heroin, isn't it? liz and charles ritchie set up the charity gambling with lives after their 24—year—old son jack took his own life in 2017. they and annie want to see free bets banned. for some people, that. will be the start of their
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journey into addiction. we set up gambling with lives to warn other parents, because nobody warned us, because there is no messaging. and i've spoken to so many mums and dads who say to me, "i warned them about road safety, i warned them about sexual predators, i warned them about drugs. i didn't know there was another predator out there to warn them about." annie is pushing for change in the name of her husband just as the government reviews current legislation to make sure it is fit for the digital age, the government told us. legislation was passed in 2005 and was quickly outdated by technology, which put a casino and a bookmaker in the palm of everybody�*s hand. the betting and gaming council told us... "promotions are an issue for individual operators," but added, "the industry is determined to protect people. and the rate of problem gamblers has remained stable
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for the past 20 years." free bets, they are not designed to give anyone anything, they are not designed to be free. they are enticing people to open accounts and, potentially, they cost lives. annie ashton. it is 9:25am. we have the weather coming up very shortly but before that scott... it's peak music festival season — or it should be. over half of all the major festivals in the uk have been cancelled this year — many because they couldn't afford the insurance to cover the risk of last minute cancellations. ben thompson visited one event in birmingham for us. good morning from birmingham. it really is the morning after the weekend before. we are at the birmingham soul, jazz and funk festival, one of the festivals that has got the go—ahead after 18 months of the stoppage. organisers here
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very glad to get things up and running, get people through the doors again. they have about 8000 people here over the days, down from the 12,000 they would normally have as an event like this. they are making less money but at the same time the costs are high because they need a lot of procedures in place to make sure gathering is safe. the clean—up operation really does begin in earnest. you can tell it is a good festival, there is plenty of mud and plenty of letter after we get celebration, but the organisers are just thrilled to get back up and running again. last year, there wasn't much to dance about. covid wiped out most festivals. but with more vaccines, more tests and a return to something more normal this year, organisers felt more confident to stage events and sell tickets. but one by one, many of those have been forced to cancel. glastonbury was one of the first.
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in normal times, it welcomes nearly 200,000 people. but despite the uncertainty, some smaller events did get the go—ahead, like this music festival in birmingham. after the first lockdown, we did glastonbury on the back lawn, so we set all our lights up and stayed in a tent in the garden and had the screens up. and just basically pretended we were at a festival. this is the first gig that i've been to since obviously it all shut down two years ago now, was our last festival. so, yeah, it's good to have this as a first one and just get back into the music scene again. we came last time pre—pandemic, and this one was super tiny- so it was her first ever festival. so it's lovely being able to be back, isn't it? - yeah. for the traders here, it's their first taste of working 18 months. of work in 18 months. we was nearly two years out of actually being on events, which was heartbreaking. and it's my mainstay of income. so it's difficult, it was very difficult. i ended up being a scaffolderfor a year.
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i know, got these! previously, we've done a lot of pop—ups and click and collects so we've had to adapt, to adjust to the market. but it'sjust been really nice to just get backjust talking to the customers and engaging, it's been really good. but others are still reluctant to put on events. they're worried that a surge in infections could force them to cancel, leaving them to count the cost. and so the government has launched an insurance scheme to reassure the industry that it is safe to reopen. but the group representing festival organisers says it's too little, too late. and many, they say, have already lost millions. and with the summer break nearly over, time is running out. the success of the next few weeks will determine whether there is really anything to celebrate.
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that is the weekend's celebrations here. finally able to reopen the doors after maybe 18 months or more of not being able to put on events. let me introduce you to jump, of not being able to put on events. let me introduce you tojump, the organiser. good morning. relief, i would imagine, you have finally been able to put on an event and it was a great success this weekend. how relieved are you that we have got to this point? relieved are you that we have got to this oint? ., this point? relieved, tired, elated. for the whole _ this point? relieved, tired, elated. for the whole music _ this point? relieved, tired, elated. for the whole music industry - this point? relieved, tired, elated. for the whole music industry it - this point? relieved, tired, elated. for the whole music industry it has| for the whole music industry it has been an incredibly difficult 18 months, so to be able to put the best fullback, see people dancing, happy again, having some sense of normality back again. it was a beautiful sight.— normality back again. it was a beautiful sight. from a business oint of beautiful sight. from a business point of view. — beautiful sight. from a business point of view, because - beautiful sight. from a business point of view, because let's - beautiful sight. from a business point of view, because let's not | point of view, because let's not forget these are businesses, unique people can begin, paying the tickets, to pay all the other businesses you have got here on the site. how difficult has it been to bring all of those moving parts together when you just don't know what is going to happen? it has been
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incredibly difficult. _ what is going to happen? it has been incredibly difficult. at _ what is going to happen? it has been incredibly difficult. at the _ what is going to happen? it has been incredibly difficult. at the best - what is going to happen? it has been incredibly difficult. at the best of - incredibly difficult. at the best of times a festival or event like this is hard to plan but when things are changing constantly it is incredibly difficult. it was almost impossible but we made our way through there, we have the original event cancelled in july and we have the original event cancelled injuly and had to bring it back. last year was cancelled, as well. the line—up changed, we had to bring in disease measurements. goalposts have changed... we made it through and it feels like the industry is getting back on track. talk about this insurance. _ getting back on track. talk about this insurance. the _ getting back on track. talk about this insurance. the covenant - getting back on track. talk about this insurance. the covenant has| getting back on track. talk about - this insurance. the covenant has put in a scheme that says if you have to cancel because of lockdown restrictions you will be supported. some say it is too little too late, some say it can't save this summer, some say it can't save this summer, some say it doesn't go far enough. i think everything you have said is bang on. it is way too late for the summer with 50% of festivals already cancelled. it starts in september so evenif cancelled. it starts in september so even if this festivals in august
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wanted to use the insurance they can't this year. so it doesn't go far enough. it covers a straight cancellation but there are 20 of things that might happen before that, reduced capacity, social distancing, etc, which could affect the viability of the business. so it is not really what we hoped. and the viability of the business. so it is not really what we hoped. and how ho eful are is not really what we hoped. and how hopeful are you _ is not really what we hoped. and how hopeful are you that _ is not really what we hoped. and how hopeful are you that if— is not really what we hoped. and how hopeful are you that if you _ is not really what we hoped. and how hopeful are you that if you can't - hopeful are you that if you can't save this summer even if you can have a few reduced capacity events, that next year things get back to some sort of normality? i that next year things get back to some sort of normality?- that next year things get back to some sort of normality? i think we are always — some sort of normality? i think we are always going — some sort of normality? i think we are always going to _ some sort of normality? i think we are always going to be _ some sort of normality? i think we are always going to be planning i some sort of normality? i think we are always going to be planning in | are always going to be planning in the back of our minds because throughout the whole journey every time something has happened, in february this year when the road map was announced we were so buoyant and delighted about it and tickets were the best we had ever seen, they were flying out. so that is on the back of our minds, but seeing this event work and other events work we are getting back to normality and will
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note that in reality we can make things happen. note that in reality we can make things happen-— note that in reality we can make thins ha en. w , _ things happen. good luck, busy night to ian things happen. good luck, busy night to [an all things happen. good luck, busy night to plan all these _ things happen. good luck, busy night to plan all these things _ things happen. good luck, busy night to plan all these things and _ things happen. good luck, busy night to plan all these things and lots - things happen. good luck, busy night to plan all these things and lots of i to plan all these things and lots of work ahead. really nice to see you. thank you very much. next year is the real aim to get things back to normal but for the organisers of things like this, just being able to get people back through the doors again after so long of not being able to open and get events on the stage and people gathered and all the associated businesses, the lighting cruise, the sound, the bars, restaurants, everything that goes with festivals has had a tough 18 months so there is very welcome to get people back through the doors. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. last week there was a lot of cloud in the forecast — this week there isn't as much cloud in the forecast. high pressure is dominating, so things are fairly settled. you can see we hang onto some low cloud across the northern isles, parts of the coastline of the north
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and the west — that could be thick enough for the odd spot of drizzle — but for many today we're looking at some sunny spells, the odd shower on high ground, with temperatures up to 23 degrees. it's always going to feel cooler this week along the north sea coastline, and here tonight we've got more cloud coming in across northern england, in through the midlands, and into east wales. at the same time, low cloud, mist and fog across the north and west coasts, and also by the end of the night across some central and eastern parts of scotland, with temperatures a little bit lower than they were last night. now, tomorrow, this low cloud will break up and we'll see some of that sink southwards with the odd spot of drizzle in it. we hang on to the low cloud draped across parts of the north and west coastline, but inland there will be a fair bit of sunshine. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the prime minister will ask joe biden to keep american troops
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in afghanistan beyond the 31st of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights — but ministers say they'll need cooperation from the taliban. a member of the afghan security forces has been killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport — us and german troops were involved. as all 16 and 17 year olds are offered their first coronavirus vaccine, a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed — warning of the effects long covid. and the boxing olympic silver medallist, ben whittaker, achieves his dream. becoming mayor of wolverhampton for a day. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall. good morning... we are starting with golf. there are three english players in europe's team for their defence of the solheim cup against the united states next month.
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georgia hall and charley hull made the team automatically, while mel reid is one of captain catriona matthew's six picks. let's look at the full team. anna nordqvist�*s win at the women's open yesterday meant she got the points to qualify automatically, as did georgia hall who came joint second at carnoustie. there are four rookies in the team, including captain's pick leona maguire, ireland's first ever solheim cup player. a short time ago i spoke to europe captain catriona matthew and asked her how many of her picks were still undecided while she waited for the women's open to finish? a lot, we left it to just the last few holes on sunday. there was a lot that could change with some of them playing like georgia and others being knocked out. there are a lot of different scenarios. we had three orfour of different scenarios. we had three or four different of different scenarios. we had three orfour different options of different scenarios. we had three or four different options depending on what happened yesterday. llirul’itli
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or four different options depending on what happened yesterday. with the euro eans on what happened yesterday. with the europeans doing _ on what happened yesterday. with the europeans doing so _ on what happened yesterday. with the europeans doing so well _ on what happened yesterday. with the europeans doing so well at _ europeans doing so well at carnoustie, did that give you a bit of a headache? abs, carnoustie, did that give you a bit of a headache?— carnoustie, did that give you a bit of a headache? �* ., �* , of a headache? a good headache. it's tou:h of a headache? a good headache. it's tou . h to of a headache? a good headache. it's tough to tell — of a headache? a good headache. it's tough to tell the _ of a headache? a good headache. it's tough to tell the one _ of a headache? a good headache. it's tough to tell the one that _ of a headache? a good headache. it's tough to tell the one that can't i tough to tell the one that can't make it but it's good to have players playing so well. you have three english _ players playing so well. you have three english players— players playing so well. you have three english players in - players playing so well. you have three english players in the i players playing so well. you have three english players in the 12. i three english players in the 12. let's look at the two that qualified automatically, georgia performed so well over the weekend. from a personality point of view it would feel like she might have a calming influence on the team? i feel like she might have a calming influence on the team?— influence on the team? i think georie influence on the team? i think george has — influence on the team? i think george has a _ influence on the team? i think george has a great _ influence on the team? i think george has a great record i influence on the team? i think george has a great record in l influence on the team? i think. george has a great record in the solheim cup. i think all three of them are actually quite different characters, georgia, charlie and mel. that is what you need in the team, a mixture of characters, they all bring something different to the
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team. ~ ., ., , all bring something different to the team. a, ., , ., all bring something different to the team. ., , ., ., ., team. more details on that on the bbc s-ort team. more details on that on the bbc sport website. _ to football now and it didn't take romelu lukaku long, this time around — just 14 minutes into his first match back at chelsea — to get his first goal for the club. it was an impressive performance from lukaku, scoring with just his third touch and helping chelsea to a 2—0 win over london rivals arsenal. reece james got the second to secure the victory. chelsea have won their first two games without conceding a goal. arsenal are nineteenth in the league after losing both of theirs. arsenal are 19th in the league after losing both of theirs. dele alli scored the only goal for tottenham against wolves as harry kane made his made his first appearance of the season. the england captain hadn't featured in spurs' opening two matches amid speculation over his future at the club. there were some really ugly scenes in the ligue1 match between nice and marseille, which had to be abandoned. marseille and former west ham midfielder dmitri payet was hit by a bottle, but then threw it back into the crowd. supporters then stormed onto the pitch with stewards
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and police struggling to restrain them. the players tried to leave and marseille coachjorge sampaoli had to be held back by his staff. after a long delay, the nice players came out to finish the game, but the marseille players refused to do so. tennis, and andy murray beat american noah rubin in the winston—salem open first round. he was due to be playing nick kyrgios, but the australian pulled out with a knee injury. murray won in straight sets 6—2, 6—0 and took victory by winning 10 successive games. the final tennis major of the year, the us open starts next week. that's all the sport for now. borisjohnson is expected to ask president biden to delay withdrawing the last american forces from afghanistan to give more time for evacuation efforts.
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he'll make the request at an emergency g7 meeting tomorrow. just a reminder that we have been hearing from the reuters news agency in the last few minutes quoting taliban sources that they won't accept an extension of the 31st of august deadline for western armies to leave. thousands of people are crowded outside kabul airport, desperate to leave after the taliban swept to power. you may find some of the images in anisa kadri's report distressing. hoping, waiting to leave afghanistan, they gather outside kabul airport as gunshots are heard. gunfire. witnesses said the taliban fired in the air to make people line up in orderly queues. but it's not known if these shots were triggered in the same instance. these afghans are leaving everything they know to start from scratch. america says it has evacuated 30,000 people in just over a week.
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their president hopes there'll be no need to extend the august 31st deadline for a complete us withdrawal. my heart aches for those those people you see, we are proving that we can move thousands of people a day out of kabul. we're bringing our citizens, nato allies, afghanis who helped us in the war effort. we have a long way to go and a lot can still go wrong. this is the northern panjshirvalley, here forces are training. it's the last remaining holdout against the taliban, which says hundreds of its fighters are heading there because local leaders refused to hand it over peacefully. earlier, the region's powerful militia leader, ahmad masood, said he was ready for talks to avert a civil war. in the geography, panjshir is the smallest province in the whole afghanistan. but what we are standing for right now is for the whole country, it's for sovereignty,
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it's for peace, it's for people, it's for inclusivity and tolerance and acceptance and moderation. and he's being backed by the country's first vice president, amrullah saleh, who now considers himself the legitimate caretaker president of afghanistan. we will not... let me be very clear. we will not accept clerical dictatorship in my country. we make peace but the peace should not mean surrender to a group with massive record of human rights violation, massacre of people, you name it. that will not happen. the last time the taliban were in power in the 1990s, women weren't allowed to work, girls couldn't go to school. even now, they defend punishments like lashings and stoning adulterers to death. today, you do see some women out and about in kabul, but fewer than before. many are too afraid to step outside.
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many worry that whilst the taliban do promise women will be able to work and get an education, the group will grow increasingly strict when the international focus comes to an end. anisa kadri, bbc news. the number of people killed by flash floods in the us state of tennessee has risen to more than twenty. dozens are still missing. roads and bridges were washed away and power cuts have affected thousands of people. the east coast of the united states has also been hit by strong winds and heavy rain, as tropical storm henri passed through the area. tanya dendrinos reports. debris and devastation, this is tennessee after flash flooding wreaked havoc. i'm like trying to get them out the door, but the water is so high and it's pushing against the door that i'm having a hard time pushing to open the door to get them out,
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i'm holding two babies. as locals assess the unimaginable damage following the record rainfall, search and rescue teams were looking for survivors. tremendous loss of life. a number of missing people on the ground, homes washed off their foundations, cars strewn around the community. it is a devastating picture of loss and heartache. the loss front of mind in sunday's presidential address. i want to begin by expressing my deepest condolences for the sudden and tragic loss of life through this flash flood. i know we've reached out to the community and we stand ready to offer them support. i've asked the administrator to speak to governor lee of tennessee right away. and we will offer any system they
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need for this terrible moment. —— any assistance they need for this terrible moment. meanwhile, more than 20,000 homes were left without power after tropical storm henri made landfall on rhode island, downgraded from a category one hurricane, many residents along the northeast coast of the united states were breathing a sigh of relief. we've seen a lot of wind damage, trees down and stuff like that, a couple of inches of water on the road. that's about it. and loss of power. henri is weakening, but heavy rainfall is expected to continue with potential for more flooding. disaster relief has already been approved for a number of states, with the president pledging the government will do everything it can to help them respond and recover. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. an update for you on the uk effort at cobble international airport. we have just heard from the foreign office added same has further reinforced five foreign office staff
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joining 14 already working on operation in kabul. four arrived this morning and one last night. so that brings the total to 19 and that includes the ambassador who has been working personally to ensure that paperwork is processed to allow people to leave. it also includes staff from the british embassy in kabul and members of the rapid deployment team. so the staff are working right around the clock to support evacuations. that news is just into us. the other piece of news we have had in the last few minutes according to reuters, quoting taliban sources, saying that they do not want an extension of the deadline of the 31st of august that some countries are looking at to get more people out. taliban sources are saying they would not accept that
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extension. clearly that puts a huge amount of pressure on everyone working at the airport to get people out of afghanistan. young patients suffering with the debilitating effects of long covid have urged people to get their vaccine in a new nhs video. 16 and 17—year—olds in england have been invited to book their first jabs from today. the latest figures for england show people aged 18 to 34 now make up more than a fifth of those admitted to hospital with the virus. let's take a look at the campaign. i think the worst thing is like normally you would be able to go to bed, go to sleep and wake up feeling ready to face the day. i could sleep for a week and still feel tired. the kind of other one i have suffered with is joint and body aches, kind of when you've got a cold or the flu, that all—over ache. like even your teeth hurt.
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i get that most of the time. ifeel like i'm always sore in some way. let mejust let me just correct something i said there, i said 16 and 17—year—olds could book their firstjab there, i said 16 and 17—year—olds could book their first jab from today but actually they have all been offered their firstjab. megan higgins who you saw in the video has been telling us more about the impact covid has had on her life. i was diagnosed with covid on the 6th of january — that was when i got my positive test — and that is a day that is engraved in my brain. and i was quite lucky, i suppose — i was able to do my two weeks and then i returned to work and i returned to kind of normal life. and ijust kind of thought that, you spend two weeks in bed suffering from quite a nasty virus, you've got to expect to be a bit tired. but weeks and months went
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by and i wasn't getting better, and it felt like any time i did something to maybe build up my fitness, i got worse. you know, i kind of... i used to be a horse rider, i used to run, i used to walk the dog a lot and it got to the point where sort of working in a school, as well, i couldn't even do head, shoulders, knees and toes or the hokey—cokey with the kids, i was so tired just doing anything physical. megan higgins there. i have been asking you to get in touch about this subject and anthony says that he is not a young person but that long covid has impacted on his life so much, unbearable pain and severe exhaustion, shortness of breath and insomnia. "i'm 41 on some days have to work with —— walk with a cane. i encourage all young people to get jabbed." so if you are still deciding about whether to have a jab and you are a young person or if you are a parent of a young person suffering from long covid, to get in
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touch with me on twitter and i will do my best to read out as many of your comments as possible. dozens of companies selling covid pcr travel tests are to be removed from the government's list of approved providers. the firms either no longer exist or don't provide all the tests required by holidaymakers. others have been warned they could also be removed if they advertise misleading prices. more than 200,000 people are waiting for medical checks so they can renew their driving licence, according to the british medical association. the doctor's group say they're "gravely concerned" about the potential impact on road safety, with thousands more people joining the backlog every month. joining me now is dr peter holden from the bma. thank you very much for your time. i believe the issue about hgv drivers needing a fitness to drive assessments, and car drivers as
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well, what you are concerned about is that some of these drivers are not going to their gp but to other medical professionals to have this assessment done. what problems can that cause? ., ., , , , that cause? there are two issues here. that cause? there are two issues here- the — that cause? there are two issues here. the first _ that cause? there are two issues here. the first issue _ that cause? there are two issues here. the first issue there - that cause? there are two issues here. the first issue there is i that cause? there are two issues here. the first issue there is a i here. the first issue there is a huge backlog which was foreseen a year ago and not a lot has been done about it by the government. the second issue is that at the moment the driver can go to any doctor for a medical. the government said we are going to build back better after the pandemic and what we have saying is there's always been this whole in driving licences and there has been well—publicised cases of people who have obtained a licence, who shouldn't have a licence medically, and the result has been a disaster for another road user or a pedestrian. and so with the twin problem of we have to crack the backlog and it's time we plugged the hole. the government has just plug the hole on firearms or are just about to, that has been long in the
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pipeline, it is not from last week's dreadful events. it is now the same with driving licences. you need to have a full record otherwise it is a case of the driver tells me so. there are a small number who will not say accurately what is necessary because it could cost the licence. and expiry dates on hgv driving licence in particular were extended to keep the supply chain moving. we have heard of representatives from the hgv industry about a shortage of drivers. so what will it take to clear this back log.— clear this back log. there are commercial— clear this back log. there are commercial outlets _ clear this back log. there are commercial outlets that i clear this back log. there are commercial outlets that say l clear this back log. there are i commercial outlets that say they clear this back log. there are - commercial outlets that say they can do it in 15 minutes, they cannot do a proper medical assessment in that time. we need hgv drivers and it is
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a priority book because the nation needs to keep logistics going. the scale of the problem is that with 40 minutes at a time, there is enough work for one doctor in a practice for a whole week. on average about 30 drivers go to a practice. at the moment the dvla is using a section of the traffic act as a copout, it was supposed to deal with administrative hiccups, not a wholesale get out ofjail free card. section 88 basically says if you have a license you are renewing and there is no change in your medical condition and we have their paperwork at swansea then you can carry on driving but consult the doctor. the problem is consulting the doctor, it is the volume of these things. it is the indemnity issues that arise from this as well. i'm notjust giving a casual piece
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of advice. i'm giving professional advice which, if it is wrong, i will get sued for. so it is not a simple issue. ~ , ~ get sued for. so it is not a simple issue. , �* , get sued for. so it is not a simple issue. , ~ , ., issue. when the dvla says they have lans in issue. when the dvla says they have plans in place — issue. when the dvla says they have plans in place to _ issue. when the dvla says they have plans in place to reduce _ issue. when the dvla says they have plans in place to reduce the - issue. when the dvla says they have plans in place to reduce the current l plans in place to reduce the current backlog of medical applications by bringing in additional staff and evening shifts, based on what you are saying, the problem is in a different part of the chain, it is getting the medical assessment done in the first place. so something needs to be done about the medical end of it, yes? it is needs to be done about the medical end of it. yes?— end of it, yes? it is about issuing and requesting — end of it, yes? it is about issuing and requesting the _ end of it, yes? it is about issuing and requesting the information. | end of it, yes? it is about issuing i and requesting the information. the dvla is just corporate speech, it says a lot and tells you nothing. i5 says a lot and tells you nothing. is an expectation management issue around the shortage of drivers? right now we have 90,000 shortage of hgv drivers, we lost roughly 20,000
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because of brexit. you have all seen the way the supermarket shelves the way they are. we depend on these people. the government needs to make a concerted effort to crack this once and for all. in the same way that we have diverted our attention to covid and stopped other routine matters, maybe for a very short time we should do this for hgvs. the government need to take some action but the problem is the dvla, government agency, is at arms length from it. the responsibility is for ministers and it's time they grasp that. �* , ., , ministers and it's time they grasp that. , ., , , that. i'm sorry to interrupt but we are out of— that. i'm sorry to interrupt but we are out of time. _ that. i'm sorry to interrupt but we are out of time. thank _ that. i'm sorry to interrupt but we are out of time. thank you - that. i'm sorry to interrupt but we are out of time. thank you very i that. i'm sorry to interrupt but we i are out of time. thank you very much forjoining us. olympic silver medallist ben whittaker has spent the day as mayor of wolverhampton — something he said was a dream come true. it came about after he joked that he wanted to be mayor if he won gold in tokyo. he won a silver mdeal — but still got his day in office, he won a silver medal — but still got his day in office,
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as liz cooper reports. it's a golden accolade, a political honour, a source of civic pride. becoming the mayor of wolverhampton. boxer ben whittaker donned the official regalia of the first citizen. this had been ben's manifesto after his olympic quarterfinal. i want to go back with a gold medal and i want to become the mayor of wolverhampton. i want one of those nice chains on my neck and i'll be calling all the shots. everyone in wolverhampton will have a nice grille, and a nice big chain, courtesy of ben whittaker. after trying on the nice big chain, it was time to get to work with some official engagements. amongst them, a visit to a city centre youth club. it's a dream come true, i kept saying this, when i was a kid, with my coach i said, i'm going to be the mayor, i'm going to be the mayor. went to the olympics, "i'm going to be the mayor." come back, i'm the mayor. so dreams a reality, really. the role of the mayor involves encouraging young people. this group seemed impressed. we both do boxing together. |and itjust, that's our dream, so|
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we're going to hopefully reach it. it inspired me a lot, and i can't believe he won the medal, the silver. i was proud, he should be proud of himself. . he made everyone else proud, it was the best he could do. i everywhere we've been today, he's been inundated with people wanting to wish him well, telling him how proud they are, having pictures with him. and he's so good with the local community. he is happy to meet everybody. celebrations as ben met the crowds at wolves, time also for some new policies. i told them that the kids can have monday to wednesday, have a couple of playstations and a bottom grille, so i think i'm winning with the kids. the mum and dads, things like that, they're not agreeing. but if you can get the kids to vote, i think i'll get a couple of votes and you might see me there with the chain on, with the robes permanently. it could be a while before he swaps the boxing ring for the political fray but this honorary mayor seems to have secured the popular vote.
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less copper, bbc news, wolverhampton. a lovely story! now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. high pressure is going to be dominating our weather this week, which means things will be a lot more settled and there'll be less cloud than there was last week. however, there'll still be some cloud and it will largely dry but that cloud thick enough now and again for the odd spot of drizzle. you'll also expect some warm sunshine, but no heat wave on the cards. here's the high pressure dominating our weather, the air moving around it in a clockwise direction so looking at breezy conditions, especially across the southeast and especially so across kent — but that will take the edge off the temperatures slightly. so, this afternoon, you could catch a shower on higher ground across scotland. shetland hanging on to a fair bit of cloud, as will some parts of the coast of western scotland and the coast of northern ireland. here, too, inland on higher ground, you could see the odd shower. for england and for wales, though, a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine, maybe the odd shower with height in wales and the south west — but they will be the exception
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rather than the rule. top temperatures 23 degrees. now through this evening and overnight, more cloud will come in from the north sea, across northern england, the midlands, into wales — again, thick enough for some drizzle — and there'll be low cloud, mist and fog draped across the coastlines of the north and west of scotland and the north and east of northern ireland. by the end of the night, we could also see some mist and fog with poor visibility across parts of central and eastern scotland. now, high pressure still very much with us tomorrow. you can see the wind arrows pointing to where we've got the wind direction coming from — namely from the northeast. so breezy along this northeast coastline, as well as the english channel, and our weather front sinking southwards — there's a fairly weak feature taking its cloud and some drizzle with it across england and wales, but hanging on once again — especially across the northern isles — to some of that low cloud lingering on the coastline. inland, we're back into the sunshine. for wednesday, well, we've got this weak weather front, which is going to sink south during thursday, actually, bringing not much more than a band of cloud. and on wednesday, too,
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you can see there will be a bit more cloud across parts of the north and the east, and also into southern england, as well. still a keen breeze down that north sea coastline, so feeling cooler here. move out towards the north and the west, and you've got something drier, sunnier and also that bit warmer. now, on thursday, i mentioned that weather front sinking south, but it won't do much more than bring a band of cloud with it, and generally it's going to feel cooler along the east coast. the highest temperatures will be in the west, but even so, they'll take a slight dip. some say it can't save this summer, some say it doesn't go far enough.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. as aerial evacuations continue, a member of the afghan security forces is killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport. us and german troops were involved. the uk prime minister will ask joe biden at a g7 meeting to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the 31st of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights — but ministers say they'll need cooperation from the taliban, who won't accept an extension to the deadline. although they might be the seven most powerful people on the planet meeting to discuss what they want to do, they don't get to make the decision of themselves — the taliban get a vote, as well.

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